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Fasting Blood Sugar 150

Freaking Out About Gestational Diabetes At 30 Weeks (reading Is 150) - Plano,tx

Freaking Out About Gestational Diabetes At 30 Weeks (reading Is 150) - Plano,tx

J.E. I was also devastated when I found out that I had GD but in the end it wasn't so bad. See if your insurance company will pay to have you see a nutritionist. That will get you on the right track with portion control. It is also important to balance protein, fat, carbs, etc. when you eat. I did not find the diet to be that difficult and could manage my sugar just with diet. Be proactive in your treatment and make sure that you get a specific diet to follow and a device to check your sugar. Good luck mama...its going to be fine. My kiddo was 8.5 lbs and perfectly healthy. I even lost weight the last 10 weeks and was down to my prepregnancy weight immediately as a result. L.M. When you say the reading is 150, is that your fasting level taken first thing in the morning? When you do your first reading in the morning, aka fasting reading, it should be under 120. So 150 is high, but it's not extreme. Worrying and stress will make it worse. Also, remember that your doctor is letting you control it naturally and not putting you on medication. That's excellent! Try not to stress or "freak out", it'll be just fine. Most women control GD by diet and exercise. You just need to make a few adjustments to your lifestyle. Try eating 6 times a day, about every 3 hours (light breakfast, morning snack, small lunch, afternoon snack, small dinner, evening snack) In addition, to the advice given by your doctor, here are a few more..... No fruit juice I would limit the amount of milk Drink water, water, and more water, go pee, and drink some more water For beverages herbal or decaf tea, seltzer, add a lime or lemon slice to your water or seltzer Limit carbohydrates - very little potatoes and rice or avoid altogether, also limit bread and avoid white bread Eat lots of green veggies (remembe Continue reading >>

10 Things To Consider If Your Blood Sugar Is High

10 Things To Consider If Your Blood Sugar Is High

I just read Catherine’s piece about a series of pump and insulin failures (It’s great! Read it!), and I had to shake my head in that oh-I-so-feel-you way. I’m going on nearly two decades as a diabetic now, but Friday night was a first for me, and one of the worst blood sugar nights I have ever had. I had been trending insulin resistant for a few days — requiring on average about 22 units of insulin per day rather than the standard 14 or 15. This was not too surprising, as — well, I suppose I meant to write a piece announcing this, but it hasn’t happened yet, so here goes nothing– I’m pregnant, and the hormonal ups and downs lead to periodic changes in insulin requirements. Still, heading into Friday night, my insulin behaved like water, and I was just pumping it in with relatively little return on investment. By the evening, I had used some 25 units for the day. Now, being pregnant, hyperglycemia is my bogeyman. Hyperglycemia is bad bad bad. And not just standard, over 200 hyperglycemia. I now begin to panic when I hit 130 mg/dL. So before bed, when I began to climb to 120, 130, I bolused excessively and walked in circles, trying to bring myself back down. I stayed up for an extra hour, waiting, walking, bolusing. Finally I was closer to 100 mg/dL, and went to bed, annoyed to have had to stay awake longer than desired. To my chagrin, not an hour later, my CGM woke me up with its buzzing: HIGH. I cursed, got out of bed, measured myself. 139 mg/dL. Damn you, diabetes. Under normal, non-pregnant circumstances, I would bolus and go back to bed. Now, the risk of going up is too high, and I want to make sure I go down first. I left the bedroom, and proceeded to walk and bolus and wait and walk and bolus and wait and watch lame Netflix movies. Cursing diabetes Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Test

Blood Sugar Test

What is a blood sugar test? A blood sugar test is a procedure that measures the amount of sugar, or glucose, in your blood. Your doctor may order this test to help diagnose diabetes. And people with diabetes can use this test to manage their condition. Blood sugar tests provide instant results and let you know the following: your diet or exercise routine needs to change your diabetes medications or treatment is working your blood sugar levels are high or low your overall treatment goals for diabetes are manageable Your doctor may also order a blood sugar test as part of a routine checkup. Or to see if you have diabetes or prediabetes, a condition where your blood sugar levels are higher than normal. Your risk for diabetes increases if any of the following factors are true: you are 45 years old or older you are overweight you don’t exercise much you have high blood pressure, high triglycerides, or low good cholesterol levels (HDL) you have a history of gestational diabetes or giving birth to a baby who weighed over 9 pounds you have a history if insulin resistance you are Asian, African, Hispanic, Pacific Islander, or Native American you have a family history of diabetes Checking your blood sugar levels can be done at home or at a doctor’s office. Read on to learn more about blood sugar tests, who they are for, and what the results mean. Your doctor may order a blood sugar test to see if you have diabetes or prediabetes. The test will measure the amount of glucose in your blood. Your body takes carbohydrates found in foods like grains and fruits and converts them into glucose. Glucose, a sugar, is one of the body’s main sources of energy. For people with diabetes, a home test helps monitor blood sugar levels. Taking a blood sugar test can help determine your blood Continue reading >>

