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Fasting Glucose Test

Blood Glucose

Blood Glucose

Test Overview A blood glucose test measures the amount of a type of sugar, called glucose, in your blood. Glucose comes from carbohydrate foods . It is the main source of energy used by the body. Insulin is a hormone that helps your body's cells use the glucose. Insulin is produced in the pancreas and released into the blood when the amount of glucose in the blood rises. Normally, your blood glucose levels increase slightly after you eat. This increase causes your pancreas to release insulin so that your blood glucose levels do not get too high. Blood glucose levels that remain high over time can damage your eyes, kidneys, nerves, and blood vessels. There are several different types of blood glucose tests. Fasting blood sugar (FBS). This test measures blood glucose after you have not eaten for at least 8 hours. It is often the first test done to check for prediabetes and diabetes . 2-hour postprandial blood sugar. This test measures blood glucose exactly 2 hours after you start eating a meal. This is not a test used to diagnose diabetes. This test is used to see if someone with diabetes is taking the right amount of insulin with meals. Random blood sugar (RBS). It measures blood glucose regardless of when you last ate. Several random measurements may be taken throughout the day. Random testing is useful because glucose levels in healthy people do not vary widely throughout the day. Blood glucose levels that vary widely may mean a problem. This test is also called a casual blood glucose test. Oral glucose tolerance test. This test is used to diagnose prediabetes and diabetes. An oral glucose tolerance test is a series of blood glucose measurements taken after you drink a sweet liquid that contains glucose. This test is commonly used to diagnose diabetes that occurs durin Continue reading >>

Why The Fasting Glucose Test Is Important

Why The Fasting Glucose Test Is Important

Fasting Glucose Test Fact Sheet Diabetes and its precursor, pre-diabetes, cause few symptoms, particularly early on in the progression of the condition. Blood sugar or blood glucose testing is common for screening apparently healthy people to determine whether they have diabetes or are at risk of diabetes. Public health fairs and routine examinations frequently include blood glucose tests. One of these tests is known as a fasting glucose test, though this test is more likely to performed at a prearranged appointment because it requires overnight fasting beforehand. People who are overweight or who have a family history of diabetes are likely to benefit from this screening test, as are adults age 40 and older. As people age, their bodies ability to regulate blood glucose can decline, making the fasting glucose test beneficial for older adults. When people eat carbohydrates, the body breaks down the carbs into glucose. With the assistance of insulin, the body uses glucose for energy. Without insulin, glucose cannot enter cells; instead, it remains in the blood, causing high blood sugar levels. The inability to produce insulin or an impaired ability to make or use it defines diabetes. A high level of fasting glucose suggests diabetes, especially if high levels are found more than once. Overview of the test A fasting glucose test or FBS, is a simple blood test that looks at how much sugar is in a blood sample. This test screens for abnormal blood glucose ranges, either too much or too little. Doctors may use it to screen for diabetes. Results could indicate a person has diabetes or is in a blood glucose range that indicates pre-diabetes, which is when glucose levels are moderately elevated. People with pre-diabetes do not have symptoms. How is it done A fasting glucose test Continue reading >>

Why Are Fasting Blood Glucose Numbers High?

Why Are Fasting Blood Glucose Numbers High?

Stumped by high fasting blood glucose results? Join the club. "It just doesn't compute. When I snack before bed, my fastings are lower than when I limit my night nibbles," says Pete Hyatt, 59, PWD type 2. "It's logical for people to point the finger for high fasting blood sugar numbers at what they eat between dinner and bed, but surprisingly food isn't the lead villain," says Robert Chilton, M.D., a cardiologist and professor of medicine at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. The true culprit is compromised hormonal control of blood glucose levels. The Essential Hormones During the years (up to a decade) that type 2 diabetes develops, the hormonal control of blood glucose breaks down. Four hormones are involved in glucose control: Insulin, made in the beta cells of the pancreas, helps the body use glucose from food by enabling glucose to move into the body's cells for energy. People with type 2 diabetes have slowly dwindling insulin reserves. Amylin, secreted from the beta cells, slows the release of glucose into the bloodstream after eating by slowing stomach-emptying and increasing the feeling of fullness. People with type 1 and type 2 diabetes are amylin-deficient. Incretins, a group of hormones secreted from the intestines that includes glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), enhance the body's release of insulin after eating. This in turn slows stomach-emptying, promotes fullness, delays the release of glucose into the bloodstream, and prevents the pancreas from releasing glucagon, putting less glucose into the blood. Glucagon, made in the alpha cells of the pancreas, breaks down glucose stored in the liver and muscles and releases it to provide energy when glucose from food isn't available. {C} How the Essential Hormones Work in the Body When d Continue reading >>

What Is A Normal Blood Sugar Level?

