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Erratic Blood Sugar Symptoms

15 Ways High Blood Sugar Affects Your Body

15 Ways High Blood Sugar Affects Your Body

High blood sugar symptoms Glucose, or sugar, is the fuel that powers cells throughout the body. Blood levels of this energy source ebb and flow naturally, depending what you eat (and how much), as well as when you eat it. But when something goes wrong—and cells aren't absorbing the glucose—the resulting high blood sugar damages nerves, blood vessels, and organs, setting the stage for dangerous complications. Normal blood-sugar readings typically fall between 60 mg/dl and 140 mg/dl. A blood test called a hemoglobin A1c measures average blood sugar levels over the previous three months. A normal reading is below 5.7% for people without diabetes. An excess of glucose in the bloodstream, or hyperglycemia, is a sign of diabetes. People with type 1 diabetes don’t make insulin, the hormone needed to ferry sugar from the bloodstream into cells. Type 2 diabetes means your body doesn’t use insulin properly and you can end up with too much or too little insulin. Either way, without proper treatment, toxic amounts of sugar can build up in the bloodstream, wreaking havoc head to toe. That’s why it’s so important to get your blood sugar levels in check. “If you keep glucose levels near normal, you reduce the risk of diabetes complications,” says Robert Ratner, MD, chief scientific and medical officer of the American Diabetes Association. Here’s a rundown of the major complications and symptoms of high blood sugar. No symptoms at all Often, high blood sugar causes no (obvious) symptoms at all, at least at first. About 29 million people in the U.S. have diabetes, but one in four has no idea. Another 86 million have higher-than-normal blood sugar levels, but not high enough to be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. That's why it’s a good idea to get your blood sugar test Continue reading >>

Why Does Blood Sugar Fluctuate?

Why Does Blood Sugar Fluctuate?

Q: My doctor is not helpful when I ask about fluctuation in blood sugar readings. Can someone help me? A: It's perfectly normal for blood glucose levels to fluctuate in all people -- even those without diabetes. Ask your doctor or diabetes educator for a target range, such as 70-130 mg/dl before meals. Eating, especially eating foods that contain carbohydrate, raises your blood glucose level. It peaks one to two hours after the first bite, and then begins to lower to premeal levels. Diabetes medications work to lower the glucose level or prevent it from going too high. Physical activity also lowers blood glucose. Stress and illness typically raise blood glucose. While you sleep, your liver releases some stored glucose to keep the level from dropping too low. In a person with diabetes, the liver tends to overcompensate, releasing more than you need. This can lead to a high morning blood glucose reading. Virginia Zamudio Lange, R.N., M.S.N., CDE, is a registered nurse, certified diabetes educator, and a past president of the American Association of Diabetes Educators. Continue reading >>

Tips For Managing Glucose Levels

Tips For Managing Glucose Levels

Upswing: Caffeine There are many different ways blood sugar (glucose levels in the blood) can be affected and cause problems with sugar control in people with diabetes. Each person reacts differently to various items that influence blood sugars. There are some compounds individuals with diabetes may want to examine to see how they influence their own blood sugar levels. For example, blood sugar levels can rise after drinking coffee, black tea, and some energy drinks due to the presence of caffeine. There are other compounds that may alter blood glucose levels and methods people with diabetes can use to see what compounds and actions influence their own blood sugar levels. Upswing: Sugar-Free Foods A number of foods claim to be "sugar-free," but these foods raise blood sugar levels because many of them contain carbohydrates in starches, fats, and even fiber. Sugar alcohols such as sorbitol and xylitol add sweetness to foods but still may have enough associated carbohydrates to raise blood sugar levels. Foods with high levels of carbohydrates are likely to raise blood sugar levels very high, and eventually may cause organ damage over time in people with diabetes. Upswing: Chinese Food Foods high in fat can cause blood sugar to stay higher for longer periods of time. Pizza, French fries, and most fried foods are high in carbohydrates and fat. It's a good idea to check your blood sugar about two hours after you eat such foods to see how your blood sugar levels are affected. Upswing: A Bad Cold Dehydration can elevate your blood sugar so it is wise to stay well hydrated. If you are sick, diarrhea and vomiting for more than two hours, or illness longer than a few days may alter your blood sugar. Moreover, blood sugar rises as your body tries to fight any type of illness. Medi Continue reading >>

