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Glucometer For Multiple Patients

Blood Glucose Meter: How To Choose

Blood Glucose Meter: How To Choose

Many types of blood glucose meters are available. Here's how to choose one that fits your needs and lifestyle. If you have diabetes, you'll likely need a blood glucose meter to measure and display the amount of sugar (glucose) in your blood. Exercise, food, medications, stress and other factors affect your blood glucose level. Using a blood glucose meter can help you better manage your diabetes by tracking any fluctuations in your blood glucose level. Many types of blood glucose meters are available, from basic models to more-advanced meters with multiple features and options. The cost of blood glucose meters and test strips varies, as does insurance coverage. Study your options before deciding which model to buy. Choosing the right meter When selecting a blood glucose meter, it can help to know the basics of how they work. To use most blood glucose meters, you first insert a test strip into the device. Then you prick a clean fingertip with a special needle (lancet) to get a drop of blood. You carefully touch the test strip to the blood and wait for a blood glucose reading to appear on the screen. When used and stored properly, blood glucose meters are generally accurate in how they measure glucose. They differ in the type and number of features they offer. Here are several factors to consider when choosing a blood glucose meter: Insurance coverage. Check with your insurance provider for coverage details. Some insurance providers limit coverage to specific models or limit the total number of test strips allowed. Cost. Meters vary in price. Be sure to factor in the cost of test strips. Ease of use and maintenance. Some meters are easier to use than others. Are both the meter and test strips comfortable and easy to hold? Can you easily see the numbers on the screen? How e Continue reading >>

9.2 Glucometer Use

9.2 Glucometer Use

People with diabetes require regular monitoring of their blood glucose to help them achieve as close to normal blood glucose levels as possible for as much of the time as possible. The benefits of maintaining a blood glucose level that is consistently within the range of 4-7 mmol/L will reduce the short-term, potentially life-threatening complications of hypoglycemia as well as the occurrence rate and severity of the long-term complications of hyperglycemia. Patients in the hospital setting are likely to have inconsistent blood glucose levels as they are affected by changes in diet and lifestyle, surgical procedures, and the stress of being in a hospital. The physician will prescribe how regularly the blood glucose should be monitored. In acute situations, a sliding-scale treatment for insulin will be individually prescribed per patient. The medication administration record (MAR) or sliding scale will provide directions for the amount of medication to be given based on the blood glucose reading. It is usually the responsibility of the nurse to perform blood glucose readings. As with any clinical procedure, ensure that you understand the patient’s condition, the reason for the test, and the possible outcomes of the procedure. Prior to performing a blood glucose test, ensure that you have read and understood the manufacturer’s instructions and your agency’s policy for the blood glucose monitoring machines (see Figure 9.1) used in your clinical setting, as these vary. It is also important that you determine the patient’s understanding of the procedure and the purpose for monitoring blood glucose level. Before you begin, you should also determine if there are any conditions present that could affect the reading. For example, is the patient fasting? Has the patient j Continue reading >>

Simulation Of A Multi-strip Blood Glucometer

Simulation Of A Multi-strip Blood Glucometer

Simulation of a multi-strip blood glucometer TENCON 2014 - 2014 IEEE Region 10 Conference (2014) Amperometry , Biochemistry , biomedical measurement , Biosensors , Blood , blood glucose level regulation , Chemical sensors , chemical variables measurement , Detectors , diabetes , Diseases , economically viable blood glucometer , electric potential , Electrodes , enzyme-coated test strips , Enzymes , expensive test strips , Glucometer , glucometer manufacturer , glucometer-specific test strips , glucose-specific test strips , haemoglucose level monitoring , high glucose specificity , home environment glucose level monitoring , human body glucose level , multi-strip blood glucometer , normal blood glucose levels , patient diagnosis , Patient monitoring , patient-specific blood glucometer , portable blood glucometer , Potentiostat , severely diabetic patients , Strips , sugar , Test strips , uncontrolled diabetes onset , uncontrolled diabetes progress Normal blood glucose levels are tightly regulated in the human body, in the range of 70-150 mg/dL. With the increasing awareness that uncontrolled diabetes plays a significant role in the onset and progress of other diseases, severely diabetic patients are being advised to closely monitor their haemoglucose levels, as often as four times every day. This is done in a home environment, by means of a glucometer and enzyme-coated test strips, having high specificity for glucose. The test strips are expensive and specific to the glucometer of a particular manufacturer, which implies that a patient is tied to one glucometer, making it economically unviable, especially in a developing country like India. Efforts are being made to develop a portable glucometer, which would accommodate, if not all, most of the commercial glucose test Continue reading >>

