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Gestational Diabetes Feeling Sick

Gestational Diabetes And Morning Sickness: Food Tips

Gestational Diabetes And Morning Sickness: Food Tips

Nausea and vomiting, or morning sickness, affects about three-fourths of pregnant women in the U.S. , including women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). If pregnant and diagnosed with GDM you will naturally want to follow your medical team’s advice concerning diet and blood glucose monitoring. Those of you who are experiencing the unpleasant symptoms of morning sickness may also find the following helpful. Expert GDM Morning Sickness Guidelines The American Dietetic Association, in their Guide to Gestational Diabetes Mellitus, recommends the following ten practices to maintain healthy glucose levels and relieve symptoms of morning sickness. Eat a small amount of food every two to four hours. Eating large portions or having an empty stomach can exacerbate nausea or vomiting. Either before going to bed or during the night, eat a light snack. Put a morning snack (e.g., bread, crackers) by your bed before turning in at night. In the morning, eat the snack while in bed and remain lying down for a half hour. Then, get up slowly, and avoid quick movements. Avoid brushing your teeth early in the morning or right after eating since toothpaste can trigger nausea. You might also try brushing with baking soda instead of a paste. Caffeinated beverages and chocolate can elevate stomach secretions so are best avoided. Consume liquids between meals—wait at least a half hour after eating. Unsweetened carbonated beverages, especially carbonated water, are recommended. Most women find that low fat foods such as lean meats, skinless chicken, and eggs are better tolerated that high fat or fried foods. Cold food, or foods at room temperature might be better tolerated. Ginger has been used for centuries to treat nausea. There are delicious ginger teas available or you can take ging Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Gestational Diabetes: What You Need To Know

This pregnancy complication is more common than you might think. Learn who's at risk for it, how it's detected, and what can be done to treat it. For years, doctors believed that gestational diabetes affected three to five percent of all pregnancies, but new, more rigorous diagnostic criteria puts the number closer to 18 percent. The condition, which can strike any pregnant woman, usually develops in the second trimester, between weeks 24 and 28, and typically resolves after baby is born. If gestational diabetes is treated and well-managed throughout your pregnancy, "There's no reason you can't deliver a very healthy baby," says Patricia Devine, M.D., perinatologist at New York-Presbyterian Hospital in New York City. But gestational diabetes that goes untreated, or isn't carefully monitored, can be harmful for both mother and baby. Consult our guide for risk factors, signs of gestational diabetes, and treatment options. What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes, or diabetes that is diagnosed during pregnancy in a woman who previously did not have diabetes, occurs when the pancreas fails to produce enough insulin to regulate blood sugar efficiently. "A hormone produced by the placenta makes a woman essentially resistant to her own insulin," Dr. Devine explains. How does gestational diabetes differ from type 1 or 2 diabetes? Gestational diabetes affects only pregnant women. People who have type 1 diabetes, sometimes referred to as juvenile diabetes, are generally born with it. Type 2 diabetes accounts for 95 percent of all cases of diabetes in the U.S.; it occurs in adulthood, and is triggered by lifestyle factors such as obesity and lack of physical activity. What causes it? It's unclear why some women develop gestational diabetes while others do not. Doctors th Continue reading >>

