diabetestalk.net

Gestational Diabetes Low Blood Sugar Numbers

Low Levels With Gestational Diabetes - How Low Is Too Low?

Low Levels With Gestational Diabetes - How Low Is Too Low?

Many women diagnosed with gestational diabetes are not given much information or advice around low levels. A question that we get asked frequently in our Facebook support group, is "how low is too low?" Levels below 2.0mmol/L should be reported to a health care professional, but if they are just lower than normal then please continue reading... The answer to this question differs depending on how your gestational diabetes is controlled: If you take Insulin or Glibenclamide:- If you are taking Glibenclamide or Insulin to help control your blood sugar levels (at any point in the day) then levels below 4.0mmol/L are classed as 'too low', a good phrase to remember is "four is the floor" As Glibenclamide is a sulfonylureas medicine it can cause hypoglycaemia (or hypos), the same as insulin. Please note: some medical teams may advise that a hypo is a blood sugar level below 3.5mmol/L rather than 4.0mmol/L. To learn more about hypos and how to treat them, please read more here. If you do not take any medication OR if you use Metformin:- If you are controlling your blood sugar levels with dietary changes alone OR with Metformin then you cannot have a true 'life threatening' hypo and lower levels should not be a cause of concern. You may experience low levels (e.g. levels below 4.0mmol/L) and have 'hypo type symptoms', which can be unpleasant, but there is no need to treat the hypo symptoms with glucose to raise levels, in fact this can worsen the problem. Eating a normal, gestational diabetes suitable snack will raise levels enough and should make you feel better. This is known as a 'false hypo'. More information on false hypos can be found on our false hypo page. Low levels below my lower test target Ladies often get concerned when their levels are below or towards the lower e Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Dealing With Low Blood Sugar

Gestational Diabetes: Dealing With Low Blood Sugar

Introduction Women who take insulin shots or take the medicine glyburide are at risk for low blood sugar levels. Most women with gestational diabetes do not have problems with low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). If your blood sugar (glucose) drops very low, make sure to get treated immediately so that neither you nor your baby is harmed. Low blood sugar occurs when the sugar level in the blood drops below what the body needs to function normally. Women who take insulin may get low blood sugar if they don't eat enough food, skip meals, exercise more than usual, or take too much insulin. These steps can help you avoid a life-threatening emergency from low blood sugar: Test your blood sugar often so that you don't have to guess when your blood sugar is low. Know the signs of low blood sugar, such as sweating, shakiness, hunger, blurred vision, and dizziness. The best treatment for low blood sugar is to eat quick-sugar foods. Liquids will raise your blood sugar faster than solid foods. Keep the list of quick-sugar foods in a convenient place. Wait 10 to 15 minutes after eating the quick-sugar food, and, if possible, check your blood sugar again. Keep some hard candy, raisins, or other sugary foods with you at all times. Eat some at the first sign of low blood sugar. Check your blood sugar before getting in a car, and don't drive if your blood sugar level is less than 70 mg/dL. Teach your friends and coworkers what to do if your blood sugar is very low. How to deal with low blood sugar emergencies Here are some ways you can prevent and manage low blood sugar emergencies. Although most women with gestational diabetes do not have problems with low blood sugar, you should always be prepared for the possibility. Keep some quick-sugar foods with you at all times. If you are at home, Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Pregnancy

