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Exercise Before 3 Hour Glucose Test

Instructions For 3-hour Glucose Tolerance Test

Instructions For 3-hour Glucose Tolerance Test

This test is done to evaluate how your body is processing sugar and to determine if you have developed Gestational Diabetes(Diabetes of Pregnancy). The test requires a total of 4 blood draws. The first is done fasting (after you have had nothing to eat or drink for at least 8-12 hours prior –except water) The you will be given a glucose liquid to drink that has a specific amount of sugar in it. Blood samples will be taken 1, 2, and 3 hours after you have completed this drink. In preparation for this test: You should eat your normal diet prior to the day of testing Do not eat, drink, smoke, or exercise for at least 8-12 hours before your first blood sample is taken. You may drink plain water but no other beverages. This test may take up to 4 hours to complete. Activity can interfere with the results so you will need to remain in the lab for the duration of the test. Consider bringing something to read or a project to work on while waiting. You may drink water so feel free to bring your own cup or water bottle. Once the test is completed, you may resume normal eating and drinking. You may be hungry once the test is finished so you may want to bring along a light snack to eat before leaving or driving home. Gestational Diabetes is typically diagnosed when two or more of the results are elevated. Your doctor may also use other criteria to make the diagnosis. Continue reading >>

Pcos: Preparing For Your Oral Glucose Tolerance Test

Pcos: Preparing For Your Oral Glucose Tolerance Test

If you have PCOS and you’re getting ready to have an oral glucose tolerance test, you may be wondering how to prepare for the test and what the results may mean. The test can help your health care provider figure out whether you have a high risk of developing diabetes and whether lifestyle changes and medications such as Metformin might be helpful in treating your PCOS. What is Glucose? Glucose is a type of sugar and the main source of energy used by your body. The glucose that your body uses for energy comes from many kinds of foods called carbohydrates, such as cereal, bread, rice, pasta, and other grains, not just sugary foods. Dairy products, fruits, and vegetables all contain carbohydrates as well. Your body uses the glucose it needs and then stores the rest as “glycogen” in your liver and muscles. What is an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT)? An OGTT is a way to measure your body’s ability to use glucose. Your pancreas (a gland located behind the stomach) makes a hormone called insulin, which helps your body use the glucose in your blood. If your pancreas doesn’t make enough insulin or if your body is unable to use the insulin it makes, you may have a high blood glucose level. The OGTT involves fasting overnight and then having your blood checked early in the morning. You will then drink a special glucose drink and have your blood tested again after 2 hours. Sometimes blood sugar levels are also checked at other times such as 1 hour, 3 hours, or 4 hours after the glucose drink. What if my blood glucose level is high? If the OGTT shows that your blood glucose levels are higher than normal, your health care provider may tell you that you have “impaired glucose tolerance”. This often means that you are at risk for developing diabetes. Rarely, diabetes Continue reading >>

Beaumont Laboratory

Beaumont Laboratory

Glucose Tolerance 3 Hour, Pregnancy (100g Glucola) Pregnancy GTT 3 hour 100 g, 3 Hour Pregnancy Glucose Tolerance Test 100 g, Pregnancy Glucose Tolerance Test, 3 hour 100 g, Antrim #13285, EPIC: LAB5059, SOFT: GLTPR Instructions This test must be scheduled through the Beaumont Appointment Center at 800-328-8542. Be sure the requisition indicates "Pregnancy 3 Hour Glucose Tolerance Test (100g)". Patient Preparation The patient should be on a full, well-balanced diet (80g protein and at least 150g carbohydrates) for 3 days prior to the test. The patient should fast after the evening meal the night before the test. (Fasting for at least 8 hours.) The test should be done in the morning before the patient has exercised. The patient should not exercise or smoke during the test. The patient may have one glass of water two hours after the glucose is taken. Specimen Collection Criteria Collect: One Gray-top Potassium Oxalate/Sodium Fluoride tube prior to administration of the oral glucose load, and at each hour interval, as outlined below. Also acceptable: One Gold-top SST tube or Microtainer® drawn under the same guidelines as listed above and below. SST tubes and Microtainers® must be centrifuged within 1 hour of collection. Contact the Laboratory for acceptibility of other tube types. After the fasting glucose is drawn, the specimen is assayed. If the value of the fasting glucose for a pregnant patient is 140 mg/dL or greater, the glucose tolerance test will be canceled and only the fasting glucose value will be reported. This policy will prevent the unnecessary administration of an oral glucose load to a non-fasting or overtly diabetic patient. If the value is less than the above cutoff value the appropriate dose of glucose will be given. Administer Dose: The proper oral g Continue reading >>

