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Falling Asleep After Eating Diabetes

Pre Diabetes Symptoms

Pre Diabetes Symptoms

Here's a fact: Most people diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes had pre diabetes symptoms that if known, could have alerted them to make diet and lifestyle changes before their diagnosis. Most physicians only pay attention to fasting blood sugar when watching for diabetes. For instance, if a patient's blood sugar is between 110-125, mg/dL, it indicates prediabetes. But blood sugar results can test in normal ranges even as diabetes is developing. If people with a type 2 diabetes diagnosis knew ALL of the pre diabetic symptoms for which to watch, it could help them avoid being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Prediabetes is defined medically as the state in which fasting blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be classified as type 2 diabetes. Blood sugars in the prediabetic range (between 100 - 126 mg/dl) indicate insulin resistance is developing, and a metabolic syndrome diagnosis is more likely in the future. Insulin resistance (IR) is a condition in which chronically elevated blood sugar and insulin levels have resulted in an inability of body cells to respond to them normally. IR is the driving factor as insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, prediabetes and diabetes are all linked together on a continuum. Pre Diabetes Symptoms: It's Not Just About Blood Sugar Medical information about pre diabetes comes from medical associations such as the American Diabetes Association. The ADA guidelines say that prediabetes is a function of a fasting blood sugar is between 100-125 mg/dl. However, I am convinced that signs of prediabetes can be spotted even when blood tests indicated blood sugars below 100 mg/dl. I saw this in my own life. Eight years ago, I had many of the pre diabetic symptoms listed below, but my fasting blood sugar was still classified as "n Continue reading >>

Women Who Fall Asleep When They Eat: It Sounds Bizarre, But It's A Genuine Medical Condition - And It's Wrecking Their Lives

Women Who Fall Asleep When They Eat: It Sounds Bizarre, But It's A Genuine Medical Condition - And It's Wrecking Their Lives

Sharon Anne Jackson, a 42-year-old receptionist from Reading, will often find herself sinking into a brain fog when she goes out for an Italian Reena Khan, 37, a hypnotherapist from West Yorkshire, has been suffering from post-eating exhaustion for three years 'Food comas' are more common than we think and the effects can be hard Every day, straight after lunch, Faye Perminsky crawls into bed and immediately falls into a two-hour sleep. Waking up just in time for the school run, she picks up her son Samuel, comes home, has dinner, and can barely keep her eyes open to read him a bedtime story before sinking gratefully back into bed no later than 9pm. Contrary to what you might think, Faye is not lazy. Nor is she exhausted just from the constant grind of juggling work and motherhood. The 43-year-old make-up artist from Potters Bar, Hertfordshire, has a condition known as postprandial hypoglycaemia, which leaves sufferers overwhelmed with exhaustion immediately after eating. In a previous administrative job for a media company, Faye would struggle to keep her eyes open after lunch and once even nodded off at her desk. 'Thankfully, on that occasion, everyone was still out at lunch and hadn't noticed,' recalls Faye. 'I'd had a jacket potato, and soon afterwards felt my eyes start to become heavy and my lids start to close. My vision went blurry and all I wanted to do was sleep. The next thing I knew, I woke up with my head lying on a bunch of files and an hour had passed.' Faye, a slim size eight, and healthy eater, says some foods are worse than others. 'Anything substantial makes me headachy and dizzy, and knocks me out as soon as I have eaten it,' she says. 'Eggs on toast, a jacket potato, chicken curry and rice, even a sandwich. I eat it and within minutes, I'm desperate Continue reading >>

