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Fasting Blood Sugar 117 Morning

Is 117 Mg/dl Blood Sugar From A Glucose Test Normal?

Is 117 Mg/dl Blood Sugar From A Glucose Test Normal?

Here we will look at a 117 mg/dL blood sugar level from a Glucose test result and tell you what it may mean. Is 117 mg/dL blood sugar good or bad? Note that blood sugar tests should be done multiple times and the 117 mg/dL blood sugar level should be an average of those numbers. According to the U.S. National Library of Medicine, there is a Fasting Glucose Test and a Random Glucose Test. Below you can see what different results may mean. Fasting Glucose Test 70 - 100 mg/dL = Normal 101 - 125 mg/dL = Prediabetes 126 and above = Diabetes Therefore, according to the chart above, if the 117 mg/dL blood sugar level was from a Fasting Glucose Test, then it may indicate prediabetes. Random Glucose Test Below 125 mg/dL = Normal 126 - 199 mg/dL = Prediabetes 200 and above = Diabetes If the test result of a 117 mg/dL blood sugar level was from a Random Glucose Test, then the result would indicate it to be in the normal range. Is 118 mg/dL Blood Sugar from a Glucose test normal? Go here for the next blood sugar level on our list. Continue reading >>

Cannabis Use Associated With Lower Blood Sugar

Cannabis Use Associated With Lower Blood Sugar

A new study published in the American Journal of Medicine has revealed a potential benefit from the use of cannabis. The article, entitled “The Impact of Marijuana Use on Glucose, Insulin, and Insulin Resistance among U.S. Adults,” investigated the blood sugar-related effects of cannabis use among participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 2005 to 2010. In several other studies of large populations, lower rates of both obesity and diabetes have been noted among users of cannabis, as compared with non-users. This curious fact encouraged the three primary authors of the study to examine cannabis use among the 4657 participants in the national survey. The researchers noted that although cannabis smokers generally consume more calories than non-users, they paradoxically live with lower body mass indexes (BMIs) and reduced rates of both obesity and diabetes. Of the participants in the national survey, 579 were currently using cannabis and 1975 had previously used cannabis. To assess blood glucose, insulin resistance and other factors among cannabis users, the authors organized survey participants into three groups – those who had never used cannabis, those who had used cannabis but not within 30 days, and those who were current users. The authors put study participants through tests for fasting blood sugar levels, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) testing, and assessments of blood pressure, BMI and waist circumference. The researchers found that subjects who were current cannabis users had lower levels of fasting insulin, lower levels of insulin resistance, smaller waist circumference, and higher levels of HDL cholesterol, which is known to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. This supported findings from earlier studies Continue reading >>

Cure Diabetes Now...my Experience With Diabetes..

Cure Diabetes Now...my Experience With Diabetes..

How it all started? I have been a skinny guy all my younger life and was really not happy with it, I always wanted a huge macho type body so to obtain the same I focused on eating heavily, as a result I increase my weight but it was mainly in the abdominal area, not happy with this I joined Gym so that I could put on weight at the right place in my body, at the Gym someone suggested supplements so I started taking them,but I was not working hard enough to digest them so i started seeing bad results I started getting these symptoms of thirst and frequent urination and I started losing weight too, when these symptoms became extreme(I had to wake up like 2/3 times at night to urinate) I decided to go to the doctor, the doctor did the quick blood sugar test and rushed me to the ER my reading were 590 mg/dl, they gave me some fluid and rechecked after 2 hours, when it was 320 they said I could go home and come back the next day for fasting A1C and post prandial test. The next day my fasting appeared 232 and post prandial was like 407, the doctor diagnosed me diabetes, as it runs in the family I was not surprised but I I thought it was a bit early for me as I was just 32 years old. I was put on medicine but I really did not want to take them as someone suggested there are complications of medication too and that once you take them your body is more dependent on them. So what did I do?? Where I am today??? Both are normal readings, but I still fear if I am not disciplined towards what I eat and my exercise routine I might get back higher readings. For Exercise I personally think exercise played vital role in my case of normalizing the blood sugar, After trying different things many times finally I stuck to one exercise plan which worked for me. I spent like 2 hours per day, 1 Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Monitoring