Glucose Levels Can Fluctuate For Variety Of Reasons

Glucose Levels Can Fluctuate For Variety Of Reasons

Living with diabetes blog Unexplained elevations in your blood glucose values can be perplexing. Most of you understand that increased carbohydrate intake or decreased physical activity raises your blood glucose, but what if you're seeing glucose elevations despite maintaining a relatively consistent diet and exercise schedule? Hormonal fluctuations brought on by illness, injury, surgery, emotional stress, puberty, menses and menopause can also affect blood glucose. Physical or emotional stress triggers the release of hormones called catecholamines, which often cause hyperglycemia (high blood sugar). Even if you don't have diabetes, you can develop hyperglycemia during severe illness. If you already have diabetes, you may need more insulin or other diabetes medications during illness or stress. For children, insulin requirements increase with growth, particularly during puberty. This can, in part, be attributed to growth hormone as well as the sex hormones, estrogen and testosterone. For girls and women, menstruation and menopause present unique challenges to blood glucose control. Estrogen and progesterone can induce temporary resistance to insulin, which can last up to a few days and then drop off. Many women report having higher blood glucose levels a few days before beginning their period. Once menstruation begins, some women continue to have hyperglycemia while others experience a sharp drop in glucose levels. During menopause, women often notice their blood glucose levels are more variable or less predictable than before. Significant hyperglycemia can lead to emergency complications such as diabetic ketoacidosis or diabetic hyperosmolar syndrome. Persistent hyperglycemia puts you at increased risk for long-term complications such as cardiovascular disease, blindne Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar: Causes, Warning Signs And Treatments

Low Blood Sugar: Causes, Warning Signs And Treatments

Low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, is the most common and most dangerous condition for many people with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Very low blood sugar may lead to insulin shock, which can be life threatening if not treated promptly. Low blood sugar occurs when the body has too little food/glucose or too much insulin. The following are all potential reasons that a person with diabetes might have low blood sugar: Too much insulin taken Eating less than usual Eating later than usual Insulin was injected at a site on the body where the absorption rate is faster than usual Injecting extra insulin after forgetting about a previous dose More exercise than normal Illness or injury Other hormones Medication interaction The following is a list of general symptoms that indicate low blood sugar (the person with T1D may exhibit one or more of these and symptoms may change from event to event) Dizziness Nervousness Personality change/irrational behavior Blurry vision Shakiness Nausea Crying Sluggishness Sweating Poor coordination Hunger Lightheadedness Irritability Drowsiness Erratic response to questions Inability to concentrate Severe symptoms (symptoms as listed above, plus): Convulsions or seizure Loss of consciousness A blood-glucose meter reading below the target range specified by the physician indicates low blood sugar. The following are general treatments for low blood sugar. The physician and parents (for a child) should determine what course to follow. Please note that people with T1D have symptoms of low blood sugar at various readings. Some people with T1D feel perfectly fine at readings below 70. Others begin to show low blood-sugar symptoms at readings somewhat above 70. If blood-sugar levels are slightly low and the person is alert and lucid, he or she should: Not exercis Continue reading >>