How Carbohydrates Cause Insulin Resistance & Diabetes

How Carbohydrates Cause Insulin Resistance & Diabetes

Carbohydrates are a name given to describe food that is either sugary (e.g., honey) or starchy (e.g., potatoes). There are two main types of carbohydrate: simple and complex. Simple carbohydrates, such as sugar and flour, are digested by the body very quickly. This means that when you eat foods containing simple carbohydrates, you will get a short and rapid boost of energy. It’s like lighting a firework, once you light it, you get a lot of immediate energy but it only lasts for a short time. In summary, simple carbohydrates are… Usually the foods you love! Simple, so the body can use them quickly Usually taste sweet like sugar Provide a quick boost of energy Energy boost doesn’t last long Complex carbohydrates are found mainly in vegetables, grains and brown rice. When you eat complex carbohydrates, the body takes longer to digest them resulting in a gradual release of energy over a prolonged period of time. In summary, complex carbohydrates are… Usually the foods you hate! They are complex, so the body takes longer to break them down Mainly found in vegetables and rice Provide a gradual release of energy Energy supplied for a long period of time Let’s now look at what happens when you eat carbohydrates, and how eating the wrong type can have negative effects on your health. What Happens When You Eat Carbs? Every time you eat carbohydrates the body breaks them down into a form of sugar called glucose. Glucose is then burned and used as a source of energy. So when you eat carbohydrates, it’s like throwing wood on a fire. The fire burns the wood and uses it to stay alive. As there is only so much glucose that the body needs or can use, any glucose that the body doesn’t need right away is converted to glycogen so that it can be stored as a reserve supply of e Continue reading >>

Appointments At Mayo Clinic

Appointments At Mayo Clinic

I think I have reactive hypoglycemia. How can I address my symptoms? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. Reactive hypoglycemia (postprandial hypoglycemia) refers to low blood sugar that occurs after a meal — usually within four hours after eating. This is different from low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) that occurs while fasting. Signs and symptoms of reactive hypoglycemia may include hunger, weakness, shakiness, sleepiness, sweating, lightheadedness and anxiety. It's possible to have symptoms that are similar to reactive hypoglycemia without actually having low blood sugar. True reactive hypoglycemia symptoms that are caused by low blood sugar occurring after eating are uncommon. For the majority of people with postprandial symptoms, the actual cause of the symptoms is not clear but may relate to what food was eaten or variations in the timing of the food moving through the stomach and intestinal tract. Generally, a medical evaluation is done to determine whether symptoms are caused by low blood sugar — and whether symptoms resolve once blood sugar returns to normal. Further evaluation of reactive hypoglycemia depends on the severity of symptoms. For the majority of people, reactive hypoglycemia usually doesn't require medical treatment. It may help, however, to pay attention to the timing and composition of your meals: Eat a well-balanced diet, including lean and nonmeat sources of protein, and high-fiber foods, including whole grains, fruits and vegetables. Avoid sugary foods, especially on an empty stomach. Be sure to eat food if you're consuming alcohol, and avoid using sugary soft drinks as mixers. Eat several small meals and snacks throughout the day, no more than three hours apart during the waking hours. Most people will try to find out what dietary changes ar Continue reading >>

Popcorn: Mindless Eating Is Not Blood Sugar Friendly

Popcorn: Mindless Eating Is Not Blood Sugar Friendly

We celebrated Tom’s 12th birthday yesterday (yes, that makes me…. old). Tom didn’t want a big party so we invited a few of his friends over for a movie and pizza. Jessica made popcorn, using coconut oil, instead of olive oil. “I’ve read that coconut oil is what makes movie theater popcorn taste so much better,” she said. “I thought it was the chemicals,” I replied. Jessica and I haven’t been to the movies for years, so we’re not very up-to-date on movie theater food and I have to confess I don’t remember much about movie theater popcorn. When Jessica’s popcorn was ready I couldn’t resist trying it. I don’t usually eat popcorn, both because it’s not paleo and because I consider it mindless eating, but it was there, it smelled good, and I tried it. Jessica was right (as usual). It did taste better and did have the movie theater smell. The problem with popcorn is that you can keep eating it even when you’re not hungry. It’s hard not to. So I ate some popcorn, don’t know how much, but I didn’t think it was very much. I didn’t bolus for it either (mindless eating). The kids watched the movie, played and ate pizza. At around 7:00 p.m. it was finally cake time (of course I didn’t have any). The cake was another one of Jessica’s great ideas – a Boggle cake that said HAPPY BIRTHDAY TOM. (Boggle has become very popular in our home over the last few weeks. At around 8:30 after all of Tom’s friends had gone, Jessica and I finally sat down for dinner (we had resisted the pizza too, not just the cake). I checked my blood sugar and was surprised by the result – 217. I bolused and ate my low carb dinner. A couple hours later, while in bed reading I started to feel extremely tired, the kind of tired where you can’t keep your eyes open Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Insulin Resistance: Tired After Lunch?