Frequently Asked Questions (faqs) Regarding Assisted Blood Glucose Monitoring And Insulin Administration

Frequently Asked Questions (faqs) Regarding Assisted Blood Glucose Monitoring And Insulin Administration

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) regarding Assisted Blood Glucose Monitoring and Insulin Administration The following FAQs summarize inquiries from healthcare personnel received by CDC regarding best practices for performance of assisted blood glucose monitoring and insulin administration, including questions related to cleaning, disinfection, and storage of blood glucose monitoring equipment. These FAQs are not intended as a comprehensive resource for all issues related to blood glucose monitoring and insulin administration, and additional considerations may be necessary for certain clinical situations or settings. View more detailed information related to assisted blood glucose monitoring and insulin administration.Visit CDCs Injection Safety website for additional information regarding injection safety and CDCs Sharps Safety website information related to sharps safety and safe disposal of sharps in healthcare settings. Healthcare personnel are also encouraged to consult guidance provided by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) (links provided in responses below) as well as the manufacturers of the devices (blood glucose meters, fingerstick/lancing devices, insulin pens) in use at their facilities. What is the difference between self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) and assisted monitoring of blood glucose (AMBG)? With self-monitoring of blood glucose, individuals perform all steps of monitoring for themselves. With assisted monitoring of blood glucose, the same steps are followed but testing is performed for an individual or multiple persons by someone else (e.g., a caregiver or healthcare professional) [ 1 , 2 ]. Assisted monitoring of blood glucose is typically performed in healthcare settings such as clinics, hospitals, and long-term care settings (e.g., sk Continue reading >>

Simulation Of A Multi-strip Blood Glucometer

Simulation Of A Multi-strip Blood Glucometer

Simulation of a multi-strip blood glucometer Abstract: Normal blood glucose levels are tightly regulated in the human body, in the range of 70-150 mg/dL. With the increasing awareness that uncontrolled diabetes plays a significant role in the onset and progress of other diseases, severely diabetic patients are being advised to closely monitor their haemoglucose levels, as often as four times every day. This is done in a home environment, by means of a glucometer and enzyme-coated test strips, having high specificity for glucose. The test strips are expensive and specific to the glucometer of a particular manufacturer, which implies that a patient is tied to one glucometer, making it economically unviable, especially in a developing country like India. Efforts are being made to develop a portable glucometer, which would accommodate, if not all, most of the commercial glucose test strips, available in the market today. As a first step, three of the most widely used test strips have been characterised and a circuit has been designed to obtain their current responses. This paper describes the simulation of the circuit and discusses the results obtained. Continue reading >>

Nova Statstrip Glucose Hospital Meter System Approved For Use In Critical Care Patients

Nova Statstrip Glucose Hospital Meter System Approved For Use In Critical Care Patients

Nova StatStrip Glucose Hospital Meter System Approved for Use in Critical Care Patients Evidence-Based Diabetes Management > December 2014 Published on: December 05, 2014 Nova StatStrip Glucose Hospital Meter System Approved for Use in Critical Care Patients The FDA approved the Nova StatStrip Glucose Hospital Meter System for use among all hospitalized patients on September 24, 2014.1 Nova StatStrips system was first approved for such use by the FDA in 2006 to help monitor the effectiveness of a diabetes control program. The recent approval extends the use of this continuous glucose monitoring system in all capacities, including monitoring critically ill patients. Multiple studies have shown that Nova StatStrip, which is indicated for hospitalized patients on complex medication regimens, accurately reports blood glucose levels when healthcare providers test patients with a wide array of medical conditions, including cardiopulmonary disease, endocrine disorders, malignancies, obstetric or gynecologic issues, renal disease, surgery, and trauma. Moreover, this device can use arterial or venous whole blood obtained from hospitalized patients of all ages, including neonates, children, and adults. Glucometers (or blood glucose meters) are handheld instruments that allow healthcare workers to test blood glucose levels at the bedside. A single drop of blood pricked from the patients finger is applied to a plastic strip, which is then inserted into the glucometer. Glucose in the blood reacts with an enzyme on the test strip, and the chemical reaction creates an electrical current, which is measured and displayed as a surrogate for the blood glucose level. The Nova StatStrip functions by using a modified glucoseoxidase-based amperometric test.2 This device also corrects for int Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Monitoring And Insulin Administration

