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Fasting Blood Sugar 150

Controlling The Dawn Phenomenon

Controlling The Dawn Phenomenon

One of our most stubborn challenges is to control the dawn phenomenon. That’s when our fasting blood glucose readings in the morning are higher than when we went to bed. The dawn phenomenon is a normal physiological process where certain hormones in our body work to raise blood glucose levels before we wake up, as we wrote in The New Glucose Revolution: What Makes My Blood Glucose Go Up…And Down? Professor Jennie Brand-Miller of the University of Sydney, Kaye Foster-Powell, and I co-authored that book (Marlowe & Co., first edition 2003, second American edition 2006). These so-called counter-regulatory hormones, including glucagon, epinephrine, growth hormone, and cortisol, work against the action of insulin. They stimulate glucose release from the liver and inhibit glucose utilization throughout the body. The result is an increase in blood glucose levels, ensuring a supply of fuel in anticipation of the wakening body’s needs. If you take insulin injections, it could be that the effect of insulin you took is waning. Your blood glucose will rise if you didn’t take enough to keep your insulin level up through the night. The dawn phenomenon varies from person to person and can even vary from time to time in each of us. That much was clear when our book came out. But how to control it was a different story. A couple of years ago here I wrote about several efforts for “Taming the Dawn Phenomenon.” People have tried everything from eating a green apple at bedtime to high-maize grain to uncooked cornstarch. None of these remedies that I have been able to try ever worked for me. I always thought that the most promising remedy was one that a correspondent named Renee suggested – vinegar capsules. “I am still using vinegar tablets (usually 8) each night and have us Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Blood Sugar Readings

Diabetes: Blood Sugar Readings

www.CardioSmart.org What is a blood sugar reading? A blood sugar reading shows how much sugar, or glucose, is in your blood. A test of your blood sugar may be done to: • Check for diabetes. • See how well diabetes treatment is working. • Check for diabetes that occurs during pregnancy (gestational diabetes). • Check for low or high blood sugar levels (hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia). What are normal blood sugar readings? There are several types of blood sugar tests. Normal results can vary from lab to lab. Talk with your doctor about what any abnormal results might mean, and about any symptoms and other health problems you have. Normal values for adults who do NOT have prediabetes or diabetes Less than or equal to 100 When you have not eaten (fasting blood sugar): Less than 140 if you are age 50 or younger; less than 150 if you are age 50 to 60; less than 160 if you are age 60 and older 2 hours after eating (postprandial): Levels vary depending on when and how much you ate at your last meal. In general: 80 to 120 beforemeals or when waking up; 100 to 140 at bedtime. Random (casual): Target values for nonpregnant adults who have prediabetes or diabetes 80 to 130When you have not eaten (fasting blood sugar): Less than 1802 hours after eating (postprandial): What causes abnormal blood sugar? High blood sugar can be caused by: • Diabetes or prediabetes. • Certain medicines, such as corticosteroids. Low blood sugar can be caused by: • Certain medicines, especially those used to treat diabetes. • Liver disease, such as cirrhosis. Rarely, high or low blood sugar can be caused by other medical problems that affect hormone levels. Prediabetes and diabetes Blood sugar helps fuel your body. Normally, your blood sugar rises slightly af Continue reading >>

8 Tips To Avoid Blood Sugar Dips And Spikes

8 Tips To Avoid Blood Sugar Dips And Spikes

If you have type 2 diabetes and your blood sugar levels are racing up and down like a roller coaster, it's time to get off the ride. Big swings in your blood sugar can make you feel lousy. But even if you aren't aware of them, they can still increase your risk for a number of serious health problems. By making simple but specific adjustments to your lifestyle and diet, you can gain better blood-sugar control. Your body uses the sugar, also known as glucose, in the foods you eat for energy. Think of it as a fuel that keeps your body moving throughout the day. Blood Sugar Highs and Lows Type 2 diabetes decreases the body’s production of insulin, which is a hormone that regulates blood sugar. Without enough insulin, sugar builds up in the blood and can damage nerves and blood vessels. This increase of blood sugar also increases your risk for heart disease and stroke. Over time, high blood sugar, also known as hyperglycemia, can lead to more health problems, including kidney failure and blindness. "Keeping blood sugar stable can help prevent the long-term consequences of fluctuations," says Melissa Li-Ng, MD, an endocrinologist at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio. Dr. Li-Ng explains that high blood sugar can cause a number of symptoms that include: Fatigue Increased thirst Blurry vision Frequent urination It's also important to know that you can have high blood sugar and still feel fine, but your body can still suffer damage, Li-Ng says. Symptoms of high blood sugar typically develop at levels above 200 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). "You can have high blood sugar that's between 150 and 199 and feel perfectly fine," Li-Ng says. Over time, your body can also get used to chronically high blood sugar levels, so you don’t feel the symptoms, she says. On the flip side, if you Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Level Chart And Information

