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Glucose Level 147 During Pregnancy

Blood Sugar 147 Mg/dl After Eating - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Blood Sugar 147 Mg/dl After Eating - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Your blood glucose level is 147 mg/dl after eating? (or 8.16mmol/l) Blood sugar 147 mg/dl (8.16mmol/l) after eating - is that good or bad? We help you interpret your blood sugar values. You have tested your blood sugar after eating and the result was 147 mg/dl. Let's have a look at the blood sugar gauge: Slightly too high blood sugar (beginning hyperglycemia) To improve your blood sugar after eating you need to lower your blood glucose level by 7mg/dl. Your blood sugar level (up to 2 hours) after eating should always be below 140mg/dl but not fall below 80mg/dl. It is normal for blood sugar levels to rise immediately after a meal. The increased glucose is a product of the carbohydrates in the food that was just consumed. The higher blood glucose triggers the pancreas to produce more insulin. This release of insulin usually takes place within about 10 minutes of eating. The insulin removes the glucose from the blood and stores it for the body to use as energy. In a healthy individual, blood glucose levels should return to a normal level within about two hours after finishing the meal. In diabetics, the blood sugar level often remain elevated for a longer period because of the bodys inability to produce or utilize insulin properly.An elevated two-hour postprandial (after a meal) blood sugar may indicate diabetes or prediabetes. As a general rule, a normal two- hour postprandial blood sugar is as follows: A doctor may recommend different postprandial blood sugar levels based on an individuals particular circumstances and health history. Several factors may cause a persons postprandial blood sugar to remain elevated. Smoking after the meal: Studies show that smoking raises blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. Extreme stress: Stress produces the bodys fight-or-flight Continue reading >>

Is 147 A High Number After Taking The 1 Hour Glucose Test While Pregnant?

Is 147 A High Number After Taking The 1 Hour Glucose Test While Pregnant?

Is 147 a high number after taking the 1 hour glucose test while pregnant? I am 27 weeks pregnant and apparently I failed the 1 hour diabetes screening, I have to take the 3 hour one next week. I am nervous, What if I fail that one too? Does that mean that I am going to have a large baby? Will I need to have a c-section? Are you sure you want to delete this answer? Best Answer: The glucose tolerance test really isn't a "pass/fail" type of test. What it is designed to be is a diagnostic tool to see if a 3 hour fasting glucose tolerance test is warranted. Usually, the target number for the 1 hour test is under 140. So, at 147, it is not "high", but it is elevated and puts you in the position of taking the 3 hour test. It is very normal for pregnant women to have an elevated number with their 1 hour test. It does not mean anything other than you should take the 3 hour test to be screened for Gestational Diabetes. Most women with elevated numbers for the 1 hour test go on to have glucose numbers in the normal range for the 3 hour test. Only around 5-8% of pregnant women develop Gestational Diabetes. It can be worrisome whenever you have to take any type of test. I developed Gestational Diabetes with my 4th pregnancy. At first, I was quite upset, but as I became more knowledgeable about the condition, I found there were many things I could do help me and my baby stay as healthy as possible. It was challenging, but certainly manageable. It is true that some babies born to moms with Gestational Diabetes are born at higher than average birth weight. Not all are, though. My baby was born at 41 weeks and she weighed 6 pounds 14 ounces. Usually, a mom with Gestational Diabetes will be monitored closely througout her pregnancy and things like excessive rate of growth for the baby a Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes - My Story And Recipes

