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Glucometer For Multiple Patients

Simulation Of A Multi-strip Blood Glucometer

Simulation Of A Multi-strip Blood Glucometer

Simulation of a multi-strip blood glucometer Abstract: Normal blood glucose levels are tightly regulated in the human body, in the range of 70-150 mg/dL. With the increasing awareness that uncontrolled diabetes plays a significant role in the onset and progress of other diseases, severely diabetic patients are being advised to closely monitor their haemoglucose levels, as often as four times every day. This is done in a home environment, by means of a glucometer and enzyme-coated test strips, having high specificity for glucose. The test strips are expensive and specific to the glucometer of a particular manufacturer, which implies that a patient is tied to one glucometer, making it economically unviable, especially in a developing country like India. Efforts are being made to develop a portable glucometer, which would accommodate, if not all, most of the commercial glucose test strips, available in the market today. As a first step, three of the most widely used test strips have been characterised and a circuit has been designed to obtain their current responses. This paper describes the simulation of the circuit and discusses the results obtained. Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Meters: Effective Self-monitoring

Blood Glucose Meters: Effective Self-monitoring

Blood Glucose Meters: Effective Self-Monitoring Receiving the news that you have pre-diabetes or diabetes may seem overwhelming for any patient diagnosed with this complex medical condition. However, a reliable and easy-to-use blood glucose meter (BGM) can be an indispensable and powerful tool for all patients with diabetes. BGMs allow patients to track blood glucose patterns and daily blood glucose targets, prevent or detect episodes of hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia, and monitor ones glycemic response to certain foods, medications, physical activity, or therapy changes.1 Ample clinical study results reveal that maintaining tight glycemic control is critical to effectively managing diabetes, as well as reducing or preventing the various health complications associated with poorly controlled diabetes. At present, there are a host of self-testing BGMs to suit the needs of all patients with diabetes, even pediatric patients (Table 14). Technological advances enable BGM manufacturers to make meters that are less invasive and less painful when testing, require a smaller sample size, are capable of alternate site testing, provide rapid test results, and allow testing without a major interruption to a patients daily routine.1 Moreover, some BGMs have large memory storage, which can translate to audio capability and the ability to measure blood pressure or ketones in addition to blood glucose levels. Pharmacists are in a pivotal position to aid patients in the proper selection and use of self-monitoring BGMs. Factors and features that patients may consider when selecting a meter can include one or more of the following1,2: Ease of use and an easy-to-follow testing procedure High-tech features, such as audio capability, blue tooth, and cellular capability Once a patient selects Continue reading >>

Are Those Glucometer Results Accurate?

Are Those Glucometer Results Accurate?

Clinician Reviews. 2015 December;25(12):29,33-35 Kristen Scheckel practices at Creekside Endocrine Associates in Denver. She would like to thank Dr. Leonard Zemel for his assistance in the preparation of this manuscript. Multiple factors affect the accuracy of currently available glucometers. Consideration of patient comorbidities, medication use, operational technique, and the conditions under which test strips are stored is important when utilizing glucometer data to make medication adjustments in diabetes management. It is important to refer to specific glucometer and test strip manufacturer device labeling to help select the appropriate glucometer for a particular patient. The case presentation from 2009, involving falsely elevated blood glucose readings in a patient using a GDH-PQQ meter while receiving icodextrin peritoneal dialysis solution, highlights the importance of background knowledge of glucometer operational mechanisms. For a full list of test strips that are compatible with icodextrin peritoneal dialysis solution, please see the Country-Specific Glucose Monitor List at www.glucosesafety.com .5 Examples of specific GO meters include the OneTouch Ultra, iBGStar, and ReliOn meters. Although the GO meters do not cross-react with icodextrin, these meters should be avoided in patients receiving supplemental oxygen, due to the potential for falsely lowered readings. The GDH-FAD, GDH-NAD, and Mut Q-GDH test strips may be used in patients receiving icodextrin peritoneal dialysis solution and those receiving supplemental oxygen.3,5 Examples of GDH-FAD meters include most currently available FreeStyle meters, Bayer Contour meters, and One Touch Verio meters. The Precision Xtra meter uses GDH-NAD test strips. Most Accu-Chek meters currently use Mut Q-GDH test strip Continue reading >>