Don’t Eat The Cucumber And Other Helpful Tips For The Gestational Diabetes Tests

Don’t Eat The Cucumber And Other Helpful Tips For The Gestational Diabetes Tests

This is not my first rodeo. Three pregnancies in four years and you’d think I could walk through the pre-natal care routine backwards with my eyes closed, but no. No, I made some rookie mistakes last week and I want to share them so that a) you don’t do the same thing b) I remember for the next time, if there is one. Just writing the words “next time” right now makes me want to curl up in the fetal position and find a corner to rock in. But I digress. The one-hour gestational diabetes glucose test: It has a reputation that precedes it, and any formerly pregnant woman anywhere will strike up conversation about that blessed orange drink. First of all, the drink for this test is not as bad as lore makes it out to be. (Isn’t that true of so many things in pregnancy and birth? Hype does not equal reality.) I remember being pleasantly surprised during my first pregnancy to discover that it is carbonated and pretty much tastes like Orange Crush soda. Even for a non-pop drinker, I don’t think it is as much of a shock to the system as we preggos like to yack about. For those who don’t know, you drink the soda, wait for an hour, and then they draw a vile of blood and test your blood sugar level. If it is lower than 140, you pass. Higher, you fail. The one-hour test has no official dietary guidelines except eating nothing between the glucose drink and your blood draw. Most practices and online pregnancy forums will tell you to watch your sugar and carb intake the day of the test, and to stick to a lot of protein. My appointment for the one-hour test was Monday at 2:40 (rookie mistake number one). I had eggs for breakfast, a no-tortilla Chipotle burrito bowl for lunch, and cucumber slices for an afternoon snack before leaving for my midwife’s office (rookie mistake Continue reading >>

Did Not Pass Glucose Test :(

Did Not Pass Glucose Test :(

I took the one hour glucose test yesterday and was "slightly" elevated. My # came back 135. They said under 130 would have passed. What kind of level is everyone else getting? Now I must take the 3 hour test. What can I do to get my levels in the right placeover the next week or so before I take the test, any experience with this? Perhaps I'm eating too many sugary things, or not getting enough exercise? It's a little bit of a bummer. I'd hate to fail again and then have to get shots or blood draws every day or whatever they require you to do with gestational diabetes. @funistyle It is not just 'sugary' things that will effect your glucose test. It's anything that causes a rise in insulin, so carbs like bread, baked goods, juice, fruit. Sticking with protein and veggies will keep your energy up and your insulin low. If you want carbs, make sure they are complex carbs, and then they won't negatively effect your blood-sugar levels. @funistyle It also depends on how your body processes the sugar. I'm 26 w, eat mostly sugar and carbs and don't exercise and I passed the one hour test with 113. I also have diabetes in my family so I was worried i would fail. That's just a screening and doesn't mean you have GD yet. Good luck with the three hour test! @funistyle I just found out I failed as well. I feel I eat a pretty balanced diet. So, not sure what I will change, but I know there are other factors involved then just what I am eating. My number was high, 170, so that isn't great. :( So, I'll just wait and see I guess. Good luck to you! Thanks for the suggestions, everyone. I wonder if my "advanced maternal age" of 39 has anything to do with this as well. I'm really surprised about failing because most of my life I've been borderline hypoglycemic, meaningI've had low blood su Continue reading >>

What Diet Should I Eat Prior To Getting A 2 Hour Glucose Tolerance Test?

What Diet Should I Eat Prior To Getting A 2 Hour Glucose Tolerance Test?

