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Glucose Medication Side Effects

Insulin, Medicines, & Other Diabetes Treatments

Insulin, Medicines, & Other Diabetes Treatments

Taking insulin or other diabetes medicines is often part of treating diabetes. Along with healthy food choices and physical activity, medicine can help you manage the disease. Some other treatment options are also available. What medicines might I take for diabetes? The medicine you take will vary by your type of diabetes and how well the medicine controls your blood glucose levels, also called blood sugar. Other factors, such as your other health conditions, medication costs, and your daily schedule may play a role in what diabetes medicine you take. Type 1 diabetes If you have type 1 diabetes, you must take insulin because your body no longer makes this hormone. You will need to take insulin several times during the day, including with meals. You also could use an insulin pump, which gives you small, steady doses throughout the day. Type 2 diabetes Some people with type 2 diabetes can manage their disease by making healthy food choices and being more physically active. Many people with type 2 diabetes need diabetes medicines as well. These medicines may include diabetes pills or medicines you inject under your skin, such as insulin. In time, you may need more than one diabetes medicine to control your blood glucose. Even if you do not take insulin, you may need it at special times, such as during pregnancy or if you are in the hospital. Gestational diabetes If you have gestational diabetes, you should first try to control your blood glucose level by making healthy food choices and getting regular physical activity. If you can’t reach your blood glucose target, your health care team will talk with you about diabetes medicines, such as insulin or the diabetes pill metformin, that may be safe for you to take during pregnancy. Your health care team may start you on diab Continue reading >>

Do I Need To Change My Type 2 Diabetes Medication?

Do I Need To Change My Type 2 Diabetes Medication?

Type 2 diabetes medications offer many options to manage your blood sugar (also known as blood glucose). But if your current treatment isn’t getting the job done or doesn’t feel right for you, talk to your doctor. She may tell you it’s time to change your treatment plan. It’s important to keep your blood sugar within a healthy range. This lowers your chances of diabetes complications. If your readings are too high on your current medication, your doctor might want to change the dose or try another. This can happen even if your medication worked very well at first. Sometimes it just doesn’t do the trick by itself anymore. If one drug doesn’t manage your blood sugar well enough, your doctor might add a second. If two don’t work, she could add a third. Some diabetes medications can make your blood glucose go too low. Your doctor will call this hypoglycemia. It can be dangerous. You might see it with: Your blood sugar might also go too low if you take combination treatments that have these drugs in them: Talk to your doctor if you have low readings. You might need a lower dose or different medication. Some are temporary and should go away within a few weeks after you start the drug. Upset stomach, gas, or diarrhea can happen with: DPP-4 inhibitors like linagliptin (Tradjenta), saxagliptin (Onglyza), and sitagliptin (Januvia) GLP-1 agonists like albiglutide (Tanzeum), dulaglutide (Trulicity), exenatide (Byetta), exenatide extended release (Bydureon), and liraglutide (Saxenda, Victoza) You might have the same problem with treatments that combine these drugs. Talk to your doctor if your side effects are severe or don’t go away in a few weeks. Drugs called SGLT2-inhibitors -- canagliflozin (Invokana), dapagliflozin (Farxiga), and empagliflozin (Jardiance) -- hav Continue reading >>