Diabetes And Pregnancy

One in twenty pregnant women in Australia is affected by diabetes. Although the disease can cause serious complications for mothers and babies, good planning and comprehensive antenatal care can keep you and your baby healthy. By Joanna Egan. Diabetes is a chronic condition characterised by the body's inability to control glucose levels in the blood. Glucose is a simple sugar found in foods such as breads, cereals, fruit, starchy vegetables, legumes, dairy products and sweets. A hormone produced by the pancreas, called insulin, converts this glucose into energy that is used to fuel the body. When a person has diabetes, they either don't produce enough insulin or are unable to use insulin effectively. This causes glucose to build up in their bloodstream. There are several types of diabetes: Type 1: People with type 1 diabetes don't produce insulin. As a result, they need to monitor their blood glucose levels carefully and require regular insulin injections (up to four times a day). Generally, type 1 diabetes arises in children and young adults, but it can occur at any age. Type 2: This is the most common form of diabetes. Some people have a genetic predisposition to developing the disease but often, it is caused by lifestyle factors such as high blood pressure, obesity, insufficient exercise and poor diet. People with type 2 diabetes produce insulin, but either don't produce enough or are unable to use it effectively. Generally, it is initially managed with healthy eating and regular physical activity, but as the condition progresses, glucose-lowering tablets and/or insulin injections may be prescribed. Gestational diabetes: This form of diabetes develops, or is first diagnosed, during pregnancy. It usually appears late in the second trimester and resolves after childbir Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Overview Gestational diabetes develops during pregnancy (gestation). Like other types of diabetes, gestational diabetes affects how your cells use sugar (glucose). Gestational diabetes causes high blood sugar that can affect your pregnancy and your baby's health. Any pregnancy complication is concerning, but there's good news. Expectant women can help control gestational diabetes by eating healthy foods, exercising and, if necessary, taking medication. Controlling blood sugar can prevent a difficult birth and keep you and your baby healthy. In gestational diabetes, blood sugar usually returns to normal soon after delivery. But if you've had gestational diabetes, you're at risk for type 2 diabetes. You'll continue working with your health care team to monitor and manage your blood sugar. Symptoms For most women, gestational diabetes doesn't cause noticeable signs or symptoms. When to see a doctor If possible, seek health care early — when you first think about trying to get pregnant — so your doctor can evaluate your risk of gestational diabetes as part of your overall childbearing wellness plan. Once you're pregnant, your doctor will check you for gestational diabetes as part of your prenatal care. If you develop gestational diabetes, you may need more-frequent checkups. These are most likely to occur during the last three months of pregnancy, when your doctor will monitor your blood sugar level and your baby's health. Your doctor may refer you to additional health professionals who specialize in diabetes, such as an endocrinologist, a registered dietitian or a diabetes educator. They can help you learn to manage your blood sugar level during your pregnancy. To make sure your blood sugar level has returned to normal after your baby is born, your health care team wil Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

What is hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia is a condition characterized by low blood sugar (glucose). Glucose is the main source of fuel for the body. Carbohydrates, such as rice, potatoes, bread, cereal, fruit and sweets, are the major source of glucose in our diet. The ideal range of fasting morning blood sugar is 70 to 99 mg/dL (milligrams of glucose per deciliter of blood). Blood sugar levels under 70 mg/dL are too low and are considered unhealthy. Hypoglycemia may be a condition by itself, or may be a complication of diabetes or another disorder. It’s most often seen as a complication of diabetes. This is sometimes referred to as insulin reaction. Hypoglycemia can happen quickly. In adults and children older than age 10, hypoglycemia is uncommon except as a potential side effect of diabetes treatment. What causes hypoglycemia? Causes of hypoglycemia in people with diabetes may include the following: Too much medicine, such as diabetes medicines A missed meal A delayed meal Too little food eaten as compared to the amount of insulin or other medicine taken Other causes of hypoglycemia are rare, but may happen in early pregnancy, after strenuous exercise, or during prolonged fasting. Hypoglycemia may also result from abusing alcohol, or other rare causes, such as a tumor that makes insulin. What are the symptoms of hypoglycemia? The following are the most common symptoms of hypoglycemia. However, each individual may experience symptoms differently. The symptoms include: Shakiness Dizziness Sweating Hunger and nausea Headache Irritability Pale skin color Sudden moodiness or behavior changes, such as crying for no apparent reason Clumsy or jerky movements Difficulty paying attention, or confusion Tingling sensations around the mouth Rapid heartbeat Blurred or impaired vision Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Placenta Deterioration