What diet should I eat prior to getting a 2 hour glucose tolerance test? What diet should I eat prior to getting a 2 hour glucose tolerance test? I have been diagnosed with polycystic ovary syndrome, which is commonly associated with abnormal glucose/carbohydrate metabolism. Because I get bouts of low blood sugar, and almost all my relatives have become type 2 diabetics in later life despite being thin and active, I'm getting a 2 hour GTT next week. I always eat a low carb diet and exercise frequently, and I'm at a healthy weight. By eating a low carb diet a lot of my blood sugar symptoms have lessened. Does eating a low carb diet prior to the test affect the results of the GTT? Should I eat more carbs the day before the test to simulate a 'normal' diet, or stick to what I'm doing? I'd like the test to pick up on any abnormalities in my system if any exist. If my GTT results are concerning to my Dr, then he might put me on metformin, which could improve the other symptoms associated with PCOS. All my fasting glucose tests have been normal. D.D. Family T2 on Levemir,NovoRapid,Fenofibrate,Glucophage SR. I have been diagnosed with polycystic ovary syndrome, which is commonly associated with abnormal glucose/carbohydrate metabolism. Because I get bouts of low blood sugar, and almost all my relatives have become type 2 diabetics in later life despite being thin and active, I'm getting a 2 hour GTT next week. I always eat a low carb diet and exercise frequently, and I'm at a healthy weight. By eating a low carb diet a lot of my blood sugar symptoms have lessened. Does eating a low carb diet prior to the test affect the results of the GTT? Should I eat more carbs the day before the test to simulate a 'normal' diet, or stick to what I'm doing? I'd like the test to pick up on a Continue reading >>

3 Hour Glucose Test - Help!

3 Hour Glucose Test - Help!

So I took my 1 hour glucose challenge test a little over a week ago and failed. I got a 170 and the cutoff was 140, per my doctor. I was told I could have breakfast that morning but didn't because my test was pretty early and I figured it would be better just to not eat. That being said, I failed it and need to take the 3 hr test. Not sure if I failed cause I fasted or what. I eat healthy and work out 5 days a week. This time I am supposed to fast and dr says to eat high protein and low or no carbs the day before the test. I really don't want to fail due to messing with my diet. I want the results to be accurate. Any suggestions or recommendations as far as diet or what to do or not to do the day before the test? I had to take the 3 hour as well so I understand being concerned. Unfortunately even the healthiest of people can get GD. It has nothing to do with what you eat. It's a result of pregnancy hormones affecting the way your body produces insulin. I ate normally the day before. You have to fast so I dont think what you eat before will make a difference. Just eat how you normally would and obviously take in to consideration what your doctor has said. Nothing you do or dont do the day before can change the results. It's all based on how your body processes the glucose drink. Good luck!! Other than it being 3 hours the test is fine! I also fasted before the one hour and failed it. I have been being very healthy during my pregnancy but have a lot of risk factors for GD but passed all 4 parts of my 3 hour test. I started pregnancy overweight have a father with diabetes am over 25 so I thought I had no chance. It passed so hang in there! Just started my 3 hour test. Not looking forward to the blood tests every hour! Ate normally yesterday albeit dinner was later than us Continue reading >>

Pregnant Ladies, Take Note: You Can Be Healthy And Fit And Still Get Gestational Diabetes

Pregnant Ladies, Take Note: You Can Be Healthy And Fit And Still Get Gestational Diabetes

The one-hour glucose test is something every pregnant woman is asked to take. For the test, you chug a sugary drink, wait an hour, have your blood drawn, and then go about your day. The test is designed to check for gestational diabetes, a form of high blood sugar that affects pregnant women, and most women don’t hear or think about it again. That’s how I was, until I was told that I seriously flunked mine—and I didn’t take the news well. In fact, I'm pretty sure I blurted out something like, "How is that possible?" After all, the typical gestational diabetes patient is someone who has gained a lot of weight during their pregnancy and doesn’t exercise often. (Two of the major recommendations for women diagnosed with gestational diabetes are to follow a healthy diet and exercise more.) At seven months pregnant, I haven’t gained much weight, I eat healthy, and I run four miles, five days a week. My doctor also told me in the same visit that my baby bump is “measuring small,” and she wants to keep a close eye on it. WTF is going on?! According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) anywhere from one in 50 to one in 20 pregnant women has gestational diabetes, so this is a fairly common issue. I just didn’t think it would be my issue. But, apparently, you can develop gestational diabetes and be an otherwise healthy person. Like type 2 diabetes, “gestational diabetes is linked to excess weight gain and lack of exercise,” Anita Avery, M.D., an ob/gyn at Michigan State University, tells SELF. “However, plenty of otherwise healthy women who are in good shape can still develop gestational diabetes.” That’s why women are screened with a blood test, rather than just those who are thought to have a chance of having gestational diabetes ba Continue reading >>

