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Glucose Model 3d

Molecular Structure Of Glucose

Molecular Structure Of Glucose

What I wanted to do in this video is familiarize ourselves with one of the most important molecules in biology And that is Glucose sometimes referred to as Dextrose and the term Dextrose comes from the fact that the form of Glucose typically Typically found in nature if you form a solution of it, it's going to polarize light to the right and Dextre means Right But the more typical term glucose this literally means sweet in greek if you ask a greek friend to say sweet it sounds like Lucas or I'm not saying it perfectly, but it sounds a lot like a glucose And that's because that's where the word comes from and it is super important because it is it is it is how energy [is] stored and transferred in biological systems in fact right [now] when if someone were to talk about your blood your blood sugar they're talking about the glucose content, so when people talk about blood blood sugar they're talking about your they're talking about your glucose content the whole process of photosynthesis this is all about plants using harnessing the [sun's] energy and storing that energy in the form of glucose when we talk about when we talk about things like respiration in our in our cells cellular respiration that's all about taking glucose and using it to full and to create atp's which are the molecular currency of energy Inside of our body, so these are in credit is an incredibly important molecule We can start wreaking chains of glucose to form Glycogen to form Starches this along with another similar another simple sugar fructose you can use to form our table sugar But even glucose by itself is sweet so let's get familiar with it as a molecule so immediately When you look at this is it kind of drawn as a as an open chain we see that we have one two three Actually, let me number thes Continue reading >>

3d Printed Solubility Of Glucose Model By Chemteacher628 | Pinshape

3d Printed Solubility Of Glucose Model By Chemteacher628 | Pinshape

Be the first to upload a Print for this Design! This model is designed to show how covalent compounds such as glucose dissolve in water. The carbon atoms (black), oxygen atoms (pink), and water molecules are all to scale. Separate molecules can be printed and placed on top of the molecule in the same repeating structure. Using the included water molecules, the process of dissolving a covalent compound can be shown by removing the individual molecules. Files are included to print the model on dual extruder printers (recommended) and single extruder printers. The glucose crystal file for a single extruder is too large for 123D to export as an STL so a single layer (which can be printed multiple times and glued together) is included. Print Settings Printer: Flash Forge Creator Pro Rafts: Yes Supports: Yes Resolution: .2mm Infill: 15% Overview and Background Often times I find that students struggle to understand the concept of solubility on the particle level. This model can be used to demonstrate how a molecular compound separates into molecules when dissolved. The model can also be used to do demonstrate the structure of covalent crystals. Students should be familiar with the differences between ionic and molecular compounds before using this model. Objectives: Students will be able to describe the process by which a molecular compound dissolves in water. Students should be able to explain how water molecules interact with covalent compounds through intermolecular forces Students should be able to explain why certain substances can form crystal structures. Lesson Plan and Activity Show students some glucose or sucrose and ask what will occur when the molecules are dropped in water. Discuss what occurs on the macro level (it dissolves) and then ask students to draw what Continue reading >>

Search For Glucose/galactose-binding Proteins In Newly Discovered Protein Sequences Using Molecular Modeling Techniques And Structural Analysis

Search For Glucose/galactose-binding Proteins In Newly Discovered Protein Sequences Using Molecular Modeling Techniques And Structural Analysis

Sugar moieties serve as specificity markers in a wide variety of biochemical functions, and periplasmic glucose/galactose-binding proteins (GGBPs) serve as the primary receptors for transport and chemotaxis. Recently, complete genome sequencing projects have revealed many open reading frames for such receptors. On the basis of the homology search with the known x-ray structures (PDB ID: 3GBP/1GCA) of a periplasmic receptor protein from Salmonella typhimurium, we selected four putative proteins with amino acid identities between 30 and 48% for the prediction of three-dimensional (3D) structures of the proteins as well as their complexes with glucose and galactose. We could successfully identify the key residues involved in coordination with calcium ion spanning over two loop structures. We calculated the ligand-binding affinities and hydrogen bonding patterns of the modeled structures and compared with those of the x-ray structures. The calculation of free energies of binding of the modeled structures to glucose and galactose in the presence of water suggested that two of four putative proteins can form complexes with dissociation constants in the micromolar range (110 M). Electrostatic potentials on the surfaces near the sugar and calcium-binding sites of the modeled structures were predominately negative as found in case of the x-ray structure. Taken together, our results suggest that the products of two newly discovered genes would serve as receptors for the transport of glucose and galactose. 3D, three dimensional , ABP, l-arabinose-binding protein , CBLs, calcium-binding loops , GGBP, glucose/galactose-binding protein , RMSD, root mean square deviation , vdW, van der Waals Sugar moieties associated with glycoproteins and polysaccharides are involved in the determin Continue reading >>

Glucose And Fructose 3d Models.