Blood Sugar Monitoring

What Do the Numbers Tell You? “I must admit that I stopped checking my blood sugar,” Dave said. “I used to stick myself and write the numbers in a book, but I had no idea what they meant. I’d eat the same thing and get different numbers. Finally, I just gave up.” Sound familiar? Many people dutifully check their blood glucose levels but have no idea what the numbers mean. Part of the problem is that blood glucose levels constantly fluctuate and are influenced by many factors. The other part of the problem is that no two people are alike. A blood glucose reading of 158 mg/dl in two different people might have two different explanations. Most people know that their bodies need glucose to fuel their activities and that certain foods or large quantities of almost any food will raise blood glucose. That’s the easy part. But just as cars require a complicated system of fuel pumps, ignition timing, batteries, pistons, and a zillion other things to convert gasoline into motion, our bodies rely on an intricate system to convert glucose into energy. Back to basics Insulin is a hormone secreted by the pancreas that helps regulate the way the body uses glucose. Its main job is to allow glucose in the blood to enter cells of the body where it can be used for energy. In people who don’t have diabetes, the pancreas changes how much insulin it releases depending on blood glucose levels. Eating a chocolate bar? The pancreas releases more insulin. Sleeping? The pancreas releases less insulin until the wee hours of the morning when the hormones secreted in the early morning naturally increase insulin resistance, so the pancreas needs to release a little more. Insulin also controls how much glucose is produced and released from the liver. Glucose is stored in the liver in a f Continue reading >>

Want To Know If Your Diet Is Healthy? Track Your Blood Sugar.

Want To Know If Your Diet Is Healthy? Track Your Blood Sugar.

Are you confused if what you are eating is healthy? Are whole grains good for us? Do we need to be gluten free? Should we be eating dairy regularly? What about fruit? Nuts? Beans? Ahhhhhhhh! Let’s face it, there is A LOT of conflicting diet information out there. Where do you even start? Well it all comes down to one very basic thing…your blood sugar. It doesn’t have to be complicated. It doesn’t have to take weeks of diet diaries and calorie counting. Nor does it require reading endless books, websites, studies, and journals to get the most up-to-date nutrition advice. It is really quite simple, and it can be tested. Wouldn’t it be great to know when you eat something how the inside of your body responds? Does it give you the green light or the red light? Well, you can learn this with a very inexpensive piece of equipment that you can find at any drug store or pharmacy called a glucose meter or glucometer. Click here for a video tutorial on how to test your blood sugar. ……. So, ask your body what it thinks of the food you are eating by taking your blood sugar. Here is a quick & very basic break down on how your blood sugar works. Step 1: You eat a food Step 2: It gets broken down into two categories: stuff the body will use and stuff that will become waste Step 3: Glucose, aka blood sugar, is one of the essential breakdown products of food that the body and brain use for fuel Step 4: Depending on the types of food you just ate, your blood sugar rises. If you just ate a meal high in starch and sugar, your blood sugar rises high over a normal fasting level. If you just had a meal of healthy fats and proteins, your blood sugar does not rise as high. ……. Having a normal functioning blood sugar is the key to optimal health and the prevention of chronic dis Continue reading >>

Is Random Sugar Of 117 Normal?

Is Random Sugar Of 117 Normal?

QUESTION: Sir, No Charge Glucose Meter - OneTouch Verio Flex® Meter Ad Compact Design to Track Your Glucose On-the-Go. Get It At No Charge. OneTouch Learn more I want to know that my random blood sugar level is 117. So, can u tell me if my sugar is normal or not or am i diabetic patient and if so plz tell me the remedies also to cure my disease. ANSWER: Hi Amita, According to ADA/EASD hyperglycemia management guidelines, blood sugar levels targets should be set personally and specifically for each person according to their age, body indexes (weight, height) and other diseases and conditions they might have. Based on this, I should have these data of yours. If you a young person, such glucose levels can be accepted due to high metabolism rate of the young people. However, if you are a mature person with other diseases; then, I should ask you to go for the next steps as the following. In addition, I want you to measure your blood sugar levels for 2 subsequently weeks (each day at one precise time). Next, I would like to ask you to measure fasting blood sugar, oral-glucose tolerance test, and A1C test. All these data are necessary to give an exact diagnosis. Once I would have all these data, I could give an exact answer whether you are a diabetic, a pre-diabetic or a going-to-be:). All the best! Dr.Alba Continue reading >>