Symptoms Of Insulin Resistance: Tired After Lunch?

When the clock strikes 2:00 in the afternoon, does fatigue drop on you like a heavy load? The time frame over the couple hours after lunch can send the best of us down for the count. If you notice that you are so exhausted you want to curl up and take nap after your midday meal, you may be experiencing your blood sugar levels shifting. For many people, eating a higher carbohydrate meal, like a sub sandwich or a pasta dish, or even sushi can really knock the wind out of their sails, because their blood sugar will spike and then drop after the body releases insulin. If you find that you are tired almost every day around the same time after lunch, then you may be experiencing a symptom of insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is a condition where your body doesn't process carbohydrates and sugars like it is supposed to. Insulin is a fat-storing hormone, and insulin resistance simply means your cells don't respond like they should to this hormone. Insulin is the key that unlocks the cell door to let glucose inside. With insulin resistance, the insulin key isn't fitting properly and so your body will store the glucose that cannot get inside cells as fat. This condition of insulin resistance can make it extremely difficult to lose weight, and insulin causes your body to become very eager to store fat. People can have varying degrees of insulin resistance, some more severe than others. When you have insulin resistance for a long time, it almost always leads to type 2 diabetes. The good news is, insulin resistance is easily reversible with the right type of meal plan and nutrition. At Cederquist Medical Wellness Center, we can determine the level of your insulin resistance, and formulate a customized program to first help reverse your insulin resistance, and second, to help yo Continue reading >>

What Is Insulin Resistance?

What Is Insulin Resistance?

Insulin resistance is a condition that develops when the body cannot use insulin properly, which, over time, causes the development of chronic diseases of aging. Insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas, helps the body use glucose (a form of sugar that is the body’s main source of energy). Our digestive system breaks food down into glucose, which then travels through bloodstream to cells throughout the body. Glucose in the blood is called blood glucose, also known as blood sugar. As the blood glucose level rises after a meal, the pancreas releases insulin to help cells take in and use the glucose. When people are insulin resistant, their muscle, fat, and liver cells do not respond properly to insulin. As a result, their bodies need more insulin to help glucose enter cells. The pancreas tries to keep up with this increased demand for insulin by producing more. Eventually, the pancreas fails to keep up with the body’s need for insulin and excess glucose builds up in the bloodstream. This blood sugar disregulation contributes to obesity, cholesterol abnormalities, elevated blood pressure (hypertension), osteoporosis, cancer, and ultimately the development of Type 2 diabetes (also called adult-onset diabetes) and cardiovascular disease (heart attack/stroke). Therefore, controlling your insulin levels is one of the most powerful strategies you can possibly implement. Symptoms of Insulin Resistance Fatigue The most common feature of Insulin Resistance is that it wears people out; some are tired just in the morning or afternoon, others are exhausted all day. Brain fogginess Sometimes the fatigue of Insulin Resistance is physical, but often it’s mental. The inability to focus is the most evident symptom. Poor memory, loss of creativity, poor grades in school often acco Continue reading >>