Laboratory Ph Pc Freestyle Precision Glucometer

Laboratory Ph Pc Freestyle Precision Glucometer

FSP Glucometer Strips PGR Review: No Review Date Name of Associated Policy: Laboratory General Policy Name of Associated PGR: Laboratory Guideline Point of Care Testing PGR Name of Associated Forms: Emergency Glucose Screen Form DigiPath DEFINITIONS: 1. FSP – Freestyle Precicion Pro Glucometer 2. UniPOC – POC software and data management system PURPOSE; CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE AND/OR PRINCIPLE DEFINITIONS: 1. The FreeStyle Precision Pro Blood Glucose Testing System (FSP) is intended for the quantitative measurement of glucose in fresh capillary whole blood from the finger, and from venous, arterial and neonatal whole blood. 2. The Freestyle Precision Pro Blood Glucose Monitoring System is intended for testing outside the body (in vitro diagnostic use) and is intended for multiple-patient use in professional healthcare settings as an aid to monitor the effectiveness of a diabetes control program. 3. The system should not be used for the diagnosis of or screening for diabetes. 4. The Freestyle Precision Pro Blood Glucose Test Strips are for use with the Freestyle Precision Pro Blood Glucose Meter to quantitatively measure glucose in fresh capillary whole blood samples drawn from the fingertips and from venous, arterial, and neonatal whole blood. 5. When blood is applied to the test strip, the glucose in the blood reacts with chemicals on the strip producing a small electrical current. FSP uses a proprietary glucose specific chemistry that includes the glucose dehydrogenase enzyme, NAD cofactor and PQ mediator (GDH-NAD). The current is measured and a result displays on the meter based on the amount of glucose in the blood. 6. Freestyle Precision Pro Blood Glucose Monitoring System enables automatic transmission of stored data to a data management system using t Continue reading >>

Dexcom Provider

Dexcom Provider

Patients on multiple daily injections (MDI) insulin therapy and Dexcom CGM saw greater A1C reduction than those on pump therapy and self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG).1 Dexcom CGM has been shown to reduce median time spent in hypoglycemia by 79% (<60 mg/dL) at night.2 The COMISAIR study demononstrates that Dexcom CGM usenot the insulin delivery methoddrives A1C reduction. Both MDI patients and those on pump therapy experience significant glycemic benefits when their insulin regimens are augmented by CGM use.1 COMISAIR Study Shows CGMNot the Delivery SystemDrives A1C Reduction1 Medicare now provides coverage for therapeutic CGM systems (those approved for use in making diabetes treatment decisions).The Dexcom G5Mobile CGM System is the first and only mobile-enabled CGM system covered as a Medicare benefit. Soupal J, Petruzelkova L, Flekac M, et al. Comparison of Different Treatment Modalities for Type 1 Diabetes, Including Sensor-Augmented Insulin Regimens, in 52 Weeks of Follow-Up: A COMISAIR Study. Diabetes Technol Ther. 2016;18(9):532-538. Beck RW, Riddlesworth T, Ruedy K, et al. Effect of Continuous Glucose Monitoring on Glycemic Control in Adults With Type 1 Diabetes Using Insulin Injections: The DIAMOND Randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA. 2017;317(4):371-378. If you are a clinician and want to learn more about Dexcoms Continuous Glucose Monitoring Systems, please fill out the form and a Dexcom representative will contact you. If you are a Dexcom User or Patient, please contact Dexcom here . The information you provide will be sent securely and subject to the Dexcom Terms of Use and Privacy Policy . Continue reading >>

Cdc And Fda: Don’t Share!

Cdc And Fda: Don’t Share!

It would seem to go without saying that devices used to puncture the skin — such as lancets and insulin pen needles — should never be shared by more than one person. In fact, these components are not officially considered reusable even by the same person, although as we noted in a previous post here at Diabetes Flashpoints, many people with diabetes reuse them anyway. But what about the reusable devices that these disposable components are paired with: lancing (fingerstick) devices and insulin pens? Can more than one person safely share them? The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently addressed this question as it relates to devices in health-care settings. In coordinated statements, the agencies announced their position that lancing devices should never be used to obtain a blood sample from more than one person. The FDA noted that there has been a constant increase in reported instances of bloodborne infections being transmitted in health-care settings over the last 10–15 years, particularly involving the hepatitis B virus. The agency blames, in part, unclear labeling of multiple-use lancing devices for this trend. It has not always been made clear, says the agency, whether a device was approved for use on multiple patients or simply for multiple uses on the same patient. Furthermore, cleaning and disinfection instructions for these devices may have been inadequate. Therefore, even for devices the FDA previously cleared for use on multiple patients, the agencies say this practice should be discontinued. They even recommend using devices that physically cannot be reused, such as those on which the lancing blade permanently retracts after one use. But the agencies do not stop at lancing devices. They als Continue reading >>

