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Fat Blood Sugar

Sugar Vs Fat

Sugar Vs Fat

Tweet Sugar and fat are two of the most widely talked about dietary topics, with one of the most commonly asked questions by people with (and without) diabetes being 'how much sugar or fat can I have in my diet?' Sugar Limiting the amount of sugar we take in should be a priority for all people, not just individuals with diabetes. Sucrose (table sugar) is a major part of some of our favourite daytime snacks like cakes and biscuits, but what many people fail to remember is that sugar is also present in a wide range of other foods. These include: Cereals Fruit drinks and smoothies Fruit yoghurts Ready meals Soups Aside from energy (calories), sugar provides no nutrition which is why it is often referred to as 'empty calories'. It also increases blood glucose levels quickly, which is one of the reasons why people with diabetes are advised to limit their daily intake of sugar (the NHS recommends consuming less than 70g a day of sugar for men and under 50g of sugar a day for women). In fact, limiting sugar intake is a good way to start getting your blood glucose levels under control. Cutting back on the amount of processed foods you eat is also recommended as the majority contain added sugars and in the UK, manufacturers are currently not required to state how much sugar has been added in processing. But saying no to sugary foods in an effort to restrict your sugar intake can be difficult, especially if those around you (friends, work colleagues, relatives, etc) often indulge in sweet food and drink. Sugary snacks such as energy drinks (lucozade) and glucose tablets are used to prevent or treat hypoglycemia, so don't worry about taking these if you are at risk of hypos. Fat For decades, fat has been labelled the 'bad guy' in diet and nutrition. However in recent years, a numb Continue reading >>

The Impact Of Fat And Protein On Blood Glucose Levels

The Impact Of Fat And Protein On Blood Glucose Levels

The Impact of Fat and Protein on Blood Glucose Levels People with diabetes have traditionally been taught to bolus only for foods containing carbohydrates, given that it has the greatest impact on blood glucose levels. However increasingly, people with lived experience are beginning to suggest otherwise, and research is finally beginning to catch up. I recently had the opportunity to hear from a researcher at the University of Sydney in Australia, who has played a key role in studies looking into the effects of fat and protein on blood glucose levels. Here are some of my observations from this presentation. Effects of Fat and Protein on Blood Glucose Levels The effects of slowly digested fats and proteins on blood glucose are minimal in people without diabetes who produce sufficient insulin. In people with diabetes, however, the effects of fat and protein are far more significant due to the absence of enough insulin. In addition to converting glucose in the bloodstream from carbohydrates into energy, insulin is also required to convert fatty acids from fat and amino acids from protein into energy. A series of seven studies concluded that both fat and protein increased blood glucose levels. It’s important to note, however, that we are all different and that these findings won’t apply to everyone. Higher fat meals, typically defined as meals with greater than 35g (1.2 ounces) of fat, reduced early responses on blood glucose levels during the first 2-3 hours. The blood glucose peak was pushed out later and caused a sustained blood glucose response that often carried on for several hours. Higher protein meals began producing a noticeable effect on blood glucose levels 1.5 to 2 hours after being consumed. There was a noticeable difference between meals where protein was Continue reading >>