Why Diabetics Get Sleepy After Meals

Why Diabetics Get Sleepy After Meals

A healthy meal should leave you feeling energized and ready to accomplish your daily activities. However, if you feel sleepy after a meal or find yourself taking a nap on the couch after eating, it may be because of your diabetes. You will need to do a bit of experimentation to find out the cause of your sleepiness, but it is possible to correct this simple problem. Video of the Day For many people with diabetes, eating too much, and especially eating too much carbohydrates and sugar, makes them feel very tired after the meal. Feeling tired and lack of energy are common symptoms of hyperglycemia, or high-blood sugar levels. You may have a lot of sugar circulating through your bloodstream, but your insulin is either deficient or inefficient at getting that sugar into your cells. If your cells are not getting sugar, which is their main source of energy, they feel tired and so do you. Hyperglycemia also may be, but is not always, accompanied by increased thirst and frequent urination. Hypoglycemia, or low-blood sugar levels, may be the cause of your sleepiness after eating. Hypoglycemia can happen if you have taken too much insulin or diabetes medications for the amount of carbohydrates you ate or if you had quickly digestible carbohydrates that made your blood sugar levels peak high and then crash within one to two hours. If your blood sugar levels drop below 70 mg/dL, it is considered a low-blood sugar level and you need to treat it immediately with either three to four glucose tablets, 1/2 cup of a regular soft drink, 1/2 cup of fruit juice or 1 tbsp. of sugar or honey. If you experience low-blood sugar, you also may feel hungry, shaky, dizzy, weak, confused and irritable. Blood Sugar Target With diabetes, it is important to adjust your treatment plan, which includes yo Continue reading >>

Surprising Symptoms Of Prediabetes

Surprising Symptoms Of Prediabetes

One of the best ways to prevent diabetes is to spot blood sugar (glucose) problems before the full-blown disease develops. But most people don’t realize that diabetes — and its precursor, prediabetes — can cause no symptoms at all or a wide range of symptoms that often are misinterpreted. Common mistake: Because diabetes is strongly linked to excess body weight, many people who are a normal weight assume that they won’t develop the disease. But that’s not always true. About 15% of people who are diagnosed with diabetes are not overweight. And paradoxically, even weight loss can be a symptom of this complex disorder in people (normal weight or overweight) who have uncontrolled high glucose levels. Shocking new finding: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now estimates that 40% of Americans ages 40 to 74 have prediabetes, and nearly two out of three Americans over age 65 have prediabetes or diabetes — most likely due to the increasing numbers of people who are overweight and inactive, both of which boost diabetes risk. However, most primary care doctors aren’t diagnosing and treating prediabetes early enough in their patients — often because they fail to order the necessary screening tests. And because the symptoms of prediabetes can be subtle, especially in its early stages, most people are not reporting potential red flags to their doctors. Fortunately, prediabetes can virtually always be prevented from progressing to diabetes if the condition is identified and treated in its early stages (by following a healthful diet, exercising regularly and taking nutritional supplements and medications, if necessary). Being overweight (defined as having a body mass index, or BMI, of 25 or higher) is perhaps the best-known risk factor for diabetes.* The mo Continue reading >>

Why Do I Feel Tired After Eating?

Why Do I Feel Tired After Eating?

We’ve all felt it — that drowsy feeling that sneaks in after a meal. You’re full and relaxed, and you’re struggling to keep your eyes open. Why are meals so often followed by a sudden urge to take a nap, and should you be concerned about it? In general, a little bit of sleepiness after eating is completely normal and nothing to worry about. There are several factors that contribute to this post-meal phenomenon, and there are a few things you might be able to do to minimize those drowsy effects. Your Digestion Cycle Your body needs energy to function — not just to run after your dog or put in time at the gym — but to breathe and simply exist. We get this energy from our food, which is broken down into fuel, or glucose, by our digestive system, and then macronutrients provide calories, or energy, to our bodies. More than just changing food into energy, our digestive cycle triggers all kinds of responses within our body. Hormones such as cholecystokinin (CCK), glucagon, and amylin are released to increase satiety, blood sugar rises, and insulin is produced to allow this sugar to go from the blood and into the cells, where it is used for energy. Interestingly, there are also hormones that can increase in the brain, such as serotonin, that can lead to drowsiness. Melatonin, the other hormone that induces sleep, is not released due to eating, but food does influence melatonin production. Your Diet Though all foods are digested in much the same manner, not all foods affect your body in the same way. Some foods, like turkey, can make you sleepier than others. Turkey and other high-protein foods, along with spinach, soy, eggs, cheese, tofu, and fish contain the amino acid tryptophan, which is used by the body to create serotonin, possibly responsible for that post-me Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar And Sleep Problems: How Blood Sugar Levels Impact Sleep

