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Glucose Curve Worksheet

Blood Sugar Tracker Template For Excel

Blood Sugar Tracker Template For Excel

Articles Forms Guides & Templates Blood Sugar Tracker Template For Excel Blood Sugar Chart Template for Excel is meant for logging sugar levels in Excel . The added data automatically generates a blood sugar chart, which shows trends for your blood sugar levels over a period of time. Generate a Blood Sugar Level Chart Based on Added Data To create your blood sugar level chart, enter recorded levels in the Blood Sugar Data worksheet in this template. This will automatically populate the trends on the Blood Sugar Level Chart worksheet, to provide you with a visual representation of your blood sugar levels over a period of time. As you can see from the screenshot given below, the Blood Sugar Data worksheet provides different rows to enter information about the date, time and blood sugar levels. This worksheet is connected to the graph in the Blood Sugar Level Chart worksheet (shown above). This can help you keep track of your blood sugar levels or of a loved one, to identify important trends regarding any possible issues which may need the doctors attention. While people with a blood sugar monitor can use this template to track trends, it can also be of immense help to doctors to log blood sugar levels for their patients, so that they can conveniently refer to recorded information each time the patient visits the clinic. The Blood Sugar Chart Template for Excel can be used with Excel 2003 or later versions, including; Excel 2007, 2010 and 2013. Every business needs a way to forecast its costs and sales in order to plan and make crucial decisions. This is because forecasting sales and Continue reading >>

Bio 2.3 And 6.1 Worksheet - Calli Ramunno Ch 2 6 Data-based...

Bio 2.3 And 6.1 Worksheet - Calli Ramunno Ch 2 6 Data-based...

BIO 2.3 and 6.1 worksheet - Calli Ramunno Ch 2 6 Data-based... Calli RamunnoCh. 2 & 61/12/17Data-based question: biosynthesis of glycogen1.Glycogen is a polysaccharide, composed of glucose molecules bonded together in two ways called 14 and 16 bonds. So, one enzyme will be needed to catalyze the formation of the 14 bonds, and the other enzyme will catalyze the 16 bonds. 2.In the branches, a 16 bond is created. This means that all that has to be done is the enzyme that catalyzes the 14 bond will have to do that, and the glycogen molecule can grow faster. This means that the substrate for that enzyme is greater. 3.Curve A is very low because the enzymes must have denatured in the heat, and thus were not productive in converting the glucose phosphate into glycogen.4.A. Curve B is increasing at an exponential rate until about 35 minutes when it begins to level off.B. The shape of curve B is because the rapid production of glycogen is possible because every available chain is contributing to the growth of the glycogen. However, it begins to level off because the available enzymes would decrease and the chains would finish. This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document. Continue reading >>

Pet Health: Bg Curves - Pet Supplies

Pet Health: Bg Curves - Pet Supplies

A Rational Approach to Feline Blood Glucose Curves The glucose curve is the most effective way to monitor insulin therapy in diabetic cats. But curves are expensive, and many consider euthanasia because of the high cost. In such cases, here are some practical, less expensive alternatives. From the November 1995 issue of Veterinary Medicine (a peer-reviewed journal) Diabetes Mellitus in cats is one of the most frustrating diseases faced by veterinarians. Diabetic cats have certain peculiarities not seen in dogs, including the marked effect of stress on glucose concentrations. In addition, a cat's response to insulin is much less predictable than a dog's. We know, in general, what to expect from the different types of insulin. But the same type of insulin may be absorbed and metabolized differently from one cat to the next. Assumptions about peak times and duration of action in diabetic cats are often inaccurate. The only way to know how any given insulin works in an individual cat is to perform a glucose curve. The standard glucose curve and its alternative A glucose curve is a series of blood glucose determinations made after a dose of insulin is given. Typically, blood samples are taken every 1 1/2 to 2 hours until the effects of the insulin injection can be determined. For ease of understanding, they are often plotted on a graph (Figures 1 & 2). I use the term " mini-glucose curve " to describe blood glucose determinations made just before an insulin injection is given and at the previously determined peak time This two-point curve should identify the highest and lowest, or peak and trough, blood glucose concentrations. As described below, in certain situations, the mini-glucose curve is a useful substitute for the full glucose curve. Fig 1. This is an example of an Continue reading >>