5 Reasons Why People With Diabetes Need To Eat Fat

5 Reasons Why People With Diabetes Need To Eat Fat

5 Reasons Why People With Diabetes Need to Eat Fat In our personal coaching program we work with hundreds of clients who have diabetes and, time and time again, we see their need for blood sugar reducing medications (like insulin and Metformin) decrease when they eat more fat. A common misconception when you are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes is youre doomed to forever be a diabetic and your need for pills and insulin will continue to increase for the rest of your life. This flat out isnt true. We can prevent and reverse the damage in our cells when we are eating the right foods in the right amounts, and this includes plenty of fat. We know that healthy fat is important for everyone, for a million different reasons. If I were to pick one population who especially need to eat fat, even more than most, it would be people with diabetes.Ironically, this is the exact opposite of what we are being taught by the American Diabetes Association and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. These same associations are known to cover up blood sugar imbalances with prescription medication, not the functional medicine, real food approach we embracehere. The standard diabetes treatment approach is a backwards, after the fact approach because it focuses on treating the symptoms rather than the underlying cause. With proper nutrition, medication isnt needed to target elevated blood glucose levels. Carbohydrate counting is still considered the gold standard, ensuring that people with diabetes are getting enough carbohydrates for blood sugar control, with the general goal being 45-60 grams at meals and 15-30 grams at snacks. This boggles my mind since carbohydrates are the VERY thing that cause spikes in blood sugar levels! Fat doesn't spike blood sugar levels, carbohydrates do. Once you u Continue reading >>

Why Does Fat Increase Blood Glucose?

Why Does Fat Increase Blood Glucose?

Has this ever happened to you? — You eat a meal such as fettuccine alfredo with garlic bread and tiramisu for dessert. — You take either the appropriate amount of insulin for the carbohydrate in the meal or your oral medications. — You check 2 to 3 hours after eating and see a blood glucose reading that is in range. So far, so good, right? —Then you wake up the next morning with a very high number? Ever wondered what causes this? There are two reasons. First, Fettuccine Alfredo, garlic bread and tiramisu are, for the most part, a mixture of carbohydrate and fat. But it’s the fat in the meal that is contributing to the elevated readings. Although carbohydrate is the nutrient that has the most immediate affect on blood glucose levels, fat is not glucose neutral. But only a small portion of the triglyceride (fat) molecule, called the glycerol backbone, can be used as glucose. This very small addition to the glucose pool can’t be the source of your high blood glucose readings. So if fat doesn’t directly raise blood glucose, what is it doing? For many years scientists thought that fat was a metabolically inert substance. Fat on the body was considered dead weight, just extra blubber people carted around. Well it turns out that fat has been masquerading as the quiet shy guy in the back row, all the while packing a considerable metabolic punch. A high fat meal can increase the amount of free fatty acids (FFAs) in the blood. Both repeatedly elevated levels of FFAs as found in chronic intake of high fat (especially high saturated fat) meals and obesity are associated with both skeletal muscle and liver insulin resistance. That resistance means that it will take more insulin—either made by your pancreas or from an injection—to move the glucose in the blood strea Continue reading >>

8 Sneaky Things That Raise Your Blood Sugar Levels

8 Sneaky Things That Raise Your Blood Sugar Levels

Skipping breakfast iStock/Thinkstock Overweight women who didn’t eat breakfast had higher insulin and blood sugar levels after they ate lunch a few hours later than they did on another day when they ate breakfast, a 2013 study found. Another study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that men who regularly skipped breakfast had a 21 percent higher chance of developing diabetes than those who didn’t. A morning meal—especially one that is rich in protein and healthy fat—seems to stabilize blood sugar levels throughout the day. Your breakfast is not one of the many foods that raise blood sugar. Here are some other things that happen to your body when you skip breakfast. Artificial sweeteners iStock/Thinkstock They have to be better for your blood sugar than, well, sugar, right? An interesting new Israeli study suggests that artificial sweeteners can still take a negative toll and are one of the foods that raise blood sugar. When researchers gave mice artificial sweeteners, they had higher blood sugar levels than mice who drank plain water—or even water with sugar! The researchers were able to bring the animals’ blood sugar levels down by treating them with antibiotics, which indicates that these fake sweeteners may alter gut bacteria, which in turn seems to affect how the body processes glucose. In a follow-up study of 400 people, the research team found that long-term users of artificial sweeteners were more likely to have higher fasting blood sugar levels, reported HealthDay. While study authors are by no means saying that sugary beverages are healthier, these findings do suggest that people who drink artificially sweetened beverages should do so in moderation as part of a healthy diet. Here's what else happens when you cut artificial sweetener Continue reading >>