The Cause Of Fluctuating Blood Sugar Levels In Diabetics

The Cause Of Fluctuating Blood Sugar Levels In Diabetics

The cause of fluctuating blood sugar levels in diabetics The number of people with diabetes is growing at an alarming rate. Blood sugar levels begin to fluctuate when the hormone known as insulin ceases to function as it should. A less well known fact is that the concentrations of the hormone glucagon are also disturbed and contribute to the peaks and troughs in the levels of blood sugar. Patrik Rorsman is investigating how the secretion of glucagon is regulated in the body and what role it plays in diabetes. Secretion of insulin and glucagon from the islets of Langerhahns in healthy individuals and diabetics. The small electrode is only allowed to just brush against the surface of the cell so it must be controlled extremely carefully under the microscope. Tiny, tiny steps. Only 0.1 of a micron at a time. When the electrode finally makes contact the surface of the cell bends inwards. Then - quite suddenly the electrode fuses with the cell and measurement can begin. This technique allows us to register extremely small flows of current through the cells ion channels, says Patrik Rorsman, Professor of Diabetic Medicine at the University of Oxford in England and newly appointed to an Excellent Researcher position at the Sahlgrenska Academy. The method he uses is called patch-clamp. Thanks to the technique he has managed to develop basic knowledge of how the body regulates sugar levels in the blood. It is a delicate tightrope act that is first and foremost controlled by the hormones insulin and glucagon. Insulin ensures that the levels fall while glucagon makes them rise. But the fact that Patrik Rorsman entered research at all, and that he has devoted himself to studying the behavior of these particular hormones is due to pure chance. Lets tell the story from the beginning Continue reading >>

How To Control Fluctuating Sugar Levels

How To Control Fluctuating Sugar Levels

Your blood sugar levels fluctuate naturally throughout the day, and the normal blood sugar range is between 70 and 140 mg/dL. Your blood sugar levels are generally lowest in the morning, because you have not eaten for several hours, and increase after your first meal of the day. Your levels continue to fluctuate depending on how active you are, how often you eat and how many calories you consume. Your body uses sugar as energy at all times, so it is not possible to stop your levels from fluctuating. However, you can control how much they fluctuate. Video of the Day Eat your first meal within a half hour of waking. Your blood sugar levels already are low, and, the longer you wait, the lower they will drop. Combine a complex carbohydrate, such as a whole grain, with a protein for your first meal of the day. The carbohydrate will convert to sugar in your body, and the protein will prevent your body from using the sugar too quickly. Healthy options include a scrambled egg in a whole-wheat tortilla, oatmeal with nuts or a peanut butter sandwich. Consume a light snack two to three hours after your first meal. The snack will help boost your blood sugar levels and carry you through to lunch. As with your first meal, combine a complex carbohydrate with a protein such as a sliced apple with 1 ounce of cheddar cheese or a cup of plain yogurt with fruit. Have lunch two to three hours after your first snack. Eating at frequent intervals keeps your blood sugar levels from dropping too far throughout the day. Lunch options include tuna salad with tomato, bean soup with a piece of bread or store-bought sushi and miso soup. Eat your second snack two to three hours after your lunch. The afternoon snack will carry you through to dinner and help prevent the afternoon slump. Options include Continue reading >>

What Is Brittle Diabetes?

What Is Brittle Diabetes?

Brittle diabetes is a severe form of diabetes. Also called labile diabetes, this condition causes unpredictable swings in blood sugar (glucose) levels. These swings can affect your quality of life and even lead to hospitalization. Thanks to advances in diabetes management, this condition is uncommon. However, it can still occur in people with diabetes. In some cases, it’s a sign that your blood sugar is poorly managed. The best way to prevent brittle diabetes is to follow a diabetes care plan created by your doctor. The biggest risk factor for brittle diabetes is having type 1 diabetes. Brittle diabetes occurs mainly in people with type 1 diabetes, and rarely in people with type 2 diabetes. Some doctors classify it as a complication of diabetes, while others consider it a subtype of type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is characterized by high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia). However, your body may have a reaction to insulin, also causing dips in glucose levels. This results in a dangerous “roller coaster” effect. The fluctuation in glucose levels can be rapid and unpredictable, causing dramatic symptoms. In addition to having type 1 diabetes, your risk of brittle diabetes is higher if you: are female have hormonal imbalances are overweight have hypothyroidism (low thyroid) are in your 20s or 30s have a high level of stress on a regular basis have depression Frequent symptoms of low or high blood glucose levels are common indicators of brittle diabetes. People with type 1 or type 2 diabetes can experience these symptoms when their blood sugar levels are off. However, with brittle diabetes, these symptoms occur and change frequently and without warning. Symptoms of very low blood sugar levels include: dizziness weakness irritability extreme hunger trembling hands do Continue reading >>