Eal

Eal

The rise in plasma glucose was significantly greater 30 and 60 minutes after the ingestion of glucose than after ingestion of sugar alcohols (P<0.02) At 150 and 180 minutes, the plasma glucose concentration was below baseline and it was lower than after the ingestion of the sugar alcohols (P<0.05) The plasma glucose curve was significantly different after glucose ingestion than after both lactitol and xylitol ingestion (P<0.01).There was greater area under the curve for plasma glucose. The c-peptide curve afterglucose ingestion differed from xylitol and lactitol (P<0.01).There was greater area under the curve for glucose.The same can be said for insulin curve (P<0.01). Reactive hypoglycemia was not observed after the sugar alcohols. The present study confirms the potential metabolic advantages of the use of xylitol and lactitol as carbohydrate energy sources in the diet.Compared with glucose, the advantages associated with these sugar alcohols are lower energy content, smaller fluctuations in blood glucose and insulin responses and smaller thermogenic effects. Continue reading >>

Monitoring Glucose Regulation

Monitoring Glucose Regulation

MONITORING GLUCOSE REGULATION Monitoring is crucial to determining your pet’s proper insulin dose. Much monitoring can be done at home and it is possible to save a great deal of money by doing so; however, some tests simply must be done at the veterinarian’s office. We will now review important parameters that one must keep an eye on if diabetic regulation is to be achieved long term. Consider keeping a notebook with weekly (if not daily) notations regarding some of these parameters and an assortment of smartphone apps are available as well. The more information you have when it is time to see the vet, the better. To download a printable Monitoring Diary visit (PDF format): www.vetsulin.com/PDF/Treatment-Monitoring-Sheet.pdf AlphaTrak and possibly other veterinary meter companies offer an on-line tracking log including automatic uploading of glucose data from the meter to the web. CLINICAL IMPROVEMENT The hallmark signs of diabetes mellitus are excessive water consumption, excessive urination, excessive hunger and weight loss. It is not necessary to measure your pet’s water consumption as the fluid requirement will change with exercise level, environmental temperature, and other factors. Still, make a mental note about whether your pet’s appetite, thirst, and urine production are “normal,” increased or decreased. If you are keeping a notebook, consider making a daily notation in this regard. It is subjective somewhat but good to note. Your pet’s body weight is less subjective. If your pet is small enough, consider weighing your pet every couple of weeks. As your pet comes into regulation, weight will be gained. A well-regulated pet will maintain body weight. Keep body weights recorded in your notebook. GLUCOSE MONITORING In a perfect world, glucose monitor Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Chart

Blood Sugar Chart

Our free blood sugar chart (or blood glucose chart) lets you track your blood sugar levels throughout the day. It also allows you to enter in normal blood sugar levels, both high and low, so you can see how well you are staying within your healthy range. Next to each entry, you can enter notes about your diet and exercise, to see how they affect your levels. You can also keep track of your A1C levels (also referred to as hemoglobin HbA1c levels), which you get tested by your doctor. Printable Blood Sugar Log For Excel & PDF When you measure your blood sugar levels, you're not always next to your computer. This printable blood sugar log allows you to write down your results no matter where you are. Print this blood sugar log and attach it to your fridge or wherever you typically test your blood sugar. Description With this Blood Sugar Chart spreadsheet you can enter your blood sugar test results and see those results plotted on a graph along with your recommended upper and lower blood sugar levels. Remember to enter notes next to your entries regarding your diet and exercise so that you can see how they may be affecting your levels. Consult a doctor to find out what your upper and lower levels should be. This spreadsheet also contains a chart for tracking your A1C level. For the A1C level chart, you can enter the level that your doctor recommends you stay close to. Using a Blood Sugar Chart Tracking your A1C levels * Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Mellitus: The wordsare of Latin origin meaning "passing through" and "honey". DM is a metabolicdisorder characterized by elevated blood sugar, or glucose. In humans, DM isclassified as either Type I (also known as insulin dependent diabetes mellitus(IDDM) or juvenile diabetes) or Type 2 (non insulin dependent diabetes (NIDDM)or adult onset diabetes). Dogs are almost exclusively Type 1; therefore theterms are not usually used. (Note: 30-50% of cats are Type 2). Glucose: Simply put, think of glucose assugar. Specifically it is a type ofmonosaccharide or "simple sugar". All sugars are types of carbohydrates. Tablesugar (sucrose or saccharose) is also a monosaccharide. Hyperglycemia:elevatedblood sugar levels. Usually measured in mg/dl. Hypoglycemia:decreasedblood sugar levels. This is often a dangerous, and potentially life threateningsituation. For more information see below. Ketones: an energy source produced by the liver inresponse to unregulated DM. Ketones are acidic and will lead to a severeclinical syndrome The main cause ofdiabetes in dogs is an immune mediated destruction of the beta cells located inthe islets of Langerhans within the pancreas. The beta cells are responsiblefor creating insulin. (Endocrine Pancreatic Disease) Other causes include severe pancreatic inflammation(pancreatitis), pancreatic cancer, obesity, progesterone interference in intact(non-spayed) females and Cushing's Disease (hyperadrenocorticism). Other lesscommon causes also exist. This often depends upon how long the DM has been presentand whether or not other more serious complications have arisen. Often earlyuncomplicated DM goes unnoticed until severe signs occur. Also these signs arecommon to other diseases and their presence does not create a diagnosis of DMby itself. Signs o Continue reading >>