The Fat Of The Matter: How Dietary Fat Effects Blood Glucose

The Fat Of The Matter: How Dietary Fat Effects Blood Glucose

Pizza. A hot fudge sundae. Movie theater popcorn. Cheesesteaks wit (hey, I’m a Philly guy). What do they all have in common? More than being mighty tasty, they’re also loaded with fat. Fat doesn’t usually receive a whole lot of attention from those on intensive insulin programs; carbs seem to get all the glory. And deservedly so: Carbs cause a rapid rise in blood glucose, while fat seems to have little effect. Or does it? You may have noticed that your blood glucose level rises overnight after a restaurant meal. Or perhaps it climbs excessively in the evening after having a big piece of birthday cake during the day. The culprit is most likely the fat content of these types of meals and snacks, not the carbohydrates. It has long been known that adding fat to a meal will slow down the digestion/absorption of carbohydrates. This is due to a slowdown in gastric emptying – the rate at which food passes from the stomach into the intestines, where the nutrients (such as glucose) are absorbed into the bloodstream. This is why the carbohydrates in high-fat meals tend to take longer to raise the blood glucose level. But the difference is generally an hour or two: Whereas a low-fat meal will raise the blood glucose level quickly (usually within an hour), a high-fat meal may take two to four hours to produce a blood sugar peak. So what about after the carbohydrates are finished doing their thing? That’s when the fat itself begins to exert its effects. The process goes something like this: You eat a high-fat meal or snack (this is the fun part). In a few hours, the fat begins to digest; this continues for several hours. The level of fat in the bloodstream (triglycerides) rises. High triglycerides in the bloodstream cause the liver to become resistant to insulin. When the l Continue reading >>

Dietary Fat And Blood Glucose

Dietary Fat And Blood Glucose

When most people with diabetes think about the effects that different foods have on their blood glucose levels, one particular component of foods usually comes to mind: carbohydrates. And rightfully so, since out of the three major macronutrients in the human diet — carbohydrates, proteins, and fats — carbohydrates have the greatest effect on blood glucose levels. But as a recent study makes clear, fats can also have a significant effect on blood glucose levels — both positive and negative. As many people with diabetes have experienced firsthand, eating fats in combination with carbohydrates can affect how quickly the carbohydrates are absorbed in the digestive tract, potentially leading to a slower, more sustained rise in blood glucose levels. But this study looked at a different, often overlooked aspect of dietary fat: what type it is — saturated, monounsaturated, or polyunsaturated — as well as the effect of substituting fat for carbohydrate. Published last month in the journal PLOS Medicine, the study examined 102 different clinical trials in which participants followed different diets and had their blood glucose, insulin, and HbA1c (a measure of long-term blood glucose control) levels recorded. A total of 4,220 adults — some of whom had diabetes — and 239 different diet groups were included in the study. Within each of the clinical trials, participants in each diet group consumed the same number of calories, regardless of the other aspects of their diet. As noted in a HealthDay article on the study, the researchers found that some fats raised blood glucose levels less than others — and that substituting some fats for carbohydrates could also lead to better blood glucose control. When participants switched out 5% of the calories in their diet from ca Continue reading >>

Does Red Meat Raise Blood Sugars?

Does Red Meat Raise Blood Sugars?

Recently I have heard more and more people use the phrase “I don’t eat red meat because it bad for my blood sugars.” As red meat- along with any other cuts of meat- is a food made up of only fat and protein, eating red meat will have no immediate effect on your blood sugar. Crash course in macro-nutrients Foods can be broken up into three macro-nutrient categories: Carbohydrate, Fat and Protein. Blood sugars increase when we consume Carbohydrate foods- fruits, rice, beans, pastas, breads, milk, and starchy vegetables such as corn, potatoes and winter squash. As these foods are digested into their basic components- glucose is released into the bloodstream. This glucose is what causes blood sugars to raise after eating a food containing Carbohydrates. Protein foods however do not have glucose as part of their elemental structure, instead they break down into amino acids. Amino acids aid in building muscle and repairing cells in your body. Fats can be either saturated or unsaturated fats and fuel cells providing a required source of energy for our brains for survival. Red meat Foods are often a combination of these three macronutrients. Take red meat for example: Beef contains both protein and fat, but no carbohydrates. Where then does the misconception that red meat hurts blood sugars come from? Red meat is typically high in fats, especially saturated fatty acids. Foods containing fat are higher in calories which may lead to poor weight control if eaten in excess. As mentioned before, fats are essential for brain and cell health, but the American Diabetes Association recommends limiting fats to less than 30% of total calorie consumption with saturated fats making up less than 10% calorie consumption. Saturated fatty acids are the types of fat that stay solid at room Continue reading >>