4 December 2012why Is My Blood Glucose So High When I Wake Up?

4 December 2012why Is My Blood Glucose So High When I Wake Up?

It doesn't seem fair, does it? You haven't eaten anything all night and you still wake up with high blood glucose! What is going on and how can you lower it? For those of you with diabetes, this post is for you! Basics Your body strives to keep blood glucose (BG) within a safe range, but with diabetes the balance is disturbed. The insulin your pancreas produces might not be sufficient to cover your BG lowering needs. As well, the insulin it does produce might not be handled properly by target body cells. And to make matters worse, your liver might be on glucose production overdrive. All of this results in your body's failure to control BG overnight as well as after meals or snacks. For more basic information about diabetes, please be sure to read my article, Diabetes Basics at MyNetDiary's library. Dawn Phenomenon Due to normal daily changes in our body's release of hormones during sleep and wake cycles, BG typically starts to rise in the very early morning – starting about 3 AM - and continues to rise as the morning progresses. For folks without diabetes, insulin production simply increases and takes care of the rising BG. However, for folks with diabetes, unless there is medication on board to cover this early morning rise, BG will eventually rise out of target range by the time they wake up. The classic pattern is to see BG within target range at both bedtime and during the middle of the night, and then see a high fasting BG. If you have noticed that your fasting BG is creeping up over time and is no longer within target range despite sticking to a carb controlled eating plan and taking your diabetes medication as prescribed, then it might be time to talk with your doctor about your diabetes medication. The type, dose, and/or timing might need to be adjusted to bet Continue reading >>

What Is The Right Amount Of Sugar In Your Blood On An Empty Stomach?

What Is The Right Amount Of Sugar In Your Blood On An Empty Stomach?

Blood sugar tested on an empty stomach, also called fasting blood glucose, can help determine whether you are healthy or have a medical condition like Type 2 diabetes. Different medical conditions can cause your fasting blood sugar to be higher or lower than normal, and certain medications can also affect your blood sugar levels. A fasting blood glucose score of 100 to 125 milligrams per deciliter often means you have a condition called pre-diabetes, and if your blood sugar level is above 126 milligrams per deciliter it usually means you have diabetes, according to MedlinePlus. However, other conditions can also cause high fasting blood sugar, including pancreatic inflammation or cancer, an overactive thyroid gland or rare conditions like Cushing syndrome or acromegaly, which causes tumors. Medications, including corticosteroids, oral contraceptives, beta blockers and certain types of antidepressants can also increase your blood sugar levels. Some signs of high blood sugar levels including increased thirst and frequent urination. Too Low Should your test results show a fasting blood sugar level under 70 milligrams per deciliter, you may an underactive thyroid or a pituitary problem called hypopituitarism. Diabetics may get this type of result if they've taken too much diabetes medication or insulin. Medications like MAOIs, acetaminophen, anabolic steroids and gemfibrozil can also lower your blood sugar levels. Low blood sugar levels can cause symptoms including fatigue, confusion, fast heartbeat, lightheadedness, shakiness and irritability. Just Right The correct amount of sugar in your blood on an empty stomach is between 70 milligrams per deciliter and 100 milligrams per deciliter, although for diabetics fasting blood sugar results of up to 130 milligrams per decilite Continue reading >>

What Is The Average Blood Sugar Level?

What Is The Average Blood Sugar Level?

Blood sugar, or glucose, serves as the fuel your body uses to generate energy. The level of glucose in your blood remains fairly stable, slightly rising after eating and declining a small amount between meals or after exercising. Blood glucose can be measured in many ways. Some tests measure glucose directly, while others measure the amount of glucose attached to a specific protein. Video of the Day Fasting and Premeal Blood Glucose Levels The amount of glucose in the blood varies, depending on when you last ate. A fasting blood glucose level after at least 8 hours without caloric intake in a healthy, nondiabetic adult typically ranges from 70 to 99 mg/dL, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). People with a fasting blood glucose of 100 to 125 mg/dL are considered prediabetic, meaning the body's handling of glucose is impaired but not yet to the point of warranting a diagnosis of diabetes. A fasting blood glucose of 126 mg/dL or greater typically indicates diabetes, according to ADA criteria. Among people diagnosed with diabetes who are not pregnant, the ADA recommends a target fasting or premeal blood sugar level of 80 to 130 mg/dL. Postprandial and Oral Glucose Tolerance Levels As the blood glucose level typically increases after eating, testing after a meal -- known as a postprandial glucose level -- provides information about the body's capacity to maintain a healthy blood sugar level when challenged with a caloric load. Blood glucose levels usually peak 1 to 2 hours after beginning a meal, depending largely on the amount of carbohydrates, proteins and fat in the meal. Among healthy, nondiabetic adults a normal postprandial glucose level 2 hours after a meal is less than 140 mg/dL. For people with diabetes, the ADA generally recommends a peak postpran Continue reading >>