Recordkeeping

Recordkeeping

Thorough record keeping provides an invaluable tool for both you and your vet to determine the needs of your sugar pet. Without good records you won't see the "whole picture" of how your dog is doing or whether and increase/decrease may be in order. Accurate data will also give you a reference of how your dog reacts to doses, feedings and times of day. It's good to have a Diabetic Log book for your diabetic dog. It should contain everything needed to maintain up to date information. One suggestion is to purchase a hard surface 3 ring binder that has a pocket on each cover. On the front inside pocket to clip a business card for your vet as well as your local emergency clinic. In a crisis it is handy to know where these are. On the front you might insert a picture of your dog and the title Diabetic Log Book. The picture of your dog could be handy for a pet sitter, etc. to know without a doubt who they are caring for. List of items you should have in your Log Book BG Log Some glucometer manufacturers also provide logging software, such as this free software from LifeScan, [1] the manufacturer of the One Touch meters Vet information Insulin Type/Manufacturer/Ordering Info (+script if necessary) Syringe Type/Ordering Info (+script if necessary) Most recent lab results Pet sitter information Blank pages for notes The curve article discusses recording blood glucose numbers and completing a curve graph. Having a card with information on it in the area with your driver's license stating you have a diabetic pet at home, possibly with some individual care information on it would be great. In cases of accident/illness away from home, the driver's license is ALWAYS checked for your ID, in case you're unable to ID yourself. At home, it's good to keep a current sheet of information in Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Curves

Blood Glucose Curves

Home What Is Diabetes? Questions to Ask Your Vet How To Fill Syringes How To Inject Your Cat Feline Urine Testing Reasons to Home Blood Test Blood Glucose Monitors How to Blood Test At Home Blood Glucose Curves Blood Glucose Curves Part II Ongoing Monitoring Associated Conditions Other Cats’ Stories The Cat Walk! Things You Need To Know Feline Diabetes Glossary Ask A Question! Search This Site Useful Websites The purpose of home blood glucose curves is to determine if your cat is on the optimum insulin dosage for its lifestyle. Having convinced you that it’s a good idea to home blood test, and (hopefully!) having shown you how, it’s now time to do a full “Blood Glucose Curve”. This is simply a series of blood tests taken over the course of a normal day to determine whether the insulin dose you’re giving is correct for your cat’s feeding and exercise habits. Ideally, your first few blood glucose curves will be done over a full 24 hour period, so plan it for a weekend or holiday if you work away from home. Take your first blood sugar reading in the morning, at injection time. Feed you cat, do your blood test and then inject your cat as normal, and allow your cat to wander/stay in/ go out/ just as they would on any normal day. The only thing that makes this day different from any other is that you’re taking blood sugar readings. Make a note of the time of the first test and the amount of insulin given. Take blood glucose readings every two hours after the first one. So if your first reading and injection were at 7:00am, the next will be 9:00am, then 11:00am, you get the idea! You will hopefully notice that the blood sugar reading goes down to start with, then rises again as the insulin wears off. If you are injecting twice a day, make a note of the time of Continue reading >>

Worksheet For Analytical Calibration Curve

Worksheet For Analytical Calibration Curve

[ Background ] [ Instructions ] [ Frequently Asked Questions ] These are fill-in-the-blanks spreadsheet templates for performing the calibration curve fitting and concentration calculations for analytical methods using the calibration curve method.All you have to do is to type in (or paste in) the concentrations of the standard solutions and their instrument readings (e.g. absorbances, or whatever method you are using) and the instrument readings of the unknowns. The spreadsheet automatically plots and fits the data to a straight line, quadratic or cubic curve, then uses the equation of that curve to convert the readings of the unknown samples into concentration. You can add and delete calibration points at will, to correct errors or to remove outliers; the sheet re-plots and recalculates automatically. Screen shots and Download links: 2. Enter the concentrations of the standards and their instrument readings (e.g. absorbance) into the blue table on the left. Leave the rest of the table blank. You must have at least two points on the calibration curve (three points for the quadratic method or four points for the cubic method), including the blank (zero concentration standard). If you have multiple instrument readings for one standard, it's better to enter each as a separate standard with the same concentration, rather than entering the average. The spreadsheet automatically gives more weight to standards that have more than one reading. 3. Enter the instrument readings (e.g. absorbance) of the unknowns into the yellow table on the right. You can have any number of unknowns up to 20. (If you have multiple instrument readings for one unknown, it's better to enter each as a separate unknown, rather than averaging them, so you can see how much variation in calculated conce Continue reading >>