Diabetes Medication

Diabetes Medication

There are different types of medications available for diabetes mellitus with each having their own mechanism of action and side effects. The best drug should be chosen by a doctor assessing the condition of the patient – please note all these are prescription medicines and need to be taken properly, under medical-supervision and with correct dosage and at the right timings. You must, at all times, follow instructions from your doctor. Never self-medicate. Basically, anti-diabetic drugs can be categorized into two classes: A. Oral anti-diabetic drugs: This includes the following classes: Insulin secretagogues: sulphonylureas and non-sulphonylureas(Glinides/Meglitinide) Biguanides Thiazolidinediones a-glucosidase inhibitors Di-peptydyl Peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors/gliptins Sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors B. Injectable anti-diabetic drugs: Insulin preparations Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) agonists According to A consensus statement of the American Diabetes Association and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes, a tier system is used to prescribe medicines depending on how validated (tested) the medication is. The tier is divided into steps depending on the stage of diabetes and how the patient responds to the lifestyle changes and medicines. Tier 1: This includes the best established, most-effective and most cost effective therapeutic strategies to control blood sugar. This is also the most preferred strategy for patients with type 2 diabetes. The tier is divided into 3 steps. Step 1: These are prescribed at when someone is diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Apart from a lifestyle change, a mild medication that is well tested, has low and less severe side-effects and is cheap is prescribed. Step 2: A second medication is added when step 1 Continue reading >>

Type 2 Oral Diabetes Medications Side Effects, Differences, And Effectiveness

Type 2 Oral Diabetes Medications Side Effects, Differences, And Effectiveness

What are the types of oral diabetes medications? Currently, there are nine drug classes of oral diabetes medications approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. α-glucosidase inhibitors Biguanides Sulfonylureas Meglitinides Thiazolidinediones DPP-4 inhibitors Sodium-glucose cotransporter (SGLT)-2 inhibitors These medications differ in the way they function in the body to reduce blood glucose. Metformin (Glucophage) is the only biguanide available in the United States and is generally the first choice for oral treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Metformin improves Sulfonylureas are the oldest classes of oral diabetes medications. Sulfonylureas work primarily by stimulating the release of insulin. Insulin is the hormone responsible for regulating blood glucose by increasing the uptake of blood glucose by tissues and increasing storage of glucose in the liver. Meglitinides and sulfonylureas have a similar mechanism of action. Meglitinides are short acting glucose lowering medications. They stimulate the secretion of insulin from the pancreas. Thiazolidinediones enhance insulin sensitivity meaning that the effect of a given amount of insulin is greater. Thiazolidinediones also are referred to as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? or PPAR-? agonists. α-glucosidase inhibitors delay the digestion and absorption of starch or carbohydrates by inhibiting enzymes in the small intestine which help breakdown these molecules. The starches and carbohydrates are broken down into glucose, which then is absorbed from the intestine and increases the level in the blood. DPP-4 inhibitors help lower blood glucose by increasing the production of insulin from the pancreas and reducing the release of glucose from the liver. SGLT2 inhibitors or sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 in Continue reading >>

Glucose Uses, Side Effects & Warnings - Drugs.com

Glucose Uses, Side Effects & Warnings - Drugs.com

Generic Name: glucose (oral/injection) (GLOO kose) Brand Name: Dex4 , Dextrose , Insta-Glucose , Relion Grape , TRUEplus , Trutol Fruit Punch , ...show all 69 brand names Glutose , BD Glucose , Monojel, Glutol , Leader Orange Glucose, Leader Watermelon Glucose, Kinray Preferred Plus Orange Glucose, Dex4 Vertical Glucose Orange, Brite Life Grape Glucose, Dex4 Vertical Glucose Raspberry, Dex4 Vertical Glucose Grape, Brite Life Orange Glucose, Kinray Preferred Plus Raspberry Glucose, Brite Life Raspberry Glucose, Dex4 Vertical Glucose Watermelon, Brite Life Watermelon Glucose, Family Pharmacy Orange Glucose, Family Pharmacy Raspberry Glucose, Kinray Preferred Plus Grape Glucose, Good Neighbor Grape Glucose, Leader Raspberry Glucose, Good Neighbor Orange Glucose, Good Neighbor Raspberry Glucose, Good Neighbor Watermelon Glucose, Longs Orange Glucose, Longs Raspberry Glucose, Health Care America Raspberry Glucose, Health Care America Watermelon Glucose, Kinray Preferred Plus Watermelon Glucose, Dex4 Watermelon, Dex4 Pouch Pack, Albertsons Glucose Watermelon, Dex4 Gel Tropical Blast, Dex4 Strawberries & Cream, Dex4 Assorted Flavors, Dex4 Sour Apple, Leader Quick Dissolve Strawberries & Cream, GNP Quick Dissolve Strawberries & Cream, Medicine Shoppe Quick Dissolve Strawberries & Cream, CVS Glucose, Publix Glucose Sour Apple, Publix Glucose Raspberry, Publix Glucose Orange, Publix Glucose Assorted Flavors, Glutose 15 , GNP Glucose Orange, Dex4 Berry Blast, Dex4 Tropical Blast, Glutose 45 , Trutol Orange , Trutol Lemon-Lime , Dex4 Tropical Fruit, GlucoBurst, TRUEplus Glucose Shot, Dex4 Grape, Dex4 Mango Twist, Dex4 Berry Twist, Dex4 Citrus Punch, Dex4 Raspberry, Dex4 Assorted Fruit, Dex4 Orange, Dex4 Fruit Punch, Dex4 Natural Orange Glucose is a form of natural sugar that is no Continue reading >>