[effect Of Dietary Fat On Blood Sugar Levels And Insulin Consumption After Intake Of Various Carbohydrate Carriers In Type I Diabetics On The Artificial Pancreas].

[effect Of Dietary Fat On Blood Sugar Levels And Insulin Consumption After Intake Of Various Carbohydrate Carriers In Type I Diabetics On The Artificial Pancreas].

Abstract The role of fat on carbohydrate absorption was investigated in 14 type-I-diabetics who were connected to a glucose-monitored insulin infusion pump (Biostator, Miles). The patients received test meals in the form of potatoes, rice and apples with equal carbohydrate content, in each case with and without added fat. Comparison of carbohydrate carriers showed an increase of blood sugar and insulin consumption which was biggest after the potato meal and significantly lower after rice and apple ingestion. This is probably related to the different biologic availability of carbohydrate carriers. Addition of fat caused lowering of blood sugar and insulin consumption in the potato meal; in this case nutritional fat is likely to have slowed gastrointestinal passage. There were no major differences among rice and apple. It can be concluded that addition of fat delays absorption of rapidly split carbohydrates more than absorption of slowly split carbohydrates such as rice. The lack of influence of fat on postprandial blood sugar and insulin consumption after an apple meal is related to the slight increase of blood sugar caused by the high content of fructose. Continue reading >>

Why/how Does Fat Increase Blood Glucose?

Why/how Does Fat Increase Blood Glucose?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community hey Again I stumbled over an article explaining in what way fat can raise blood glucose... maybe most relevant for type 1 diabetic or insuline users of type 2 ... I was a Little puzzled to find that fat in any ways could be able to raise blood glucose as I have been taught that fat is the only thing that never raises blood glucose besides from pure alcohol . If youll take the time and read the article , I like to hear what you think of it.. "First, Fettuccine Alfredo, garlic bread and tiramisu are, for the most part, a mixture of carbohydrate and fat. But its the fat in the meal that is contributing to the elevated readings." What utter cobblers.. the carb causes the elevated readings... the fat delays the spike and maybe slows it down. Take your blood before and after a bulletproof coffee or fat bomb and you'll see minimal changes. From my basic understanding fat doesnt necessarily raise your levels. It acts as more of a hindrance as it takes longer for the body to break down the fat and get what it needs. Hence when i havena takeaway my levels can be good when i go to bed but higher in the morning. Did you read all of the first article? It was purely focused on T1 and was pretty reasonable in what it said @bulkbiker The second article seems to say that if you have ketones you will develop ketoacidosis whatever happens which I'm afraid is also wrong. Did you read all of the first article? It was purely focused on T1 and was pretty reasonable in what it said @bulkbiker It doesn't mention type 1 at all though does it? Just says you need have your insulin dose or your oral meds? do Type 1's take oral meds?..unclear at best surely. The second article see Continue reading >>