Blood Sugar And Sleep Problems: How Blood Sugar Levels Impact Sleep

November is National Diabetes Month and Alaska Sleep Clinic is dedicating this month’s blog posts to raising awareness for diabetic complications and how they correlate with sleep disorders and overall tiredness. SLEEP PROBLEMS AND SNORING MAY PREDICT DIABETES Studies have shown that individuals who consistently have a bad night's sleep are more likely to develop conditions linked to diabetes and heart disease. Loud snoring sleepers (many of whom may have sleep apnea), compared to quiet sleepers, double (2x) their risks of developing certain types of metabolic syndrome(s); including diabetes, obesity, and high blood pressure. This likelihood also increased dramatically to 80% in those who found it difficult to fall asleep and to 70% for those who woke up feeling not as refreshed. Blood Sugar and Sleep Problems Sleep can affect your blood sugar levels, and your blood glucose control can also affect your sleep. It’s a vicious cycle. As the amount of sleep decreases, blood sugar increases, escalating the issue. Lack of sleep has been shown to increase blood sugar levels and the risk of diabetic issues. Higher blood sugar means less long-lasting fat metabolism in the night and even less sleep. Researchers at Boston University School of Medicine found that people who slept less than 6 hours a night had more blood sugar complications compared to those who received 8 hours of sleep. HIGH BLOOD SUGAR - HYPERGLYCEMIA Sleepless and restless nights hurt more than your mood and energy; it is a form of chronic stress on the body. When there is added stress on your body this results in having higher blood sugar levels. When researchers restricted people with type-1 diabetes to just 4 hours of sleep, their sensitivity to insulin was reduced by 20% compared to that after a full nig Continue reading >>

How Blood Sugar Levels Affect Your Sleep

How Blood Sugar Levels Affect Your Sleep

Dr. Doni discusses why eating too much, too late can make it hard to sleep (it’s all about blood sugar). She offers some simple tips to help you take control. In the introduction to this series of articles I gave an overview of 12 things that can disrupt our sleep. This week, we’ll focus on blood sugar – and how eating too much of the wrong things can pull us into a vicious cycle of over-eating and blood sugar fluctuations that can have a serious impact on our ability to sleep. Did you notice that you felt sleepy after your Thanksgiving meal last week? This lull in energy is often attributed to tryptophan, an essential amino acid found in turkey meat that is known to make us feel sleepy. However that sleepiness is also due to a rise in your blood sugar levels as the carbs from your meal make their way into your blood stream. Then, the day after Thanksgiving, did you notice that you felt hungrier or that you craved sweets? This is because, once your blood sugar goes high (the technical term for this is hyperglycemia) for even just one meal, it will always be followed by a dip in blood sugar (hypoglycemia) a few hours later. This dip will make you to want to eat more and repeat the pattern of eating a large amount of carbohydrates. In fact, some people end up eating more the day after Thanksgiving than they did on Thanksgiving itself. As you might imagine, once this pattern starts, it is difficult to get it to stop. The more often you consume large, Thanksgiving-sized meals, the more likely your body is to send the signals that lead you to have another large meal. This is because a rise in blood sugar is followed by a rise in insulin, the hormone which causes the sugar to move into your cells to be used to make energy. Then, when your blood sugar is low again, you a Continue reading >>