Glucose And Fructose 3d Models.

... Furthermore, in comparison with other designer sol- vents such as ionic liquids, DES are cheaper to produce, since the raw materials have a lower cost, their synthesis is quite simple and com- pounds with high purity and no by-products are obtained [13,32,46]. Nonetheless, some recent publications reported that DES appear to have some toxicity [32,34, 46]. To overcome this drawback, the use of natural origin molecules to produce DES has been proposed and these are hence called natural deep eutectic systems (NADES) [33,34,40]. ... ... Nonetheless, some recent publications reported that DES appear to have some toxicity [32,34,40,46]. To overcome this drawback, the use of natural origin molecules to produce DES has been proposed and these are hence called natural deep eutectic systems (NADES) [33,34, . NADES are mostly composed by natural primary metabolites such as sugars, sugar alcohols, organic acids, amino acids, and amines and additionally often contain water in certain molar ratios [13,18,46,54]. ... ... The introduction of water as a tertiary component primarily leads to strong hydrogen bond interactions between water and the components of NADES. In addition, it decreases the overall viscosity of the eutectic mixture and, consequently, enhances its process ability and decreases the cytotoxic profile of NADES [18, . Recently, the presence of NADES in animal and plants who survive in extreme conditions and temperature amplitudes has been discussed in the literature [2,10,11,42,52,58]. ... furthered their cytotoxicity studies by assessing two NADESs (namely ChCl/fructose (2:1) as NADES1 and ChCl/glucose (2:1) as NADES2) and one DES (N,N-diethyl ethanolammonium chloride/ triethylene glycol (1:3) as DES1) using six human cancer cell lines. Cytotoxicity lies in the o Continue reading >>

How Do You Make A 3d Model Of Glucose Using A Ball-and-stick Kit?

How Do You Make A 3d Model Of Glucose Using A Ball-and-stick Kit?

How do you make a 3D model of glucose using a ball-and-stick kit? How do you make a 3D model of glucose using a ball-and-stick kit? Submitted by Chemistry Duck on Sat, 2014-02-01 12:07 I need to know how to assemble the carbon, hydrogen and oxygen "balls" together for this project. I know the formula is C6H12O6, but I'm confused as to how I should assemble them to form sugar? Permalink Submitted by Steve Sockalingham on Sat, 2014-02-01 12:13 Glucose is hexagon-shaped, with 5 carbons and 1oxygenmaking up that hexagon. Attached to 4 of the 5 carbons is ahydrogen atom(H) and a hydroxide (OH). They alternate, with H on top and OH on the bottom 2 of the 4 times, and OH on top and H on the bottom the other 2 times. Then, on the 5th carbon atom, attach a CH2OH on top and a H atom on the bottom. The oxygen just sits there by itself and doesn't require any attachments. Watch this video for more info on how to make 3D sugar models and to see what they look like when made out of ball and stick kits: Continue reading >>