What Is A Normal Blood Sugar Level?

The aim of diabetes treatment is to bring blood sugar (“glucose”) as close to normal as possible. What is a normal blood sugar level? And how can you achieve normal blood sugar? First, what is the difference between “sugar” and “glucose”? Sugar is the general name for sweet carbohydrates that dissolve in water. “Carbohydrate” means a food made only of carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen. There are various different kinds of sugars. The one our body uses most is called “glucose.” Other sugars we eat, like fructose from fruit or lactose from milk, are converted into glucose in our bodies. Then we can use them for energy. Our bodies also break down starches, which are sugars stuck together, into glucose. When people talk about “blood sugar,” they mean “blood glucose.” The two terms mean the same thing. In the U.S., blood sugar is normally measured in milligrams of glucose per deciliter of blood (mg/dl). A milligram is very little, about 0.00018 of a teaspoon. A deciliter is about 3 1/3 ounces. In Canada and the United Kingdom, blood sugar is reported in millimoles/liter (mmol/L). You can convert Canadian or British glucose levels to American numbers if you multiply them by 18. This is useful to know if you’re reading comments or studies from England or Canada. If someone reports that their fasting blood glucose was 7, you can multiply that by 18 and get their U.S. glucose level of 126 mg/dl. What are normal glucose numbers? They vary throughout the day. (Click here for a blood sugar chart.) For someone without diabetes, a fasting blood sugar on awakening should be under 100 mg/dl. Before-meal normal sugars are 70–99 mg/dl. “Postprandial” sugars taken two hours after meals should be less than 140 mg/dl. Those are the normal numbers for someone w Continue reading >>

Diagnosis

Diagnosis

Print Symptoms of type 1 diabetes often appear suddenly and are often the reason for checking blood sugar levels. Because symptoms of other types of diabetes and prediabetes come on more gradually or may not be evident, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) has recommended screening guidelines. The ADA recommends that the following people be screened for diabetes: Anyone with a body mass index higher than 25, regardless of age, who has additional risk factors, such as high blood pressure, a sedentary lifestyle, a history of polycystic ovary syndrome, having delivered a baby who weighed more than 9 pounds, a history of diabetes in pregnancy, high cholesterol levels, a history of heart disease, and having a close relative with diabetes. Anyone older than age 45 is advised to receive an initial blood sugar screening, and then, if the results are normal, to be screened every three years thereafter. Tests for type 1 and type 2 diabetes and prediabetes Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) test. This blood test indicates your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. It measures the percentage of blood sugar attached to hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells. The higher your blood sugar levels, the more hemoglobin you'll have with sugar attached. An A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests indicates that you have diabetes. An A1C between 5.7 and 6.4 percent indicates prediabetes. Below 5.7 is considered normal. If the A1C test results aren't consistent, the test isn't available, or if you have certain conditions that can make the A1C test inaccurate — such as if you're pregnant or have an uncommon form of hemoglobin (known as a hemoglobin variant) — your doctor may use the following tests to diagnose diabetes: Random blood sugar Continue reading >>

Glucose Test

Glucose Test

Definition A blood glucose test measures the amount of a sugar called glucose in a sample of your blood. Glucose is a major source of energy for most cells of the body, including those in the brain. Carbohydrates (or carbs) are found in fruit, cereal, bread, pasta, and rice. They are quickly turned into glucose in your body. This raises your blood glucose level. Hormones made in the body called insulin and glucagon help control blood glucose levels. See also: Alternative Names Random blood sugar; Blood sugar level; Fasting blood sugar How the test is performed A blood sample is needed. For information on how this is done, see: Venipuncture. How to prepare for the test The test may be done in 2 ways: After you have not eaten anything for at least 8 hours (fasting) At any time of the day (random) How the test will feel When the needle is inserted to draw blood, some people feel moderate pain, while others feel only a prick or stinging sensation. Afterward, there may be some throbbing. Why the test is performed Your doctor may order this test if you have signs of diabetes. However, other tests (glucose tolerance test and fasting blood glucose test) are better for diagnosing diabetes. The blood glucose test is also used to monitor patients who have the diabetes. It may also be done if you have: A change in behavior Fainting spells Seizures for the first time Normal Values If you had a fasting blood glucose test, a level between 70 and100 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) is considered normal. If you had a random blood glucose test, normal results depend on when you last ate. Most of the time, blood glucose levels will be below 125 mg/dL. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Talk to your doctor about the meaning of your specific test results. Th Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Tests