Gestational Diabetes Placenta Deterioration

The gestational diabetes placenta The placenta is the organ between the baby and mother which is responsible for providing oxygen and nutrients to the baby through the blood flow in the umbilical cord and removing waste and carbon dioxide from the baby, back to the mother. As we know, gestational diabetes increases the amount of glucose flowing through the bloodstream to the baby but the gestational diabetes placenta may also have growth, structural and functional differences to that of a non-diabetic mother: In diabetes, the placenta undergoes a variety of structural and functional changes (rev. in1–3). Their nature and extent depend on a range of variables including the quality of glycemic control achieved during the critical periods in placental development, the modality of treatment, and the time period of severe departures from excellent metabolic control of a non-diabetic environment. Placental structure and function can be changed as a result of maternal diabetes. The nature and extent of these changes depend on the type of diabetes and on the gestational period. Consequences of gestational and pregestational diabetes on placental function and birth weight Gestational diabetes placenta issues Having gestational diabetes means that we are at a higher risk of having placenta issues, although other factors can also cause placenta issues such as other types of diabetes, hypertension, anaemia, blood clotting disorders, smoking and drug abuse during pregnancy. Many terms may be used for gestational diabetes placenta issues such as placenta deterioration, placenta insufficiency, placenta failure, placenta dysfunction, premature ageing, calcification and impaired placenta function. Gestational diabetes placenta issues can occur when there are problems with blood flow t Continue reading >>

What To Expect With Gestational Diabetes

What To Expect With Gestational Diabetes

Blood glucose control is key to having a healthy baby A diagnosis of gestational diabetes can cast a shadow over the joys of pregnancy. While the vast majority of these cases end with a healthy baby and mom, gestational diabetes (high blood glucose during pregnancy in a woman who has never had type 1 or type 2 diabetes) does increase risks to the health of both baby and mother. Keeping blood glucose under control is crucial for women with gestational diabetes to help safeguard their babies and themselves. Gestational diabetes is caused by issues that arise as part of a normal pregnancy: hormonal changes and weight gain. Women whose bodies can't compensate for these changes by producing enough of the hormone insulin, which ushers glucose from the blood into cells to produce energy, develop high blood glucose and gestational diabetes. Overweight mothers are at a greater risk for the condition. In the United States, gestational diabetes is reported in somewhere between 2 and 10 percent of pregnancies, but it is now believed that the condition affects 18 percent of women in pregnancy. The larger number is the result of new criteria for diagnosis, not just skyrocketing rates. The American Diabetes Association began recommending this year that gestational diabetes be diagnosed with only one abnormal test result rather than two, the previous method, and this is causing more cases to be detected. Gestational diabetes usually appears roughly halfway through pregnancy, as the placenta puts out large amounts of "anti-insulin" hormones. Women without known diabetes should be screened for gestational diabetes 24 to 28 weeks into their pregnancies. (If high blood glucose levels are detected earlier in pregnancy, the mother-to-be may actually have type 2 diabetes, rather than gestati Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia Or Low Blood Glucose