Must Read Articles Related To High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

Must Read Articles Related To High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

A A A High Blood Sugar (Hyperglycemia) Whenever the glucose (sugar) level in one's blood rises high temporarily, this condition is known as hyperglycemia. The opposite condition, low blood sugar, is called hypoglycemia. Glucose comes from most foods, and the body uses other chemicals to create glucose in the liver and muscles. The blood carries glucose (blood sugar) to all the cells in the body. To carry glucose into the cells as an energy supply, cells need help from insulin. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas, an organ near the stomach. The pancreas releases insulin into the blood, based upon the blood sugar level. Insulin helps move glucose from digested food into cells. Sometimes, the body stops making insulin (as in type 1 diabetes), or the insulin does not work properly (as in type 2 diabetes). In diabetic patients, glucose does not enter the cells sufficiently, thus staying in the blood and creating high blood sugar levels. Blood sugar levels can be measured in seconds by using a blood glucose meter, also known as a glucometer. A tiny drop of blood from the finger or forearm is placed on a test strip and inserted into the glucometer. The blood sugar (or glucose) level is displayed digitally within seconds. Blood glucose levels vary widely throughout the day and night in people with diabetes. Ideally, blood glucose levels range from 90 to 130 mg/dL before meals, and below 180 mg/dL within 1 to 2 hours after a meal. Adolescents and adults with diabetes strive to keep their blood sugar levels within a controlled range, usually 80-150 mg/dL before meals. Doctors and diabetes health educators guide each patient to determine their optimal range of blood glucose control. When blood sugar levels remain high for several hours, dehydration and more serious complicat Continue reading >>

High And Low Blood Sugar Symptoms

High And Low Blood Sugar Symptoms

Tweet Knowing and understanding the symptoms of high and low blood sugar should be essential for both diabetics and their friends and families. Symptoms of high blood sugar Hyperglycemia, or high blood sugar, is common amongst diabetics. It occurs when a diabetic person eats too much food, and has too little insulin to regulate their blood sugar. Sometimes stress can cause diabetes. Being aware of the following symptoms and staying alert for their presence, whether you are a diabetic or a family member or friend, should be essential: Need for frequent urination Drowsiness Nausea Extreme hunger and/or thirst Blurring of the vision Symptoms of low blood sugar Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, occurs when a diabetic has not eaten enough food, or has too much insulin within his or her body. An excessive amount of exercise can also cause low blood sugar levels. Be aware of low blood sugar symptoms Being aware of the following symptoms and staying alert for their presence, whether you are a diabetic or a family member or friend, should be essential: Shaking Fast heartbeat Sweating Anxiety Dizziness Extreme hunger Weakness and tiredness Irritability Why do these symptoms matter for diabetics? These symptoms are essential for diabetics to understand, because they may encounter high or low blood sugar levels from time to time. A cold or virus can cause sudden high blood sugar levels, and understand the symptoms means knowing how to deal with hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia. People with diabetes who can recognise the symptoms can avoid levels that lead to medical emergencies such as diabetic ketoacidosis. Knowing your high and low blood sugar symptoms allows you to test Once you understand symptoms of high and low blood sugar, it is possible to test quickly and avoid serious proble Continue reading >>

