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Garlic And Diabetes Interaction

Garlic | Health Benefits | Cardiovascular | Diabetes

Garlic | Health Benefits | Cardiovascular | Diabetes

Garlicprovides health benefits to other systems and areas of the human body. From a medical history standpoint, the antibacterial and antiviral properties of garlic are perhaps its most legendary feature. This allium vegetable and its constituents have been studied not only for their benefits in controlling infection by bacteria and viruses, but also infection from other microbes including yeasts/fungi and worms. (One particular disulfide in garlic, called ajoene, has been successfully used to help prevent infections with the yeast Candida albicans.) Very recent research has shown the ability of crushed fresh garlic to help prevent infection by the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa in burn patients. Also of special interest has been the ability of garlic to help in the treatment of bacterial infections that are difficult to treat due to the presence of bacteria that have become resistant to prescription antibiotics. However, most of the research on garlic as an antibiotic has involved fresh garlic extracts or powdered garlic products rather than fresh garlic in whole food form. Overgrowth of the bacterium Helicobacter pylori in the stomacha key risk factor for stomach ulcerhas been another key area of interest for researchers wanting to explore garlic's antibacterial benefits. Results in this area, however, have been mixed and inconclusive. While garlic may not be able to alter the course of infection itself, there may still be health benefits from garlic in helping to regulate the body's response to that infection. Research shows that anti-inflammatory compounds in garlic can also benefit our musculoskeletal system and respiratory system. Two sulfur containing constituents in garlic, diallyl sulfide (DAS) and thiacremonone, have anti-arthritic properties. Garlic has al Continue reading >>

7 Surprising Things That Make Blood Sugar Control Easier

7 Surprising Things That Make Blood Sugar Control Easier

Being asleep. Being awake. Hot weather. Cold weather. Seems there’s no end to the number of things that can raise your blood glucose levels. No wonder diabetes management can be such an obstacle course. But it’s not all doom and gloom. For every factor that unexpectedly sends your blood sugars spiralling out of control, there’s an equally unexpected – and often enjoyable – way to keep them under control. 1. Peanut butter We know that peanuts are great for people with diabetes. But one group of researchers from Brazil were more interested in peanut butter (and why wouldn’t they be). The team split participants into three groups: the first ate 1.5 ounces of peanuts; the second had three tablespoons of peanut butter with breakfast; and the third had no peanut butter or peanuts. They all ate the same lunch of white bread and strawberry jam. Interestingly, the researchers found that the peanut butter was better for blood glucose levels than the peanuts. The second group felt fuller for long, and had lower blood sugars when they were tested after lunch. Not all peanut butter is as good for you, of course. But the researchers found that the healthier brands can do you a lot of good. Turns out that peanut butter has a lovely combination of high protein, fibre and healthy oils. So you no longer have to feel ashamed for eating it straight from the jar with a tablespoon. I certainly won’t. 2. Red wine Red wine lowers blood sugars by stopping the intestines absorbing glucose. Recently, plenty of researchers have become very interested in the effects of red wine on weight loss and blood glucose levels. A number of studies reckon it could be beneficial. That said, drinking too much of it can cause problems (such as a build-up of fat around the liver), so everything in m Continue reading >>

Garlic For Diabetes

Garlic For Diabetes

Garlic helps lower blood sugar and may be used (under a doctors supervision) by people with diabetes in addition to their regular regime of insulin and special diets. Researchers have found that certain compounds in garlic such as allicin, allyl propyl disulfide and S-allyl cysteine sulfoxide work byincreasing the amount of insulin in the blood by blocking the livers inactivation of insulin, making more insulin available to the body. While more research is still needed to know the full extent of garlics effectiveness, diabetic patients may benefit by taking moderate amounts of garlic as a supplement: raw and cooked garlic or aged garlic extract not only can help regulate blood glucose, but also possibly prevent or lessen the effects of some of the complications of diabetes. Among the complications of diabetes may include high blood pressure, heart disease and stroke, arteriosclerosis, kidney disease and kidney failure (requiring dialysis or kidney transplant), nervous system damage, amputations and blindness . The following is a partial list of the health benefits of garlic or its constituents for diabetics: Continue reading >>