Tutorial: How To Log & Chart Blood Glucose In Excel

Tutorial: How To Log & Chart Blood Glucose In Excel

Tutorial: How to Log & Chart Blood Glucose in Excel Moderator T2 since Oct 08, from insulin to no meds =) Tutorial: How to Log & Chart Blood Glucose in Excel OK... here's a sample month of my bg log using excel sheet.... at home I use MS Excel 2007, although its similar to 2003, but some of the interfaces are really different from MS Excel 2003. For this, I will use MS Word 2003 as its actually easier. If you can get how I do it in 2003, you'll be able to see how I do it in 2007. Its just better graphics Comment (to describe whatever... like what i ate or what activities i did) Daily and Weekly BG Average (requires manual insertion of formula and checking whether the values they use are from the correct cells) So here's some steps to create a chart with your own bg log: 1. Highlight the data area. Obviously you can't highlight the comments as its not numerical. So one way to just highlight it one shot is to rearrange the columns and put the comments at the end. But if you're doing it like me with a gap in the middle... highlight the area for the first 3 columns first. After that, press and hold the CTRL button and highlight the other areas that you want to include in the chart 2. Now you have the area highlighted, go to Insert and click Chart 3. The chart wizard will appear. Select Line and Chart Type (whichever type you want). Click NEXT 4. Step 2 will appear. If you've preselected the data on the excel sheet, a preview of the chart will automatically appear. If you didn't preselect the data, you can either select a whole range under the Data Range Tab If you want to select the range individually and also name the series where you get the data from, you can do it under the Series tab. Category (X) axis is the area where you highlight the date and time (not the bg data Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Curves In Diabetic Dogs And Cats

Blood Glucose Curves In Diabetic Dogs And Cats

Blood glucose curves are a a useful tool in the stabilisation and monitoring of diabetic animals.They give an accurate assessment on which to base changes in insulin therapy and are vital in investigating the unstable diabetic. They help to determine insulin effectiveness and the maximum and minimum blood glucose concentrations and when these occur. They are an ideal tool for differentiating the problems of short duration of action and the Somogyi effect. See Problems. Protocol for producing serial glucose curves Hospitalise the animal Follow the pet owner’s normal regime. This includes insulin injections, size, type and timing of meals and exercise routine. Take a blood sample prior to insulin injection. Administer the insulin. Take a blood sample every two (to four) hours, if possible for 24 hours but at least until the concentration has crossed back above the renal threshold. More frequent blood sampling (e.g. hourly) may be required if Somogyi effect is suspected and difficult to identify. Be careful not to take too many large blood samples from small dogs and cats. Blood glucose concentrations are measured and plotted against time to produce a blood glucose curve Spreadsheet to produce a blood glucose curve The spreadsheet below enables glucose curves (in mmol/l) to be drawn and viewed easily. The graph is on the second page of the spreadsheet and appears as a scatter plot as it is then less likely that a Somogyi effect may be missed. There is also a conversion table for mg/dl and g/L. Spreadsheet for serial glucose curve (mmol/l) Interpreting blood glucose curves The aim of treatment is to alleviate the clinical signs of diabetes mellitus. To achieve this, blood glucose concentrations must be kept below the renal threshold and hypoglycaemia must be avoided. Thus Continue reading >>

