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Glucose Serpl-mcnc

Relationship Between 1-hour Glucose Challenge Test Results And Perinatal Outcomes.

Relationship Between 1-hour Glucose Challenge Test Results And Perinatal Outcomes.

Abstract OBJECTIVE: To estimate the relationship between 1-hour 50 g glucose challenge test values and perinatal outcomes. METHODS: This was a secondary analysis of data from a multicenter treatment trial of mild gestational diabetes mellitus. Women with glucose challenge test values of 135-199 mg/dL completed a 3-hour oral glucose tolerance test. Mild gestational diabetes mellitus was defined as fasting glucose less than 95 mg/dL and two or more abnormal oral glucose tolerance test values: 1-hour 180 mg/dL or more; 2-hour 155 mg/dL or more; and 3-hour 140 mg/dL or more. Our study included untreated women with glucose challenge test values of 135-139 mg/dL and 140-199 mg/dL and a comparison group with values less than 120 mg/dL. Primary outcomes included a perinatal composite (stillbirth, neonatal death, hypoglycemia, hyperbilirubinemia, neonatal hyperinsulinemia, and birth trauma), large for gestational age (LGA, birth weight above the 90 percentile based on sex-specific and race-specific norms), and macrosomia (greater than 4,000 g). RESULTS: There were 436 women with glucose challenge test values less than 120 mg/dL and 1,403 with values of 135 mg/dL or more (135-139, n=135; 140-199, n=1,268). The composite perinatal outcome occurred in 25.6% of those with glucose challenge test values less than 120 mg/dL compared with 21.1% for values of 135-139 mg/dL and 35.3% for values of 140-199 mg/dL. Rates of LGA by group were 6.6%, 6.8%, and 12.4%, respectively. Rates of macrosomia by group were 7.8%, 6.1%, and 12.1%, respectively. Compared with glucose challenge test values less than 120 mg/dL, the adjusted odds ratios (ORs) (95% confidence intervals [CIs]) for values of 140-199 mg/dL were 1.48 (1.14-1.93) for the composite outcome, 1.97 (1.29-3.11) for LGA, and 1.61 (1.07-2 Continue reading >>

17865-7 Loinc Code | Glucose [mass/volume] In Serum Or Plasma --8 Hours Fasting | Medical Coding Library | Www.hipaaspace.com

17865-7 Loinc Code | Glucose [mass/volume] In Serum Or Plasma --8 Hours Fasting | Medical Coding Library | Www.hipaaspace.com

The unique LOINC Code is a string in the format of nnnnnnnn-n. Second major axis-property observed (e.g., mass vs. substance) Third major axis-timing of the measurement (e.g., point in time vs 24 hours) Fourth major axis-type of specimen or system (e.g., serum vs urine) Fifth major axis-scale of measurement (e.g., qualitative vs. quantitative) An arbitrary classification of the terms for grouping related observations together. The current classifications are listed in Table 29. We present the database sorted by the class field within class type (see field 23). Users of the database should feel free to re-sort the database in any way they find useful, and/or to add their own classifying fields to the database.The content of the laboratory test subclasses should be obvious from the subclass name. The LOINC version number in which the record has lastchanged. For new records, this field contains the same value asthe loinc.FirstPublishedRelease field. Change Type CodeDEL = delete (deprecate)ADD = addNAM = change to Analyte/Component (field #2);MAJ = change to name field other than #2 (#3 - #7);MIN = change to field other than nameUND = undelete Narrative text that describes the LOINC term taken as a whole(i.e., taking all of the parts of the term together) or relaysinformation specific to the term, such as the context in whichthe term was requested or its clinical utility. ACTIVE = Concept is active. Use at will.TRIAL = Concept is experimental in nature. Use with caution as the concept and associated attributes may change.DISCOURAGED = Concept is not recommended for current use. New mappings to this concept are discouraged; although existing may mappings may continue to be valid in context. Wherever possible, the superseding concept is indicated in the MAP_TO field in the M Continue reading >>