What We Learned When We Tried (and Failed) To Find The Best Blood Glucose Meter

What We Learned When We Tried (and Failed) To Find The Best Blood Glucose Meter

Chris Hannemann, a 32-year-old product engineer in San Diego, California, was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes when he was 8. For the past 24 years, multiple times a day, every day, he’s pricked his finger and used a blood glucose meter to measure the amount of sugar in his blood and decide whether to administer either insulin or a snack.The meter Hannemann uses regularly sometimes gives him readings that suggest his blood sugar levels are normal, even when he feels woozy or loses fine motor control (early effects of low blood sugar levels). “As someone who’s been comatose multiple times [due to other diabetic issues],” he told us, “it’s not fun.” During a doctor’s visit, Hannemann noticed that his glucose levels in lab tests seemed different than the measurements he would take himself. He suspected that his blood glucose meter was giving him inaccurate readings. To prove his theory, he ran a series of tests on 10 different meters. Hannemann found that readings from different meters varied from each other by as much as 60 percent, even though they were analyzing the same drop of blood, and varied 30 percent on average from each other. He published his findings in a Medium post. This discovery frustrated him because there’s so little information on glucose meter accuracy. “As a patient, you have no knowledge of this,” he said. Now, if he is using the inaccurate meter, he mentally calculates the difference. “If I check my glucose and it reads 90, I have to remind myself, ‘Oh, you actually need to eat something before you go drive or run or something.’” Accuracy matters to people like Hannemann and the many patients like him. Twenty-one million Americans have been diagnosed with diabetes, and another eight million have diabetes but don’t know Continue reading >>

How To Use A Glucometer

How To Use A Glucometer

First, set out your glucometer, a test strip, a lancet and an alcohol prep pad. Wash your hands to prevent infection.If you are not by a sink, it is okay to just use the alcohol swab and vice versa. If you are by a sink and wash your hands thoroughly, you do not have to use an alcohol swab. Decide where you are going to obtain the blood from the standard choice is from a finger . Some monitors let you use, alternative site testing, such as your forearm or another less sensitive place. Before you use an alternate site,discuss this with your doctor and check the instructions for your glucometer. Sometimes it helps to warm your hands first to make the blood flow easier. You can rub your hands together briskly or run them under warm water. If you run them under hot water, be sure to dry them well as wet hands can dilute the blood sample, resulting in a lower number. Turn on the glucometer and place a test strip in the machine when the machine is ready. Watch the indicator for placing the blood on the strip. Make sure your hand is dry and wipe the area you've selected with an alcohol prep pad and wait until the alcohol evaporates. Pierce your fingertip on the side of your finger, between the bottom of your fingernail to the tip of your nail (avoid the pads as this can pinch more). The type of drop of blood is determined by the type of strip you are using (some use a "hanging drop" of blood versus a small drop for strips that draw blood in with a capillary action). Place the drop of blood on or at the side of the strip. The glucometer will take a few moments to calculate the blood sugar reading. Follow your doctor's orders for whatever blood sugar reading you get. You may use the alcohol prep pad to blot the site where you drew the blood if it is still bleeding. Write down y Continue reading >>

9.2 Glucometer Use

9.2 Glucometer Use

People with diabetes require regular monitoring of their blood glucose to help them achieve as close to normal blood glucose levels as possible for as much of the time as possible. The benefits of maintaining a blood glucose level that is consistently within the range of 4-7 mmol/L will reduce the short-term, potentially life-threatening complications of hypoglycemia as well as the occurrence rate and severity of the long-term complications of hyperglycemia. Patients in the hospital setting are likely to have inconsistent blood glucose levels as they are affected by changes in diet and lifestyle, surgical procedures, and the stress of being in a hospital. The physician will prescribe how regularly the blood glucose should be monitored. In acute situations, a sliding-scale treatment for insulin will be individually prescribed per patient. The medication administration record (MAR) or sliding scale will provide directions for the amount of medication to be given based on the blood glucose reading. It is usually the responsibility of the nurse to perform blood glucose readings. As with any clinical procedure, ensure that you understand the patient’s condition, the reason for the test, and the possible outcomes of the procedure. Prior to performing a blood glucose test, ensure that you have read and understood the manufacturer’s instructions and your agency’s policy for the blood glucose monitoring machines (see Figure 9.1) used in your clinical setting, as these vary. It is also important that you determine the patient’s understanding of the procedure and the purpose for monitoring blood glucose level. Before you begin, you should also determine if there are any conditions present that could affect the reading. For example, is the patient fasting? Has the patient j Continue reading >>