Gestational Diabetes - My Story And Recipes

This is a little bit of a departure from my normal blog posts. However, I thought sharing my experience with gestational diabetes would be good to raise awareness and let other pregnant gals hear a first hand account. I hope you keep reading and that you learn something. The recipes, ideas and meal suggestions are healthy for anyone diabetic or not. Heading into my third trimester gestational diabetes was not on my radar. It blindsided me. I didn't expect to be diagnosed. I've been very proactive about my health. I've focused on eating well, maintaining a good weight and getting exercise. I only had two of the risk factors: I'm over 25 and I do have history of type II diabetes from both my maternal grandfather and paternal grandmother. Although they both were diagnosed late in life and already had other health problems so it just didn't seem relevant. When I failed the first 1-hour non-fasting glucose test I figured it was a fluke and I would pass the longer 3-hour fasting glucose test. I didn't. For the 1-hour glucose test, anything over 130mg/dL (or 140mg/dL depending on your doctor) is high enough to warrant the three-hour test. If your blood sugar is over 200mg/dL they don't even bother with the 3-hour test and confirm a diagnosis of gestational diabetes. Usually pregnant women are tested between 24 and 28 weeks. At week 28 my blood sugar tested at 138 mg/dL. What is considered elevated blood glucose levels vary by doctor and practice. From what I've read, I go to a fairly conservative practice. Below you can see the American Diabetes Association scores to diagnose gestational diabetes verses the practice I go to and then what my scores were. The 3-hour fasting glucose test involves not eating for 12 hours, then having blood drawn. That's the first fasting score. Th Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes - Risks, Causes, Prevention!

Gestational Diabetes - Risks, Causes, Prevention!

Gestational Diabetes What is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational Diabetes is diabetes that is found for the first time when a woman is pregnant. The expecting mother develops large amount of sugar in her blood which generally resolves itself after baby's birth - unlike other types of diabetes which are lifelong conditions. How does Gestational Diabetes develop? Gestational diabetes develops when the body cannot produce enough insulin - a substance produced by pancreas which regulates the amount of sugar available in the blood for energy and enables any sugar that isn't immediately required to be stored. The pregnant women has to produce extra insulin to meet baby's needs, if her body can't manage this, she may develop gestational diabetes. Blood sugar levels may also rise because the hormonal changes of pregnancy interfere with insulin function. Gestational diabetes usually develops during the last half of pregnancy. Risk Factors • Women who are obese. • Women with high blood pressure • Women listed positive for sugar in urine during antenatal checkup. • Women who are above 25yrs of age. • Women with family history of type 2 diabetes. How is Gestational Diabetes Treated? Gestational Diabetes can be treated by keeping blood glucose level in a target range. Proper diet, physical activity and insulin if required plays important role in maintaining blood glucose levels. • Dietary Tips 1. Have small frequent meals i.e. six small meals in a day. 2. Limit sweets. 3. Include more and more fiber in your diet in form of fruits, vegetables, whole grain bread and cereals. 4. Carbohydrates should be 40%-45% of the total calories with breakfast and a bedtime snack containing 15-30 grams of carbohydrates. 5. Drink 8-10 glasses of liquids/day. 6. Avoid Trans fats, fried foods Continue reading >>

Glucose Challenge And Glucose Tolerance Test - Gct And Gtt

Glucose Challenge And Glucose Tolerance Test - Gct And Gtt

Before and during pregnancy there is usually a two-step approach to diagnosing diabetes: The initial screening test is called GCT, or Glucose Challenge Test, and it's often done between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy. The GCT does not necessarily diagnose diabetes but it screens women who may be at risk and who may need a 3-hour glucose tolerance test or GTT. The GCT consists of measuring the serum glucose concentration 1 hour after the woman has drunk a 50 g (some use 75 g) oral glucose load. Values below 130 dg/mL are usually considered normal, values above 140 mg/dL are usually considered abnormal, and values between 130 and 140 mg/dL are "in between." A glucose threshold value >140 mg/dL identifies approximately 80% of women with pregnancy diabetes (GDM), and the yield is further increased to 90% by using a cutoff of >130 mg/dL. Women whose serum glucose is above the threshold value on the GCT (130-140 mg/dL) have a diagnostic 3-hour GTT done to find out if they have diabetes. The 3-hour GTT consists of a woman drinking 100 g of glucose and having four blood samples drawn: fasting, and then 1, 2, and 3 hours after the drink. Cutoff values for the 3-hour GTT are as follows (Sullivan criteria): Fasting: 95 mg/dL 1-hour: 180 mg/dL 2-hours: 155 mg/dL 3-hours: 140 mg/dL Pregnant women with two or more elevated values are considered to have gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), though even one elevated value increases certain risks. Continue reading >>