Hypoglycemia Or Low Blood Glucose

Hypoglycemia means that your blood glucose is low - generally below 60 to 80 mg/dL. Symptoms occur quickly and need to be treated as soon as possible. Causes Prevention Not enough food Eat all your meals and snacks on time. More physical activity than usual Eat extra food to match your increased activity. Too much diabetes medicine Take only the dose that has been prescribed. Symptoms You may have one or more of the following symptoms: sweating shaking feeling weak or tired feeling anxious or nervous racing heart feeling hungry having a mild headache tingling sensation around lips and tongue Treating hypoglycemia You are never harming yourself if you take glucose tablets or eat a simple sugar food because you suspect you have low blood glucose. If you are injecting insulin, always carry a simple sugar food with you. These include raisins, marshmallows, glucose tablets or a juice box. Test your blood glucose as soon as you feel symptoms. If your level is low, treat with 15 grams of carbohydrate. Examples include: 1/2 cup of fruit juice (you don't need to add sugar) 1/2 cup of regular pop 1 tablespoon of honey or sugar 2 tablespoons of raisins 3 large marshmallows 1 cup of skim milk 3 to 4 glucose tablets 15 grams of glucose gel After eating one of these foods, test your blood glucose every 10 to 15 minutes. If it is still low, eat another 15 grams of carbohydrate until your symptoms are gone or your blood glucose level is above 80. Follow-up treatment after hypoglycemia After you've experienced hypoglycemia, you may need more food. If your next meal or snack is less than one hour away, eat at your normal time. If your next meal or snack is one to two hours away, eat an extra snack that contains 15 grams of carbohydrate. If your next meal or snack is more than two hours a Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

What Is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes sometimes develops when a woman is pregnant. It’s when the blood glucose level (blood sugar level) of the mother goes too high during pregnancy. Having an elevated blood glucose level during pregnancy can cause problems for your baby—if it’s left untreated. Fortunately, doctors are vigilant about checking for gestational diabetes so that it can be identified and effectively managed. A pro-active treatment plan helps you have a good pregnancy and protects the health of your baby. Gestational Diabetes Symptoms Gestational diabetes doesn’t often cause noticeable symptoms for the mother. Other types of diabetes (eg, type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes) do cause symptoms such as increased thirst, but that is hardly ever noticed in gestational diabetes. Because there aren’t often symptoms, it’s very important to be tested for a high blood glucose level when you’re pregnant. (Your doctor will most likely test you for gestational diabetes sometime between the 24th and 28th week. You can learn more about the diagnostic process here.) Then your doctor will know if you need to be treated for gestational diabetes. Gestational Diabetes Causes and Risk Factors Gestational diabetes develops when your body isn’t able to produce enough of the hormone insulin during pregnancy. Insulin is necessary to transport glucose—what your body uses for energy—into the cells. Without enough insulin, you can build up too much glucose in your blood, leading to a higher-than-normal blood glucose level and perhaps gestational diabetes. The elevated blood glucose level in gestational diabetes is caused by hormones released by the placenta during pregnancy. The placenta produces a hormone called the human placental lactogen (HPL), also Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes And Pregnancy

Gestational Diabetes And Pregnancy

Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that is first seen in a pregnant woman who did not have diabetes before she was pregnant. Some women have more than one pregnancy affected by gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes usually shows up in the middle of pregnancy. Doctors most often test for it between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy. Often gestational diabetes can be controlled through eating healthy foods and regular exercise. Sometimes a woman with gestational diabetes must also take insulin. Problems of Gestational Diabetes in Pregnancy Blood sugar that is not well controlled in a woman with gestational diabetes can lead to problems for the pregnant woman and the baby: An Extra Large Baby Diabetes that is not well controlled causes the baby’s blood sugar to be high. The baby is “overfed” and grows extra large. Besides causing discomfort to the woman during the last few months of pregnancy, an extra large baby can lead to problems during delivery for both the mother and the baby. The mother might need a C-Section to deliver the baby. The baby can be born with nerve damage due to pressure on the shoulder during delivery. C-Section (Cesarean Section) A C-section is an operation to deliver the baby through the mother’s belly. A woman who has diabetes that is not well controlled has a higher chance of needing a C-section to deliver the baby. When the baby is delivered by a C-section, it takes longer for the woman to recover from childbirth. High Blood Pressure (Preeclampsia) When a pregnant woman has high blood pressure, protein in her urine, and often swelling in fingers and toes that doesn’t go away, she might have preeclampsia. It is a serious problem that needs to be watched closely and managed by her doctor. High blood pressure can cause harm to both Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