Breath-acetone And Blood-sugar Measurements In Diabetes

Breath-acetone And Blood-sugar Measurements In Diabetes

Abstract The concentration of breath acetone has been found to correlate with the β-hydroxybutyrate concentration of venous blood in fasting obese patients. Overnight fasting levels of both breath acetone and blood-sugar were measured in 251 diabetics, after which the patients were grouped for analysis by the type of diabetic management and the fasting blood-sugar found. Amongst the subgroups with near-normal fasting blood-sugar (<120 mg. per 100 ml.) the mean breath acetone was normal only in the group whose diabetes was controlled by a non-reducing diet ( > 100 g. carbohydrate per day); it was raised in similarly well-controlled patients receiving either reducing diets (< 100 g. carbohydrate per day) or hypoglycæmic tablets or insulin. Among those with higher simultaneous blood-sugar levels the mean acetone concentration was abnormal and rose progressively with the blood-sugar. In insulin-dependent diabetics similar measurements made before meals showed a progressive decrease in mean acetone levels during the day (for the same simultaneous blood-sugar), lowest levels being attained in the late afternoon. This mild ketosis, present in 40–50% of diabetics apparently well controlled on hypoglyæmic tablets or insulin, was not relatable to diet, degree of obesity, or the occurrence of hypoglycæmia. In such patients, measurement of the breath acetone can detect inadequacies of control not revealed by measure- ment of the blood-sugar alone. Continue reading >>

Is My Blood Sugar Normal?

Is My Blood Sugar Normal?

“Is my blood sugar normal?” seems like a simple question – but it’s not! The answer can vary dramatically based on your situation. Let’s look at some of the factors to consider. Please remember: you should figure out your personal goals in consultation with your doctor. Normal Blood Sugar in Diabetic vs. Non-Diabetic First, a quick note on how we measure blood sugar. In the USA, blood sugars are measured by weight in milligrams per deciliter, abbreviated as mg/dL. Most everyone else uses millimole per liter, abbreviated mmol. If you are in the USA, look at the big numbers, most everyone else look at the small numbers. In a person without diabetes, blood sugars tend to stay between 70 and 100 mg/dL (3.8 and 5.5 mmol). After a meal, blood sugars can rise up to 120 mg/dL or 6.7 mmol. It will typically fall back into the normal range within two hours. In a person with diabetes, the story is much more complex: Below 70 mg/dL Below 3.8 mmol Low Blood Sugars (Hypoglycemia). When blood sugars drop below this level, you may start feeling hunger, shakiness, or racing of the heart. Your body is starved for sugar (glucose). Read how to detect and treat low blood sugars. 70 mg/dL to 140 mg/dL 3.8 mmol to 7.7 mmol Normal Blood Sugar. In this range, the body is functioning normally. In someone without diabetes, the vast majority of the time is spent in the lower half of this range. 140 mg/dL to 180 mg/dL 7.7 mmol to 10 mmol Elevated Blood Sugars. In this range, the body can function relatively normally. However, extended periods of time in this zone put you at risk for long-term complications. Above 180 mg/dL Abovoe 10 mmol High Blood Sugars. At this range, the kidney is unable to reabsorb all of the glucose in your blood and you begin to spill glucose in your urine. Your bo Continue reading >>