Glucose Test During Pregnancy For Gestational Diabetes

Glucose Test During Pregnancy For Gestational Diabetes

Congratulations! A baby is on the way. Your nine months will be filled with preparations, from decorating the nursery to stocking up on bibs and booties to going for regular checkups to ensure that you and your baby are as healthy as possible. One of the tests that you’ll have during this time is to check for gestational diabetes. A few weeks ago, we looked at Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Gestational diabetes, which is growing more common among pregnant women, will be our focus this week. What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes, or GDM for short, is diabetes that occurs during pregnancy. In fact, it only occurs during pregnancy. (Gestational diabetes is not the same as diabetes in women who have existing diabetes and become pregnant). Diabetes, as most of you know, is a condition in which blood glucose levels go too high. High blood glucose levels can be harmful to you and, in the case of pregnancy, to your unborn child. Fortunately, blood glucose, or sugar, levels can be controlled during pregnancy, and in most instances, high blood sugar levels return to normal after the baby is delivered. According to the National Institutes of Health, up to 10% of pregnant women in the United States have gestational diabetes. What causes gestational diabetes? A lot of changes occur in the body during pregnancy, many of them occurring due to widely fluctuating hormone levels. The placenta, which is what connects the baby to the mother’s uterine lining, makes various hormones, and while this is a good thing, these hormones can sometimes make it hard for the body’s insulin to work properly (a condition called insulin resistance). As a result, blood sugar levels can start to climb in women who cannot produce enough insulin to deal with the insulin resistance. How do you Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Level Chart And Information

Blood Sugar Level Chart And Information

A - A + Main Document Quote: "A number of medical studies have shown a dramatic relationship between elevated blood sugar levels and insulin resistance in people who are not very active on a daily or regular basis." A doctor might order a test of the sugar level in a person's blood if there is a concern that they may have diabetes, or have a sugar level that is either too low or too high. The test, which is also called a check of blood sugar, blood glucose, fasting blood sugar, fasting plasma glucose, or fasting blood glucose, indicates how much glucose is present is present in a person's blood. When a person eats carbohydrates, such as pasta, bread or fruit, their body converts the carbohydrates to sugar - also referred to as glucose. Glucose travels through the blood to supply energy to the cells, to include muscle and brain cells, as well as to organs. Blood sugar levels usually fluctuate depending upon what a person eats and how long it has been since they last ate. However; consistent or extremely low levels of glucose in a person's blood might cause symptoms such as: Anxiety Sweating Dizziness Confusion Nervousness Warning signs of dangerously high levels of blood sugar include sleepiness or confusion, dry mouth, extreme thirst, high fever, hallucinations, loss of vision, or skin that is warm and dry. A blood sugar test requires a finger prick or needle stick. A doctor might order a, 'fasting,' blood glucose test. What this means is a person will not be able to drink or eat for 8-10 hours before the test, or the doctor may order the test for a random time or right after the person eats. If a woman is pregnant, her doctor might order a, 'glucose-tolerance test,' which involves drinking glucose solution and having blood drawn a specified amount of time later. The re Continue reading >>