Blood Sugar Tests

A test that measures blood sugar levels. Elevated levels are associated with diabetes and insulin resistance, in which the body cannot properly handle sugar (e.g. obesity). Goal values: Less than 100 mg/dL = normal Between 110–125 mg/dL = impaired fasting glucose (i.e., prediabetes) Greater than 126 mg/dL on two or more samples = diabetes Preparation This test requires a 12-hour fast. You should wait to eat and/or take a hypoglycemic agent (insulin or oral medication) until after test has been drawn, unless told otherwise. Eating and digesting foods called carbohydrates forms glucose (blood sugar). Glucose is needed by your body to provide energy to carry out your normal activities. Insulin is needed by the body to allow glucose to go into the cells and be used as energy. Without insulin, the levels of glucose in the blood will rise. Diabetes is a disease that occurs when either the pancreas (an organ in your body) is not able to produce insulin or the pancreas makes insulin, but it does not work as it should. Fasting blood sugar is a part of diabetic evaluation and management. An FBS greater than 126 mg/dL on more than one occasion usually indicates diabetes. Glycosylated Hemoglobin or Hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C) Reflects average blood sugar levels over the preceding 90-day period. Elevated levels are associated with prediabetes and diabetes. Individuals with diabetes have an increased risk of a cardiac event. A diabetic person's risk for heart attack is the same as a non-diabetic person, who has experienced one heart attack, having a second heart attack. Aggressive global preventive risk reduction efforts, such as lower LDL targets, diet, exercise and blood pressure control, are recommended. Goal values (per American Diabetes Association guidelines): A range of 5.7-6.4 p Continue reading >>

How Food Intake Can Alter Glucose Test Results

How Food Intake Can Alter Glucose Test Results

Your body maintains a reservoir of glucose—the sugar that is the body's preferred source of energy—in the blood at all times. Your doctor may test your level of blood glucose at a certain time, particularly when fasting, as part of a diagnostic test. If your blood sugar is too high or too low, it can be an indication of a disease or other medical condition. Nutrients in food can temporarily elevate your blood sugar, so our doctor will likely ask you to fast before a blood glucose test. All carbohydrates are built from long chains of sugars. Enzymes in your small intestines break many forms of carbohydrates into component sugars; this is necessary for them to be absorbed into your body. These sugars circulate in the blood until they are used for energy by your body's cells. Any food that contains carbohydrates will elevate blood sugar. Fasting Blood Glucose Test The most common blood sugar test ordered by doctors is a measurement of fasting blood glucose. This tells your doctor whether your baseline blood sugar levels are low, normal or elevated as a result of balance or imbalance in your body, rather than the effects of foods. This blood test requires a 12-hour fast. It is normally taken in the morning, and you will be asked to abstain from eating after 8 or 9 p.m. the night before. HbA1C Test HbA1C is a form of hemoglobin, the molecule in your blood that carries oxygen. HbA1C differs from normal hemoglobin in that it has been bound to a sugar molecule. The risk of this is elevated when your blood sugar levels are elevated. The level of HbA1C estimates your average blood sugar levels over the past 90 days. The test can be performed regardless of recent food intake. A high HbA1C level is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Glucose Tolerance Continue reading >>

Glucose Test

Glucose Test

Testing blood sugar levels A glucose test is a type of blood test used to determine the amount of glucose in the blood. It is mainly used in screening for prediabetes or diabetes.[1] Patients are instructed not to consume anything but water during the fasting period. Caffeine will also distort the results. If the person eats during the period in which he or she is supposed to have been fasting then they may show blood sugar levels that may cause his or her doctor to think the person has or is at increased risk of having diabetes. In people already having diabetes, blood glucose monitoring is used with frequent intervals in the management of the condition.[1] There are several different kinds of glucose tests: Fasting blood sugar (FBS), fasting plasma glucose (FPG): 8 or 12 or 14 hours after eating Glucose tolerance test:[2] continuous testing Postprandial glucose test (PC): 2 hours after eating Random glucose test Reference ranges[edit] Fasting blood sugar[edit] A range of 4 to 5.5 mmol/l (70 to 99 mg/dl) before a meal is normal. Continual fasting levels of 5.5 to 7 mmol/l (101–125 mg/dl) causes concern of possible prediabetes and may be worth monitoring. 7 mmol/l (126 mg/dl) and above means a risk of diabetes.[3] After a 12‑hour fast, a range of 3.9 to under 5.5 mmol/l (70.2 to 100 mg/dl) is normal; a level of 5.6 to under 7 mmol/l (100 to 126 mg/dl) is considered a sign of prediabetes.[3] Postprandial glucose[edit] Main article: Postprandial glucose test A level of < 7.8 mmol/l (140 mg/dl) 90 minutes after a meal is normal.[4] See also[edit] Glucose meter Hyperglycemia Hypoglycemia [edit] Continue reading >>

What Is The Fasting Blood Sugar Test?