Human Insulin Molecule Scientific 3d Model

Human Insulin Molecule Scientific 3d Model

Insulin isahormone that signals cells tocapture glucose from the blood and break itdown toobtain energy. Abnormalities ininsulin synthesis orthe tissues reaction toitlead tothe development ofdiabetes ofthe first orsecond type, respectively. Inthis scenario, chronic disease tissues ofanorganism donot receive the desired amount ofglucose, whereas its concentration inblood isgreatly increased. This condition iscalled hyperglycemia. According tothe World Health Organization diabetes and hyperglycemia iscurrently causing upto3.5 million deaths annually (1). Insulin isasmall protein consisting oftwo polypeptide chains. The Achain (indicated ingray) consists of21amino acid residues, and theB chain (orange) of30amino acids. The chains are linked bytwo disulfide bonds. Another disulfide bond islocated inside the A-chain. Insulin isanancient,conserved molecule. Even nematodes have insulin very similar tohumans. This isthe first protein inwhich amino acid sequences were identified inthe early 1950s (2). Insulin molecules can bind zinc ions and form complexes ofsix subunits. The complexes are not active, but they can gradually break down torelease active proteins. This property isused tocreate insulin medical formulations with longer action. The name ofthe protein comes from the Latin word insula island. Itwas named after asmall group ofcells inthe pancreatic islets ofLangerhans, inwhich the hormone issynthesized. Pancreatic islets were discovered asaresult ofinhumane experiments ondogs: the animal had its pancreatic duct ligated while scientists waited until all the cells that secrete digestive enzymes died and were disposed ofbyimmunity. Asaresult ofthis experiment only connective tissues and groups ofcells that synthesize insulin remained inthe pancreas ofananimal (3). Continue reading >>

3d-modeling Of The Influence Of Isomalt, Glucose, And Compaction Pressure On The Quality Of Ascorbic-acid Tablets

3d-modeling Of The Influence Of Isomalt, Glucose, And Compaction Pressure On The Quality Of Ascorbic-acid Tablets

, Volume 52, Issue5 , pp 467472 | Cite as 3D-Modeling of the Influence of Isomalt, Glucose, and Compaction Pressure on the Quality of Ascorbic-Acid Tablets The influence of the isomalt mass fraction in a mixture with glucose on the flowability, density, and elastic-plastic properties of the tableting mass and the quality of the obtained 1-g tablets (14 mm diameter) was studied. The flowability of the mixture decreased by 0.6 0.06 g/c if the isomalt ST-PF content was increased by 10%. The curve for the bulk density had a distinct maximum near an isomaltglucose ratio of 50:50. The tablet strength increased linearly by 55 7 and 51 7 N; the density, by 0.0036 0.0002 and 0.076 0.003 g/cm3; and the disintegration time, by 1.2 0.2 and 1.7 02 min if the isomalt ST-PF concentration in the mixture was increased to 35% and the compaction pressure to 350 N/cm2, respectively. direct pressing3D-modelingtabletsexcipientsisomaltglucoseascorbic acid Translated from Khimiko-Farmatsevticheskii Zhurnal, Vol. 52, No. 5, pp. 49 54, May, 2018. This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access. N. N. Zhuikova, O. S. Sablina, E. A. Shtokareva, and A. S. Gavrilov, Khim.-farm. Zh., 43(8), 50 52 (2009); Pharm. Chem. J., 43(8), Article: 447 (2009). Google Scholar K. Day, K. Xiao, et al., US Pat. 8,383,632, Feb. 26, 2013. Google Scholar E. V. Alshev, RU Pat. 2,426,454, Dec. 27, 2010. Google Scholar C.-Y. Wu, B. C. Hancock, A. Mills, et al., Powder Technol., 181, 121 129 (2008). CrossRef Google Scholar G. K. Bolhuis, J. J. Engelhart, and A. C. Eissens, Eur. J. Pharm. Biopharm., 72(3), 621 625 (2009). CrossRef PubMed Google Scholar G. K. Bolhuis E. G. Rexwinkel, and K. Zuurman, Drug Dev. Ind. Pharm., 35(6), 671 677 (2009). CrossRef PubMed Google Scholar W. L. Chen, D. W. Guo, Y. Y. Sh Continue reading >>