10 Surprising Causes Of Blood Sugar Swings You Probably Didn’t Know

10 Surprising Causes Of Blood Sugar Swings You Probably Didn’t Know

1 / 11 What Causes Blood Sugar to Rise and Fall? Whether you were recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes or have been living with the disease for several years, you know how fickle blood sugar levels can be, and how important it is that they stay controlled. Proper blood sugar control is key for helping ward off potential diabetes complications, such as kidney disease, nerve damage, vision problems, stroke, and heart disease, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH). If you keep your levels in check on a daily basis, it will help you stay energized, focused, and in a good mood. You’ll know if your diabetes is poorly controlled if you experience symptoms such as frequent urination, sores that won’t heal, blurred vision, and unexplained weight loss. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), proper medication, effective meal planning, regular exercise, and use of a blood glucose meter to track your numbers routinely can all help you keep your levels within a healthy range. The ADA recommends blood glucose be 80 to 130 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) before meals, and below 180 mg/dL two hours after the start of a meal. Furthermore, the organization recommends getting an A1C test, which measures your average blood glucose over the past two to three months, at least twice per year if your levels are stable and you are meeting treatment goals. Learning how different habits can cause your blood sugar to fluctuate can help you better predict how your levels will swing. You may be more likely to experience hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar if you have advanced-stage diabetes, according to the ADA. Meanwhile, high blood sugar, or hyperglycemia, may be caused by factors such as not using enough insulin or other diabetes medication, not following a prop Continue reading >>

Severely Fluctuating Blood Glucose Levels Associated With A Somatostatin-producing Ovarian Neuroendocrine Tumor

Severely Fluctuating Blood Glucose Levels Associated With A Somatostatin-producing Ovarian Neuroendocrine Tumor

Severely Fluctuating Blood Glucose Levels Associated with a Somatostatin-Producing Ovarian Neuroendocrine Tumor Departments of Diabetes and Metabolic Medicine (T.S., K.I., M.No.), 162-8655, Japan Diabetes Research Center (T.S., K.I., M.No., T.U., K.Y.), National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, 162-8655, Japan Search for other works by this author on: Obstetrics and Gynecology (M.Na., S.M.), 162-8655, Japan Search for other works by this author on: Departments of Diabetes and Metabolic Medicine (T.S., K.I., M.No.), 162-8655, Japan Search for other works by this author on: Metabolic Disorders (T.U., K.Y.), 162-8655, Japan Diabetes Research Center (T.S., K.I., M.No., T.U., K.Y.), National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, 162-8655, Japan Search for other works by this author on: Departments of Diabetes and Metabolic Medicine (T.S., K.I., M.No.), 162-8655, Japan Diabetes Research Center (T.S., K.I., M.No., T.U., K.Y.), National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, 162-8655, Japan Search for other works by this author on: Diagnostic Pathology (K.H., H.E.), 162-8655, Japan Search for other works by this author on: Departments of Diabetes and Metabolic Medicine (T.S., K.I., M.No.), 162-8655, Japan Search for other works by this author on: Metabolic Disorders (T.U., K.Y.), 162-8655, Japan Diabetes Research Center (T.S., K.I., M.No., T.U., K.Y.), National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, 162-8655, Japan Search for other works by this author on: Departments of Diabetes and Metabolic Medicine (T.S., K.I., M.No.), 162-8655, Japan Diabetes Research Center (T.S., K.I., M.No., T.U., K.Y.), National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, 162-8655, Japan Address all correspondence and requests for reprints to: Mitsuhiko Noda, Depar Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Spikes: Causes, Symptoms, And Prevention