Several Steps Forward: A New Meter For Multiple Patient Use

Several Steps Forward: A New Meter For Multiple Patient Use

Several Steps Forward: A New Meter for Multiple Patient Use Huong T. Le , M.D. and Mark J. Rice , M.D. Department of Anesthesiology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida Corresponding Author: Mark J. Rice, M.D., College of Medicine, University of Florida, P.O. Box 100254, Gainesville, FL 32610-0254; email address [email protected] Copyright 2013 Diabetes Technology Society Point-of-care (POC) blood glucose testing is becoming ubiquitous in the hospitals because of ease of use, timely results, and cost effectiveness. Historically, these POC devices were designed and regulated for home use by patients with diabetes. Their transition into the hospital multipatient setting has introduced the real risk of crosscontamination and has exposed inadequate accuracy standards. This article highlights some of the current recommendations for these devices and focuses on a new meter that addresses these issues. Although not currently approved for use in the United States, the OneTouch VerioPro blood glucose meter (LifeScan, Inc.), which is the topic of an article by MacRury and coauthors in this issue of the Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, is a step forward with minimal interferences and good accuracy, and perhaps most importantly, is robust enough to withstand rigorous disinfection. Keywords: disinfection, glucose, hepatitis B virus, meter, point of care Historically, self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) began with point-of-care (POC) meters that were designed, manufactured, and regulated for home use by patients with diabetes. This POC glucose testing has slowly migrated from the home into hospitals and other institutional care facilities because of their ease of use, timely results, and inexpensive cost model. The major drawback of these Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Monitoring And Insulin Administration

Blood Glucose Monitoring And Insulin Administration

Summary The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has become increasingly concerned about the risks for transmitting hepatitis B virus (HBV) and other infectious diseases during assisted blood glucose (blood sugar) monitoring and insulin administration. CDC is alerting all persons who assist others with blood glucose monitoring and/or insulin administration of the following infection control requirements: Fingerstick devices should never be used for more than one person Whenever possible, blood glucose meters should not be shared. If they must be shared, the device should be cleaned and disinfected after every use, per manufacturer’s instructions. If the manufacturer does not specify how the device should be cleaned and disinfected then it should not be shared. Insulin pens and other medication cartridges and syringes are for single-patient-use only and should never be used for more than one person Monitoring of blood glucose levels is frequently performed to guide therapy for persons with diabetes. Blood glucose monitoring and insulin administration can be accomplished in two ways: self-monitoring of blood glucose and insulin administration, where the individual performs all steps of the testing and insulin administration themselves, and assisted monitoring of blood glucose and insulin administration, where another person assists with or performs testing and insulin administration for an individual. Examples of settings where assisted monitoring of blood glucose and insulin administration may occur include: Hospitals or clinics Long term care settings such as nursing homes and assisted living facilities Senior centers Health fairs Correctional facilities Schools or camps Unsafe Practices during Blood Glucose Monitoring and Insulin Administration An underap Continue reading >>

The Lifespan Of A Lancet

The Lifespan Of A Lancet

Ask ten people with diabetes how often they change their lancet, and youll likely come away with ten different answers. Some people prefer to change their lancets with each use, some prefer a daily, weekly or monthly swap, and some go even longer. Out of all the diabetes to-dos, lancet changing practices probably vary the most person to person. Well it depends on who you ask. The technical answer, according to manufacturers and most healthcare providers, is to change your lancet with each use. This is a precautionary recommendation meant to guard against painful fingersticks, changes in the skin, and infection. 1 , 2 , 3 However, home glucose testing has come a long way from when it first became available in the 1980s. Nowadays, meters require much smaller blood samples, lancing devices deliver shallower pokes, and we have better lancets. While it's true that any needle used multiple times will become dull and require more force, many people do not notice a major difference after using the same lancet for multiple pokes. A simple rotation of fingerstick sites (use each side of the pad of the fingertip) can help guard against skin changes from dulling lancets. And, as long as lancets are used by only one person (whose hands are clean), the risk of infection is very low.(For what it's worth, even a studyon syringe re-use concluded that "diabetic patients frequently reuse disposable syringes, without apparent harmful effect.") In daily life with diabetes, sometimes theres no convenient place nearby to dispose of a used lancet. Sometimes there are no new lancets on hand to replace one weve just used. And, lets face it, sometimes we may just not want to. In the grand scheme of things, a fresh lancet is not as critical to your health and well-being as the many other self-car Continue reading >>

Frequently Asked Questions (faqs) Regarding Assisted Blood Glucose Monitoring And Insulin Administration

Frequently Asked Questions (faqs) Regarding Assisted Blood Glucose Monitoring And Insulin Administration