Rcsb Pdb - 2fvy: High Resolution Glucose Bound Crystal Structure Of Ggbp

Rcsb Pdb - 2fvy: High Resolution Glucose Bound Crystal Structure Of Ggbp

144211 Biological Macromolecular Structures Enabling Breakthroughs in Research and Education This is version 1.2 of the entry. See complete history . D-Glucose/D-Galactose-binding protein (GGBP) mediates chemotaxis toward and active transport of glucose and galactose in a number of bacterial species. GGBP, like other periplasmic binding proteins, can exist in open (ligand-free) and closed (ligand- ... D-Glucose/D-Galactose-binding protein (GGBP) mediates chemotaxis toward and active transport of glucose and galactose in a number of bacterial species. GGBP, like other periplasmic binding proteins, can exist in open (ligand-free) and closed (ligand-bound) states. We report a 0.92 angstroms resolution structure of GGBP from Escherichia coli in the glucose-bound state and the first structure of an open, unbound form of GGBP (at 1.55 angstroms resolution). These structures vary in the angle between the two structural domains; the observed difference of 31 degrees arises from torsion angle changes in a three-segment hinge. A comparison with the closely related periplasmic receptors, ribose- and allose-binding proteins, shows that the GGBP hinge residue positions that undergo the largest conformational changes are different. Furthermore, the high-quality data collected for the atomic resolution glucose-bound structure allow for the refinement of specific hydrogen atom positions, the assignment of alternate side chain conformations, the first description of CO(2) trapped after radiation-induced decarboxylation, and insight into the role of the exo-anomeric effect in sugar binding. Together, these structures provide insight into how the hinge-bending movement of GGBP facilitates ligand binding, transport, and signaling. Continue reading >>

D-glucose

D-glucose

Eraser: erase atoms, bonds or the current selection Undo/redo: undo or redo your recent changes Selection tools: all these tool can be used to drag the current selection or individual atoms and bonds. You can add/remove atoms and bonds to the selection by clicking them. If you have selected a separate fragment, you can rotate it by dragging an atom in the selection. You can delete the selection using the DEL key or using the eraser tool. Each tool has different behavior for the right mouse button: Drag: move the entire molecule (you can already use the left mouse button for this) Rectangle select: select atoms and bonds using a rectangular selection area Lasso select: select atoms and bonds by drawing a freehand selection area Color mode: display atoms and bonds using colors Full mode: displays all C and H atoms instead of skeletal display Clean: cleans the structural formula using an external service 2D to 3D: converts the structural formula into a 3D model Bonds: pick one of the bond types (single, double, triple, up, down) and add or modify bonds Fragments: pick one of the fragments (benzene, cyclopropane, etc.) and add fragments Charge: increment (+) or decrement (-) the charge of atoms In this toolbar you can select from a number of elements, you can also pick an element from the periodic table using the last button. You can use the element to create new atoms or modify existing atoms. You can load molecules from large databases like PubChem and RCSB using the search form located on the left side of the menu-bar. Just type what you are looking for and a list of available molecules will appear. You can also click on the dropdown button next to the search field to select a specific database. This will perform a more extensive search on the selected database. Current Continue reading >>

Time-lapse 3-d Measurements Of A Glucose Biosensor In Multicellular Spheroids By Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy In Commercial 96-well Plates

Time-lapse 3-d Measurements Of A Glucose Biosensor In Multicellular Spheroids By Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy In Commercial 96-well Plates

Time-lapse 3-D measurements of a glucose biosensor in multicellular spheroids by light sheet fluorescence microscopy in commercial 96-well plates Scientific Reports volume 6, Articlenumber:37777 (2016) | Download Citation Light sheet fluorescence microscopy has previously been demonstrated on a commercially available inverted fluorescence microscope frame using the method of oblique plane microscopy (OPM). In this paper, OPM is adapted to allow time-lapse 3-D imaging of 3-D biological cultures in commercially available glass-bottomed 96-well plates using a stage-scanning OPM approach (ssOPM). Time-lapse 3-D imaging of multicellular spheroids expressing a glucose Frster resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensor is demonstrated in 16 fields of view with image acquisition at 10 minute intervals. As a proof-of-principle, the ssOPM system is also used to acquire a dose response curve with the concentration of glucose in the culture medium being varied across 42 wells of a 96-well plate with the whole acquisition taking 9 min. The 3-D image data enable the FRET ratio to be measured as a function of distance from the surface of the spheroid. Overall, the results demonstrate the capability of the OPM system to measure spatio-temporal changes in FRET ratio in 3-D in multicellular spheroids over time in a multi-well plate format. Multicellular spheroids (MCS) provide a 3-D model of in vitro cell culture and are increasingly being used in in vitro assays 1 , 2 . Compared to 2-D cell monolayer culture on a plastic or glass surfaces, MCS provide cell-cell contacts and gradients of environmental parameters such as oxygen, nutrients and pH similar to those found in tumours 1 , 2 . The oxygen gradient is caused by the rate of consumption of oxygen by cells in the MCS being greater th Continue reading >>