Blood Glucose Monitoring And Insulin Administration

Summary The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has become increasingly concerned about the risks for transmitting hepatitis B virus (HBV) and other infectious diseases during assisted blood glucose (blood sugar) monitoring and insulin administration. CDC is alerting all persons who assist others with blood glucose monitoring and/or insulin administration of the following infection control requirements: Fingerstick devices should never be used for more than one person Whenever possible, blood glucose meters should not be shared. If they must be shared, the device should be cleaned and disinfected after every use, per manufacturer’s instructions. If the manufacturer does not specify how the device should be cleaned and disinfected then it should not be shared. Insulin pens and other medication cartridges and syringes are for single-patient-use only and should never be used for more than one person Monitoring of blood glucose levels is frequently performed to guide therapy for persons with diabetes. Blood glucose monitoring and insulin administration can be accomplished in two ways: self-monitoring of blood glucose and insulin administration, where the individual performs all steps of the testing and insulin administration themselves, and assisted monitoring of blood glucose and insulin administration, where another person assists with or performs testing and insulin administration for an individual. Examples of settings where assisted monitoring of blood glucose and insulin administration may occur include: Hospitals or clinics Long term care settings such as nursing homes and assisted living facilities Senior centers Health fairs Correctional facilities Schools or camps Unsafe Practices during Blood Glucose Monitoring and Insulin Administration An underap Continue reading >>

Laboratory Ph Pc Freestyle Precision Glucometer

Laboratory Ph Pc Freestyle Precision Glucometer

FSP Glucometer Strips PGR Review: No Review Date Name of Associated Policy: Laboratory General Policy Name of Associated PGR: Laboratory Guideline Point of Care Testing PGR Name of Associated Forms: Emergency Glucose Screen Form DigiPath DEFINITIONS: 1. FSP – Freestyle Precicion Pro Glucometer 2. UniPOC – POC software and data management system PURPOSE; CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE AND/OR PRINCIPLE DEFINITIONS: 1. The FreeStyle Precision Pro Blood Glucose Testing System (FSP) is intended for the quantitative measurement of glucose in fresh capillary whole blood from the finger, and from venous, arterial and neonatal whole blood. 2. The Freestyle Precision Pro Blood Glucose Monitoring System is intended for testing outside the body (in vitro diagnostic use) and is intended for multiple-patient use in professional healthcare settings as an aid to monitor the effectiveness of a diabetes control program. 3. The system should not be used for the diagnosis of or screening for diabetes. 4. The Freestyle Precision Pro Blood Glucose Test Strips are for use with the Freestyle Precision Pro Blood Glucose Meter to quantitatively measure glucose in fresh capillary whole blood samples drawn from the fingertips and from venous, arterial, and neonatal whole blood. 5. When blood is applied to the test strip, the glucose in the blood reacts with chemicals on the strip producing a small electrical current. FSP uses a proprietary glucose specific chemistry that includes the glucose dehydrogenase enzyme, NAD cofactor and PQ mediator (GDH-NAD). The current is measured and a result displays on the meter based on the amount of glucose in the blood. 6. Freestyle Precision Pro Blood Glucose Monitoring System enables automatic transmission of stored data to a data management system using t Continue reading >>

How To Use A Glucometer

How To Use A Glucometer

First, set out your glucometer, a test strip, a lancet and an alcohol prep pad. Wash your hands to prevent infection.If you are not by a sink, it is okay to just use the alcohol swab and vice versa. If you are by a sink and wash your hands thoroughly, you do not have to use an alcohol swab. Decide where you are going to obtain the blood from the standard choice is from a finger . Some monitors let you use, alternative site testing, such as your forearm or another less sensitive place. Before you use an alternate site,discuss this with your doctor and check the instructions for your glucometer. Sometimes it helps to warm your hands first to make the blood flow easier. You can rub your hands together briskly or run them under warm water. If you run them under hot water, be sure to dry them well as wet hands can dilute the blood sample, resulting in a lower number. Turn on the glucometer and place a test strip in the machine when the machine is ready. Watch the indicator for placing the blood on the strip. Make sure your hand is dry and wipe the area you've selected with an alcohol prep pad and wait until the alcohol evaporates. Pierce your fingertip on the side of your finger, between the bottom of your fingernail to the tip of your nail (avoid the pads as this can pinch more). The type of drop of blood is determined by the type of strip you are using (some use a "hanging drop" of blood versus a small drop for strips that draw blood in with a capillary action). Place the drop of blood on or at the side of the strip. The glucometer will take a few moments to calculate the blood sugar reading. Follow your doctor's orders for whatever blood sugar reading you get. You may use the alcohol prep pad to blot the site where you drew the blood if it is still bleeding. Write down y Continue reading >>