Gd: Horrific Metformin Side Effects

Gd: Horrific Metformin Side Effects

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Newbie here. Had a browse, thought I'd post. I'm 19w4d and was diagnosed with GD at 17w5d after glycosuria at 16w1d. Midwives and doctors are very concerned as I'm so early on. I haven't been able to control my bloods by diet and exercise at all, and started metformin this past Tuesday at 18w6d. They are expecting to see me again this coming Tuesday at 19w6d to discuss insulin. The problem is, I am utterly miserable on metformin. I started on 500mg in the morning and 500mg at night and was told to gradually increase the dose, going up to 1000mg at night after two days. The first time I took it, I went to bed feeling sick and then got up to use the bathroom and had very loose stools. With every dose I have taken the side effects have got worse. I now can't keep any food down, have true diarrhoea (sorry) to the extent that I've even had an episode of incontinence. I'm utterly miserable and scared to take it. Today I skipped my breakfast dose and of course I feel much better. I'm petrified of taking it, fed up of being so violently sick. Now I know that lots of people experience digestive issues in the beginning and it then settles, so the best thing is to keep on taking it. But my issues are just getting worse. Should I keep taking it anyway? It makes me vomit and I can't eat, and I also won't be able to leave my house if I do. My appointment is in two days on Tuesday, but I'll be able to call them tomorrow. Nobody is there over the weekend. Has this happened to anyone else? What did you do? Metformin caused me the same problems including the incontinence. However I am not pregnant so can only advise you to phone first thing tomorrow and take advice fro Continue reading >>

Sickness And Gd

Sickness And Gd

I usually struggle with nausea in the first trimester, but I've been lucky enough to not suffer with actual vomiting in my previous pregnancies. Everything was fine this time... But something this weekend has changed! I keep being sick and cannot even keep sips of water down, let alone nibbling food to try to keep my blood sugar levels stable. No one else in the house is poorly, but perhaps it's food poisoning? I start vomiting on the Saturday, through Sunday and it seems to be worsening by Monday. I'm due at hospital on Monday for my repeat scan to date the pregnancy and I say to Gavin that I feel too poorly to go. Gavin makes me get ready and go as he's worried how much I've been sick and that I need to get checked out. I don't want to go as I know what's going to happen...they'll admit me, especially as my blood sugar levels are sky rocketing I know no one likes being sick, but I'm terrible with it. I do anything and everything I can to stop myself from vomiting and I start worrying how on earth I am going to make it onto the third floor of the hospital to the assessment unit without being sick throughout the hospital. I'm sick before my shower, during, after and then decide the washing up bowl is going to have to come with me if I have any chance going anywhere. I manage the journey to the hospital without vomiting, but just as Gavin tries to help me out the car I have to stop him. I can't say how awful, ashamed and embarrassed I was throwing up into a washing up bowl, sitting in the hospital car park with people everywhere. Gavin was brilliant at helping and reassuring me and dealing with the contents of said washing up bowl (I love you Patty). I'm called through for my scan and it's the lovely midwife from the diabetes clinic I'd seen the other day. I explain how Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Complications

Gestational Diabetes Complications

Most Gestational diabetes complications can be avoided if you keep a tight rein on the management of your diabetes. Gestational diabetes is just as dangerous as any of the other types of diabetes, even though it is short-lived (only lasting during gestation). Considering that it is not only your own health, but also the health of your unborn child that are affected by it. From this point of view, it must be seen as even more serious as the other types of diabetes. The development of your baby during the pregnancy will determine largely the lifelong health of your child. This will of course be determined on how well you've managed to avoid the gestational diabetes complications. It really is up to you. Uncontrolled blood sugar levels can be quite dangerous, as it can cause severe problems for you and your baby. These problems are highlighted in the gestational diabetes complications listed below. Most women however, who have gestational diabetes, deliver healthy babies. You can also be counted amongst them, all it takes is to manage your disease with care. It really is up to you. The dangers of gestational diabetes complications does not lie so much with the fact that your body does not control its sugar levels adequately. The danger is more in these elevated blood glucose levels. You can and must assist your body to keep your blood sugar levels within the normal range. If your blood sugar are kept at normal levels, then you or your baby will not fall victim to gestational diabetes complications. How can your Baby be Affected by Gestational Diabetes Complications? When you have gestational diabetes, your baby could be at increased risk for these gestational diabetes complications: Fetal macrosomia. Excessive growth. Extra glucose will cross the placenta, which triggers y Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Diet - Just Interested