Blood Sugar Spikes: Causes, Symptoms, And Prevention

Diabetes is a disease that causes a person's blood sugar to become too high. This can lead to various complications. A person with diabetes must be careful to keep their blood sugar levels under control. Glucose comes from the food we eat. It is the main source of energy for the body. The pancreas secretes substances, including the hormone insulin, and enzymes. Enzymes break down food. Insulin makes it possible for body cells to absorb the glucose we consume. With diabetes, either the pancreas is unable to produce insulin to help the glucose get into the body cells, or the body becomes resistant to the insulin. The glucose stays in the blood instead. This is what raises blood sugar levels. High blood sugar is known as hyperglycemia. Contents of this article: Causes of blood sugar spikes People with diabetes have to be especially careful about keeping their blood sugar levels under control. There are several reasons why blood glucose levels may spike. These are: Sleep: A lack of sleep can be especially bad for people with diabetes, because it can also raise blood sugar levels. One study performed on Japanese men found that getting under 6.5 hours of sleep each night increases a person's risk for high blood glucose levels. Prioritizing healthy sleep and promoting sleep hygiene are good habits for everyone, but especially for people with diabetes. Stress: When under a lot of stress, the body produces hormones that make it difficult for insulin to do its job, so more glucose stays in the bloodstream. Finding a way to keep stress levels down, such as yoga or meditation, is essential for people with diabetes. Exercise: Having a sedentary lifestyle can cause blood sugar levels to go up. In addition, exercise that is too difficult can cause stress and blood glucose levels to ri Continue reading >>

What You Can Do To Stop The Blood Sugar Rollercoaster

What You Can Do To Stop The Blood Sugar Rollercoaster

If you find that your blood sugars often fluctuate from too high to too low (and vice versa), you’re on the blood sugar rollercoaster. To learn how to eliminate the extremes, you’ll have to do a little sleuthing on your own. Get out your blood glucose meter, and for a week try testing before and after a variety of meals, activities, and destressors to figure out what’s making it go up and down to stop it for good! Your blood sugars are affected by a large number of things, including what you ate (especially refined “white” carbohydrates), how long ago you ate, your starting blood glucose level, physical activity, mental stress, illness, sleep patterns, and more. If you take insulin and use it to treat highs, you can easily end up overcompensating and developing low blood sugars. If you develop a low, it’s easy to overeat and end up high again. Large fluctuations in blood sugars may make you feel cruddy and are bad for your long-term health, so it’s time to learn how to stop the rollercoaster! Physical Activity Effects: During this week, your goal is to do at least 30 minutes of physical activity on three days at varying times of day, and check and record your blood glucose levels before and after the activity. Physical Activity Trial #1: For this first activity, pick one that you normally do (like walking or cycling) and try to do it at your usual time of day. Check and record your blood sugar immediately before starting and within an hour of completing the 30 minutes of activity. You will find that your body responds differently to varying types of physical activities, particularly when the time of day varies as well. If you exercise first thing in the morning (before breakfast and medications), it is not unusual to experience a modest increase in blood s Continue reading >>

What’s The Deal On Fluctuating Blood Sugars?

What’s The Deal On Fluctuating Blood Sugars?

What’s the Deal on Fluctuating Blood Sugars? One of the most persistent problems that my patients tell me about when they come in for their first visit is a lack of energy, sometimes followed by explosive bursts of temper, foggy thinking, and other unpleasant effects from eating a diet high in sugars and carbohydrates. Now, these people didn’t come to me to correct their low energy, or quick temper, and often they don’t even know there is a connection between the way they feel and what they eat. But the connection is clear. These patients are on a daily fun-house ride that seems painfully slow at times, then explosively fast at others. In medicine, we know this to be the result of fluctuating blood sugars. You eat pancakes for breakfast, with syrup, you feel like a million until about 10 am when all of a sudden you find yourself sweaty, cranky, irritable and sometimes even faint. So what do you do? Grab a donut and a cup of coffee? I hope not, but that’s often the answer. Then the fun house starts all over again, ultimately plunging you into a dark, scary place which feels like you’ll never get out. What most of these patients came to see me about is overweight and obesity. Many of them have tried punishing diets with almost no protein or fat, often vegetarian, and with such low calories that their body is thrown into a tantrum of fluctuating blood sugars. The Dangers of Blood Sugar Fluctuation A low level of blood sugar, referred to as hypoglycemia, results in an inadequate supply of glucose to the brain and leads to a considerable amount of malfunction. Hypoglycemia can cause a number unpleasant symptoms including fatigue, weakness, dizziness, inability to concentrate, poor memory, anxiety, depression, irritability, heart palpitations and excessive sweating. Continue reading >>

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