1-hour Glucose Challenge Test Or Gct (plasma, Serum) During Pregnancy

1-hour Glucose Challenge Test Or Gct (plasma, Serum) During Pregnancy

What is the 1-Hour Glucose Challenge Test GCT? The 1-hour glucose challenge test or GCT measures the effect of a glucose solution on blood glucose levels. Patients are brought into the lab where one blood sample is taken 1-hour after a glucose solution is consumed. The glucose solution typically contains 50 grams of glucose but may also contain 75 or 100 grams. The 1-hour glucose challenge test is a screening test done to identify who may be at risk of diabetes. It does not usually diagnose diabetes but done to identify those who require additional testing. Pregnant women take the 1-hour glucose tolerance test as a screening tool for gestational diabetes. If the test results are below 130 mg/dl (or below 140 mg/dl) then no additional testing is required. If the test is above 130 mg (135 or 140 mg) then a 3-hour glucose tolerance test or GTT is ordered. The 3-hour glucose tolerance test uses a 100 gram glucose solution. If non-fasting glucose levels are greater than 126 mg/dL or normal daily glucose levels are greater than 200 mg/dL, glucose tolerance testing is not necessary as these measurements indicate diabetes. Normal Value Range Adult Non-Pregnant and Pregnant: Below 130 to 140 mg/dL or 7.2 to 7.8 mmol/L < Laboratory Values During Pregnancy Continue reading >>

1558-6 Loinc Code | Fasting Glucose [mass/volume] In Serum Or Plasma | Medical Coding Library | Www.hipaaspace.com

1558-6 Loinc Code | Fasting Glucose [mass/volume] In Serum Or Plasma | Medical Coding Library | Www.hipaaspace.com

The unique LOINC Code is a string in the format of nnnnnnnn-n. Second major axis-property observed (e.g., mass vs. substance) Third major axis-timing of the measurement (e.g., point in time vs 24 hours) Fourth major axis-type of specimen or system (e.g., serum vs urine) Fifth major axis-scale of measurement (e.g., qualitative vs. quantitative) An arbitrary classification of the terms for grouping related observations together. The current classifications are listed in Table 29. We present the database sorted by the class field within class type (see field 23). Users of the database should feel free to re-sort the database in any way they find useful, and/or to add their own classifying fields to the database.The content of the laboratory test subclasses should be obvious from the subclass name. The LOINC version number in which the record has lastchanged. For new records, this field contains the same value asthe loinc.FirstPublishedRelease field. Change Type CodeDEL = delete (deprecate)ADD = addNAM = change to Analyte/Component (field #2);MAJ = change to name field other than #2 (#3 - #7);MIN = change to field other than nameUND = undelete Narrative text that describes the LOINC term taken as a whole(i.e., taking all of the parts of the term together) or relaysinformation specific to the term, such as the context in whichthe term was requested or its clinical utility. ACTIVE = Concept is active. Use at will.TRIAL = Concept is experimental in nature. Use with caution as the concept and associated attributes may change.DISCOURAGED = Concept is not recommended for current use. New mappings to this concept are discouraged; although existing may mappings may continue to be valid in context. Wherever possible, the superseding concept is indicated in the MAP_TO field in the M Continue reading >>

Random Blood Glucose Test

Random Blood Glucose Test

RATE★★★★★ A random blood glucose test is used to diagnose diabetes. The test measures the level of glucose (a type of sugar) in your blood. If your blood glucose level is 200 mg/dL or higher and you have the classic symptoms of high blood sugar (excessive thirst, urination at night, blurred vision and, in some cases, weight loss) your doctor may diagnose you with diabetes. If you do not have any symptoms of high blood sugar, your doctor will probably have you take another test for further evidence of diabetes.1 Usually, having high blood glucose can be a sign that your body is not functioning normally and that you may have diabetes. If you have high blood glucose and it is not treated, it can lead to serious health complications. However, finding out that your blood glucose is elevated is powerful information that you can use to keep yourself healthy. If you know that your blood glucose is high, you can take steps to lower it, by losing weight (if you are overweight or obese), getting regular moderate physical activity, and taking a medication that lowers blood glucose.2 Why measuring blood glucose is important in diagnosing type 2 diabetes Our bodies require energy to function properly and we get that energy from the foods we eat. Our diet (everything we eat and drink) includes three main sources of energy (also known as calories): protein, fat, and carbohydrates (sugars, starches, and fibers).When the body digests most sources of carbohydrates, they are transformed through digestion into a very important source of instant energy, a form of sugar called glucose. Our bodies depend on the action of a number of different natural body chemicals called hormones, including insulin, amylin, incretins, and glucagon, working together in conjunction, to control how we Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