Which Herbal Medications Interact With Diabetes ... | Diabetic Connect

Which Herbal Medications Interact With Diabetes ... | Diabetic Connect

OH, I thought that since herbal medicines were "all natural" they couldn't do me any harm!!!! (tongue FIRMLY planted in cheek) I guess that's not so? Mays, my former boss is a Certified Holistic Health Nurse as well as an RN. One day I was reading an article on yahoo about the benefits of herbal medications. I printed it out for her to read. She read it and threw it in the trash. The first thing she said was do not believe anything in the article and proceeded to tell us that if you want to use herbal medications you should speak to a Certified Holistic Health Nurse or Holistic Health Educator before taking them. When you make the appointment take all of your prescribed medications with you as they will tell you what herbal medications you can take with the medications you are on and that you should make sure you speak with your doctor about weaning you off your meds before you start taking herbal supplements. She also recommended the best books on the market to use when starting a herbal supplements. If you take Coumadin, your doctor should give you a list of veggies you can't eat when taking this medication. My moms doctor and my aunts doctor provided them a list when they were taking it. Continue reading >>

Garlic Lowers Fasting Blood Sugar, Total Cholesterol And Triglycerides

Garlic Lowers Fasting Blood Sugar, Total Cholesterol And Triglycerides

Eating raw garlic lowers fasting blood sugar, LDL cholesterol and triglycerides in hyperglycemic and/or hyperlipidemic people in two separate studies. Picture: Two Romanian Red garlic bulbs rest on red cloth. Garlic Lowers Fasting Blood Sugar in People with High Cholesterol In the first study, Mahmoodi et al. (2011) looked at the effect of eating raw garlic on three groups of people. Volunteers ate 10 grams of garlic daily (one small/medium clove) for 42 days. Group 1: People who had high fasting blood sugar (over 126 mg/dl) Group 2: People who had high blood cholesterol (over 245 ml/dl) Group 3: People who had high blood cholesterol (over 245 ml/dl)and high fasting blood glucose levels (over 126 mg/dl) Eating garlic had no effect on group 1; however, it had a significant effect on groups 2 and 3. Group 2: had significant decreases in fasting blood sugar, triglycerides and total cholesterol. At the same time good HDL cholesterol increased. Group 3: had significant decreases in fasting blood sugar, glycated hemoglobin and total cholesterol. Again good HDL cholesterol increased. Garlic Increases Effectiveness of Metformin In the second study, Ashraf et al. (2011) gave type 2 diabetic patients (n=60) with fasting blood sugar over 126 mg/dl either garlic (300 mg KWAI) + Metformin (500 mg) or a placebo + Metformin (500 mg) twice a day for 24 weeks. Metformin is a standard antidiabetic drug commonly prescribed to type 2 diabetic patients. The garlic plus Metformin group showed a significant reduction in fasting blood sugar at week 24 (-3.12%) (P = <0.005) as compared to group 2 (0.59%). At the end of week 24, the garlic + Metformin group also showed a considerable decrease in mean total cholesterol (6.2 mg/dl, -2.82%, P=<0.005), LDL-C (-3 mg/dl, 2.18% P=<0.005), triglycerides Continue reading >>

Pharmacodynamic Interaction Of Garlic With Gliclazide And Ramipril On Myocardial Injury In Diabetic Rats

Pharmacodynamic Interaction Of Garlic With Gliclazide And Ramipril On Myocardial Injury In Diabetic Rats