What Is The Fasting Blood Sugar Test?

The fasting blood sugar test (FBS) measures the amount of glucose (sugar) in your blood when you have not had anything to eat or drink for several hours. This test is also called a fasting plasma glucose test (FBS). Why is this test done? The most common use of this test is to check for diabetes. How do I prepare for this test? The simplest way to check for diabetes is to check your blood sugar before you've had anything to eat or drink in the morning. In most cases you will fast overnight, eating nothing and drinking nothing but water after your evening meal and in the morning before your blood is drawn. If you do shift work, it's best to have your blood checked after your usual sleeping time (after at least 6 hours of sleep) and before you start your active day. When you wake up, you should have nothing to eat and nothing to drink except water before your blood is drawn. You may need to avoid taking certain medicines before the test because they might affect the test result. Make sure your healthcare provider knows about any medicines, herbs, or supplements that you are taking. Don't stop any of your regular medicines without first consulting with your healthcare provider. Talk to your healthcare provider if you have any questions. How is the test done? Your healthcare provider may poke your finger with a lancet and fill a small tube with the blood. Or a small amount of blood may be taken from your arm with a needle. The blood is sent to a lab. Having this test will take just a few minutes. Ask your healthcare provider when and how you will get the result of your test. What does the test result mean? The normal fasting blood sugar range in most labs is 70 to 99 milligrams per deciliter (3.9 to 5.5 millimoles per liter). A fasting blood sugar level of 100 to 125 mg/dL Continue reading >>

Can You Eat Before Going For A Gestational Diabetes Test?

Can You Eat Before Going For A Gestational Diabetes Test?

I am blown away by the posts saying you shouldn't smoke before your gestational diabetes test. IF YOU'RE PREGNANT YOU SHOULDN'T BE SMOKING AT ALL PEOPLE!!!!!!! The one hour glucose test you really dont need to fast because it is not a fasting test. After you drink the glucola you should not have anything to eat or drink, no gum,candy or mints. you also should not go smoke. Cigerattes have glucose in them too. The three hour test you need to fast for 12-14 hours prior because that test is fasting the lab needs a base fasting glucose to compare the rest of the blood after you drink the glucola. With that test you should still have nothing in between the blood draws, even though the taste is very bad. My Dr. said to eat normal, just try to watch your sugar intake the day of the test. You are not supposed to fast. The idea of the test is to see how your body handles the sugar on your normal diet. If you fast, then it's like you are cheating the test. I would rather know for sure that my body is handling the foods I eat properly or if I need to change my diet. Wish me luck...I have my 1 hour test today! OKAY- so for the ONE HOUR glucose test, I definitely recommend fasting. I ate an hour before my one hour test, and my levels came back high. So, I was sent to take the three hour test (which SUCKS!!!! because you have to fast and THEN wait another 3 hours for the test, and you get stuck 3 times which really sucks). Well, my levels came back great that time-because I fasted. I told the nurses who did the three hour that I had not fasted for the one hour, and they said if I had fasted I probably wouldn't have had to do the three hour. So just to save yourself the trouble, I would fast before the first test! I wasn't told not to eat anything before my regular glucose test, so I Continue reading >>

Diagnosing Impaired Glucose Tolerance (igt)

Diagnosing Impaired Glucose Tolerance (igt)