Blood Sugar Level Chart And Information

A - A + Main Document Quote: "A number of medical studies have shown a dramatic relationship between elevated blood sugar levels and insulin resistance in people who are not very active on a daily or regular basis." A doctor might order a test of the sugar level in a person's blood if there is a concern that they may have diabetes, or have a sugar level that is either too low or too high. The test, which is also called a check of blood sugar, blood glucose, fasting blood sugar, fasting plasma glucose, or fasting blood glucose, indicates how much glucose is present is present in a person's blood. When a person eats carbohydrates, such as pasta, bread or fruit, their body converts the carbohydrates to sugar - also referred to as glucose. Glucose travels through the blood to supply energy to the cells, to include muscle and brain cells, as well as to organs. Blood sugar levels usually fluctuate depending upon what a person eats and how long it has been since they last ate. However; consistent or extremely low levels of glucose in a person's blood might cause symptoms such as: Anxiety Sweating Dizziness Confusion Nervousness Warning signs of dangerously high levels of blood sugar include sleepiness or confusion, dry mouth, extreme thirst, high fever, hallucinations, loss of vision, or skin that is warm and dry. A blood sugar test requires a finger prick or needle stick. A doctor might order a, 'fasting,' blood glucose test. What this means is a person will not be able to drink or eat for 8-10 hours before the test, or the doctor may order the test for a random time or right after the person eats. If a woman is pregnant, her doctor might order a, 'glucose-tolerance test,' which involves drinking glucose solution and having blood drawn a specified amount of time later. The re Continue reading >>

Must Read Articles Related To High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

Must Read Articles Related To High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

A A A High Blood Sugar (Hyperglycemia) Whenever the glucose (sugar) level in one's blood rises high temporarily, this condition is known as hyperglycemia. The opposite condition, low blood sugar, is called hypoglycemia. Glucose comes from most foods, and the body uses other chemicals to create glucose in the liver and muscles. The blood carries glucose (blood sugar) to all the cells in the body. To carry glucose into the cells as an energy supply, cells need help from insulin. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas, an organ near the stomach. The pancreas releases insulin into the blood, based upon the blood sugar level. Insulin helps move glucose from digested food into cells. Sometimes, the body stops making insulin (as in type 1 diabetes), or the insulin does not work properly (as in type 2 diabetes). In diabetic patients, glucose does not enter the cells sufficiently, thus staying in the blood and creating high blood sugar levels. Blood sugar levels can be measured in seconds by using a blood glucose meter, also known as a glucometer. A tiny drop of blood from the finger or forearm is placed on a test strip and inserted into the glucometer. The blood sugar (or glucose) level is displayed digitally within seconds. Blood glucose levels vary widely throughout the day and night in people with diabetes. Ideally, blood glucose levels range from 90 to 130 mg/dL before meals, and below 180 mg/dL within 1 to 2 hours after a meal. Adolescents and adults with diabetes strive to keep their blood sugar levels within a controlled range, usually 80-150 mg/dL before meals. Doctors and diabetes health educators guide each patient to determine their optimal range of blood glucose control. When blood sugar levels remain high for several hours, dehydration and more serious complicat Continue reading >>