Pharmacodynamic Interaction of Garlic with Gliclazide and Ramipril on Myocardial Injury in Diabetic Rats Concurrent therapy of herbs with conventional regimen has been extensively reported for alleviating morbidities such as diabetes and cardiac manifestations. One of unique natural remedy that carry abundant potential for ameliorating wide varieties of ailment is garlic. Present research was designed to explore the role of garlic in obviating myocardial dysfunction in diabetic animals, when combined with ramipril and/or gliclazide. Diabetic Sprague Dawley rats received garlic (250 mg kg-1), ramipril (1 mg kg-1) and gliclazide (10 mg kg-1) orally either alone or in combination in their respective groups. At the end of treatment, heart was excised; mounted on modified Langendorffs set-up; perfused with KrebsHenseleit solution and subjected to ischemia reperfusion injury. Significantly increased percentage recovery was recorded in heart rate and developed tension during post-ischemia in all treated animals, when compared to diabetic group. Further, depleted Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) and catalase activities were substantially inclined in treated groups. Furthermore, combination of garlic with ramipril was most effective in reverting the ischemic damage, whereas, garlic with gliclazide prevent beta cell degeneration. Moreover, histopathological observations validated biochemical and hemodynamic findings. To conclude, this preliminary observation in animals reveals the beneficial role of adding garlic to conventional regimen of gliclazide and ramipril. Further, a careful clinical evaluation of above combination would provide us an opportunity to standardize and implement in cardiovascular disease management in diabetic patient. Received: April 15, 2015; Accepted: May 27, 2 Continue reading >>

Garlic: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions And Warnings - Webmd

Garlic: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions And Warnings - Webmd

View clinical references for this vitamin or supplement Abbruzzese, M. R., Delaha, E. C., and Garagusi, V. F. Absence of antimycobacterial synergism between garlic extract and antituberculosis drugs. Diagn.Microbiol.Infect.Dis. 1987;8(2):79-85. View abstract. Adachi, A. [Two cases of eosinophilic gastroenteritis whose causative allergens are usefully diagnosed by patch test]. Arerugi 2010;59(5):545-551. View abstract. Adetumbi, M., Javor, G. T., and Lau, B. H. Allium sativum (garlic) inhibits lipid synthesis by Candida albicans. Antimicrob Agents Chemother 1986;30(3):499-501. View abstract. Ahmad, M. S., Pischetsrieder, M., and Ahmed, N. Aged garlic extract and S-allyl cysteine prevent formation of advanced glycation endproducts. Eur.J Pharmacol. 4-30-2007;561(1-3):32-38. View abstract. Ahmadi, N., Tsimikas, S., Hajsadeghi, F., Saeed, A., Nabavi, V., Bevinal, M. A., Kadakia, J., Flores, F., Ebrahimi, R., and Budoff, M. J. Relation of oxidative biomarkers, vascular dysfunction, and progression of coronary artery calcium. Am.J.Cardiol. 2-15-2010;105(4):459-466. View abstract. Alder, R., Lookinland, S., Berry, J. A., and Williams, M. A systematic review of the effectiveness of garlic as an anti-hyperlipidemic agent. J Am Acad.Nurse Pract. 2003;15(3):120-129. View abstract. Ali, M. and Thomson, M. Consumption of a garlic clove a day could be beneficial in preventing thrombosis. Prostaglandins Leukot.Essent.Fatty Acids 1995;53(3):211-212. View abstract. Ali, M. Mechanism by which garlic (Allium sativum) inhibits cyclooxygenase activity. Effect of raw versus boiled garlic extract on the synthesis of prostanoids. Prostaglandins Leukot.Essent.Fatty Acids 1995;53(6):397-400. View abstract. Ambati, S., Yang, J. Y., Rayalam, S., Park, H. J., Della-Fera, M. A., and Baile, C. A. Aj Continue reading >>