Several Steps Forward: A New Meter For Multiple Patient Use

Several Steps Forward: A New Meter For Multiple Patient Use

Several Steps Forward: A New Meter for Multiple Patient Use Huong T. Le , M.D. and Mark J. Rice , M.D. Department of Anesthesiology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida Corresponding Author: Mark J. Rice, M.D., College of Medicine, University of Florida, P.O. Box 100254, Gainesville, FL 32610-0254; email address [email protected] Copyright 2013 Diabetes Technology Society Point-of-care (POC) blood glucose testing is becoming ubiquitous in the hospitals because of ease of use, timely results, and cost effectiveness. Historically, these POC devices were designed and regulated for home use by patients with diabetes. Their transition into the hospital multipatient setting has introduced the real risk of crosscontamination and has exposed inadequate accuracy standards. This article highlights some of the current recommendations for these devices and focuses on a new meter that addresses these issues. Although not currently approved for use in the United States, the OneTouch VerioPro blood glucose meter (LifeScan, Inc.), which is the topic of an article by MacRury and coauthors in this issue of the Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, is a step forward with minimal interferences and good accuracy, and perhaps most importantly, is robust enough to withstand rigorous disinfection. Keywords: disinfection, glucose, hepatitis B virus, meter, point of care Historically, self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) began with point-of-care (POC) meters that were designed, manufactured, and regulated for home use by patients with diabetes. This POC glucose testing has slowly migrated from the home into hospitals and other institutional care facilities because of their ease of use, timely results, and inexpensive cost model. The major drawback of these Continue reading >>

Glucometer To Use On Multiple Patients

Glucometer To Use On Multiple Patients

8 Likes; 1 Follower; 29,878 Visitors; 4,166 Posts If you find this topic helpful leave a comment. I need to get a glucometer to use in a research study on multiple participants. I have 2 questions: 2. what single use disposable lancets do you like? I suppose it depends on the study. If you are studying people who routinely use lancets already, why not use theirs? They know what they like best for whatever reason. You would collect the blood on your own test strips depending on what meter you use, but I shouldn't think it makes a bit of difference on the sharp thing. Nope. They will be non-diabetic. We will be ruling that out at their study screening appt. And since it is a research study it is important we do each test exactly the same way using exactly the same equipment. Sorry, I should have clarified that in my original message. why don't you contact a marketing rep for Bayer or another type of equipment? They will probably give you the meter and maybe even give you strips. At least you save $60 or more on the meter. Lancets are pretty much universal remember the meter must be thoroughly cleaned with bleach cont. cleaner between patients and allowed to air dry..... remember the meter must be thoroughly cleaned with bleach cont. cleaner between patients and allowed to air dry..... Not taken as sarcasm. There is a lot of data out there about improper cleaning of the glucometer and also re-using single person use pen type lanceting devices and causing infection transmission. Probably not. This is policy at my facility. We use the Accu-Chek Inform. No, you and I are in long term care, where this is standard. I don't think Crunch is..... We currently use the purple version of these: I never knew what they were called. Capijet, I guess. We used to use the gray version of Continue reading >>

The Best Glucometers For Seniors 2018 - Glucose Meter Reviews

The Best Glucometers For Seniors 2018 - Glucose Meter Reviews

Overall Best Pick Accu-Chek Aviva Connect Best Value Contour Next Introduction For people with diabetes, it's essential to get accurate and efficient readings of blood glucose levels. Glucometers allow people to do just that: quickly and easily measure their glucose levels themselves. We spent over 80 hours researching the 30 best glucometers on the market, considering specifications, features, user reviews, medical studies, availability and cost. After eliminating models that used old technology or were too difficult to find in stores, we purchased the 10 best blood glucose meters so that we could perform hands-on evaluations of each device. Before we dive into our recommendations for the best glucometers, it's important to note that Dignifyed is not a substitute for your primary care physician. We make our recommendations based on common scenarios, hands-on experience, market cost evaluations and a comparison of important features, but they do not replace advice from your doctor. We are not medical experts. The Accu-Chek Aviva Connect gets its name from its main feature: Bluetooth that connects it to a mobile app on your smartphone. This provides excellent data management of your readings so you can spot patterns and better treat your diabetes. In addition, the device's interface is one of the easiest to navigate. It has multiple buttons, so you can get to the features you need quickly, and the display is high-contrast with big numbers. Another reason the Aviva Connect is the best glucometer is the wide availability of its test strips. We couldn't find a pharmacy or online store that didn't stock them. Of course, the one significant downside of the test strips is their cost. At $1.39 per strip in a pack of 100 and $1.52 per strip in a pack of 50, they're more expensiv Continue reading >>