A condition in which blood glucose levels are elevated, but not yet within the diabetic range. Prediabetes is also known as impaired fasting glucose (IFG) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). The new term was inaugurated by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) in March 2002 to promote public understanding of this increasingly widespread problem. According to HHS, nearly 57 million Americans have prediabetes. Studies have shown that most people with blood glucose levels in the prediabetes range go on to develop Type 2 diabetes within 10 years; the condition also raises the risk of having a heart attack or stroke by 50%. Prediabetes can be controlled, and in many cases even reversed, through lifestyle changes. Prediabetes can be detected by either of the two standard tests currently used to diagnose diabetes. In the fasting plasma glucose test (FPG), a person fasts overnight and then has blood drawn for testing first thing in the morning, before he eats. Until recently, a normal fasting blood glucose level under 110 mg/dl was considered to be normal and fasting blood glucose in the range of 110 to 125 mg/dl indicated impaired fasting glucose (IFG), or prediabetes. In late 2003, an international expert panel recommended that the cutoff be lowered to 100 mg/dl, so now people with a fasting blood glucose level of 100 to 125 mg/dl are considered to have prediabetes. A fasting blood glucose level over 125 mg/dl indicates diabetes. (A second test must be done on a subsequent day to confirm a diagnosis of diabetes.) In the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), a person’s blood glucose is tested once after an overnight fast and again two hours after he has consumed a special, glucose-rich drink. A normal blood glucose Continue reading >>

The “normal Blood Sugar Range” May Be Misleading You

The “normal Blood Sugar Range” May Be Misleading You

A fasting blood sugar test measures the amount of a type of sugar, called glucose, in your blood after you have not eaten for at least eight hours. Checking for an ideal fasting blood sugar is one of the most commonly performed tests to check for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. So what should your fasting blood sugar be? The normal blood sugar range is 65-99 mg/dL. If your fasting blood sugar is between 100 and 125 mg/dL, you have “impaired fasting glucose,” also referred to as “prediabetes.” If your fasting blood sugar is more than 126 mg/dL on two or more occasions, you have full-blown diabetes. What Is Prediabetes? People defined as having impaired fasting glucose/prediabetes are individuals whose blood sugar levels do not meet criteria for diabetes, yet are higher than those considered normal. These people are at relatively high risk for the future development of diabetes. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), prediabetes is not a disease itself but rather a risk factor “for diabetes as well as cardiovascular disease.”[1] However, the ADA also state that prediabetes can be considered an “intermediate stage” in the diabetes disease process.[1](One might wonder how prediabetes can be a both a risk factor for diabetes and an intermediate stage of the diabetes disease process simultaneously). In addition to increasing the chance of developing diabetes, it’s well-established that people with impaired fasting glucose/prediabetes are more likely to be overweight or obese, especially with what’s known as abdominal or visceral obesity. They also are more likely to have high triglycerides and/or low HDL cholesterol, and hypertension.[1] Even Normal-Range Blood Glucose Levels Can Increase Diabetes Risk There’s a lot more at stake for thos Continue reading >>

Glucose Test

Glucose Test

Testing blood sugar levels A glucose test is a type of blood test used to determine the amount of glucose in the blood. It is mainly used in screening for prediabetes or diabetes.[1] Patients are instructed not to consume anything but water during the fasting period. Caffeine will also distort the results. If the person eats during the period in which he or she is supposed to have been fasting then they may show blood sugar levels that may cause his or her doctor to think the person has or is at increased risk of having diabetes. In people already having diabetes, blood glucose monitoring is used with frequent intervals in the management of the condition.[1] There are several different kinds of glucose tests: Fasting blood sugar (FBS), fasting plasma glucose (FPG): 8 or 12 or 14 hours after eating Glucose tolerance test:[2] continuous testing Postprandial glucose test (PC): 2 hours after eating Random glucose test Reference ranges[edit] Fasting blood sugar[edit] A range of 4 to 5.5 mmol/l (70 to 99 mg/dl) before a meal is normal. Continual fasting levels of 5.5 to 7 mmol/l (101–125 mg/dl) causes concern of possible prediabetes and may be worth monitoring. 7 mmol/l (126 mg/dl) and above means a risk of diabetes.[3] After a 12‑hour fast, a range of 3.9 to under 5.5 mmol/l (70.2 to 100 mg/dl) is normal; a level of 5.6 to under 7 mmol/l (100 to 126 mg/dl) is considered a sign of prediabetes.[3] Postprandial glucose[edit] Main article: Postprandial glucose test A level of < 7.8 mmol/l (140 mg/dl) 90 minutes after a meal is normal.[4] See also[edit] Glucose meter Hyperglycemia Hypoglycemia [edit] Continue reading >>