Things That Impact A Fasting Glucose Blood Test

Things That Impact A Fasting Glucose Blood Test

A fasting blood sugar level is usually ordered by a physician either to check for a new diagnosis of diabetes or to monitor a person who is known to have diabetes. Ideally fasting blood sugar is tested shortly after you get up in the morning, 8 to 12 hours after eating or drinking anything other than water. The normal range is from 70 to 99 mg/dL. Levels above 100 mg/dL may indicate impaired glucose metabolism. Various factors can affect fasting blood sugar levels. Any foods eaten within 8 hours of the test may cause glucose levels to be elevated. After food is digested, higher levels of glucose remain in the blood for some time. Alcoholic beverages consumed even the night before the test may cause a drop in blood sugar. Medications such as corticosteroids, estrogen -- present in birth control pills, some diuretics, certain antidepressants, anti-seizure medication and even plain aspirin can increase glucose levels. Glucose levels can be decreased by medications that include insulin, oral hypoglycemic agents, anabolic steroids and even acetaminophen. Exercise can cause an increase or a decrease in blood sugar levels. During exercise, insulin becomes more efficient. This effect can persist, lowering blood sugar levels for hours afterward. An hour of afternoon exercise may lower glucose levels until the next morning, affecting the fasting blood sugar test. Exercise can also affect glucose levels by releasing adrenaline. This raises blood sugar temporarily. Physical exertion or other activities that cause excitement may increase fasting sugar levels if performed shortly before the test. Many medical conditions can affect blood sugar levels, such as liver disease, disorders of the pancreas and disorders of the thyroid gland. Acute and severe trauma -- such as major surgery, Continue reading >>

12 Things Pregnant Women Don't Know About The Three Hour Glucose Test

12 Things Pregnant Women Don't Know About The Three Hour Glucose Test

As new moms, many women are unaware or don't know what to expect about the 3 hour glucose test during pregnancy. Everyone knows what it is. It checks a woman's blood sugar levels. But, do people really think about the process and how difficult it can be for some women? The main concern women have about the glucose test is testing positive for gestational diabetes, which is common during pregnancy. About 1 in 10 women will develop gestational diabetes during their pregnancy, which is why doctors and practitioners screen for this in every patient. For the most part, it starts with a one hour test. Depending on the result, it can last up to three hours, or longer. Women with gestational diabetes are likely to have wonderfully normal pregnancies and healthy babies, they will just have to alter their eating habits and live a healthier lifestyle. Want to learn more about the three hour glucose test? Read below to gain more knowledge about the process and now we will all be aware of what to expect when walking into the doctor’s office between 24-28 week check-up. 12Sugar Sugar Everywhere Diabetes can be genetic or due to a lifestyle factor. When you go to your first prenatal visit and the doctor finds out diabetes run in your family or if your body mass index was 30 or higher before pregnancy, they will test for diabetes. Usually, gestational diabetes is tested between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy and about 1 in 10 women will develop it during their pregnancy. The process is quite simple….sometimes. You’ll drink a syrupy glucose solution. One hour later, you’ll have a blood test to measure your blood sugar level. If your blood level comes out normal, great! The doctor will see you again next visit. If your blood sugar is higher than normal, you’ll need a glucose tole Continue reading >>