Gestational Diabetes Diet - Just Interested

gestational diabetes diet - just interested Come and join us on Facebook and Twitter . The BellyBelly forums are now closed. Join the official BellyBelly Facebook community for support and advice, and visit the BellyBelly website for awesome information! gestational diabetes diet - just interested What does you typical daily diet consist of for breakfast, lunch, tea and snacks? Do you feel satisfied on this diet? For those that had morning sickness, do you feel sick or nauseous while on the diet, or does the regultion of your blood sugar level make it more tolerable? I suppose this is more aimed at those on diet controlled measures, but I am sure those on insulin still follow a set diet plan. When I had GD with both of my bubs - the first one was diet controlled at first and then needed insulin in the last few weeks. My second baby I controlled it with diet alone, no problems. Breaky - 2 x slices burgen bread with vegemite, cup of tea with one sugar Lunch - Pasta with tomato sauce, OR burgen bread sandwich with ham and salad OR Vitawheat 9 grains with cheese and tomato Dinner - meat and salad/veges, or pasta, or casserole with rice/pasta Before bed snack - apple OR grilled cheese on burgen toast, glass of milk That's a fairly rough guide - my diet was more varied than that I certainly didn't eat those same things every day. The main things were I cut out all sweets and sugar (except for in my tea) and crappy junk food, and really heavy carbs like white bread and potatoes. I found I was generally ok to eat most other things as long as I watched the portions. If I ate heaps of anything I would have a blow out, I had to learn to really cut down. With my first pregnancy I was constantly hungry while on the diet which was why I ended up on insulin. I had cut down my food in Continue reading >>

What Does Gestational Diabetes Really Feel Like?28

What Does Gestational Diabetes Really Feel Like?28

Just wondering as im blooming sure i have it. 20 week scan showed babys belly is on the 95th centile (indication of GD apparently) Does this mean our baby will be big? I'm tired, feel sick esp after eating, i feel like utter crap, headaches, blurry eyes, thirsty/dry mouth. NOW - midwife says it doesnt mean i have it, they can also be normal pregnancy issues. WHY do they test at 28 weeks? whats special about that time in pregnancy? how do i manage the way i feel without knowing if i have it or not? Im seeing consultant tomorrow, who has already said previously shes testing me at 28 weeks. i will mention all this to her, however, im betting she says no test before 28 weeks. Same as PP, if it wasn't got the GTT coming back positive I wouldn't have had a clue. Felt no different, just normal pregnancy tiredness and aches and pain. I'm now expecting DC2 and feel exactly the same as you and due to previous GD I'm undergoing regularly tests this time around and know I definitely do not have it (yet...there is still time!) It's worth mentioning if your worried about it, do you have risk factors? I doubt they would prevent you from taking a GTT if you requested one i should know all this really, with having had previous pregnancys. didnt have GD with them, BUT i certainly didnt feel like this either! emergency c-section with DS (growth issues) Planned c-section with DD 8lb 4oz (all from previous marriage) this pregnancy (IVF) - with new dh (well of 6 years) whats so special about the 28 week mark? (as thats when im having growth scans from too, is that when baby starts piling on weight??) I would never have known if I wasn't tested. I was in fact quite bad in that I had to have the insulin four times a day plus the metformin tablets three times a day. I couldn't control my sugar Continue reading >>

Treatment

Treatment

If you have gestational diabetes, the chances of having problems with the pregnancy can be reduced by controlling your blood sugar (glucose) levels. You'll also need to be more closely monitored during pregnancy and labour to check if treatment is working and to check for any problems. Checking your blood sugar level You'll be given a testing kit that you can use to check your blood sugar level. This involves using a finger-pricking device and putting a drop of blood on a testing strip. You'll be advised: how to test your blood sugar level correctly when and how often to test your blood sugar – most women with gestational diabetes are advised to test before breakfast and one hour after each meal what level you should be aiming for – this will be a measurement given in millimoles of glucose per litre of blood (mmol/l) Diabetes UK has more information about monitoring your glucose levels. Diet Making changes to your diet can help control your blood sugar level. You should be offered a referral to a dietitian, who can give you advice about your diet, and you may be given a leaflet to help you plan your meals. You may be advised to: eat regularly – usually three meals a day – and avoid skipping meals eat starchy and low glycaemic index (GI) foods that release sugar slowly – such as wholewheat pasta, brown rice, granary bread, all-bran cereals, pulses, beans, lentils, muesli and porridge eat plenty of fruit and vegetables – aim for at least five portions a day avoid sugary foods – you don't need a completely sugar-free diet, but try to swap snacks such as cakes and biscuits for healthier alternatives such as fruit, nuts and seeds avoid sugary drinks – sugar-free or diet drinks are better than sugary versions; be aware that fruit juices and smoothies contain s Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Causes, Symptoms And Treatments