Pet Diabetes - Anne's Excel Instructions For Canine Blood Glucose Curve

Pet Diabetes - Anne's Excel Instructions For Canine Blood Glucose Curve

Instructions following the example of Max's Curve that Anne done in Excel...Thanks Anne! You can download this sample and directions at the bottom of this page! You will need winzip! 1) Open Excel and put headings on three columns: DATE TIME BG Enter the appropriate values under these columns 2) Once all values have been entered, bold only the TIME and BG columns including headings and values 3) Click once on the Chart Wizard button on the toolbar (blue yellow red bar graph) 4) Under the Standard Types tab, select Line graph ~ you can click on a button here labeled 'press and hold to view sample' to see what it'll look like. Click on Next > 5) Chart source data, click on Next > 6) Chart options, (here you can enter the title of the chart). Click on the Data Table tab and put a check in the Show Data Table box (this puts the actual readings along with times at the bottom of the chart), Click on Next > 7) Chart location, the default here is As object in, where the chart will show up next to your numbers. If you click in the top button As new sheet, you'll have a separate worksheet tab on the bottom of the whole spreadsheet that says chart1. Click on Finish 8) Once the chart has been added to the worksheet you can move it around to put it below the readings, make it wider so that all readings are showing. You can print the chart alone by clicking on it and hitting the print button. If you want to print the columns and values along with the chart, make sure you have clicked somewhere outside of the chart. Blood Curve Directions and Sample in a Zip Download the above zip and zip it opent into a file folder. Then open the file titled SampleSS.xls with Microsoft excel If you need addtional help on how to do this in Excel please email Anne Fiorenzo Max Continue reading >>

Curve

Curve

A curve is the result of regular blood glucose readings taken over the space of 12 or 24 hours, on the same animal, with notes on timing and amounts of insulin and food. (For how to take a reading, see hometesting.) The curve shows the action of the insulin on the animal's system, and can be used to adjust dosage. It's useful to find the highest and lowest blood-glucose readings of the day, the peak action time of the insulin, the onset time and duration of the insulin. See also Insulin for more information on how long your particular brand of insulin is expected to last. Some people and even vets mistakenly try to base an insulin dosage on one or two readings. This is dangerously mistaken -- there's no way to know if that reading was at a high or low point in the day, or if the reading was skewed due to stress or even from being at the vet's. Any change in dose should be based on at least the information of a good mini-curve. When first regulating, it's not unusual to take a curve or two every week. Later on, many people take a curve every few weeks, to obtain analytical data to help decide whether, and by how much, to increase or decrease the pet's insulin dosage. Some people take a 24-hour curve if their preshot and shot check numbers indicate that there may be significant differences between their pet's AM and PM cycles. Keeping your curves, whether in written or graphed form, is an essential part of recordkeeping. Many glucometers come with an optional data cable for uploading readings to an excel sheet -- this can help tremendously too. You can help the Petdiabetes Wiki by copying or linking to your logs and curves in your pet's case study. Readings are generally taken once every 2 hours, though it's possible to be more or less frequent. The minimum useful curve i Continue reading >>

Area Under Normal Curve Worksheet Answers

Area Under Normal Curve Worksheet Answers

Area Under Normal Curve Worksheet Answers Area Under Normal Curve Worksheet Answers Assume that is normally distributed with a specified mean and standard deviation. Find the indicated probabilities : 1. (0.5 1.0)= ( = 1.0)( = 0.5)= 0.84130.3085 = 0.5328 (1.25 2.75)= ( = 2.75) ( = 1.25)= 0.99710.1056 = 0.8915 (2.19 0.94)= (0.94) (2.19)= 0.17360.0143 = 0.1593 (0.67 0.2)= ( = 0.2)( = 0.67)= 0.42070.2514 = 0.1693 ( 1.33)= 1 ( = 1.33)= 1 0.9082 = 0.0918 described and sketch the area on the given curve. 6. such that 6% of the standard normal curve lies to the left of 6% = 0.0600 From the table z = -1.55 at 0.0606 z = -1.56 at 0.0594 Right in between so such that 55% of the standard normal curve lies to the left of 55% = 0.5500 From the table z = 0.12 at 0.5478 Z = 0.13 at 0.5517 0.5500 is closer to 0.5517 so such that 8% of the standard normal curve lies to the right of 0.0800 = 0.9200 From the table z = 1.40 at 0.9192 z = 1.41 at 09207 0.9200 is closer to 0.9207 so such that 95% of the standard normal curve lies to the right of 0.9500 = 0.0500 From the table z = - 1.64 at 0.0505 z = - 1.65 at 0.0495 Right in between so such that 98% of the standard normal curve lies between From the table z = - 2.32 at 0.0102 z = - 2.33 at 0.0099 0.0100 is closer to 0.0099 so such that 60% of the standard normal curve lies between From the table z = - 0.84 at 0.2005 z = - 0.85 at 0.1977 0.2000 is closer to 0.2005 so A persons blood glucose level and diabetes are closely related. Let be a random variable measured in milligrams of glucose per deciliter of blood. After a 12 will have a distribution that is approximately normal with a mean After 50 years, these tend to increase. Find the probability that, an adult under 50 years of age after a 12 Continue reading >>

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