Controlling The Dawn Phenomenon

Controlling The Dawn Phenomenon

Do you wake up with a blood glucose level that’s higher than when you went to bed? You might wonder how this could be. Is this “dawn phenomenon” serious, and what can you do about it? Our reader Mishelle commented here, “I don’t eat [much] during the day. [I take metformin morning and night.] My blood sugar is still too high in the morning…sometimes 125–140ish.” How can Mishelle’s glucose levels go up if she didn’t eat anything? She probably has a mild case of dawn phenomenon. Her glucose is going up from sources other than digested food. Some of it is produced by the liver from stored starch and fatty acids. Livers that produce too much glucose are one of the main ways diabetes causes high blood glucose levels. Other organs also produce small amounts of glucose. This is called “gluconeogenesis” for you science freaks out there. Organs do this to keep blood glucose from going too low at night or other times of not eating. From about 2 AM to 8 AM, most people’s bodies produce hormones, including cortisol, glucagon, and epinephrine. All these hormones increase insulin resistance and tell the liver to make more glucose. The idea is to get you enough glucose to get out of bed and start the day. The whole process is apparently started by growth hormones. Everyone has a dawn phenomenon. Otherwise they’d be too weak to get breakfast. But in people without diabetes, insulin levels also increase to handle the extra glucose. People with diabetes can’t increase insulin levels that much, so their early morning blood glucose levels can rise dramatically. Experts disagree on how many people have a dawn phenomenon. Estimates range from 3% to 50% of Type 2s and from 25% to 50% of Type 1s. Is dawn phenomenon a serious problem? It can be serious. According t Continue reading >>

His Blood Sugar Was Above Normal. Why Did I Advise Against Tighter Glucose Control?

His Blood Sugar Was Above Normal. Why Did I Advise Against Tighter Glucose Control?

The case: A diabetic dissatisfied with his blood sugar control There was no doubt about it: For a man in his early 90s, Mr. T was in great shape. Despite having had type 2 diabetes for 10 years, as well as a heart attack in his 70s, he remained slim, fit, and was still able to drive confidently from his home in Oakland to our clinic in San Francisco. "I feel good," he told me during a check-up. "I'm hoping to live to be at least 100, like my father. I'm walking 30 minutes every day, just like he did. And I eat healthy foods. "But I'm worried about my blood sugar," he went on, pulling out his home blood glucose records. "Look. I've been taking my metformin every day, just like I'm supposed to. But the other day, I got all the way up to 182." (Blood sugar in non-diabetics usually measures between 70 and 120.) I looked over the log he handed me. Then I checked the computer for that day's bloodwork results. Mr. T's glycosylated hemoglobin, also known as hemoglobin A1C, was 7.1 percent, about the same as it had been over the past year. "Doctor, my son looked on the Internet and read that it's better to have lower blood sugar. Shouldn't I be taking more diabetes medication?" The challenge: Weighing the pros and cons of tight glucose control When people develop difficulty naturally regulating the amount of glucose (sugar), in their blood, they're said to have diabetes. Without treatment, diabetics have blood sugar levels that are higher than normal. People with type 2 diabetes often feel fine if their blood sugar gets only mildly-to-moderately high; they may not even realize they have the disease. But experts always urge diabetics to take this condition very seriously, because over several years higher blood sugar can cause permanent damage to the body, especially to the eyes Continue reading >>

How To Tell When Normal Blood Sugar Isn’t

How To Tell When Normal Blood Sugar Isn’t

Most people don’t worry about diabetes until a doctor tells them their blood sugar is too high. But even if you get a “normal” blood sugar reading at your next exam, you might not be totally in the clear. According to cutting-edge research, blood sugar levels on the high end of the normal range may still raise your risk of illness, leading some doctors to take such results more seriously — particularly if patients have other diabetes risk factors, such as obesity or family history. The somewhat arbitrary cutoff between normal blood sugar levels and higher ones associated with diabetes may give a false sense of security to millions of people, notes brain researcher Nicolas Cherbuin of Australian National University. His research published in 2013 found that middle-aged people with high-normal fasting blood sugar readings had worse scores on memory tests and more shrinkage in a brain region important to memory than those with lower blood sugar. Higher glucose levels may damage blood vessels and hinder the flow of nutrients to the brain. THE NUMBERS YOU AND YOUR DOC SHOULD KNOW • DIABETES: Blood sugar level of 126 mg/dl or higher • PREDIABETES: Blood sugar level between 100 and 125 mg/dl • HIGH-NORMAL BLOOD SUGAR: Roughly 90 to 99 mg/dl (a new category being studied for health risks) • NORMAL BLOOD SUGAR: Currently defined as 70 to 99 mg/dl * All levels are based on a fasting blood glucose test, which involves an overnight fast. Other research suggests high-normal blood sugar may increase your heart disease risk by raising inflammation and making blood vessels stiffer. A 2012 Israeli study found that people with a fasting blood sugar between 90 and 99 mg/dl were 40 percent more likely to suffer heart disease than those with a level under 80 mg/dl. Cancer is Continue reading >>