Reference Values During Pregnancy

Reference Values During Pregnancy

perinatology.com Please enable JavaScript to view all features on this site. Activated partial thromboplastin time Alanine aminotransferase (ALT, SGPT)AlbuminAldosteroneAlkaline phosphataseAlpha-1-antitrypsin Alpha-fetoproteinAmylase Angiotensin converting enzyme Anion gapAntithrombin III, functionalApolipoprotein A-1Apolipoprotein BAspartate aminotransferase (AST, SGOT)Basophil countBicarbonateBile acidsBilirubin,conjugated (direct) Bilirubin,unconjugated (indirect) Bilirubin,totalCA -125Calcium,ionizedCalcium,totalCeruloplasminChlorideCholesterol,HDLCholesterol,LDLCholesterol,VLDLCholesterol,total Complement C3 Complement C4 CopperCortisol C-reactive protein CreatinineCreatine kinaseD-dimerDehydroepiandrosterone sulfateEosinophil countErythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR)ErythropoietinEstradiolFactor VFactor VIIFactor VIIIFactor IXFactor XIFactor XIIFerritin Fibrinogen Folate,red cellFolate,serumGamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT)Glomerular filtration rate (GFR)Glucose,fasting HematocritHemoglobin Hemoglobin A1CHomocysteineImmunoglobulin A (IgA)Immunoglobulin G (IgG)Immunoglobulin M (IgM)IronLactate dehydrogenase (LDH)LipaseLymphocyte countMagnesiumMean corpuscular volume (MCV)Mean corpuscular hemoglobinMean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration Mean platelet volume (MPV)Monocyte count Neutrophil countOsmolalityParathyroid hormoneParathyroid hormone-related proteinPhosphatePlatelet countPotassiumPrealbuminProgesteroneProlactinProtein, totalProtein C activityProtein S activityProtein S freeProtein S totalProthrombin timeRed blood cell count (RBC)Red cell distribution width (RDW)SeleniumSex hormone binding globulinSodiumTestosteroneThyroxine-binding globulinThyroid-stimulating hormone(TSH)Thyroxine, freeThyroxine, totalTissue plasminogen activatorTissue plasminogen activator Continue reading >>

What Is Considered A High Level Of Serum Glucose?

What Is Considered A High Level Of Serum Glucose?

Glucose is required by the body to maintain life. However, it is possible to have too much of a good thing. Hyperglycemia, or high blood glucose levels, may be due to diabetes, medications, stress, illness, hyperthyroidism, Cushing syndrome, pancreatitis or pancreatitis cancer. It is important to know the symptoms of high blood glucose and to see your doctor immediately if you experience any signs to prevent further complications. Video of the Day A fasting blood glucose test is usually the first step to determining if you have high blood glucose levels, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. It is most reliable when done in the morning, after you have fasted for at least eight hours. Normal levels should be below 99 mg/dL. Pre-diabetes is diagnosed when levels are between 100 to 125 mg/dL. Diabetes is confirmed if your fasting blood glucose levels are 126 mg/dL or above on repeated tests. Random or nonfasting blood glucose levels of above 200 mg/dL could mean you have diabetes, as well. According to the American Diabetes Association, symptoms of high glucose levels include frequent urination, extreme hunger and thirst, extreme fatigue and irritability, unusual weight loss, frequent infections, blurred vision, tingling and numbness in the hands and feet, cuts and bruises that take a long time to heal, and recurring bladder, gum or skin infections. It is possible for you to have high glucose levels with no symptoms, so be sure to have your doctor check your levels at your regular physical. Dangers of Hyperglycemia The danger of continuously high blood glucose or hyperglycemia is that sugar coats the red blood cells, causing them to become stiff and “sticky”. These cells interfere with proper blood circulation and can cause Continue reading >>