What We Learned When We Tried (and Failed) To Find The Best Blood Glucose Meter

What We Learned When We Tried (and Failed) To Find The Best Blood Glucose Meter

Chris Hannemann, a 32-year-old product engineer in San Diego, California, was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes when he was 8. For the past 24 years, multiple times a day, every day, he’s pricked his finger and used a blood glucose meter to measure the amount of sugar in his blood and decide whether to administer either insulin or a snack.The meter Hannemann uses regularly sometimes gives him readings that suggest his blood sugar levels are normal, even when he feels woozy or loses fine motor control (early effects of low blood sugar levels). “As someone who’s been comatose multiple times [due to other diabetic issues],” he told us, “it’s not fun.” During a doctor’s visit, Hannemann noticed that his glucose levels in lab tests seemed different than the measurements he would take himself. He suspected that his blood glucose meter was giving him inaccurate readings. To prove his theory, he ran a series of tests on 10 different meters. Hannemann found that readings from different meters varied from each other by as much as 60 percent, even though they were analyzing the same drop of blood, and varied 30 percent on average from each other. He published his findings in a Medium post. This discovery frustrated him because there’s so little information on glucose meter accuracy. “As a patient, you have no knowledge of this,” he said. Now, if he is using the inaccurate meter, he mentally calculates the difference. “If I check my glucose and it reads 90, I have to remind myself, ‘Oh, you actually need to eat something before you go drive or run or something.’” Accuracy matters to people like Hannemann and the many patients like him. Twenty-one million Americans have been diagnosed with diabetes, and another eight million have diabetes but don’t know Continue reading >>

Diabetes Educator Guide To Blood Glucose Meter Selection And Monitoring For Accuracy And Safety

Diabetes Educator Guide To Blood Glucose Meter Selection And Monitoring For Accuracy And Safety

The diabetes educator can play an important role in assisting patients with choosing the best blood glucose meter (BGM) to fit their needs and optimize accuracy and safety. There is a wide variety of BGMs on the market and patients are often at the mercy of their prescriber and insurance company when making a choice. In addition to teaching the patient appropriate techniques that will improve accuracy regardless of BGM, diabetes educators should address barriers (physical abilities, mental status, insurance coverage, etc.) to help patients choose a BGM with features that best support individual needs. With the typical life of a meter being 3 to 5 years, the diabetes educator’s role is critical in helping the patient select a BGM that has features that will enhance his/her care. Meter Selection To make sure the device is matched to patient need, consider if the following features may be helpful: • High contrast display that assist with visual impairments/low vision • Talking meter for visual impairments • Test strip and meter size and shape for individuals with dexterity impairments • Lancet function and needle removal for issues with manual dexterity • Alternate site monitoring possibilities • Portability of meter for monitoring multiple times a day • Affordability and access (insurance coverage/copays) • Ability to assist with insulin dosage calculations (bolus calculator) • Uploading capabilities • Interaction with a smart phone app Note: Diabetes Forecast magazine provides an annual review of current meters that can be helpful in guiding decision-making regarding meter selection. Self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) provides feedback on the effectiveness of the treatment plan, assists with the eval Continue reading >>

Dexcom Provider

Dexcom Provider

Patients on multiple daily injections (MDI) insulin therapy and Dexcom CGM saw greater A1C reduction than those on pump therapy and self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG).1 Dexcom CGM has been shown to reduce median time spent in hypoglycemia by 79% (<60 mg/dL) at night.2 The COMISAIR study demononstrates that Dexcom CGM usenot the insulin delivery methoddrives A1C reduction. Both MDI patients and those on pump therapy experience significant glycemic benefits when their insulin regimens are augmented by CGM use.1 COMISAIR Study Shows CGMNot the Delivery SystemDrives A1C Reduction1 Medicare now provides coverage for therapeutic CGM systems (those approved for use in making diabetes treatment decisions).The Dexcom G5Mobile CGM System is the first and only mobile-enabled CGM system covered as a Medicare benefit. Soupal J, Petruzelkova L, Flekac M, et al. Comparison of Different Treatment Modalities for Type 1 Diabetes, Including Sensor-Augmented Insulin Regimens, in 52 Weeks of Follow-Up: A COMISAIR Study. Diabetes Technol Ther. 2016;18(9):532-538. Beck RW, Riddlesworth T, Ruedy K, et al. Effect of Continuous Glucose Monitoring on Glycemic Control in Adults With Type 1 Diabetes Using Insulin Injections: The DIAMOND Randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA. 2017;317(4):371-378. If you are a clinician and want to learn more about Dexcoms Continuous Glucose Monitoring Systems, please fill out the form and a Dexcom representative will contact you. If you are a Dexcom User or Patient, please contact Dexcom here . The information you provide will be sent securely and subject to the Dexcom Terms of Use and Privacy Policy . Continue reading >>

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