Gestational Diabetes: Causes, Symptoms And Treatments

Gestational diabetes has become one of the most common pregnancy complications in the US, with about 7 percent of pregnant women developing the condition. But just because it’s more widespread doesn’t mean it comes without risks. So what is gestational diabetes—and how can you minimize your chances of getting it? In this article What is gestational diabetes? What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes symptoms Gestational diabetes treatment How to prevent gestational diabetes What Is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes means your body can’t properly regulate your blood sugar levels while you’re pregnant—either because you don’t produce enough insulin or your body can’t properly use the insulin it does produce. That causes your blood sugar levels to spike when you eat, leading to a condition called hyperglycemia. Most moms-to-be diagnosed with gestational diabetes experience diabetes only during pregnancy, and the condition clears up soon after birth. But 5 to 10 percent of women continue to have type 2 diabetes after pregnancy, and those whose diabetes clears up after childbirth are still at a 20 to 50 percent risk of developing type 2 diabetes within the next 10 years. So why are doctors so concerned about this condition? “Gestational diabetes puts the mom and baby at increased risk for pregnancy complications,” says Sherry A. Ross, MD, a Santa Monica, California-based ob-gyn and author of She-ology: The Definitive Guide to Women’s Intimate Health. Period. For moms, those include: High blood pressure Preeclampsia Preterm labor C-section Gestational diabetes effects on baby can increase the risk of: Higher birth weight Shoulder dystocia (when the shoulders get stuck in the birth canal) Congenital malformations (such as abnormal sp Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes And Morning Sickness

Gestational Diabetes And Morning Sickness

Gestational Diabetes and Morning Sickness You may view most areas of the forum without registering. If you wish to post, you do need to register . It's FREE! Gestational Diabetes and Morning Sickness Gestational Diabetes and Morning Sickness I have PCOS and was tested early for GD at 5 weeks. I've since been told that I do have GD and have been given lots of information on how to adjust my diet and lifestyle to control it. The problem I'm having now is that for the last two weeks (Wks 6-8) I've been battling terrible morning sickness. I've been taking Zofran but have found that while it does stop the vomiting and allows me to keep some liquid and food down, the nausea is still quite awful. I've been finding it difficult to eat well for the GD while trying to cope with morning sickness - often having to reach quickly for easy (but not healthy) choices to try and quell the sickness. I'm finding that I'm really put off the foods that I should be eating as well. Any suggestions would be amazing - I'm feeling really guilty and stuck in the middle of two awful situations! Finding it difficult to stay positive when I know I should! Hi congratulations on your pregnancy. I was diagnosed with GD at 28 wks & was diet controlled for the rest of my pregnancy. Its no fun i know. I never had morning sicknesses so can't help there but i just ate small amounts. I would have breakfast, morning tea, lunch, afternoons tea then dinner with a piece of fruit. Apples & bananas were great. Also for snacks 2 rice cakes with vegemite. I also walked (or waddled) after every meal, even if it was 30 mins, it kept my levels down. One big thing also is DONT STRESS.....easier said then done i know but stress plays a big part in your sugar levels . Try yoghurt, that was another good one for me & wholem Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is a condition marked by high blood glucose (sugar) levels that are discovered during pregnancy. It is defined as carbohydrate intolerance. About two to 10 percent of all pregnant women in the U.S. are diagnosed with gestational diabetes. Am I at risk for gestational diabetes? These factors increase your risk of developing diabetes during pregnancy: Being overweight before becoming pregnant (if you are 20% or more over your ideal body weight) Family history of diabetes (if your parents or siblings have diabetes) Being over age 25 Previously giving birth to a baby that weighed more than 9 pounds Previously giving birth to a stillborn baby Having gestational diabetes with an earlier pregnancy Being diagnosed with pre-diabetes Having polycystic ovary syndrome Being African-American, Hispanic/Latino, Asian-American, American Indian, or Pacific Islander American Keep in mind that half of women who develop gestational diabetes have no known risk factors. What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is caused by some hormonal changes that occur in all women during pregnancy. The placenta is the organ that connects the baby (by the umbilical cord) to the uterus and transfers nutrients from the mother to the baby. Increased levels of certain hormones made in the placenta can prevent insulin—a hormone that controls blood sugar—from managing glucose properly. This condition is called "insulin resistance." As the placenta grows larger during pregnancy, it produces more hormones and increases this insulin resistance. Usually, the mother’s pancreas is able to produce more insulin (about three times the normal amount) to overcome the insulin resistance. If it cannot, sugar levels will rise, resulting in gestational dia Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Pregnancy