What Is A Normal Blood Sugar And How To Get It Back On Track

What Is A Normal Blood Sugar And How To Get It Back On Track

My Family History of Diabetes Diabetes has been in my family for generations. My grandmother was a diabetic, my father is diabetic, and during my pregnancy I almost developed prenatal diabetes. Given my family history and my own personal experience, I've learned a lot about this condition over the years. It turns out that there are many things we can do to control our blood sugar though the foods we eat. Normal Blood Glucose Levels What are normal blood glucose levels? Before meals: 80-90 mg/dL After meals: Up to 120 mg/dL Keep in mind that the blood glucose level before a meal for a non-diabetic and a prediabetic person may be very similar. As you can see in the graph below, how your blood sugar fluctuates after eating a meal can be more telling than your pre-meal glucose levels. However, if your pre-meal glucose level is over 100 mg/dL, you should see a doctor. A fasting glucose level of 126 mg/dL is considered diabetic. In this article, you will learn about the progression of Type 2 diabetes and how you can reverse it. Understanding the Diagnosis If you are reading this, you probably have been told by your doctor that you have, or someone you care about has, diabetes or prediabetes. You may be surprised, shocked, or even scared. You wonder how and why this is happening. Basically, diabetes means that the level of glucose in your blood (or blood sugar) is too high. Everyone has glucose in his or her blood. We need it to provide energy for all the cells in our body. Having diabetes means you have more than you need, way above normal blood sugar levels. The diagnosis of diabetes is somewhat arbitrary and keeps changing over time. Some time ago, your fasting glucose levels had to be 140 mg/dL or higher to be considered diabetic. Today the official number is 126 mg/dL, an Continue reading >>

Managing Blood Sugar

Managing Blood Sugar

Everyone’s experience with mealtime insulin is different, but there are some things you can look out for. Your Humalog dose will probably change over time. Your doctor gave you a starting dose, but most people need to increase their Humalog dose over time. When you track your blood sugar every day, you will probably see different numbers all the time. These variations in your blood sugar from day to day are normal. Your blood sugar varies based on stress, what you eat, other medications, exercise, and other factors. Don't be discouraged by changes in your blood sugar. With your doctor’s input, these variations may provide learning opportunities. Testing your blood sugar When using mealtime insulin like Humalog, you must test your blood sugar (glucose) regularly. For example, you may need to test before and after meals and at bedtime. Your doctor will tell you when and how often you should test. Why keep track? Keeping track of your blood sugar levels will help you and your doctor: Know if you’re meeting your blood sugar goals Learn how different foods affect your blood sugar levels Figure out how much insulin you should be taking Your doctor will tell you what to do if your blood sugar is high or low. If you take too much Humalog, your blood sugar may fall too low (hypoglycemia). If you forget to take your dose of Humalog, your blood sugar may go too high (hyperglycemia). Your blood sugar goals The American Diabetes Association recommends blood sugar goals for people with diabetes. These don’t apply to everyone, however, so work with your doctor to set the right goals for you. These goals are not applicable to pregnant women or children. These goals should be individualized. About high blood sugar One of the goals of your diabetes treatment is to keep blood suga Continue reading >>

Glucose: The Silent Killer

Glucose: The Silent Killer

The deadly effects of even slightly elevated glucose are fatally misunderstood. One reason for this calamity is physicians who continue to rely on obsolete blood glucose ranges. These doctors fail to recognize that any excess glucose creates lethal metabolic pathologies that are underlying factors behind multiple age-related diseases. People today thus suffer and die from diabetic-like complications without knowing their blood sugar (glucose) levels are too high! Life Extension® long ago argued that most aging people have elevated blood glucose. Our controversial position has been vindicated as mainstream medicine consistently lowers the upper-level threshold of acceptable (safe) fasting blood glucose. As new evidence accumulates, it has become abundantly clear that maturing individuals need to take aggressive actions to ensure their fasting and after-meal glucose levels are kept in safe ranges. Glucose Is Like Gasoline Our body’s primary source of energy is glucose. All of our cells use it, and when there is not enough glucose available, our body shuts down in a similar way that a car engine stops when the gasoline tank is empty. When glucose is properly utilized, our cells produce energy efficiently. As cellular sensitivity to insulin diminishes, excess glucose accumulates in our bloodstream. Like spilled gasoline, excess blood glucose creates a highly combustible environment from which oxidative and inflammatory fires chronically erupt. Excess glucose not used for energy production converts to triglycerides that are either stored as unwanted body fat or accumulate in the blood where they contribute to the formation of atherosclerotic plaque.1-6 If you were filling your automobile with gasoline and the tank reached full, you would not keep pumping in more gas. Yet Continue reading >>