Glucose Side Effects

Glucose Side Effects

Applies to glucose: oral gel, oral liquid, oral tablet chewable What are some side effects that I need to call my doctor about right away? WARNING/CAUTION: Even though it may be rare, some people may have very bad and sometimes deadly side effects when taking a drug. Tell your doctor or get medical help right away if you have any of the following signs or symptoms that may be related to a very bad side effect: Signs of an allergic reaction, like rash; hives; itching; red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin with or without fever; wheezing; tightness in the chest or throat; trouble breathing, swallowing, or talking; unusual hoarseness; or swelling of the mouth, face, lips, tongue, or throat. Blood sugar stays low after stopping the drug. What are some other side effects of this drug? All drugs may cause side effects. However, many people have no side effects or only have minor side effects. Call your doctor or get medical help if any of these side effects or any other side effects bother you or do not go away: These are not all of the side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, call your doctor. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. You may also report side effects at Some side effects of glucose may not be reported. Always consult your doctor or healthcare specialist for medical advice. You may also report side effects to the FDA . Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided is accurate, up-to-date and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. In addition, the drug information contained herein may be time sensitive and should not be utilized as a reference resource beyond the date hereof. This material does not endorse drugs Continue reading >>

Glucose Oral Gel Drug Information, Side Effects, Faqs

Glucose Oral Gel Drug Information, Side Effects, Faqs

They need to know if you have any of these conditions: -an unusual or allergic reaction to glucose, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives Twist tip off of tube. Squeeze the dose of the gel needed into mouth and swallow. Take with a glass of water. Follow the directions on the package label or follow the advice of your health care professional. Do not take your medicine more often than directed. Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed. This does not apply; this medicine is not for regular use. Visit your health care professional or doctor for regular checks on your progress. Learn how to check your blood sugar. Learn the symptoms of low and high blood sugar and how to manage them. Make sure others know that you can choke if you eat or drink when you develop serious symptoms of low blood sugar, such as seizures or unconsciousness. They must get medical help at once. Wear a medical ID bracelet or chain, and carry a card that describes your disease and details of your medicine and dosage times. What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine? Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible: -allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome): Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Print Diagnosis To diagnose type 2 diabetes, you'll be given a: Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) test. This blood test indicates your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. It measures the percentage of blood sugar attached to hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells. The higher your blood sugar levels, the more hemoglobin you'll have with sugar attached. An A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests indicates you have diabetes. A result between 5.7 and 6.4 percent is considered prediabetes, which indicates a high risk of developing diabetes. Normal levels are below 5.7 percent. If the A1C test isn't available, or if you have certain conditions — such as if you're pregnant or have an uncommon form of hemoglobin (known as a hemoglobin variant) — that can make the A1C test inaccurate, your doctor may use the following tests to diagnose diabetes: Random blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken at a random time. Blood sugar values are expressed in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Regardless of when you last ate, a random blood sugar level of 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) or higher suggests diabetes, especially when coupled with any of the signs and symptoms of diabetes, such as frequent urination and extreme thirst. Fasting blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken after an overnight fast. A fasting blood sugar level less than 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L) is normal. A fasting blood sugar level from 100 to 125 mg/dL (5.6 to 6.9 mmol/L) is considered prediabetes. If it's 126 mg/dL (7 mmol/L) or higher on two separate tests, you have diabetes. Oral glucose tolerance test. For this test, you fast overnight, and the fasting blood sugar level is measured. Then you drink a sugary liquid, and blood s Continue reading >>