Garlic Uses, Side Effects & Warnings - Drugs.com

Garlic Uses, Side Effects & Warnings - Drugs.com

Garlic is an herb also known as Ail, Ajo, Allii Sativi Bulbus, Allium, Allium sativum, Camphor of the Poor, Da Suan, Lasun, Lasuna, Nectar of the Gods, Poor Man's Treacle, Rason, Rust Treacle, or Stinking Rose. Garlic is a commonly used food and flavoring agent. When used as a food product, garlic is not likely to produce health benefits or side effects. When used as a medicinal product, garlic may produce both desired and unwanted effects on the body. Garlic products sold as health supplements may vary widely in amount of allicin, the active ingredient in garlic. Allicin is unstable and can be reduced in garlic products that are aged to reduce odor. Odorless garlic may contain little to no allicin. The lower the amount of allicin, the less effective a garlic product might be. Garlic taken orally (by mouth) has been used in alternative medicine as a possibly effective aid in treating high blood pressure , coronary artery disease (hardened arteries), stomach cancer , colon cancer or rectal cancer , and in preventing tick bites. Garlic applied to the skin may also be possibly effective in treating fungal skin infections such as ringworm , jock itch , or athlete's foot . Garlic has also been used to treat high cholesterol , stomach ulcers caused by H. pylori, cancer , or circulation problems in the legs. However, research has shown that garlic may not be effective in treating these conditions. Other uses not proven with research have included preventing the common cold , and improving urination problems caused by an enlarged prostate . It is not certain whether garlic is effective in treating any medical condition. Medicinal use of this product has not been approved by the FDA. Garlic should not be used in place of medication prescribed for you by your doctor. Garlic is o Continue reading >>

Garlic Effectiveness, Safety, And Drug Interactions On Rxlist

Garlic Effectiveness, Safety, And Drug Interactions On Rxlist

Aged Garlic Extract, Ail, Ail Blanc, Ail Cultive, Ail Rocambole, Ajo, Alho, Allii Sativi Bulbus, Allium, Allium sativum, Angio D'India, Camphor Of The Poor, Clove Garlic, Common Garlic, Da Suan, Echte Rokkenbolle, Echter Knoblauch, Garlic Clove, Garlic Oil, Knoblauch, Lasun, Lasuna, Maneul, Nectar Of The Gods, Ninniku, Ophio Garlic, Poor Man's Treacle, Rason, Rocambole, Rockenbolle, Rust Treacle, Schlangenknoblauch, Serpent Garlic, Spanish Garlic, Stinking Rose, Suan, Thoum, Vitlok. Garlic is an herb that is grown around the world. It is related to onion, leeks, and chives. It is thought that garlic is native to Siberia, but spread to other parts of the world over 5000 years ago. Garlic is used for many conditions related to the heart and blood system. These conditions include high blood pressure , low blood pressure, high cholesterol, inherited high cholesterol, coronary heart disease, heart attack, reduced blood flow due to narrowed arteries, and "hardening of the arteries" (atherosclerosis). Some people use garlic to prevent colon cancer, rectal cancer, stomach cancer, breast cancer, prostate cancer, multiple myeloma, and lung cancer. It is also used to treat prostate cancer and bladder cancer. Garlic has been tried for treating an enlarged prostate (benign prostatic hyperplasia; BPH), cystic fibrosis, diabetes, osteoarthritis, hayfever (allergic rhinitis), traveler's diarrhea, high blood pressure late in pregnancy (pre-eclampsia), yeast infection, flu, and swine flu. It is also used to prevent tick bites, as a mosquito repellant, and for preventing the common cold, and treating and preventing bacterial and fungal infections. Garlic is also used for earaches, chronic fatigue syndrome, menstrual disorders, abnormal cholesterol levels caused by HIV drugs, hepatitis, s Continue reading >>

(garlic) Drug Side Effects, Interactions, And Medication Information On Emedicinehealth.

(garlic) Drug Side Effects, Interactions, And Medication Information On Emedicinehealth.