6 Things To Do If Your Blood Sugar Is Too High

6 Things To Do If Your Blood Sugar Is Too High

Grapefruit also has a low glycemic index (GI), around 25, which means it doesn't raise blood sugar as quickly or as much as high-GI foods like white bagel (72) or even a banana (48) or watermelon (72). (The highest GI score is 100.) A 2006 study published in the Journal of Medicinal Food, found that people who ate grapefruit (juice or half a fruit) before a meal had a lower spike in insulin two hours later than those taking a placebo, and fresh grapefruit was associated with less insulin resistance. All 91 patients in the 12-week study were obese, but they did not necessarily have type 2 diabetes. While the results are promising in those without diabetes, blood-sugar reactions to food can vary widely, so if you have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, test your blood sugar after eating grapefruit to make sure it can be part of your healthy eating plan. Getty Images Blood sugar is a tricky little beast. Yes, you can get a high reading if you throw caution to the wind and eat several slices of cake at a wedding. The problem is that you can also have a high blood sugar reading if you follow every rule in the type 2 diabetes handbook. That's because it's not just food that affects blood sugar. You could have a cold coming on, or stress may have temporarily boosted your blood sugar. The reading could be wrong, and you need to repeat it. Or it could mean that your medicine is no longer working, and it's time to try a new one. The point is, it's the pattern that matters, not a single reading. Whatever you do, don't feel bad or guilty if you have a high blood sugar reading. A 2004 study found that blood sugar monitoring often amplifies feelings of being a "success" or "failure" at diabetes, and when readings are consistently high, it can trigger feelings of anxiety or self-bla Continue reading >>

A Study Of 22,808 Blood Sugar Estimations—fasting And Postprandial—in Non-diabetic Individuals

A Study Of 22,808 Blood Sugar Estimations—fasting And Postprandial—in Non-diabetic Individuals

A year ago I analyzed the fasting blood sugar estimations in one thousand non-diabetic patients taken at random as they had presented themselves at the Clinic for various examinations. Previous to that time I had had the impression that with each advancing decade of life the fasting blood sugar rose within reasonable limits, so that, for example, in the sixth decade as much as 150 mg. of sugar per 100 c.c. of blood might be considered as a normal figure. My study of this series of 1000 cases disillusioned me in this respect, though in each decade there was a Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Levels After Eating

Blood Sugar Levels After Eating

Blood sugar levels do rise temporarily after eating. However, after some time the levels do come back to normal. Scroll down to know, what should the blood sugar levels after meals be. Blood sugar levels is the amount of sugar or glucose present in the blood stream of humans or animals. Glucose makes its way into the bloodstream with the carbohydrates, which one eats. Glucose is the primary source of energy required for body cells and blood lipids. They are actually a compact energy store. Glucose is transported from the intestines or liver to the cells in the body via the bloodstream. Normally the body is able to maintain the blood glucose level in the normal range. The glucose levels are regulated by insulin and glucagon. Insulin is the hormone, which is produced by the pancreas and are released into the bloodstream, when the blood sugar levels rise. It is natural, that the blood sugar levels are higher after eating than the normal blood sugar levels or blood sugar levels before eating. What is Normal Blood Sugar Levels After Eating To know the healthy blood sugar range after eating, it is important, we know what is the average blood sugar levels. The mean normal blood sugar levels in humans is 72 mg/dL (milligrams/deciliter) to 150 mg/dL. However, this levels keeps changing all through the day. The blood sugar levels are at its lowest, on waking up in the morning, before the first meal of the day. This blood sugar level is called the 'fasting level'. The fasting blood glucose test is conducted after eight hours of fasting. The blood sugar level after eating is taken 2 hours after the meal and is known as postprandial. On the other hand, the blood sugar taken at any time of the day is known as random or casual. If the blood sugar levels are consistently above 150 mg/d Continue reading >>

Managing Gestational Diabetes

Managing Gestational Diabetes

The whole purpose of managing gestational diabetes is to maintain normal blood glucose levels. So that you can have the best possible outcome for you and your baby. A healthy pregnancy with a healthy birth is the greatest of rewards. The disease itself is not addressed, only the results of the condition can be controlled. In other words, there is no treatment (yet) that will reduce the resistance to insulin. Therefore, you should concentrate all your efforts in minimizing the effect of the disease. All that is needed is to keep your blood glucose levels in the normal range to successfully managing gestational diabetes. Aim to maintain your blood sugar levels in the same range as in a non-diabetic. If the sugars do not harm non-diabetics, then how can it harm you or your baby, if it is kept at the same levels? It is possible to have a healthy pregnancy with a healthy baby, even with gestational diabetes. Many women have accomplished this. Managing gestational diabetes, by following the treatment that their health care team set up for them. You can do it, too! Managing gestational diabetes by just following the treatment plan your health care provider designs for you. It really is up to you. It is important to make regular health care appointments and keep them. You need to have more frequent appointments than women without gestational diabetes do. This will ensure that your health care providers can catch any problems, before it becomes major health issues. Not managing gestational diabetes is allowing it to progress unchecked. Unchecked gestational diabetes will increase the risk for growth and hormonal abnormalities in your baby. Who Makes up this Health Care Team? A few medical professionals can make up the health care team. You might not need them all in managing ges Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Level Chart And Information