1507-3 Loinc Code | Glucose [mass/volume] In Serum Or Plasma --1 Hour Post 75 G Glucose Po | Medical Coding Library | Www.hipaaspace.com

1507-3 Loinc Code | Glucose [mass/volume] In Serum Or Plasma --1 Hour Post 75 G Glucose Po | Medical Coding Library | Www.hipaaspace.com

The unique LOINC Code is a string in the format of nnnnnnnn-n. Second major axis-property observed (e.g., mass vs. substance) Third major axis-timing of the measurement (e.g., point in time vs 24 hours) Fourth major axis-type of specimen or system (e.g., serum vs urine) Fifth major axis-scale of measurement (e.g., qualitative vs. quantitative) An arbitrary classification of the terms for grouping related observations together. The current classifications are listed in Table 29. We present the database sorted by the class field within class type (see field 23). Users of the database should feel free to re-sort the database in any way they find useful, and/or to add their own classifying fields to the database.The content of the laboratory test subclasses should be obvious from the subclass name. The LOINC version number in which the record has lastchanged. For new records, this field contains the same value asthe loinc.FirstPublishedRelease field. Change Type CodeDEL = delete (deprecate)ADD = addNAM = change to Analyte/Component (field #2);MAJ = change to name field other than #2 (#3 - #7);MIN = change to field other than nameUND = undelete Narrative text that describes the LOINC term taken as a whole(i.e., taking all of the parts of the term together) or relaysinformation specific to the term, such as the context in whichthe term was requested or its clinical utility. ACTIVE = Concept is active. Use at will.TRIAL = Concept is experimental in nature. Use with caution as the concept and associated attributes may change.DISCOURAGED = Concept is not recommended for current use. New mappings to this concept are discouraged; although existing may mappings may continue to be valid in context. Wherever possible, the superseding concept is indicated in the MAP_TO field in the M Continue reading >>

High-normal Fasting Blood Sugar Above 87 Mg/dl Could Signal Diabetes Risk

High-normal Fasting Blood Sugar Above 87 Mg/dl Could Signal Diabetes Risk

Men and women with fasting plasma glucose levels in the high-normal range of 87 to 99 mg/dL should be counseled with regard to weight and lifestyle, and assessing their lipid profiles. Young men with fasting plasma glucose levels in the high-normal range appear to be at increased risk for type 2 diabetes, especially if they are on the heavy side and have high serum triglyceride levels. That’s the finding of researchers who studied more than 13,000 apparently healthy young men in the Israeli defense forces. The investigators found that so-called "normal" test values may actually predict type 2 diabetes. "Higher fasting plasma glucose levels within the normoglycemic range constitute an independent risk factor for type 2 diabetes among young men, and such levels may help, along with body-mass index and triglyceride levels, to identify apparently healthy men at increased risk for diabetes," wrote Amir Tirosh, M.D., Ph.D., from the Israeli Defense Forces Medical Corps and colleagues at various Israeli institutions. According to the American Diabetes Association, fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels below 100 mg/dL (5.55 mmol/L) are considered to be normal, whereas levels between 100 mg/dL and 109 mg/dL signal impairment. But readings at the upper end of the normal limit – just below the 100 mg/dL threshold – might signal risk for future diabetes, and could serve as a risk marker. To see how things stood with glucose among young Israeli adults, they drew on data from the Metabolic, Lifestyle and Nutrition Assessment in Young Adults study, which tracks all Israeli service personnel older than 25. Participants fill out a detailed demographic, nutrition, lifestyle and medical questionnaire, and have blood samples drawn after a 14-hour fast. The study included data on 13,163 Continue reading >>