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) regarding Assisted Blood Glucose Monitoring and Insulin Administration The following FAQs summarize inquiries from healthcare personnel received by CDC regarding best practices for performance of assisted blood glucose monitoring and insulin administration, including questions related to cleaning, disinfection, and storage of blood glucose monitoring equipment. These FAQs are not intended as a comprehensive resource for all issues related to blood glucose monitoring and insulin administration, and additional considerations may be necessary for certain clinical situations or settings. View more detailed information related to assisted blood glucose monitoring and insulin administration.Visit CDCs Injection Safety website for additional information regarding injection safety and CDCs Sharps Safety website information related to sharps safety and safe disposal of sharps in healthcare settings. Healthcare personnel are also encouraged to consult guidance provided by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) (links provided in responses below) as well as the manufacturers of the devices (blood glucose meters, fingerstick/lancing devices, insulin pens) in use at their facilities. What is the difference between self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) and assisted monitoring of blood glucose (AMBG)? With self-monitoring of blood glucose, individuals perform all steps of monitoring for themselves. With assisted monitoring of blood glucose, the same steps are followed but testing is performed for an individual or multiple persons by someone else (e.g., a caregiver or healthcare professional) [ 1 , 2 ]. Assisted monitoring of blood glucose is typically performed in healthcare settings such as clinics, hospitals, and long-term care settings (e.g., sk Continue reading >>

Only Glucose Meters Accurate Enough To Be Fda-cleared For Use With All Patients, Including Critically Ill

Only Glucose Meters Accurate Enough To Be Fda-cleared For Use With All Patients, Including Critically Ill

ONLY glucose meters cleared by the FDA for use with all patients, in all professional healthcare settings, including critical care • Eliminates interference which cause incorrect glucose readings and misdosed insulin. ONLY glucose meters that are CLIA-waived for use with all patients including critically ill • Nursing and point-of-care (POC) operators can perform testing with all patients Accuracy proven in study of 1,698 critically ill patients with over 257 medical conditions • Improved accuracy results in fewer insulin misdoses and better outcomes for critically ill patients Excellent correlation to IDMS traceable laboratory methods • ONLY glucose meter proven to have no known clinical interferences • Tested over 8,000 medications with no interferences ONLY glucose measurement technology specifically designed for hospital use Wireless meter connectivity to LIS/HIS with StatStrip Glucose New breakthrough for use with critically ill In 2014, after an extensive, nearly four-year project conducted at five major university medical centers, Nova Biomedical achieved a major breakthrough in intended use for the StatStrip Glucose Hospital Meter System. In response to Nova’s 510(k) submission (K132121), the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) cleared StatStrip Glucose for use throughout all professional healthcare settings including critical care. It is the only glucose meter to obtain this clearance. “This device [StatStrip Glucose] provides an important public health resource for critically ill hospitalized patients, who often have conditions or are taking medications that can cause incorrect blood glucose reading. It is important for manufacturers of glucose meters used in hospitals to design and test their devices for use in all hospitalized patients.”1 Continue reading >>

Letter To Manufacturers Of Blood Glucose Monitoring Systems Listed With The Fda

Letter To Manufacturers Of Blood Glucose Monitoring Systems Listed With The Fda

Letter to Manufacturers of Blood Glucose Monitoring Systems Listed With the FDA OIVD has sent the following letter to manufacturers with blood glucose monitoring systems (BGMS) listed with the FDA. The letter outlines recent changes in the review of BGMS submissions. These review changes were instituted in response to a critical public safety risk concerning the risk of transmission of disease from shared use of fingerstick (lancing) devices and point of care blood testing devices. Your company has been identified as having listed blood glucose monitoring systems (BGMS) with the Food and Drug Administration [product code NBW]. The review of BGMS was recently changed in response to a critical public safety risk. The regulatory changes outlined in this letter are effective immediately and will apply to all new BGMS submissions to be submitted to OIVD. Please read the following in its entirety and include information on how you have addressed the following issues when preparing a BGMS pre-market submission for OIVD review. During the week of August 23, 2010, the FDA, CDC, and CMS issued clinical reminders and public health notifications highlighting the risk of transmission of disease from shared use of fingerstick (lancing) devices and point of care blood testing devices. The posting of these notifications was in response to recent outbreaks of viral hepatitis among patients where these devices were shared between users. The CDC and the FDA currently recommend the following: Lancing devices should never be used for more than one person. Only auto-disabling, single use lancing devices should be used for assisted blood glucose monitoring in multiple patients. Point of care blood testing devices such as blood glucose meters should be used only on one patient and not shared. Continue reading >>

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