The Basic Food Groups: The Insulin/fat Connection

The Basic Food Groups: The Insulin/fat Connection

The Insulin/Fat Connection The primary source of body fat for most Americans is not dietary fat but carbohydrate, which is converted to blood sugar and then, with the aid of insulin, to fat by fat cells. Remember, insulin is our main fatbuilding hormone. Eat a plate of pasta. Your blood sugar will rise and your insulin level (if you have type 2 diabetes or are not diabetic) will also rise in order to cover, or prevent, the jump in blood sugar. All the blood sugar that is not burned as energy or stored as glycogen is turned into fat. So you could, in theory, acquire more body fat from eating a high-carbohydrate “fat-free” dessert than you would from eating a tender steak nicely marbled with fat. Even the fat in the steak is more likely to be stored if it is accompanied by bread, potatoes, corn, and so on. The fatty-acid building blocks of fats can be metabolized (burned), stored, or converted by your body into other compounds, depending on what it requires. Consequently, fat is always in flux in the body, being stored, appearing in the blood, and being converted to energy. The amount of triglycerides (the storage form of fat) in your bloodstream at any given time will be determined by your heredity, your level of exercise, your blood sugar levels, your diet, your ratio of visceral (abdominal) fat to lean body mass (muscle), and especially by your recent consumption of carbohydrate. The slim and fit tend to be very sensitive (i.e., responsive) to insulin and have low serum levels not only of triglycerides but insulin as well. But even their triglyceride levels will increase after a high-carbohydrate meal, as excess blood sugar is converted to fat. The higher the ratio of abdominal fat (and, to a lesser degree, total body fat) to lean body mass, the less sensitive to i Continue reading >>

Carbohydrates, Proteins, Fats, And Blood Sugar

Carbohydrates, Proteins, Fats, And Blood Sugar

The body uses three main nutrients to function-carbohydrate, protein, and fat. These nutrients are digested into simpler compounds. Carbohydrates are used for energy (glucose). Fats are used for energy after they are broken into fatty acids. Protein can also be used for energy, but the first job is to help with making hormones, muscle, and other proteins. Nutrients needed by the body and what they are used for Type of nutrient Where it is found How it is used Carbohydrate (starches and sugars) Breads Grains Fruits Vegetables Milk and yogurt Foods with sugar Broken down into glucose, used to supply energy to cells. Extra is stored in the liver. Protein Meat Seafood Legumes Nuts and seeds Eggs Milk products Vegetables Broken down into amino acids, used to build muscle and to make other proteins that are essential for the body to function. ADVERTISINGinRead invented by Teads Fat Oils Butter Egg yolks Animal products Broken down into fatty acids to make cell linings and hormones. Extra is stored in fat cells. After a meal, the blood sugar (glucose) level rises as carbohydrate is digested. This signals the beta cells of the pancreas to release insulin into the bloodstream. Insulin helps glucose enter the body's cells to be used for energy. If all the glucose is not needed for energy, some of it is stored in fat cells and in the liver as glycogen. As sugar moves from the blood to the cells, the blood glucose level returns to a normal between-meal range. Several hormones and processes help regulate the blood sugar level and keep it within a certain range (70 mg/dL to 120 mg/dL). When the blood sugar level falls below that range, which may happen between meals, the body has at least three ways of reacting: Cells in the pancreas can release glucagon, a hormone that signals the b Continue reading >>

Lipotoxicity: How Saturated Fat Raises Blood Sugar

Lipotoxicity: How Saturated Fat Raises Blood Sugar

You guys should look into the blood viscosity theory of cardiovascular disease. It answers the question why everything seems to be a cofactor in heart disease, but nothing seems to be the single factor. Its because everything alters the viscosity of the blood. Everything IS a cofactor. If you have chronic elevated viscosity, over time the arteries are stressed and toughen up. As to the debate between vegetarian high carb and low carbers. Its obvious at this point that the body can utilize carbs efficiently or fats efficiently, but struggles when fat and carbs are eaten in high amounts together. The blood fills up with fat AND sugar, becomes toxic. But this also seems to be the combination that gives you that High after you eat. Think about it… a baked potato is good by itself. Cheese n butter is ok by itself I guess. But a baked potato doused in cheese n butter? Eyes roll up in the head good. Foodgasm. You get a high from eating it. And in nature, what animal ever eats carbs and animal fat simultaneously? Milk is the only thing I can think of. So is a low carb diet just as good as a vegetarian diet? Nope. Totally unsustainable over the long term. Works great in the short term but lack of fiber n nutrients will eventually destroy you. As to the vegans and vegetarians. Same thing. Occasional animal fat and meat is extremely healthy. And so many lifelong vegans have had to just stop due to the exact same health problems surfacing. And why are any of us still so confused about what we should be eating? The largest ‘study’ in human history has already been done proving what the best diet is. Its called JAPAN. Where they have amazingly low rates of cardiovascular disease, dementia, multiple sclerosis, obesity, skin problems…. you name it. Everything they eat seems to Continue reading >>