People with IGT have blood glucose levels that are higher than normal but not high enough to say they have diabetes. This condition is diagnosed using the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). After a fast of 8 to12 hours, a person's blood glucose is measured before and 2 hours after drinking a glucose-containing solution. In normal glucose tolerance, blood glucose rises no higher than 140 mg/dl 2 hours after the drink. In impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), the 2-hour blood glucose is between 140 and 199 mg/dl. If the 2-hour blood glucose rises to 200 mg/dl or above, a person has diabetes. How does the fasting blood glucose test differ from the oral glucose tolerance test? In the fasting blood glucose test, a person's blood glucose is measured after a fast of 8 to 12 hours: A person with normal blood glucose has a blood glucose level below 100. A person with impaired fasting glucose has a blood glucose level between 100 and 125 mg/dl. If the fasting blood glucose level rises to126 mg/dl or above, a person has diabetes. The OGTT includes measures of blood glucose levels after a fast and after a glucose challenge. In 1997, an American Diabetes Association (ADA) expert panel recommended that doctors use the fasting blood glucose test to screen their patients for diabetes because the test is easier and less costly than the OGTT. Though the fasting glucose test detects most diabetes cases, the OGTT is more sensitive in identifying people with blood glucose problems that may first appear only after a glucose challenge. For a person with IGT, what is the risk of developing type 2 diabetes? As few as 1 to as many as 10 of every 100 persons with IGT will develop diabetes per year. The risk of getting diabetes rises as people become more overweight and more sedentary, have a stronge Continue reading >>

Tests For Blood Sugar (glucose) And Hba1c

Tests For Blood Sugar (glucose) And Hba1c

Blood sugar (glucose) measurements are used to diagnose diabetes. They are also used to monitor glucose control for those people who are already known to have diabetes. Play VideoPlayMute0:00/0:00Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE0:00Playback Rate1xChapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Subtitles undefined settings, opens undefined settings dialog captions and subtitles off, selected Audio TrackFullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal Dialog End of dialog window. If your glucose level remains high then you have diabetes. If the level goes too low then it is called hypoglycaemia. The main tests for measuring the amount of glucose in the blood are: Random blood glucose level. Fasting blood glucose level. The HbA1c blood test. Oral glucose tolerance test. Capillary blood glucose (home monitoring). Urine test for blood sugar (glucose). Blood tests for blood sugar (glucose) Random blood glucose level A sample of blood taken at any time can be a useful test if diabetes is suspected. A level of 11.1 mmol/L or more in the blood sample indicates that you have diabetes. A fasting blood glucose test may be done to confirm the diagnosis. Fasting blood glucose level Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Test

Blood Sugar Test

A blood glucose test measures the amount of a sugar called glucose in a sample of your blood. Glucose is a major source of energy for most cells of the body, including brain cells. Carbohydrates are found in fruit, cereal, bread, pasta, and rice. They are quickly turned into glucose in your body. This raises your blood glucose level. Hormones made in the body help control blood glucose level. Continue reading >>

Performance Of An A1c And Fasting Capillary Blood Glucose Test For Screening Newly Diagnosed Diabetes And Pre-diabetes Defined By An Oral Glucose Tolerance Test In Qingdao, China

Performance Of An A1c And Fasting Capillary Blood Glucose Test For Screening Newly Diagnosed Diabetes And Pre-diabetes Defined By An Oral Glucose Tolerance Test In Qingdao, China

OBJECTIVE The study's goal was to evaluate the performance of A1C and fasting capillary blood glucose (FCG) tests as mass screening tools for diabetes and pre-diabetes, as determined by the standard oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Data from 2,332 individuals aged 35–74 years who participated in a population-based cross-sectional diabetes survey in Qingdao, China, were analyzed. A 2-h 75-g OGTT was used to diagnose diabetes. The performance of A1C and FCG was evaluated against the results of the OGTTs by using receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis. RESULTS The prevalence of newly diagnosed diabetes and pre-diabetes (impaired fasting glucose and/or impaired glucose tolerance) was 11.9 and 29.5%, respectively. For subjects with newly diagnosed diabetes, the area under the ROC curve was 0.67 for A1C and 0.77 for FCG (P < 0.01) in men and 0.67 and 0.75 (P < 0.01) in women, whereas for pre-diabetes, these values were 0.47 and 0.64 (P < 0.001) in men and 0.51 and 0.65 (P < 0.001) in women. At the optimal A1C cutoff point of ≥5.6% for newly diagnosed diabetes, sensitivities (specificities) were 64.4% (61.6%) for men and 62.3% (63.3%) for women. CONCLUSIONS As a screening tool for newly diagnosed diabetes and pre-diabetes, the FCG measurement performed better than A1C in this general Chinese population. Type 2 diabetes has become a serious public health threat worldwide, and it leads to increased premature mortality and morbidity including blindness, renal failure, amputation, and cardiovascular disease. Diabetes and its complications may occur several years before a clinical diagnosis is made. Mass screening for diabetes can lead to an early diagnosis and timely treatment or intervention, which have been shown to reduce diabe Continue reading >>

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