High Glucose: What It Means And How To Treat It

High Glucose: What It Means And How To Treat It

What is high blood glucose? People who do not have diabetes typically have fasting plasma blood glucose levels that run under 126 mg/dl. Your physician will define for you what your target blood glucose should be — identifying a blood glucose target that is as close to normal as possible that you can safely achieve given your overall medical health. In general, high blood glucose, also called 'hyperglycemia', is considered "high" when it is 160 mg/dl or above your individual blood glucose target. Be sure to ask your healthcare provider what he or she thinks is a safe target for you for blood glucose before and after meals. If your blood glucose runs high for long periods of time, this can pose significant problems for you long-term — increased risk of complications, such as eye disease, kidney disease, heart attacks and strokes and more. High blood glucose can pose health problems in the short-term as well. Your treatment plan may need adjustment if the blood glucose stays over 180 mg/dl for 3 days in a row. It is important to aim to keep your blood glucose under control, and treat hyperglycemia when it occurs. What are the symptoms of high blood glucose? Increased thirst Increased urination Dry mouth or skin Tiredness or fatigue Blurred vision More frequent infections Slow healing cuts and sores Unexplained weight loss What causes high blood glucose? Too much food Too little exercise or physical activity Skipped or not enough diabetes pills or insulin Insulin that has spoiled after being exposed to extreme heat or freezing cold Stress, illness, infection, injury or surgery A blood glucose meter that is not reading accurately What should you do for high blood glucose? Be sure to drink plenty of water. It is recommended to drink a minimum of 8 glasses each day. If yo Continue reading >>

Glucose Serpl-mcnc Is 119. Is That Good?

Glucose Serpl-mcnc Is 119. Is That Good?

Are you sure you want to delete this answer? I think this question violates the Community Guidelines Chat or rant, adult content, spam, insulting other members, show more I think this question violates the Terms of Service Harm to minors, violence or threats, harassment or privacy invasion, impersonation or misrepresentation, fraud or phishing, show more If you believe your intellectual property has been infringed and would like to file a complaint, please see our Copyright/IP Policy I think this answer violates the Community Guidelines Chat or rant, adult content, spam, insulting other members, show more I think this answer violates the Terms of Service Harm to minors, violence or threats, harassment or privacy invasion, impersonation or misrepresentation, fraud or phishing, show more If you believe your intellectual property has been infringed and would like to file a complaint, please see our Copyright/IP Policy I think this comment violates the Community Guidelines Chat or rant, adult content, spam, insulting other members, show more I think this comment violates the Terms of Service Harm to minors, violence or threats, harassment or privacy invasion, impersonation or misrepresentation, fraud or phishing, show more If you believe your intellectual property has been infringed and would like to file a complaint, please see our Copyright/IP Policy Upload failed. Please upload a file larger than 100x100 pixels We are experiencing some problems, please try again. You can only upload files of type PNG, JPG, or JPEG. You can only upload files of type 3GP, 3GPP, MP4, MOV, AVI, MPG, MPEG, or RM. You can only upload photos smaller than 5 MB. You can only upload videos smaller than 600MB. You can only upload a photo (png, jpg, jpeg) or a video (3gp, 3gpp, mp4, mov, avi, mpg, Continue reading >>

Lab Results | St. Peter's Health

Lab Results | St. Peter's Health

The lipid profile is a group of tests that are often ordered together to determine risk of coronary heart disease . The tests that make up a lipid profile are tests that have been shown to be good indicators of whether someone is likely to have a heart attack or stroke caused by blockage of blood vessels (hardening of the arteries). The lipid profile includes total cholesterol , HDLcholesterol (often called good cholesterol), LDLcholesterol (often called bad cholesterol), triglycerides, and Glucose.The lipid profile is used to guide providers in deciding how a person at risk should be treated. The results of the lipid profile are considered, along with other known risk factors of heart disease , to develop a plan of treatment and follow-up. Cholesterol is a substance (a steroid) that is essential for life. It forms the membranes for cells in all organs and tissues in your body. It is used to make hormones that are essential for development, growth, and reproduction. It forms bile acids that are needed to absorb nutrients from food. A small amount of your bodys cholesterol circulates in the blood in complex particles called lipoproteins. These lipoproteins include some particles that carry excess cholesterol away for disposal (see HDL , good cholesterol) and some particles that deposit cholesterol in tissues and organs (see LDL , bad cholesterol). The test for cholesterol measures all cholesterol (good and bad) that is carried in the blood by lipoproteins. HDL is one of the classes of lipoproteins that carry cholesterol in the blood. HDL is considered to be beneficial because it removes excess cholesterol and disposes of it.Therefore, HDL cholesterol is often termed good cholesterol. The test for HDL measures the amount of HDL cholesterol in blood. LDL is a type of lipo Continue reading >>

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