The use of garlic in cultural and traditional settings may differ from concepts accepted by current Western medicine. When considering the use of herbal supplements, consultation with a primary health care professional is advisable. Additionally, consultation with a practitioner trained in the uses of herbal/health supplements may be beneficial, and coordination of treatment among all health care providers involved may be advantageous. Garlic is also known as rocambole, ajo, allium, stinking rose, rustic treacle, nectar of the gods, camphor of the poor, poor man's treacle, and clove garlic. Garlic is a commonly used flavoring agent and food product. Garlic is also available as an herbal supplement. The information contained in this leaflet refers to the use of garlic as an herbal supplement. When used as a food product, the benefits and potential side effects of garlic may be less pronounced than when it is used as an herbal supplement. Garlic has been used orally as an antioxidant; to reduce cholesterol and triglycerides ; to reduce hardening of the arteries and blood clotting; to reduce blood pressure; to prevent cancer; to protect the liver; as an antibiotic, antiviral, and antifungal; to increase the effects of the immune system; to reduce blood sugar levels; and to reduce menstrual pain. Garlic has also been used topically (on the skin) to treat corns, warts , calluses, ear infections, muscle pain, nerve pain, arthritis , and sciatica . Garlic has not been evaluated by the FDA for safety, effectiveness, or purity. All potential risks and/or advantages of garlic may not be known. Additionally, there are no regulated manufacturing standards in place for these compounds. There have been instances where herbal/health supplements have been sold which were contaminated Continue reading >>

Can You Eat Garlic If You Have Diabetes?

Can You Eat Garlic If You Have Diabetes?

People who have diabetes are unable to produce enough insulin or use the insulin their body does produce in an efficient manner. This can affect your blood sugar levels. It’s important to monitor what you eat to keep your blood sugar levels as steady as possible. One way to do this is by checking the glycemic index (GI) score of each food. The GI shows how much a certain food can increase your blood sugar levels. GI helps with the planning of daily meals and avoiding high-carbohydrate combinations. A low GI is between 1 and 55 and high is 70 and above. It’s important to know that natural foods, such as garlic, though not rich in carbohydrates, can influence blood sugar levels. Most adults can safely consume garlic. For some people, taste, odor, or spiciness can be an issue. Traditionally, garlic has been recommended to help reduce high cholesterol levels and high blood pressure. Garlic consumption may also reduce the incidence of heart disease, a condition that affects approximately 80 percent of people with diabetes. A 2006 study found that raw garlic might help reduce blood sugar levels, as well as reduce the risk of atherosclerosis. This is particular interest, as diabetes increases a person’s risk of atherosclerosis-related inflammation. Though this is still under investigation, a 2014 review of studies also supported the idea that regular garlic consumption may help lower blood sugar levels. Garlic is also a good source of vitamins B-6 and C. Vitamin B-6 is involved in carbohydrate metabolism. Vitamin C may also play a role in maintaining blood sugar levels. In general, garlic has been shown to: improve the health of the cardiovascular system by reducing the levels of cholesterol, triglycerides, and blood lipids decrease blood pressure have an anti-tumor effe Continue reading >>

Treat Diabetes By Consuming Garlic

Treat Diabetes By Consuming Garlic

Edited by Nerissa Avisado, Robbi, Lynn, Ermin and 5 others High blood pressure, arteriosclerosis, heart disease and stroke are just a few of the complications of diabetes. In severe cases, it can even lead to amputations, blindness, nervous system damage, and kidney failure that may require expensive and dreadful dialysis or a kidney transplant. Sadly, a large percentage of the population (347 million as of 2004) are afflicted with this metabolic disorder. (2016 and the number has risen to 371 million) In the US alone, about 25.8 million people have diabetes. (2016 and the number has risen to 29 million) That is approximately 8.3 percent of the population. It is estimated that 79 million adults (age 20 and older) have pre-diabetes. Of those afflicted, around seven million are not even aware that they have the debilitating condition. Who reveals that about 3.4 million people died from it in 2004 and about 80 percent of these deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries. This will make diabetes the seventh leading killer around the world by 2030. With such sobering statistics, the need to find a treatment is very important, especially if there is a natural remedy that can manage diabetes in developing countries. Garlic, a culinary spice well-known for its medicinal properties, has a long history of use as a treatment for many ailments, including the treatment of diabetes. Continue reading >>