Blood Sugar Level Chart And Information

A - A + Main Document Quote: "A number of medical studies have shown a dramatic relationship between elevated blood sugar levels and insulin resistance in people who are not very active on a daily or regular basis." A doctor might order a test of the sugar level in a person's blood if there is a concern that they may have diabetes, or have a sugar level that is either too low or too high. The test, which is also called a check of blood sugar, blood glucose, fasting blood sugar, fasting plasma glucose, or fasting blood glucose, indicates how much glucose is present is present in a person's blood. When a person eats carbohydrates, such as pasta, bread or fruit, their body converts the carbohydrates to sugar - also referred to as glucose. Glucose travels through the blood to supply energy to the cells, to include muscle and brain cells, as well as to organs. Blood sugar levels usually fluctuate depending upon what a person eats and how long it has been since they last ate. However; consistent or extremely low levels of glucose in a person's blood might cause symptoms such as: Anxiety Sweating Dizziness Confusion Nervousness Warning signs of dangerously high levels of blood sugar include sleepiness or confusion, dry mouth, extreme thirst, high fever, hallucinations, loss of vision, or skin that is warm and dry. A blood sugar test requires a finger prick or needle stick. A doctor might order a, 'fasting,' blood glucose test. What this means is a person will not be able to drink or eat for 8-10 hours before the test, or the doctor may order the test for a random time or right after the person eats. If a woman is pregnant, her doctor might order a, 'glucose-tolerance test,' which involves drinking glucose solution and having blood drawn a specified amount of time later. The re Continue reading >>

A Comparison Of Hba1c And Fasting Blood Sugar Tests In General Population

A Comparison Of Hba1c And Fasting Blood Sugar Tests In General Population

Go to: Abstract Objectives: Early diagnosis of diabetes is crucially important in reduction of the complications. Although HbA1c is an accurate marker for the prediction of complications, less information is available about its accuracy in diagnosis of diabetes. In this study, the association between HbA1c and FBS was assessed through a cross-sectional population-based study. Methods: A random sample of population in Kerman city was selected. The total number was 604 people. Their HbA1c and fasting blood sugar (FBS) were tested. The association between HbA1c and FBS and also their sensitivity, specificity and predictive values in detection of abnormal values of each other were determined. The association of HbA1c with FBS was relatively strong particularly in diabetic subjects. Generally, FBS was a more accurate predictor for HbA1c compared with HbA1c as a predictor of FBS. Although the optimum cutoff point of HbA1c was >6.15%, its precision was comparable with the conventional cutoff point of >6%. Conclusions: In conclusion, FBS sounds more reliable to separate diabetic from non-diabetic subjects than HbA1c. In case of being interested in using HbA1c in screening, the conventional cutoff points of 6% is an acceptable threshold for discrimination of diabetics from non-diabetics. Keywords: HbA1c, Blood glucose, Diabetics *The adjusted values were computed in a multivariable regression model with sex, BMI and age as independent variables. Continue reading >>

Why Is Blood Sugar High In The Morning?

Why Is Blood Sugar High In The Morning?

Here you'll find info about why blood sugar is high in the morning, along with tips and resources to lower those numbers! A while back I had a client sending me her blood sugar charts every few days and on those charts she always made some notes if she had questions. Every time she sent them through, I noticed she had 3 big question marks (???) against her morning blood sugar results. And on another morning when her morning blood sugar levels were high at 160 mg/dl (or 8.9 mmol/l). She had written: I don't understand. 97 mg/dl (or 5.5mmol/l) last night when I went to sleep. I didn't eat anything because I didn't feel well. Humm… I was also over in one of the online diabetes groups I'm involved in today and this message popped up. I'm struggling with my morning BS number. When I went to bed around 11PM my BS was 107. I'm waking up with my BS between 120 – 135. I did put two pieces of string cheese next to my bed and when I woke up around 3am, I ate one. Since I was told to eat protein at night. When I woke up 3 hours later my BS was 130. I didn't want to eat anything large since it's so close to 140 (my goal is to keep it below 140). So I had 1 piece of toast (sugar free wheat bread) and just a tiny bit of peanut butter. I checked it an hour later and it was 161! What am I doing wrong? Do these morning situations sound familiar to you? Are you constantly questioning: Why is blood sugar high in the morning? I mean, logically we'd think that it should be at it's lowest in the morning right? Well don't panic, there is a reason for it, so let's explore why morning blood sugar is often higher. And at the end, I'll also point you toward some resources to help you lower those levels. Why Is Blood Sugar High In The Morning? Although it would seem logical that your body would Continue reading >>