Diabetes In Pregnancy

Diabetes is a major health problem in America today. Normally, sugars and starches (carbohydrates) are metabolized for use by the body by the chemical insulin. Insulin is produced by the pancreas. If the pancreas does not produce enough insulin, the carbohydrates cannot be used and the level increases in the blood. The carbohydrate that is tested and found in the blood is glucose. Excess glucose in the blood leads to the diagnosis of diabetes. If diabetes is not adequately controlled by diet or insulin injections, complications can occur, such as increases in infections and damage to blood vessels. GESTATIONAL DIABETES When a woman is pregnant, she must share her carbohydrates with the growing baby. The pregnancy hormones can interfere with the ability of the mother's insulin to regulate carbohydrates. In a small percentage of pregnant women (3-12%), the insulin response is very reduced and the blood glucose levels become abnormally high, causing gestational diabetes (diabetes in pregnancy). For the mother, this can mean increased risk of infections or increased chance of a Cesarean section delivery. Following delivery of the baby, the mother's system returns to normal. In addition to problems for the mother, her baby may also suffer from diabetes. Depending upon the blood levels of glucose during the pregnancy, the baby may grow excessively large, causing difficulties at delivery. Additionally, the baby may have temporary difficulty controlling its glucose and calcium at birth. If the mother's blood sugar remains elevated throughout her pregnancy, the baby has increased risk of stillbirth. DETECTING GESTATIONAL DIABETES Gestational diabetes is most often encountered in late pregnancy. In the past, screening for this disease was based on clues such as a family history o Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes...what's It Feel Like?

Gestational Diabetes...what's It Feel Like?

TTC/PRE-PREGNANCY am i pregnant? birth control birth control failure false positives fam/fertility awareness folic acid infertility irregular periods ovulation pcos (polycystic ovarian syndrome) pregnancy tests ttc (trying to conceive) PREGNANCY CHOICES abortion adoption birth centers birth plans doctors/midwives home birth hospitals medicated childbirth natural childbirth repeat cesarean subsequent pregnancies surgical birth surrogacy teen pregnancy unassisted childbirth unassisted pregnancy unplanned pregnancy vaginal birth vbac (vaginal birth after cesarean) water birth PREGNANCY - SYMPTOMS/TRIMESTERS/ETC balance bleeding - after sex bleeding - nosebleeds bloating body changes bowel movements braxton hicks breast issues/changes breathing difficulty clicking sounds colostrum constipation cramps cravings/aversions dental health and hygiene dizziness dreams dropping emotions estimated due dates fainting falling fatigue fears and worries frequent urination gas hair headaches heartbeat - mother heartburn hemorrhoids hormone changes how many months? implantation bleeding incontinence indigestion insomnia itching lack of energy leaking breasts leg cramps leukocytes linea nigra morning sickness mucus plug multiples muscle separation/diastasis recti nausea nesting overdue overheating pelvic pressure pregnancy symptoms round ligament pain sex showing skin issues sleep issues spotting stretchmarks sweating swelling/edema thirst trimester - first trimester - second trimester - third triplets twins updates- pregnancy urination vaginal appearance vaginal discharge varicose veins vision issues vomiting weight WHAT'S GOING ON IN THERE? amniotic fluid anterior placenta breech presentation clicking sounds estimated due dates fetal development fetal positioning folic acid fundal height Continue reading >>