Glucose (insta-glucose, Dex4, Enfamil Glucose, Glutol, Glutose And Many Others)

Glucose (insta-glucose, Dex4, Enfamil Glucose, Glutol, Glutose And Many Others)

What is glucose, and how does it work (mechanism of action)? Glucose also known as dextrose is a simple sugar (monosaccharide) that is used to increase the level of blood sugar (glucose) when the level falls too low (hypoglycemia). Glucose in this form increases the level of the blood sugar, so it is a glucose-elevating agent. Other glucose-elevating agents are diazoxide (Proglycem) and glucagon. Glucose is the primary fuel used by most cells in the body to generate the energy that is needed to carry out cellular functions. When glucose levels fall to hypoglycemic levels, cells cannot function normally, and symptoms develop such as nervousness, cool skin, headache, confusion, convulsions, or coma. Ingested glucose is absorbed directly into the blood from the intestine and results in a rapid increase in the blood glucose level. What are the side effects of glucose? Nausea may occur after ingesting glucose, but this also may be an effect of the hypoglycemia which is present just prior to ingestion. Other adverse effects include: increased blood glucose, injection site leakage of fluid (extravasation), injection site inflammation, and bleeding in the brain. Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis, Treatment, Medication The usual dose of glucose for hypoglycemia is 10-20 gm orally or by intravenous infusion. . The oral dose may be repeated in 10 minutes if hypoglycemic symptoms do not resolve. Oral glucose must be swallowed to be effective. What else should I know about glucose? What preparations of glucose are available? Chewable Tablet: 1 gm, 4 gm, 5 gm; Tablet: 4 gm,; Oral Gel/Jelly: 15 gm; Intravenous solution/Injection: 2.5 %, 5 %, 10 %, 20 %, 25 %, 30 %, 40 %, 50 %, 70 % How should I keep glucose stored? Glucose should be stored at room temperature, 15 C - 30 C (59 F - 86 F) in a t Continue reading >>

Medication For Type 2 Diabetes

Medication For Type 2 Diabetes

People with type 2 diabetes are often given medications including insulin to help control their blood glucose levels. Most of these medications are in the form of tablets, but some are given by injection. Tablets or injections are intended to be used in conjunction with healthy eating and regular physical activity, not as a substitute. Diabetes tablets are not an oral form of insulin.Speak with your doctor or pharmacist if you experience any problems. An alternative medication is usually available. All people with diabetes need to check their glucose levels on a regular basis. When taking medication, you may need to check your glucose levels more often to keep you safe and to ensure the medication is having the desired effect. In Australia there are seven classes of medicines used to treat type 2 diabetes: Biguanides Sulphonylureas Thiazolidinediones (Glitazones) Alpha-glucosidase Inhibitors. Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) inhibitors Incretin mimetics Sodium-glucose transporter (SGLT2) inhibitors Your doctor will talk to you about which tablets are right for you, when to take your tablets and how much to take. Your doctor can also tell you about any possible side effects. You should speak to your doctor or pharmacist if you experience any problems. Chemical name: METFORMIN , METFORMIN ER Points to remember about biguanides This group of insulin tablets helps to lower blood glucose levels by reducing the amount of stored glucose released by the liver, slowing the absorption of glucose from the intestine, and helping the body to become more sensitive to insulin so that your own insulin works better They need to be started at a low dose and increased slowly Metformin is often prescribed as the first diabetes tablet for people with type 2 diabetes who are overweight. It gene Continue reading >>