only happens during pregnancy. It means you have high blood sugar levels, but those levels were normal before you were pregnant. If you have it, you can still have a healthy baby with help from your doctor and by doing simple things to manage your blood sugar, also called blood glucose. After your baby is born, gestational diabetes usually goes away. Gestational diabetes makes you more likely to develop type 2 diabetes, but it won’t definitely happen. During pregnancy, the placenta makes hormones that can lead to a buildup of glucose in your blood. Usually, your pancreas can make enough insulin to handle that. If not, your blood sugar levels will rise and can cause gestational diabetes. It affects between 2% and 10% of pregnancies each year. You are more likely to get gestational diabetes if you: Were overweight before you got pregnant Are African-American, Asian, Hispanic, or Native American Have high blood sugar levels, but not high enough to be diabetes Have a family history of diabetes Have had gestational diabetes before Have high blood pressure or other medical complications Have given birth to a large baby before (greater than 9 pounds) Have given birth to a baby that was stillborn or had certain birth defects Gestational diabetes usually happens in the second half of pregnancy. Your doctor will check to see if you have gestational diabetes between weeks 24 and 28 of your pregnancy. Your doctor may test sooner if you're at high risk. To test for gestational diabetes, you will quickly drink a sugary drink. This will raise your blood sugar levels. An hour later, you’ll take a blood test to see how your body handled all that sugar. If the results show that your blood sugar is higher than a certain cutoff (anywhere from 130 milligrams per deciliter [mg/dL] or hig Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemic When Pregnant

Hypoglycemic When Pregnant

Hypoglycemia or low blood sugar during pregnancy is a common problem in women with diabetes. This blood sugar complication can occur in pregnant women who have preexisting type 1 or type 2 diabetes or in women who have gestational diabetes -- which is usually diagnosed during the second trimester of pregnancy. Linked to the use of insulin or certain diabetes pills, hypoglycemia can cause symptoms such as shakiness, confusion and dizziness. Hypoglycemia rarely occurs in pregnant women without diabetes. Prevention and treatment are important as low blood sugar levels can have negative consequences for both the mom and baby. Video of the Day Hypoglycemia is traditionally defined as having a blood sugar below 70 mg/dl. However, because blood sugar levels run lower during pregnancy, the consensus of a work group of the American Diabetes Association and the Endocrine Society, in a report published in the May 2013 issue of "Diabetes Care," is that hypoglycemia in pregnancy can be defined as a level below 60 mg/dl. Low blood sugars have a sudden onset and can vary in intensity. Symptoms of mild hypoglycemia can resemble early pregnancy symptoms, including hunger, nausea, sleepiness, headache, weakness and dizziness. Other symptoms a woman may experience include shakiness, nervousness, sweating, chills, nightmares, fast heartbeat, blurry vision and numbness around the mouth. When blood sugars drop so low the woman is unable to treat it without assistance, this is termed severe hypoglycemia with symptoms of confusion, lack of coordination, seizures, loss of consciousness and even death. Some women with long-standing diabetes may no longer feel the early symptoms of low blood sugar levels and, as a result, are at greater risk of suffering these more serious side effects. Pregnant Continue reading >>