I Failed The Glucola

I Failed The Glucola

Last week, I left you hanging about the results of my glucola. One of my readers emailed me: “Damn cliff hanger!! I want to know your results. Lol. This is why I binge watch tv shows after the whole season is out. The suspense is killing me.” Who knew a glucose tolerance test could be described as “suspenseful?!” (other than me, of course…) I was certainly curious to get the results of my test. When the lab technician said they could run the analysis in office, I decided to stick around for a few extra minutes. (Plus, I just had to finish the riveting article I was reading in Alaska Sporting Magazine…) I was sure I had passed, so when the lab tech said: “You should have studied better.” I knew he was joking. But he wasn’t. I got a 141. Passing is <140. I was kind of shocked. I failed the glucola. Now what? Now, the 1-hour, 50 gram glucola is NOT diagnostic of gestational diabetes on its own. It is a screening test to identify those at “high risk” and determine who should get further testing. He said my next step was to come back again for the 3-hour test. Of course, since I specialize in gestational diabetes, I knew all that. I had already discussed testing options with my doctor and had decided that regardless of the results of the 1-hour, 50g screening that I would check my blood sugar at home with a glucometer for 2 weeks just for my own knowledge. In fact, I already had my prescription for blood sugar testing supplies in hand before I drank the glucola. Still, I walked out of the office feeling like a failure. How could I not feel that way? The official medical terminology is “passing” or “failing.” I cursed under my breath as I made my way to the car. A million thoughts raced through my head: Should I have opted out of the dumb test an Continue reading >>

147 Mg/dl Value In Glucose Challenge Test. What Are The Risks?

147 Mg/dl Value In Glucose Challenge Test. What Are The Risks?

147 mg/dl value in Glucose challenge test. What are the risks? It has been long time that i logged in. I was taking care of me and my angel in my tummy as much as I can. this is my 19th week. I had Glucose challenge test done and my level is 147. Actually it shud be within 70-140. Now this got me worried. I dont know what to do now. My doctor's apppontment is next weekend. Before I go to her, I want to ask you people to advise me out of your experiences ..what are the risks? What can i do to avoid it? Am so sad now that my baby may face some prblems . I know that am sounding pathetic but thats how am feeling right now. :drowning please help me pls pls hi swathi! i am another mom to be who is suffering from gestational diabetes. but you are lucky enough that you have already crossed your first trimester. first of all, relax. dont stress much as stress can hike your sugar levels. know one thing, gestational diabetes or GD is not same as diabetes, it is temporary if you will be able to keep your sugar levels in control. it has no side effects on the baby till is not diagnosed during early pregnancy. so dont stress abut it. but if you are are not able to control your sugar levels then might some problem occur for you and your LO both. these include, big baby ( baby measuring more than 4 kgs), diabetes after pregnancy in you and chances of your baby having diabetes, ( these are the side effects i know). your doctor will prescribe insulin or diabetic medication, and you will have to cut down your sugar for the rest of the pregnancy. tips to keep your sugar level under control: - avoid fruit juices rather have whole fruits, but avoid having sugary fruits e.g. dates and banana. - take your medication on time and dont forget any dose. - no refined sugar and stuffs such as refin Continue reading >>

Normal Glucose Tolerance With A High 1-hour Postload Plasma Glucose Level Exhibits Decreased -cell Function Similar To Impaired Glucose Tolerance

Normal Glucose Tolerance With A High 1-hour Postload Plasma Glucose Level Exhibits Decreased -cell Function Similar To Impaired Glucose Tolerance

Normal Glucose Tolerance with a High 1-Hour Postload Plasma Glucose Level Exhibits Decreased -Cell Function Similar to Impaired Glucose Tolerance Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. Corresponding author: Young Min Cho. Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-744, Korea. [email protected] Received 2014 Apr 29; Accepted 2014 Sep 16. Copyright 2015 Korean Diabetes Association This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License ( ) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Subjects with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) who have a high 1-hour postload plasma glucose level (155 mg/dL; NGT 1 hour-high) have been shown to be at higher risk for type 2 diabetes than subjects with NGT 1 hour-low postload plasma glucose level (<155 mg/dL). We compared -cell function in subjects with NGT 1 hour-high, NGT 1 hour-low, and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). We classified subjects into NGT 1 hour-low (n=149), NGT 1 hour-high (n=43), and IGT (n=52). The -cell function was assessed based on insulinogenic index (IGI), oral disposition index (DI), and insulin secretion-sensitivity index-2 (ISSI-2). Insulin sensitivity was comparable between the subjects with NGT 1 hour-high and NGT 1 hour-low. The -cell function with/without adjusting insulin sensitivity was significantly different among the three groups. The IGI (pmol/mmol) was 116.8107.3 vs. 64.847.8 vs. 65.880.6 (P=0.141), oral DI was 3.54.2 vs. 1.81.4 vs. 1.83.1 (P<0.001), and ISSI-2 was 301.21 Continue reading >>