When To Test Blood Sugar In Type 2

When To Test Blood Sugar In Type 2

One of the topics that comes up a lot in the email I get from visitors to my What They Don't Tell You About Diabetes web site is the question of when is the best time to test your blood sugar. A lot of doctors still tell people with Type 2 to test first thing in the morning and before meals. That was what I was told at diagnosis in 1998. People who test using this schedule may tell you their blood sugar is usually 120 mg/dl, which sounds pretty good, except that since this is a fasting number it usually hides the information that the person's blood sugar maybe going to 250 mg/dl or higher after every meal. Research has shown that for people with Type 2 diabetes--especially those who have been diagnosed recently and still retain some beta cell function--it is the high spikes after meals that contribute most heavily to raising the A1c and causing complications. If you only test your fasting blood sugar, you will not know anything about how high your blood sugar is spiking after meals, so you won't know which foods are toxic to you because they cause dangerous spikes. If you are like most people with Type 2 your access to the very expensive blood sugar testing strips is limited. You may have to pay for strips yourself or your insurance may pay for a single box each month. That means that you need to use each strip as efficiently as possible. Here are some strategies that you can use to get the information out of your blood tests that will let you drop your A1c back into the healthy zone. Keep a written log that matches what you eat with the test result you get. Even though your meter may keep a list of your readings, these readings are meaningless unless you know what food you ate that resulted in each particular reading. If you write down what portion size of which food y Continue reading >>

Optimal Ketone And Blood Sugar Levels For Ketosis

Optimal Ketone And Blood Sugar Levels For Ketosis

A low carb helps reduce blood sugars and insulin levels and helps with the management of many of the diseases of modern civilisation (e.g. diabetes, heart disease, stroke, cancer, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s). We become insulin resistant when our body fat can’t store any more energy. Excess energy is then stored in the liver, pancreas, heart, brain and other organs that are more insulin sensitive. We also see increased levels of energy in our blood in the form of glucose, fat and elevated ketone. Endogenous ketosis occurs when we eat less food than we need. Our insulin and blood sugar levels decrease and ketones rise to supply the energy we need. Exogenous ketosis occurs when we eat lots fat and/or take exogenous ketones. Blood ketones rise, but our insulin levels will also rise because we have an excess of energy coming from our diet. Most of the good things associated with ketosis occur due to endogenous ketosis. Most people following a ketogenic diet over the long term have ketone values lower than what some people consider to be “optimal ketosis”. If your goal is blood sugar control, longevity or weight loss then endogenous ketosis with lower blood sugars and lower ketones is likely a better place to be than chasing higher blood ketones. I have seen a lot of interest and confusion recently from people following a ketogenic about ideal ketone and blood sugar levels. In an effort to try to clear this up, this article reviews blood ketone (BHB), breath ketone (acetone) and blood sugar data from a large number of people who are following a low carb or ketogenic diet to understand what “normal” and “optimal” look like. Many people initiate a low carb diet to manage their blood glucose levels, insulin resistance or diabetes. As shown in the chart below, Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes - Risks, Causes, Prevention!

Gestational Diabetes - Risks, Causes, Prevention!

Gestational Diabetes What is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational Diabetes is diabetes that is found for the first time when a woman is pregnant. The expecting mother develops large amount of sugar in her blood which generally resolves itself after baby's birth - unlike other types of diabetes which are lifelong conditions. How does Gestational Diabetes develop? Gestational diabetes develops when the body cannot produce enough insulin - a substance produced by pancreas which regulates the amount of sugar available in the blood for energy and enables any sugar that isn't immediately required to be stored. The pregnant women has to produce extra insulin to meet baby's needs, if her body can't manage this, she may develop gestational diabetes. Blood sugar levels may also rise because the hormonal changes of pregnancy interfere with insulin function. Gestational diabetes usually develops during the last half of pregnancy. Risk Factors • Women who are obese. • Women with high blood pressure • Women listed positive for sugar in urine during antenatal checkup. • Women who are above 25yrs of age. • Women with family history of type 2 diabetes. How is Gestational Diabetes Treated? Gestational Diabetes can be treated by keeping blood glucose level in a target range. Proper diet, physical activity and insulin if required plays important role in maintaining blood glucose levels. • Dietary Tips 1. Have small frequent meals i.e. six small meals in a day. 2. Limit sweets. 3. Include more and more fiber in your diet in form of fruits, vegetables, whole grain bread and cereals. 4. Carbohydrates should be 40%-45% of the total calories with breakfast and a bedtime snack containing 15-30 grams of carbohydrates. 5. Drink 8-10 glasses of liquids/day. 6. Avoid Trans fats, fried foods Continue reading >>

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