Glucose

Glucose

This article is about the naturally occurring D-form of glucose. For the L-form, see L-Glucose. Glucose is a simple sugar with the molecular formula C6H12O6, which means that it is a molecule that is made of six carbon atoms, twelve hydrogen atoms, and six oxygen atoms. Glucose circulates in the blood of animals as blood sugar. It is made during photosynthesis from water and carbon dioxide, using energy from sunlight. It is the most important source of energy for cellular respiration. Glucose is stored as a polymer, in plants as starch and in animals as glycogen. With six carbon atoms, it is classed as a hexose, a subcategory of the monosaccharides. D-Glucose is one of the sixteen aldohexose stereoisomers. The D-isomer, D-glucose, also known as dextrose, occurs widely in nature, but the L-isomer, L-glucose, does not. Glucose can be obtained by hydrolysis of carbohydrates such as milk sugar (lactose), cane sugar (sucrose), maltose, cellulose, glycogen, etc. It is commonly commercially manufactured from cornstarch by hydrolysis via pressurized steaming at controlled pH in a jet followed by further enzymatic depolymerization.[3] In 1747, Andreas Marggraf was the first to isolate glucose.[4] Glucose is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the most important medications needed in a basic health system.[5] The name glucose derives through the French from the Greek γλυκός, which means "sweet," in reference to must, the sweet, first press of grapes in the making of wine.[6][7] The suffix "-ose" is a chemical classifier, denoting a carbohydrate. Function in biology[edit] Glucose is the most widely used aldohexose in living organisms. One possible explanation for this is that glucose has a lower tendency than other aldohexoses to react nonspecific Continue reading >>

Ede Design Shop, Glucose Sweet Design 3d Model Shop

Ede Design Shop, Glucose Sweet Design 3d Model Shop

Welcome to the 3D printing shop by Glucose Sweet Design! Here are all the designs of items invented by Glucose Sweet Design, ready in order to be 3D printed. Our online shop carries Jewelry, Articulated skeleton, Building models, Decoration, Indoor design, Lights, Table art, Pendants and Necklaces, Rings, Mathematics, Mechanics, Tools, Puzzle which can be personalized with materials and colorations you prefer! Select the Jewelry, Articulated skeleton, Building models, Decoration, Indoor design, Lights, Table art, Pendants and Necklaces, Rings, Mathematics, Mechanics, Tools, Puzzle, select the material which fits so you can customize them to get a exclusive product. Personalize Jewelry, Articulated skeleton, Building models, Decoration, Indoor design, Lights, Table art, Pendants and Necklaces, Rings, Mathematics, Mechanics, Tools, Puzzle by deciding for the 3D printing dimensions, material, tint you wish them in or even by changing the 3D file to your own purpose. The Marketplace by Sculpteo enables you to adapt 3D models imagined by Glucose Sweet Design to remodel them to your own or to gift them to a relative. Each model enables you to customize unique goods by mixing the vision of Glucose Sweet Design with infinite combinations of 3D printing materials and shades. Jewelry, Articulated skeleton, Building models, Decoration, Indoor design, Lights, Table art, Pendants and Necklaces, Rings, Mathematics, Mechanics, Tools, Puzzle you see in this store could be produced with metals, resins, plastics, and composite multicolor 3D printing material and we will make suggestions to get the finest 3D printing material for each product you take. Dive into the 3D printing universe designed by Glucose Sweet Design and add your personal style to build exceptional objects you will pla Continue reading >>

Chemed Dl Application: Models 360

Chemed Dl Application: Models 360

Export to ChemPaths (Drupal), ChemEd Courses (Moodle) ChemPaths is the ChemEd DL's Drupal -powered integrated online textbook. Students can explore a full online textbook or other learning pathways. Instructors can sign-up to build their own pathways through course material. Drupal does not allow full HTML code to be inserted, so the ChemEd DL community has created a Drupal extension that enables embedding Jmols. The extension is installed in ChemPaths (currently in beta-testing), so the code below allows you to add this Jmol to a course in a pathway. If you would like to use this Drupal extension within your own Drupal installation, contact us . ChemEd Courses is the ChemEd DL's Moodle course management system. Users can manage their own courses, or develop learning resources in Moodle to share with the community. Moodle does not allow full HTML code to be inserted, so the ChemEd DL community has created a Moodle extension that enables embedding Jmols. The extension is installed in ChemEd Courses, so the code below allows you to add this Jmol to a course in ChemEd Courses. If you would like to use this Moodle extension within your own Moodle installation, contact us . Continue reading >>