When To Test Blood Sugar In Type 2

When To Test Blood Sugar In Type 2

One of the topics that comes up a lot in the email I get from visitors to my What They Don't Tell You About Diabetes web site is the question of when is the best time to test your blood sugar. A lot of doctors still tell people with Type 2 to test first thing in the morning and before meals. That was what I was told at diagnosis in 1998. People who test using this schedule may tell you their blood sugar is usually 120 mg/dl, which sounds pretty good, except that since this is a fasting number it usually hides the information that the person's blood sugar maybe going to 250 mg/dl or higher after every meal. Research has shown that for people with Type 2 diabetes--especially those who have been diagnosed recently and still retain some beta cell function--it is the high spikes after meals that contribute most heavily to raising the A1c and causing complications. If you only test your fasting blood sugar, you will not know anything about how high your blood sugar is spiking after meals, so you won't know which foods are toxic to you because they cause dangerous spikes. If you are like most people with Type 2 your access to the very expensive blood sugar testing strips is limited. You may have to pay for strips yourself or your insurance may pay for a single box each month. That means that you need to use each strip as efficiently as possible. Here are some strategies that you can use to get the information out of your blood tests that will let you drop your A1c back into the healthy zone. Keep a written log that matches what you eat with the test result you get. Even though your meter may keep a list of your readings, these readings are meaningless unless you know what food you ate that resulted in each particular reading. If you write down what portion size of which food y Continue reading >>

Normal Blood Levels - Diabetes - Type 2 - Medhelp

Normal Blood Levels - Diabetes - Type 2 - Medhelp

Blood sugar of 115 could be "somewhat normal", depending on when you measured it.Blood sugar of 147 is not normal regardless of when you measured it. Truely normal fasting is in the low 80s, however most doctors will allow up to about 99, 100 - 126 is prediabetic, and >126 is overt diabetes. 2 hours after eating target should be close to fasting if your blood sugar is normal, but always < 120, though some will allow <140. So you see your numbers are above normal.Safe numbers are normal numbers. Recommend you see your doctor for full check, including HBA1C. Then you should be adopting lower carbohydrate diet with portion control, daily aerobic exercise, and wieght loss to get you to your optimal weight.I don't know how tall you are, but 245 lbs sounds like you are probably overweight. Early type 2 diabetes can be reversed with diet, exercise and lifestyle measures. Early and agressive management will help prevent it progressing and the risk of full blow diabetes and complications. Continue reading >>

1 Hour Gestational Diabetes Test Results

1 Hour Gestational Diabetes Test Results

Came back high.. My # was 147 and the nurse said that they considered anything over 130 high. I have to go in Monday for the 3 hour test. Do any of you ladies know what your numbers were so I can compare? I'm so scared right now, what does this mean for me? For the baby? Came back high.. My # was 147 and the nurse said that they considered anything over 130 high. I have to go in Monday for the 3 hour test. Do any of you ladies know what your numbers were so I can compare? I'm so scared right now, what does this mean for me? For the baby? There is a chart I found (can't find it now of course) that tells you what percentage you are likely to have GD dependent on your 1 hour test results. I was so high I was guaranteed to have GD based on how badly i failed the 1 hour. But that is not the case with #'s like yours. Let's say you have a 50% chance. So failing the first test by 17 points does not necessarily mean you will have GD. Hope that helps ease your mind Try not to worry til your 3hr test. I've heard of women who fail the 1hr and pass the 3hr. Make sure you're eating healthily dont stress mama! a TON of women fail the 1 hour test. my cut off was 135, i failed with both kids with a 137. With DD I ended up failing the 3 hour test, but didnt know until I delivered her since my results came back that day (i put the test off for the longest time). We had no complications, she was 5lbs 11oz at 36+6. With this baby I had to take the early test. So at like 14 weeks I did the 1 hour, failed it at 137, took the 3 hour at 24 weeks and passed. I just took another 3 hour a few days ago and passed that one as well. depending on what blood draw you fail, or how many draws you fail will determine how its controlled. whether it be through diet and exercise or medication. either way, y Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Level During Pregnancy, What's Normal?