How To Get Quick Control Over Your Diabetes

How To Get Quick Control Over Your Diabetes

High Sugar Level in Just One Week! How I Lowered My Diabetic High Blood Sugar From 399 mg/dl to 112 mg/dl in Just One Week! UPDATE: In January of 2017 I weighed 215 pounds. Today is June 7th and I weighed 150.2 today!!! Amen! I've lost 65 pounds in just a few months!!! Here's a ukulele video I made last month, showing before and after. My sugar last year was 399 mg/dl, but is now 75 mg/dl. My mmol/L was 9.8 last year, but was 6.7 two months ago when I weighed 185. My doctor said my diabetes is all GONE! I've lost another 35 pounds and am now 150 pounds. I'll get my glucose tested again in a couple weeks, which should be 5 point something. My friend, LOSE WEIGHT if you want to get rid of the type II diabetes. I explain in the video and notes how I lost so much weight. I DIDN'T take any diabetes drugs!!! I DIDN'T take any pills or follow anyone's quack diet plan. I simply limited my daily calories to 1,000 or less, and walked a couple hours a day, here a little and there a little. Drink only water. Eat big salads (with hardly any dressing) and stay away from processed and breaded foods. Eat tomatoes, lettuce, cucumbers, AND FAST A DAY OR TWO EACH WEEK, eating nothing! Don't let people tell you it's unhealthy to eat under 1,000 calories a day. It depends what you're eating. Losing your feet to diabetes is MUCH WORSE! Americans are plagued with “SITTING DISEASE,” sedentary, gluttons and lazy. If you are type II diabetic, like me, this may perhaps be the most important article you ever read concerning your health. I can help you tremendously! I have nothing to sell. I am a born-again Christian and I want to help as many people as I can. You'll love me after reading this article if you have type II diabetes. But before I begin, please understand that I am not a profession Continue reading >>

Breath-acetone And Blood-sugar Measurements In Diabetes

Breath-acetone And Blood-sugar Measurements In Diabetes

Abstract The concentration of breath acetone has been found to correlate with the β-hydroxybutyrate concentration of venous blood in fasting obese patients. Overnight fasting levels of both breath acetone and blood-sugar were measured in 251 diabetics, after which the patients were grouped for analysis by the type of diabetic management and the fasting blood-sugar found. Amongst the subgroups with near-normal fasting blood-sugar (<120 mg. per 100 ml.) the mean breath acetone was normal only in the group whose diabetes was controlled by a non-reducing diet ( > 100 g. carbohydrate per day); it was raised in similarly well-controlled patients receiving either reducing diets (< 100 g. carbohydrate per day) or hypoglycæmic tablets or insulin. Among those with higher simultaneous blood-sugar levels the mean acetone concentration was abnormal and rose progressively with the blood-sugar. In insulin-dependent diabetics similar measurements made before meals showed a progressive decrease in mean acetone levels during the day (for the same simultaneous blood-sugar), lowest levels being attained in the late afternoon. This mild ketosis, present in 40–50% of diabetics apparently well controlled on hypoglyæmic tablets or insulin, was not relatable to diet, degree of obesity, or the occurrence of hypoglycæmia. In such patients, measurement of the breath acetone can detect inadequacies of control not revealed by measure- ment of the blood-sugar alone. Continue reading >>

What’s Normal Blood Sugar?

What’s Normal Blood Sugar?