Advice: Failed 1 Hr Glucose

Advice: Failed 1 Hr Glucose

Rough morning. I know gestational diabetes has nothing to do with activity level or diet necessarily...I'm a nurse so wrapping my mind around this is really hard! Im 27 weeks and still running 3.5miles a day 5 days a week. I don't eat horribly either. I failed my 1 hr glucose test horribly at 185. We did go out to dinner the night before at Shoguns to celebrate a friend's bday. I stayed away from the rice and noodles and just ate veggies and shrimp. I ate more than usual for dinner and still felt full the next morning before my 9am test. My doc doesn't require fasting so I had 2 hard boiled eggs and black coffee before the test just so I wouldn't get nauseated. I don't necessarily think dinner or breakfast messed up my results but basically I just want to know if anyone else has failed miserably and passed the 3 hr?!? It just seems so unfair...I know, I'm having a major pity party this morning ;) Also, what do I expect for the 3 hour?!? Another sugary drink?!? Breakfast messed up your results. That's the truth and I don't understand why some doctors say it's ok to eat and some say you must fast. I failed my first one with my first child and I know it's because I ate breakfast. Meanwhile I passed the 3 hour fasting no problem. Think about it this way, why would it be ok to eat before the one hour but not before the 3 hour. I feel like they set us up for failure sometimes lol, I don't know why. The 3 hour is just boring and tedious but basically same exact process as the 1 hour. Blood draw, sugar drink, wait and hour, blood draw, wait and hour, blood draw, wait an hour, blood draw. I left some waiting out somewhere because I know I was there more like 5 hours. You will most likely pass the 3 hour. EVERYONE, FAST BEFORE THE ONE HOUR TEST NO MATTER WHAT YOUR DOCTOR SAYS! N Continue reading >>

Before & During Glucose Tests

Before & During Glucose Tests

Before the Glucose Tests Report to your doctor any medications, herbs, or supplements you are taking. You may be advised to discontinue certain of these agents before all of these tests, except HbA1c. Fasting glucose test: Do not eat or drink anything for 8 hours before the test. Postprandial glucose test: A fasting blood glucose test is performed to establish the pre-test blood glucose level. You will be instructed to eat a balanced meal containing at least 75 grams of carbohydrates, and then fast for 2 hours. Do not smoke or perform any strenuous activities after the meal. Oral glucose tolerance test: Your doctor will advise you to maintain a high-carbohydrate diet for 3 days before the test. You should fast for 8 to 10 hours before the test. Water is permitted. Do not smoke, exercise strenuously, or drink coffee or alcohol for 8 hours before the test. Your doctor may weigh you to determine the appropriate amount of glucose to include in the test beverage. You may want to bring something to read during the test. HbA1c test: No advance preparation is necessary. What You Experience during Glucose Tests Fasting, postprandial, and HbA1c tests: A sample of your blood is drawn from a vein, usually in your arm, and sent to a laboratory for analysis. Oral glucose tolerance test: Blood will be drawn using venipuncture and a urine specimen will be obtained to determine fasting glucose levels. You will be given a glucose-laden beverage. It will be very sweet. (It may be diluted with a small amount of lemon juice and water.) You won’t be allowed to eat anything until the test is complete, but you may drink water. Additional blood samples are taken at 30 minutes, 60 minutes, and hourly intervals after you drink the glucose beverage. Urine specimens are taken at hourly intervals. Continue reading >>

Glucose Tolerance Tests

Glucose Tolerance Tests

It seems as though every pregnant woman experiences nervousness prior to going through the dreaded glucose tolerance test between 24-28 weeks. It’s got a bad reputation among the mother community and now I completely understand why. When I was pregnant with my first child, I was terribly scared, but passed the 1 hour test with flying colors. Easy peasy. Fast forward to this pregnancy and it all changed. I failed the 1 hour. So, how does the 1 hour glucose tolerance test work, you ask? You fast from midnight the night before the test. Some practices will allow you to drink water during this fasting period, others won’t. Go to the doctor/hospital and drink a non-carbonated, artificially flavored/dyed beverage that contains 50 grams of glucose within 5 minutes. Then, you wait for 1 hour at the doctor’s office (bring a book!). They then draw your blood to test the blood sugar level. You usually get your results in the next 1-3 days. Results and what they mean: If you get higher than a 135 mg/dL then you have to come back another day and take the 3 hour glucose test. During this pregnancy with baby #2, I got a 151 mg/dL after the 1 hour glucose test. Three days later, I’m in for the 3 hour glucose test. How does the 3 hour glucose tolerance test work? You fast from midnight the night before the test. Some practices will allow you to drink water during this fasting period, others won’t. I opted to not drink any water, for minimal affect on my test. Go to the doctor/hospital and have your finger pricked to insure your fasting blood sugar level is between 70-105 mg/dL. (Mine was 77 mg/dL, enabling me to proceed with the test.) If so, they draw your blood for initial fasting levels. Then you drink a non-carbonated, artificially flavored/dyed beverage that contains 100 Continue reading >>