Blood Sugar Level During Pregnancy, What's Normal?

The form of diabetes which develops during pregnancy is known as gestational diabetes. This condition has become predominant in the recent pastaccording to the 2009 article in American Family Physician. For instance, in the United States alone, it affects around 5% to 9% of all the pregnant women. Pregnancy aggravates the preexisting type 2 and type 1 diabetes. During pregnancy the sugar level may tend to be high sometimes, posing problems to the mother and the infant as well. However, concerning the sugar level during pregnancy, what's normal? Blood sugar control is one of the most essential factors that should be undertaken during pregnancy. When measures are taken to control blood sugar level during pregnancy, it increases chances of a successful pregnancy. The average fasting glucose for pregnant women without any diabetes condition range from 69 to 75 and from 105 to 108 immediately one hour after consuming food. If you have preexisting diabetes or you have developedgestational diabetes, the best way to handle the blood sugar level is to ensure that it remains in between the normal range, not going too low or high. According to the recommendations of the 2007, Fifth International Workshop-Conference on Gestational Diabetes, which established blood glucose goals especially for diabetic women, during the period of pregnancy, the fasting blood sugar should not exceed 96. Blood sugar should remain below 140 just one hour after eating and below 120 two hours later. Why Is It Important to Keep Normal Blood Sugar Level During Pregnancy? The most effective way to prevent complications related to diabetes is to control the amount or the level of blood sugar. This blood sugar control is very significant during pregnancy as it can: Minimize the risk of stillbirth as well as m Continue reading >>

How Many Of You Have Failed The 1 Hour Glucose Test?

How Many Of You Have Failed The 1 Hour Glucose Test?

How Many of You Have Failed the 1 Hour Glucose Test? Hi ladies I was wondering how many of you have failed the 1 hour glucose test? I failed it today, I was at 147 and they want me to be 130 or below. I have to go in for the 3 hour one now and I am very nervous. I am hoping to pass the next one... (fingers crossed) I am not looking forward to another orange drink that doesn't taste very good! :( @Chasefamily9 When do we take this test anyways? @Chasefamily9 I don't have mine until my 28 week appointment. With my son I failed the 1 hour one and the 3 hour one. It just sucks having to sit there and wait that long. If you fail the 3 hour one they will probably send you to adietitian to help you plan out your meals to help keep your sugar levels down. Good luck! @Kristi216 I take it my next appt. I'll be around 26 wks. Ahhh thanks guys... Man I am just super bummed and when I was asking the nurse questions she had no answers... To say it tastes like an orange soda is a lie!! :) To top it off I was told I have low iron and I am on the couch with a nasty headache... Pooo @Chasefamily9 Failed it with my daughter 10 years ago an did the 3 hour test which I also failed. Failed it again with this pregnancy and opted out of the 3 hour and went to home monitoring. @Chasefamily9 I took my glucose test Monday and they called this afternoon and I failed with a 146. This is my 5th child, and I've never failed before. I go in tomorrow for the 3 hours, and I hate needles :( I'm hoping to pass this time! Good luck to you! @Chasefamily9 Urg! I typed up a reply and it didn't post! Anyway...I have failed the 1 hour test in all 4 of my 4 prior pregnancies, and have always passed the 3 hour one. Every. Single. Time. So I am almost certain that I'm going to fail it again this time. I'm hoping Continue reading >>

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