A Metabolic Core Model Elucidates How Enhanced Utilization Of Glucose And Glutamine, With Enhanced Glutamine-dependent Lactate Production, Promotes Cancer Cell Growth: The Warburq Effect

A Metabolic Core Model Elucidates How Enhanced Utilization Of Glucose And Glutamine, With Enhanced Glutamine-dependent Lactate Production, Promotes Cancer Cell Growth: The Warburq Effect

A metabolic core model elucidates how enhanced utilization of glucose and glutamine, with enhanced glutamine-dependent lactate production, promotes cancer cell growth: The WarburQ effect Chiara Damiani , Riccardo Colombo , Daniela Gaglio , Fabrizia Mastroianni , Dario Pescini , Hans Victor Westerhoff , [...view 2 more...], Giancarlo Mauri , Marco Vanoni , Lilia Alberghina [ view less ] Affiliations: SYSBIO Centre of Systems Biology, Milano, Italy, Dept of Informatics, Systems and Communication, University Milano-Bicocca, Milano, Italy Affiliations: SYSBIO Centre of Systems Biology, Milano, Italy, Dept of Informatics, Systems and Communication, University Milano-Bicocca, Milano, Italy Affiliations: SYSBIO Centre of Systems Biology, Milano, Italy, Institute of Molecular Bioimaging and Physiology, CNR, Segrate, Milan, Italy Affiliations: SYSBIO Centre of Systems Biology, Milano, Italy, Dept of Biotechnology and Biosciences, University Milano-Bicocca, Milano, Italy Affiliations: SYSBIO Centre of Systems Biology, Milano, Italy, Dept of Statistics and Quantitative Methods, University Milano-Bicocca, Milano, Italy Affiliations: Dept of Molecular Cell Physiology, Faculty of Earth and Life Sciences, VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, Manchester Centre for Integrative Systems Biology, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom, Swammerdam Institute for Life Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands Affiliations: SYSBIO Centre of Systems Biology, Milano, Italy, Dept of Informatics, Systems and Communication, University Milano-Bicocca, Milano, Italy * E-mail: [email protected] (LA); [email protected] (MV) Affiliations: SYSBIO Centre of Systems Biology, Mil Continue reading >>

Glucose, What Is Glucose? About Its Science, Chemistry And Structure

Glucose, What Is Glucose? About Its Science, Chemistry And Structure

Glucose (Molecule of the Month for March 2008) Dextrose, Dextrose monohydrate , Hexose, Sugar Glucose (Glc), a monosaccharide (or simple sugar), is an important carbohydrate in biology. The living cell uses it as a source of energy and metabolic intermediate. Glucose is one of the main products of photosynthesis and starts cellular respiration in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. The name comes from the Greek word glykys (), which means "sweet", plus the suffix "-ose" which denotes a sugar. Two stereoisomers of the aldohexose sugars are known as glucose, only one of which (D-glucose) is biologically active. This form (D-glucose) is often referred to as dextrose monohydrate, or, especially in the food industry, simply dextrose (from dextrorotatory glucose). This article deals with the D-form of glucose. The mirror-image of the molecule, L-glucose, cannot be metabolized by cells in the biochemical process known as glycolysis. Glucose is produced commercially via the enzymatic hydrolysis of starch. Many crops can be used as the source of starch. Maize, rice, wheat, potato, cassava, arrowroot, and sago are all used in various parts of the world. In the United States, cornstarch (from maize) is used almost exclusively. Glucose is a ubiquitous fuel in biology. It is used as an energy source in most organisms, from bacteria to humans. Use of glucose may be by either aerobic or anaerobic respiration (fermentation). Carbohydrates are the human body's key source of energy, through aerobic respiration, providing approximately 3.75 kilocalories (16 kilojoules) of food energy per gram. Breakdown of carbohydrates (e.g. starch) yields mono- and disaccharides, most of which is glucose. Through glycolysis and later in the reactions of the Citric acid cycle (TCAC), glucose is oxidized to Continue reading >>

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