Does Prior Exercise Affect Oral Glucose Tolerance Test Results?

Does Prior Exercise Affect Oral Glucose Tolerance Test Results?

Does prior exercise affect oral glucose tolerance test results? 1 Kelley Hatfield ,1 Michael Dunn ,1 and James Davis 2 1Department of Human Nutrition, Food and Animal Sciences, University of Hawaii, 1955 East-West Rd., Honolulu, HI 96822, USA 1Department of Human Nutrition, Food and Animal Sciences, University of Hawaii, 1955 East-West Rd., Honolulu, HI 96822, USA 1Department of Human Nutrition, Food and Animal Sciences, University of Hawaii, 1955 East-West Rd., Honolulu, HI 96822, USA 2Department of Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Clinical Research Center, University of Hawaii, Gold Bond Bldg, Suite 1015, Honolulu, HI 96813, USA 1Department of Human Nutrition, Food and Animal Sciences, University of Hawaii, 1955 East-West Rd., Honolulu, HI 96822, USA 2Department of Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Clinical Research Center, University of Hawaii, Gold Bond Bldg, Suite 1015, Honolulu, HI 96813, USA Proceedings of the Fifth International Society of Sports Nutrition (ISSN) Conference and Expo 2008 International Society of Sports Nutrition Conference and Expo Copyright 2008 Titchenal et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. When oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) are repeated in individuals, relatively large variations in the magnitude of the blood glucose response often occur from one measurement occasion to another. Little is known about what causes this within-subject variability. One potential contributor may be the subject's prior extent of physical activity and/or the amount of stored glycogen present at the time of the OGTT. This research tested the effect of a bout of exercise (of the type known to significantly deplete muscle glycogen) performed within 24 hours prior to an OGTT on blood glucose and insulin responses. Ten male endurance athletes underwent Continue reading >>

Night Before 3 Hour Glucose Test?

Night Before 3 Hour Glucose Test?

I have my 1 hour tomorrow so I'm doing the same thing. I've tried to be careful about carbs all day (and sugar) but I wanted yogurt so I went to the froyo place and got the sugar free and low fat vanilla but I added cookie dough (6 chunks) and the little bead things that burst so that was my last treat of the day. That was about 2 oclock so for the rest of the day I'm sticking with fruits, and protein if possible. And tomorrow morning since my test isn't until 11 I'm going to eat scrambled eggs with cheese and maybe a slice of bacon or something if we have some. Then I won't eat again until after my appointment/blood draw so that will be from 7ish until 11ish. 3 hours before I even drink the stuff so I'm not too worried...should I be? I have my 1 hour tomorrow so I'm doing the same thing. I've tried to be careful about carbs all day (and sugar) but I wanted yogurt so I went to the froyo place and got the sugar free and low fat vanilla but I added cookie dough (6 chunks) and the little bead things that burst so that was my last treat of the day. That was about 2 oclock so for the rest of the day I'm sticking with fruits, and protein if possible. And tomorrow morning since my test isn't until 11 I'm going to eat scrambled eggs with cheese and maybe a slice of bacon or something if we have some. Then I won't eat again until after my appointment/blood draw so that will be from 7ish until 11ish. 3 hours before I even drink the stuff so I'm not too worried...should I be? Be careful with the fruits... they contain a lot of sugar! I think you will be just fine, though. I'll keep my fingers crossed that you pass, and you keep your fingers crossed that I pass! :-) Continue reading >>

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