What You Need To Know About Blood Sugar Spikes

What You Need To Know About Blood Sugar Spikes

A spike in a person’s blood sugar after eating, known as post-meal hyperglycemia, is not uncommon and typically not dangerous. Unless directed by their doctor, people with diabetes don’t have to check their blood sugar after every meal. Taking note of these spikes, however, can help you better manage meals and keep your blood sugar steady. Several factors contribute to post-meal hyperglycemia, including what you eat, how much, and the timing of insulin injections. According to the American Diabetes Association, your blood sugar should be less than 180 milligrams per deciliter of blood within one to two hours after eating, but your doctor may set different blood sugar goals specific to you. Tami Ross, RD, LD, a certified diabetes educator based in Lexington, Ky. and current president of the American Association of Diabetes Educators answers some frequently asked questions about blood sugars spikes, what they mean, and when they may be cause for concern. Who should pay the most attention to blood sugar spikes after eating? Women who are pregnant or trying to get pregnant should be very focused on keeping their blood sugar as close to normal as possible. This will help get the best possible outcome for your pregnancy. Women with uncontrolled blood sugar are at risk for birth defects, miscarriage, and your baby growing too large. If you are taking insulin, your needs for insulin will also increase, particularly in the last months of pregnancy. Those looking to improve their A1C blood glucose levels [average blood glucose over the last couple of months] should pay more attention to their post-meal blood sugar. What are the negative consequences of an after-meal spike? There are short-term and long-term effects of a post-meal blood sugar spike. In the short-term, you’ll Continue reading >>

Why You Feel Sleepy After Eating

Why You Feel Sleepy After Eating

If you feel sleepy after eating, particularly after sweets or bakery products, you are normal. Eating sugary foods causes your brain to make large amounts of the neurotransmitter, serotonin, that makes people fall asleep naturally at night. Eating sugary foods or those made from flour, such as bakery products or pastas, causes blood sugar to rise higher than normal. This causes your pancreas to release large amounts of insulin, which drives one of the protein building blocks called tryptophan from your bloodstream into your brain, where it is converted to serotonin that makes you feel sleepy. Many people can avoid feeling sleepy after eating by restricting foods that are high in sugar and flour. When it is important for you to be alert, eat foods that do not cause a high rise in blood sugar, such as vegetable salads, nuts, seeds, fish or chicken. Checked 8/23/17 Continue reading >>

Diabetes Health Flashback From The First Ever Diabetes Blogger: It All Started With Tingling Fingers

Diabetes Health Flashback From The First Ever Diabetes Blogger: It All Started With Tingling Fingers

About a month ago I was driving to Santa Cruz and noticed a tingling in my fingers. It got worse when I put my hands up on the steering wheel and better when I rested them on the bottom. During this two-hour drive, it was a struggle to keep my fingers from falling asleep. Soon after, I began to wake up often during the night, having to reposition my hands so they would stop tingling. My first fear was of neuropathy. I asked myself, “Is this how it starts?” Before I confronted that possibility, I wanted to rule out other things. I went to my chiropractor who thought one of my cervical neck vertebra was out of alignment. He adjusted my back and neck, but it provided no relief. Diagnosis From a Friend I finally told a friend about how, when I push down on my wrist, sparkles and fireworks seem to run up to my fingers. He said, “That sounds just like carpal tunnel syndrome.” His words hit me hard. “Don’t I have enough to deal with with diabetes?” I thought. “This can’t be happening to me.” He told me what carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) means. CTS occurs when the median nerve is compressed where it passes through a narrow tunnel of bone and ligament in the wrist. The tendons in the carpal tunnel may swell, pinching this nerve. It can be caused by a number of things, like performing repetitive motions such as typing. People with diabetes are 15 times more prone to CTS than the general population. (Journal of Hand Surgery, January 1995). CTS is most common in insulin-dependent patients and is not associated with neuropathy. I called my doctor and got an appointment for the very next morning. He strongly suspected CTS, but referred me to a neurologist for the actual diagnosis. He suggested wrist splints and vitamin B6 at 100 mg/day. Bracing Myself His nurse was Continue reading >>

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