Thank you for dropping in! If you need help lowering your blood sugar level, check out my books at Amazon or Smashwords. If you’re outside of the U.S., Smashwords may be the best source. —Steve Parker, M.D * * * Physicians focus so much on disease that we sometimes lose sight of what’s healthy and normal. For instance, the American Diabetes Association defines “tight” control of diabetes to include sugar levels as high as 179 mg/dl (9.9 mmol/l) when measured two hours after a meal. In contrast, young adults without diabetes two hours after a meal are usually in the range of 90 to 110 mg/dl (5.0–6.1 mmol/l). What Is a Normal Blood Sugar Level? The following numbers refer to average blood sugar (glucose) levels in venous plasma, as measured in a lab. Portable home glucose meters measure sugar in capillary whole blood. Many, but not all, meters in 2011 are calibrated to compare directly to venous plasma levels. Fasting blood sugar after a night of sleep and before breakfast: 85 mg/dl (4.7 mmol/l) One hour after a meal: 110 mg/dl (6.1 mmol/l) Two hours after a meal: 95 mg/dl (5.3 mmol/l) Five hours after a meal: 85 mg/dl (4.7 mmol/l) (The aforementioned meal derives 50–55% of its energy from carbohydrate) ♦ ♦ ♦ Ranges of blood sugar for young healthy non-diabetic adults: Fasting blood sugar: 70–90 mg/dl (3.9–5.0 mmol/l) One hour after a typical meal: 90–125 mg/dl (5.00–6.9 mmol/l) Two hours after a typical meal: 90–110 mg/dl (5.00–6.1 mmol/l) Five hours after a typical meal: 70–90 mg/dl (3.9–5.00 mmol/l) Blood sugars tend to be a bit lower in pregnant women. ♦ ♦ ♦ What Level of Blood Sugar Defines Diabetes and Prediabetes? According to the 2007 guidelines issued by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists: Prediabetes: Continue reading >>

Fasting Blood Sugar And Ppbs Test To Know Your Blood Sugar Levels

Fasting Blood Sugar And Ppbs Test To Know Your Blood Sugar Levels

Normally, your body makes a hormone called insulin to help control your blood sugar.A blood sugar level test is a type of blood test used to determine the amount of glucose in the blood. It is mainly used in screening for prediabetes or diabetes. Prediabetes is the precursor stage before diabetes mellitus in which not all of the symptoms required to diagnose diabetes are present, but blood sugar is abnormally high. In people with diabetes, blood glucose monitoring is used with frequent intervals in the management of the condition. Some of the common blood glucose tests include. FBS – fasting blood sugar. PPBS – postprandial blood sugar. Fasting Blood Sugar (FBS) A fasting sugar test is a test that determines the amount of sugar, called glucose, in the blood after fasting for certain hours. It is the most commonly used test to diagnose diabetes. Test procedure : The test procedure involves collecting a small amount of blood either from a finger or from a vein. Test Instructions: Don’t eat or drink anything but water for eight hours before the test is scheduled. Most of the time, this means having the test done in the morning, before breakfast. Levels of FBS : Fasting blood sugar more then 126 mg/dL is considered as diabetes. Postprandial Blood Sugar (PPBS) A postprandial sugar test is a test that determines of sugar, called glucose, in the blood after a meal. Test procedure : The test procedure involves collecting a small amount of blood either from a finger or from a vein. Test Instructions: Eat a meal that contains carbohydrates. Do not smoke, eat, drink, or exercise during the 2 hours. These activities cause the blood sugar level to be falsely low or falsely high. The blood will be drawn for the postprandial blood sugar(glucose) after given time. Levels of PPBS: Continue reading >>

A1c Calculator*

A1c Calculator*

Average blood glucose and the A1C test Your A1C test result (also known as HbA1c or glycated hemoglobin) can be a good general gauge of your diabetes control, because it provides an average blood glucose level over the past few months. Unlike daily blood glucose test results, which are reported as mg/dL, A1C is reported as a percentage. This can make it difficult to understand the relationship between the two. For example, if you check blood glucose 100 times in a month, and your average result is 190 mg/dL this would lead to an A1C of approximately 8.2%, which is above the target of 7% or lower recommended by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) for many adults who are not pregnant. For some people, a tighter goal of 6.5% may be appropriate, and for others, a less stringent goal such as 8% may be better.1 Talk to your doctor about the right goal for you. GET YOURS FREE The calculation below is provided to illustrate the relationship between A1C and average blood glucose levels. This calculation is not meant to replace an actual lab A1C result, but to help you better understand the relationship between your test results and your A1C. Use this information to become more familiar with the relationship between average blood glucose levels and A1C—never as a basis for changing your disease management. See how average daily blood sugar may correlate to A1C levels.2 Enter your average blood sugar reading and click Calculate. *Please discuss this additional information with your healthcare provider to gain a better understanding of your overall diabetes management plan. The calculation should not be used to make therapy decisions or changes. What is A1C? Performed by your doctor during your regular visits, your A1C test measures your average blood sugar levels by taking a Continue reading >>