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin oral tablet is available as both a generic and brand-name drug. Brand names: Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Metformin is also available as an oral solution but only in the brand-name drug Riomet. Metformin is used to treat high blood sugar levels caused by type 2 diabetes. FDA warning: Lactic acidosis warning This drug has a Black Box Warning. This is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A black box warning alerts doctors and patients to potentially dangerous effects. Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious side effect of this drug. In this condition, lactic acid builds up in your blood. This is a medical emergency that requires treatment in the hospital. Lactic acidosis is fatal in about half of people who develop it. You should stop taking this drug and call your doctor right away or go to the emergency room if you have signs of lactic acidosis. Symptoms include tiredness, weakness, unusual muscle pain, trouble breathing, unusual sleepiness, stomach pains, nausea (or vomiting), dizziness (or lightheadedness), and slow or irregular heart rate. Alcohol use warning: You shouldn’t drink alcohol while taking this drug. Alcohol can affect your blood sugar levels unpredictably and increase your risk of lactic acidosis. Kidney problems warning: If you have moderate to severe kidney problems, you have a higher risk of lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug. Liver problems warning: Liver disease is a risk factor for lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug if you have liver problems. Metformin oral tablet is a prescription drug that’s available as the brand name drugs Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Glucophage is an immediate-release tablet. All of the other brands are extended-r Continue reading >>

Medicines For Diabetes — Types, Side Effects, Drug Interactions

Medicines For Diabetes — Types, Side Effects, Drug Interactions

Diabetes is a life-long disorder that cannot be cured but can be well-controlled and treated with medication and lifestyle changes. Medication in diabetes is not always necessary if you can control your sugar levels naturally. But many people, despite all their efforts, are not able to achieve their target sugar levels. For them, anti-diabetic drugs are needed before moving to insulin therapy. In this article, we discuss indications, side-effects, contraindications and interaction of anti-diabetic drugs or oral medication prescribed in diabetes with inputs from our expert Dr Pradeep Gadge, Diabetologist, Shreya Diabetes Centre, Mumbai. Read more about causes, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment of diabetes. Drugs for diabetes: When is it prescribed for diabetes? Lifestyle modification is the first treatment option for every patient diagnosed with diabetes. If a person has borderline diabetes (fasting glucose slightly greater than 120 mg/dL, post-prandial-200 mg/dL or greater) and has no other risk factors, then diabetes can be controlled well with diet and exercise. But treatment of diabetes has an individualized approach. So it also depends on the kind of lifestyle a person follows and would prefer to follow. For example, a businessman who works 24/7 and doesn’t bother about health is less likely to adhere to dietary changes and exercise regimen. If such a person is diagnosed with borderline diabetes, then I would prescribe medicines. On the other hand, I also get patients who have really high sugar levels, say fasting glucose about 150 mg/dL and post prandial sugar levels about 250 mg/dL, and are ready to follow diet and exercise to control diabetes without taking medicines. Also read about “Diabetes can be cured in the near future,” says Dr Pradeep Gadge. What dr Continue reading >>