How Does Fat Affect Insulin Resistance And Diabetes?

How Does Fat Affect Insulin Resistance And Diabetes?

According to the Centers for Disease Control, 29 million people in America have diabetes and 86 million have prediabetes. Insulin resistance is recognized as a predictor of type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and obesity. But what causes insulin resistance? In this NutritionFacts.org video, Dr. Michael Greger talks about how fat affects insulin resistance, and about how the most effective way to reduce insulin sensitivity is to reduce fat intake. We’ve also provided a summary of Dr. Greger’s main points below. Insulin Resistance of People on High-Fat Diets vs. High-Carb Diets In studies performed as early as the 1930s, scientists have noted a connection between diet and insulin intolerance. In one study, healthy young men were split into two groups. Half of the participants were put on a fat-rich diet, and the other half were put on a carb-rich diet. The high-fat group ate olive oil, butter, mayonnaise, and cream. The high-carb group ate pastries, sugar, candy, bread, baked potatoes, syrup, rice, and oatmeal. Within two days, tests showed that the glucose intolerance had skyrocketed in the group eating the high-fat diet. This group had twice the blood sugar levels than the high-carb group. The test results showed that the higher the fat content of the diet, the higher the blood sugar levels would be. What Is Insulin Resistance? It turns out that as the amount of fat in the diet goes up, so does one’s blood sugar spikes. Athletes frequently carb-load before a race because they’re trying to build up fuel in their muscles. We break down starch into glucose in our digestive tract; it circulates as blood glucose (blood sugar); and it is then used by our muscle cells as fuel. Blood sugar, though, is like a vampire. It needs an invitation to enter our cells. And that invit Continue reading >>

Fat And Blood Sugar Levels Q&a

Fat And Blood Sugar Levels Q&a

by Richard K. Bernstein, M.D., F.A.C.E., F.A.C.N., C.W.S. The subject of treating diabetes with a low carbohydrate diet is virtually untouched by other publications. I would like to see a series of articles about it. Of course, a quicker way would be to read Dr. Richard K. Bernsteins book Dr. Bernsteins Diabetes Solution (Boston: Little, Brown & Company, 1997). I have a question which I hope Dr. Bernstein can answer. Fat in the diet is a controversial subject as it relates to diabetes. Some swear that there is a relationship between too much fat and increased blood glucose, as measured after a meal. It would be very helpful for Dr. Bernstein to comment on this subject. Despite the claims of many, fat does not raise blood sugar. Because outside pressure on this subject is so great, I do not expect anyone to accept my word. Instead, you can prove it to yourself. If you are on a rational blood glucose control regimen like the one described in my book, you should be able to skip breakfast and lunch without any significant change in your blood sugar. If you are not on an intensive program which allows you skip meals, do not attempt the following. Try skipping breakfast and lunch one day this week to make sure blood sugar remains constant. Next week, however, consume a shot glass (2 oz.) of peanut oil (better tasting than other oils) three hours after you arise in the morning. Check your blood sugar before the oil, and every hour thereafter for four hours. If your blood sugars were level in the first week, they will be level in the second week. Two ounces of peanut oil contain about 500 calories! If these do not raise your blood sugar, you have proven my point. I guarantee that you will see no blood glucose change. By the way, dont try peanut butter, as it contains carbohydr Continue reading >>

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