Diabetes-related High And Low Blood Sugar Levels

Diabetes-related High And Low Blood Sugar Levels

Topic Overview When you have diabetes, you may have high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia) or low blood sugar levels (hypoglycemia) from time to time. A cold, the flu, or other sudden illness can cause high blood sugar levels. You will learn to recognize the symptoms and distinguish between high and low blood sugar levels. Insulin and some types of diabetes medicines can cause low blood sugar levels. Learn how to recognize and manage high and low blood sugar levels to help you avoid levels that can lead to medical emergencies, such as diabetic ketoacidosis or dehydration from high blood sugar levels or loss of consciousness from severe low blood sugar levels. Most high or low blood sugar problems can be managed at home by following your doctor's instructions. You can help avoid blood sugar problems by following your doctor's instructions on the use of insulin or diabetes medicines, diet, and exercise. Home blood sugar testing will help you determine whether your blood sugar is within your target range. If you have had very low blood sugar, you may be tempted to let your sugar level run high so that you do not have another low blood sugar problem. But it is most important that you keep your blood sugar in your target range. You can do this by following your treatment plan and checking your blood sugar regularly. Sometimes a pregnant woman can get diabetes during her pregnancy. This is called gestational diabetes. Blood sugar levels are checked regularly during the pregnancy to keep levels within a target range. Children who have diabetes need their parents' help to keep their blood sugar levels in a target range and to exercise safely. Be sure that children learn the symptoms of both high and low blood sugar so they can tell others when they need help. There are many su Continue reading >>

Is A Reading Of 3.9 Before Breakfast Bad?

Is A Reading Of 3.9 Before Breakfast Bad?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community is a reading of 3.9 before breakfast bad? Hello, Do you think thats a hypo? I'm newly diagnosed so a bit confused! I am a gestational diabetic mother to be as well. The amount of conflicting information out there is staggering to be honest. Also the differences between American and British approach is surprising as well. I was reading an American website regarding gestational diabetes and in there the normal levels are given as 0200-0300 am between 60-120 (between 4.4 and 6.7) I will post the address for this site again for you as soon as I find. However, my diabetic team gave me completely different limits. They did not bother with lower limits much but they said lower than 5.6 when fasting and lower than 7.8 1 hr after meals. When they talked to me about insulin they said if my blood glucose was measuring lower than 5.3 not to drive but to have something to eat before I drive. That's what they told me. Nobody mentioned about what was a hypo as such. 3.9 before breakfast is just only a tiny bit lower than what I get really. I get 4.2, 4.3 often in the mornings. As this is a UK site for Diabetes here is a link to the information about Gestational Diabetes from this sites Community pages with information about levels and much more. The usual advice is between 4 - 7 mmol/l so 3.9 is just a tad low. Not too far out though. You should in any case discuss the acceptable levels with your Diabetes Team as there may be reasons, medical or otherwise why you should adhere to a different set of standards. As the health of both baby and Mom are paramount do not do anything without first discussing it with the HCP's. Non diabetic women in the last trimester of a p Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Dealing With Low Blood Sugar

Gestational Diabetes: Dealing With Low Blood Sugar

Gestational Diabetes: Dealing With Low Blood Sugar Gestational Diabetes: Dealing With Low Blood Sugar Women who take insulin shots or take the medicine glyburide are at risk for low blood sugar levels. Most women with gestational diabetes do not have problems with low blood sugar ( hypoglycemia ). If your blood sugar (glucose) drops very low, make sure to get treated immediately so that neither you nor your baby is harmed. Low blood sugar occurs when the sugar level in the blood drops below what the body needs to function normally. Women who take insulin may get low blood sugar if they don't eat enough food, skip meals, exercise more than usual, or take too much insulin. These steps can help you avoid a life-threatening emergency from low blood sugar: Test your blood sugar often so that you don't have to guess when your blood sugar is low. Know the signs of low blood sugar (sweating, shakiness, hunger, blurred vision, and dizziness). The best treatment for low blood sugar is to eat quick-sugar foods . Liquids will raise your blood sugar faster than solid foods. Keep the list of quick-sugar foods in a convenient place. Wait 10 to 15 minutes after eating the quick-sugar food, and, if possible, check your blood sugar again. Keep some hard candy, raisins, or other sugary foods with you at all times. Eat some at the first sign of low blood sugar. Check your blood sugar before getting in a car. And don't drive if your blood sugar level is less than 70 mg/dL. Teach your friends and coworkers what to do if your blood sugar is very low. What is a low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) emergency? Low blood sugar means that the level of sugar in your blood has dropped below what your body needs to function normally. Most women with gestational diabetes do not have problems with low blood Continue reading >>

More in blood sugar