Januvia Side Effects Center

Januvia Side Effects Center

Januvia (sitagliptin) is an oral diabetes medicine for people with type 2 diabetes (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes. Januvia is sometimes used in combination with other diabetes medications, but is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Many people using Januvia do not have serious side effects. Side effects that may occur with Januvia include: headache, joint or muscle pain, nausea, stomach pain, diarrhea, or constipation. Although Januvia by itself usually does not cause low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), low blood sugar may occur if Januvia is prescribed with other anti-diabetic medications. Symptoms of low blood sugar include sudden sweating, shaking, fast heartbeat, hunger, blurred vision, dizziness, or tingling hands/feet. Tell your doctor if you have serious side effects of Januvia including pancreatitis (severe pain in your upper stomach spreading to your back, nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite, fast heart rate), urinating less than usual or not at all, swelling, weight gain, shortness of breath, or severe skin reaction (fever, sore throat, swelling in your face or tongue, burning in your eyes, skin pain, followed by a red or purple skin rash that spreads [especially in the face or upper body] and causes blistering and peeling). The recommended dose of Januvia is 100 mg once daily. Januvia may interact with digoxin, probenecid, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), aspirin or other salicylates, sulfa drugs, monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), or beta-blockers. Tell your doctor all prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. During pregnancy Januvia should be used only when prescribed. Pregnancy may cause or worsen diabetes. Your doctor may change your diabetes treatment during pregnancy. It is unknown if this drug passes into breast milk. Cons Continue reading >>

Glucose - Side Effects, Dosage, Interactions - Drugs - Everyday Health

Glucose - Side Effects, Dosage, Interactions - Drugs - Everyday Health

Glucose is a form of natural sugar that is normally produced by the liver. Glucose is a source of energy, and all the cells and organs in your body need glucose to function properly. Glucose as a medication is given either by mouth (orally) or by injection. Glucose is used to treat very low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), most often in people with diabetes mellitus. Glucose is given by injection to treat insulin shock (low blood sugar caused by using insulin and then not eating a meal or eating enough food afterward). This medicine works by quickly increasing the amount of glucose in your blood. Glucose is also used to provide carbohydrate calories to a person who cannot eat because of illness, trauma, or other medical condition. Glucose is sometimes given to people who are sick from drinking too much alcohol. Glucose may also be used to treat hyperkalemia (high levels of potassium in your blood). Glucose may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. Follow all directions on your medicine label and package. Tell each of your healthcare providers about all your medical conditions, allergies, and all medicines you use. You should not take glucose tablets, liquid, or gel if you are allergic to any of the ingredients in these forms of the medicine. If possible before you receive a glucose injection, tell your doctor if you have: diabetes (unless you are using this medicine to treat insulin-induced hypoglycemia); heart disease, coronary artery disease, or history of a stroke; Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Tell your caregivers or call your doctor right away if you have: redness, swelling, warmth, or skin changes where an injection was given; a Continue reading >>

Diabetes Medication Side Effects

Diabetes Medication Side Effects

Tweet Many people with type 2 diabetes need diabetes drugs to manage their condition. Like all medication, there may be side effects, and this week we researched the Diabetes Forum to find out what the community is saying about type 2 diabetes medication and how it affects them. For this week, we have not included insulin, only diabetes medication taken or injected by type 2 diabetics. Type 2 Diabetes Drugs Diabetes drugs, alongside a healthy diet and exercise routine, help people with type 2 diabetes/gestational diabetes to maintain stable blood glucose levels. A variety of different diabetes drugs are available, with each performing a different function. Many people with diabetes have to take more than one type of pill, with some taking pills which combine two types of drug in one tablet. Some people experience a variety of side effects from different diabetes drugs. Got a question about diabetes medication and drugs? Try the Diabetes medication and drugs forum In the UK, doctors can prescribe many different diabetes drugs. Depending on how you react to the drugs you are prescribed, your doctor may change your prescription, change you to injections, or change you to insulin. If you are prescribed injections it generally means that you need this to reach your blood glucose targets. The diabetes drug that works best for you will depend on your individual circumstances, your body, diabetes care routine, diet and exercise, and any other health conditions that you face. Diabetes Drug Side Effects A side effect is an unwanted issue that is caused by a medicine. Some diabetes medication unfortunately includes common side effects such as nausea or an upset stomach. Your doctor will be able to advise you about specific side effects and the best ways possible to avoid them. No Continue reading >>

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