Goals For Blood Glucose Control

Goals For Blood Glucose Control

People who have diabetes should be testing their blood glucose regularly at home. Regular blood glucose testing helps you determine how well your diabetes management program of meal planning, exercising and medication (if necessary) is doing to keep your blood glucose as close to normal as possible. The results of the nationwide Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) show that the closer you keep your blood glucose to normal, the more likely you are to prevent diabetes complications such as eye disease, nerve damage, and other problems. For some people, other medical conditions, age, or other issues may cause your physician to establish somewhat higher blood glucose targets for you. The following chart outlines the usual blood glucose ranges for a person who does and does not have diabetes. Use this as a guide to work with your physician and your healthcare team to determine what your target goals should be, and to develop a program of regular blood glucose monitoring to manage your condition. Time of Check Goal plasma blood glucose ranges for people without diabetes Goal plasma blood glucose ranges for people with diabetes Before breakfast (fasting) < 100 70 - 130 Before lunch, supper and snack < 110 70 - 130 Two hours after meals < 140 < 180 Bedtime < 120 90- 150 A1C (also called glycosylated hemoglobin A1c, HbA1c or glycohemoglobin A1c) < 6% < 7% < = less than > = greater than > = greater than or equal to < = less than or equal to Information obtained from Joslin Diabetes Center's Guidelines for Pharmacological Management of Type 2 Diabetes. Continue reading >>

Understanding Fasting Blood Sugar

Understanding Fasting Blood Sugar

Among the most common questions people have about Type 2 diabetes is this: how can they lower their fasting blood sugar? To answer this question in a way that will help you lower your blood sugar we are going to have to first explain why doctors measure fasting blood sugar and what it does--and does not--tell us about our blood sugar health. WHAT IS FASTING BLOOD SUGAR? Traditionally, fasting blood sugar is the value you get when you test your blood sugar after an 8 hour long fast--which is usually immediately upon waking. In a normal person this fasting blood sugar would also be the "baseline" blood sugar--the level to which blood sugar returns a few hours after every meal all day long. However, for reasons we will discuss later on, this is often NOT the case for people with Type 2 diabetes, whose morning blood sugars may be much higher than the baseline level they achieve after meals for the rest of the day. Doctors have for decades relied on the FPG (fasting plasma glucose) test which measures fasting blood sugar to diagnose diabetes. The reason for this is NOT that FPG test results predict diabetic complications. They don't. Post-meal blood sugar tests are a much better indicator of whether a person will get the classic diabetic complications, and the A1c test is a better indicator of potential heart disease. But the FPG test is cheap and easy to administer, hence its popularity. The value most of us would find much more helpful in assessing our health is not fasting blood sugar but something else: the number of hours a day our blood sugar spends elevated over the level known to cause complications, which is roughly 140 mg/dl (7.7 mmol/L). A person can wake up with a FPG of 130 mg/dl (7.2 mmol/L), but if it drops after breakfast and most hours of the day are spent w Continue reading >>

What Is Levemir® (insulin Detemir [rdna Origin] Injection)?

What Is Levemir® (insulin Detemir [rdna Origin] Injection)?

Do not share your Levemir® FlexTouch® with other people, even if the needle has been changed. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. Who should not take Levemir®? Do not take Levemir® if: you have an allergy to Levemir® or any of the ingredients in Levemir®. How should I take Levemir®? Read the Instructions for Use and take exactly as directed. Know the type and strength of your insulin. Do not change your insulin type unless your health care provider tells you to. Check your blood sugar levels. Ask your health care provider what your blood sugar levels should be and when you should check them. Do not reuse or share your needles with other people. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. Never inject Levemir® into a vein or muscle. Do not share your Levemir FlexTouch with other people, even if the needle has been changed. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. Who should not take Levemir®? Do not take Levemir® if: you have an allergy to Levemir® or any of the ingredients in Levemir®. Before taking Levemir®, tell your health care provider about all your medical conditions including, if you are: pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding. taking new prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including supplements. Talk to your health care provider about how to manage low blood sugar. How should I take Levemir®? Read the Instructions for Use and take exactly as directed. Know the type and strength of your insulin. Do not change your insulin type unless your health care provider tells you to. Check your blood sugar levels. Ask your health care provider what your blood sugar levels should be and when you should ch Continue reading >>

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