What Is Gestational Diabetes?

What Is Gestational Diabetes?

Regular diabetes is caused by either: (1) the pancreas not producing enough insulin (Type 1 diabetes) (2) the body not responding to the insulin (Type 2 diabetes). Without enough good, working insulin in your body, you end up with too much glucose in the blood and not enough in your cells.Insulin helps the cells take in glucose produced from the foods you eat, which, in turn, supplies the energy for your body. Gestational diabetes happens only during pregnancy, usually around the 24th week. It somewhat is like Type 2 diabetes when your pancreas makes insulin, but the insulin doesn’t work as it should. This is because during this time in your pregnancy, your placenta begins making large amounts of hormones. Some of these hormones may stop the insulin from helping the cells absorb glucose from the blood. At the same time, your pancreas can’t keep up with the extra demand for insulin. Without enough good, working insulin in your body, you end up with too much glucose in the blood and not enough in your cells. If your cells can’t get enough glucose, your body won’t have enough energy to work and play. Also, the extra glucose in your blood can be dangerous. This condition, called hyperglycemia, is how diabetes is diagnosed. As more and more sugar builds up in your blood, it spills over into your urine. So sugar in your urine is another sign of diabetes. Too much sugar in your urine pulls water from your body, causing you to feel thirsty. Even though you drink plenty of water, you still feel thirsty. Drinking a lot of water also causes you to go to the bathroom often. Feeling thirsty all of the time and going to the bathroom a lot are both signs of diabetes. Other signs include blurry vision and feeling tired. A Dangerous Side Effect of Diabetes – When your body doe Continue reading >>

Preeclampsia And Gestational Diabetes

Preeclampsia And Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes and preeclampsia are both conditions that only occur during or just after pregnancy. Gestational diabetes is caused by an inability to use sugar properly during pregnancy, and may result in giving birth to a large baby. One of the potential complications of gestational diabetes is the development of preeclampsia. This condition, which may also be called toxemia of pregnancy or pregnancy-induced hypertension, occurs in about 10 to 30 percent of women with gestational diabetes. What Is Preeclampsia? Preeclampsia is defined as the presence of protein in your urine and high blood pressure occurring after the 20th week of your pregnancy. The condition affects about 5 to 8 percent of all pregnancies. In the United States, preeclampsia rarely causes the death of a mother or infant, but worldwide pregnancy-induced high blood pressure still causes 76,000 maternal deaths and 500,000 infant deaths every year. The cause of preeclampsia remains a mystery. We do know that you are at higher risk if you have gestational diabetes, a family history of preeclampsia, are overweight, or if you had high blood pressure or kidney disease before your pregnancy. Preeclampsia is more common during your first pregnancy, if you are carrying twins, and if you are over age 40 or a teenage mother. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Preeclampsia? The signs and symptoms of preeclampsia are caused by the sudden increase in your blood pressure, retention of fluids in your body, and kidney damage that allows proteins to pass into your urine. High blood pressure. You may have high blood pressure during your pregnancy without swelling or protein in your urine, so high blood pressure alone doesn't mean you have preeclampsia. Your doctor may suspect preeclampsia if you have a sudden increa Continue reading >>

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