Natural Medicines - Garlic May Help Reduce Long-term Diabetes Complications

Natural Medicines - Garlic May Help Reduce Long-term Diabetes Complications

Copyright 2018 Natural Medicines (www.naturalmedicines.com) Garlic May Help Reduce Long-Term Diabetes Complications Garlic may help control high levels of C-reactive protein and adenosine deaminase in obese people with diabetes, according to a study. C-reactive protein is a marker of inflammation, while adenosine deaminase is an enzyme that is involved in metabolism. Previous research has linked high C-reactive protein and adenosine deaminase levels to long-term complications in people with uncontrolled diabetes. Researchers set out to determine if garlic may help control levels of C-reactive protein and adenosine deaminase in obese people with type 2 diabetes. They enrolled 60 subjects who were given either metformin tablets with garlic capsules or metformin tablets alone after meals. They measured the participants' blood glucose, adenosine deaminase levels, and cholesterol at the beginning of the study, then conducted a 12-week follow-up to continue monitoring these factors. The results suggested that both metformin with garlic and metformin alone helped significantly reduce blood sugar. However, a drop in total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein (LDL or "bad") cholesterol, and triglyceride appeared to be more significant in the group given metformin and garlic. The metformin and garlic group also had a greater decrease in C-reactive protein and adenosine deaminase levels, compared to the subjects given only metformin. The research team concluded that garlic may be valuable in helping to control blood sugar and prevent long-term complications associated with type 2 diabetes and obesity. However, more studies are needed in this area before further conclusions on the potential benefits of garlic can be made. Diabetes is associated with long-term complications that af Continue reading >>

Anti-diabetic And Anti-oxidant Potential Of Aged Garlic Extract (age) In Streptozotocin-induced Diabetic Rats

Anti-diabetic And Anti-oxidant Potential Of Aged Garlic Extract (age) In Streptozotocin-induced Diabetic Rats

Anti-diabetic and anti-oxidant potential of aged garlic extract (AGE) in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Kuwait University, P.O. Box 5969, 13060 Safat, Kuwait Martha Thomson, Email: [email protected] . Received 2015 May 9; Accepted 2016 Jan 8. Open AccessThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License ( ), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver ( ) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Although aged garlic extract (AGE) shares some active components with fresh garlic and in spite of its palatability and milder side effects, the anti-diabetic and related anti-oxidant properties of AGE have not been investigated extensively, and the reported findings are inconsistent. This study investigated the anti-diabetic effects of 3 incremental doses of AGE in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats (fasting blood sugar > 20 mM). Diabetic rats were divided into a control diabetic group (CD) and AGE-treated diabetic group (AGE-D). The AGE-D was divided into 3 groups and accordingly treated with AGE i.p. at 100, 300 and 600 mg/kg daily for 8 weeks. A control normal group (CN) was also included for reference. Compared to the CN group, the CD group showed significant loss of body weight (over 50 %); and decreased serum insulin concentration (10 fold) and total anti-oxidant level and catalase activity (4570 %) in serum, kidney Continue reading >>

Does Garlic Have A Role As An Antidiabetic Agent?

Does Garlic Have A Role As An Antidiabetic Agent?

Does garlic have a role as an antidiabetic agent? Department of Nutrition, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan, PR China. [email protected] Mol Nutr Food Res. 2007 Nov;51(11):1353-64. Diabetes affects a large segment of the population worldwide, and the prevalence of this disease is rapidly increasing. Despite the availability of medication for diabetes, traditional remedies are desirable and are currently being investigated. Garlic (Allium sativum), which is a common cooking spice and has a long history as a folk remedy, has been reported to have antidiabetic activity. However, there is no general agreement on the use of garlic for antidiabetic purposes, primarily because of a lack of scientific evidence from human studies and inconsistent data from animal studies. The validity of data from previous studies of the hypoglycemic effect of garlic in diabetic animals and the preventive effects of garlic on diabetes complications are discussed in this review. The role of garlic as both an insulin secretagogue and as an insulin sensitizer is reviewed. Evidence suggests that garlic's antioxidative, antiinflammatory, and antiglycative properties are responsible for garlic's role in preventing diabetes progression and the development of diabetes-related complications. Large-scale clinical studies with diabetic patients are warranted to confirm the usefulness of garlic in the treatment and prevention of diabetes. Continue reading >>

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