Q. My Pp Blood Sugar Level Remains In The Range Of 150 To 176. How To Reduce It?

Q. My Pp Blood Sugar Level Remains In The Range Of 150 To 176. How To Reduce It?

Hi doctor, I am a 65 year old male. Before 12 years, I went for my first master checkup without symptoms. The result showed high 2 hours PPBG while FBG and A1c are normal. The consultant physician advised me to eat less at a time and increase the number of feeds in a day and encouraged me to check BG level once in every three months. Accordingly, I have done the tests both at home and labs every three months. My FBG is always normal that is 80 to 85 (rarely crosses 100 but within 105). My A1c is also quite normal of around 4.2 to 5.4. However, my PP (2 hours) is always in the range of 150 to 176. However, when I take reading after three hours of ingestion, the PP value is in the normal range 120 to 140. I do not take any medicine or Insulin. I have no symptoms like frequent urination or too much thirsty and head reeling. Nevertheless, a few months ago, I suddenly developed tinnitus in both my ears. MRI was taken and found normal. My hearing is excellent. Meniere's disease is ruled out. The volume in left ear is more than right ear (Left 6/10 whereas right 3/10). It is the insect cricket's sound. Last week, while I was working on my computer sitting in my usual chair, I developed a catching sensation on both my calves all of a sudden. A bit burning sensation in the calves also felt. It continues. I walk without any difficulty and do the routine. No tickling or pinning sensation. I am in a remote village spending my post retirement with family. My wife being a clinical biochemist advised me to rule out peripheral neuropathy as my 2 hour PP test is always in the range of 150 to 176. I also have a mild pulling sensation at the back of my right thigh. Hence, I request you to suggest tests find out the cause of the problem. Yesterday, my blood sugar levels were FBG 80, PP 176 Continue reading >>

Proven Methods To Reduce Fasting And Postprandial Glucose Levels

Proven Methods To Reduce Fasting And Postprandial Glucose Levels

Scientific studies indicate that any amount of fasting glucose over 85 mg/dL incrementally adds to heart attack risk.1 Postprandial glucose surges over 140 mg/dL lead to diabetic complications, even in those who are not diabetic. If you can choose an ideal fasting glucose reading, it would probably be around 74 mg/dL.2 We know, however, that some people are challenged to keep their glucose under 100 mg/dL. What this means is that it is critically important for aging individuals to follow an aggressive program to suppress excess glucose as much as possible. The good news is that many approaches that reduce glucose also lower insulin,3,4 LDL,3,5-7 triglycerides,3,8-10 and C-reactive protein,11 thereby slashing one’s risk of vascular disease,9,12-14 cancer,15-18 dementia,19-23 and a host of other degenerative disorders. This month’s issue featured an in-depth review of green coffee bean extract that has been shown to reduce postprandial glucose levels by an average of 32%.24 It functions by inhibiting the glucose-6-phosphatase enzyme that enables the body to create new surplus glucose and inappropriately release stored glucose from tissues. To achieve optimal glucose levels, some people will need to take steps to impede glucose absorption and improve insulin sensitivity. In this section, we succinctly describe drugs, hormones, nutrients, and lifestyle changes that facilitate healthy glucose levels. Nutrient Options Since Life Extension® members know it is best to take dietary supplements with meals, it should not be difficult for them to make it a routine practice to shield their bloodstream from excessive calorie absorption by taking the proper nutrients before most meals. An efficient way of obtaining nutrients that can impede the impact of carbohydrate and fat food Continue reading >>

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