diabetestalk.net

Dog Blood Sugar 600

Diabetes And Cats

Diabetes And Cats

Patapsco Valley View Volume 8 Fall 2012 Diabetes Affects the Sweetest Cats ....and the Sour Pusses Too! It’s a phone call that we get regularly, and one that sends up the red flags! “My cat seems to be losing weight, and he’s drinking a lot of water and peeing all over the place!!” These can be the signs of a number of issues, including urinary tract infections or kidney disease, but often the diagnosis is diabetes. Which is why it’s very important if your cat is having these symptoms to get them into the veterinary hospital as soon as possible to make the diagnosis and start the treatment process. Diabetes is an insidious condition where the pancreas stops producing enough insulin to control the ‘sugar’ or glucose level in the blood. As the disease progresses the body starts to break down muscle tissue and excretes the ketones and excess glucose in the urine. If left untreated cats will develop complications like kidney failure, infections, and toxic conditions which can quickly cause their demise. Now cats, unlike humans, do not develop diabetes by having a predisposition to twinkies and soda. In fact there are many studies trying to determine exactly WHY cats develop the condition. Diabetes seems to be an equal opportunity attacker, selecting cats from all breeds, shapes, and sizes. Although overweight cats and cats that eat a higher carbohydrate diet are more predisposed to developing the disease. There are oral medications that can be used to stabilize their glucose levels. But most cats require insulin injections. You may shudder at the thought of having to give your cat insulin injections. But with most cats it can be done and often, once you both get used to the process, it becomes ‘easy’. One of the most important things to remember with a dia Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar In Dogs

High Blood Sugar In Dogs

Hyperglycemia in Dogs A dog with abnormally high levels of glucose in the blood is said to have hyperglycemia. A simple carbohydrate sugar that circulates in the blood, glucose is a major source of energy for the body, of which normal levels range between 75-120mg. Insulin, a hormone that is produced and released by the pancreas into the bloodstream when glucose levels rise, plays a key role in maintaining normal sugar levels. Low levels or absolute deficiency of insulin results in abnormally high blood sugar levels. Some of the causes for hyperglycemia may be pancreatitis, and the resulting inability to produce insulin; normally occurring hormones, especially in female dogs; diet; and infections of the body (such as teeth, or urinary tract). Middle aged and older dogs are more at risk for developing hyperglycemia, and it is more common in female dogs than in males. Any breed can be affected, but some smaller breeds appear to be more disposed, including beagles, cairn terriers, dachshunds, miniature poodles and schnauzers. Symptoms and Types Clinical symptoms may vary depending on the underlying disease/condition. Your dog may not be showing any serious symptoms, especially those if the increased sugar is thought to be temporary, hormonal, or stress induced hyperglycemia. Some of the more common symptoms include: Depression Weight loss Excessive hunger Dehydration Bloodshot eyes (due to inflamed blood vessels) Liver enlargement Nerve damage in legs Severe depression (in cases of very high blood sugar levels) Non-healing wounds;infection is increased as the excess sugar feeds fungal and bacterial invaders Tissue damage (due to oxidizing [burning] effect of the excess sugar in the tissue) Causes Other than high stress situations, harmful drug interactions (such as with he Continue reading >>

Cushing's And Diabetes.

Cushing's And Diabetes.

My dog was diagnosed last month with cushings disease and diabetes. He's up to 14 units of insulin twice a day and trilostane 30mg twice a day. His blood sugar was at 600 and yesterday it was 265. The reason I had his blood sugar checked,he was listing to one side and losing his balance. The vet took a blood sample and injected sodium under the skin, and gave him 2.5mg of prednisone. It didn't help and the blood tests came back pretty good considering everything, but no answer to his lose of balance problem. I'd like an honest prognosis for him. I'd do anything for him, but I don't want him to suffer in the process if it might not make a difference. Can you help me make sense of all this? Thank you so much! Dr. Marie replied: Hi and thanks for your question. I have to tell you that this was a very strange coincidence. I received your email while I was in an appointment (my blackberry went off). The appointment that I was in was for a dog with cushing's and diabetes who is now having a balance issue. How strange! This is a tough question to answer as dogs with diabetes and cushings are complicated and difficult to treat. Often dogs with Cushing's will be very hard to regulate on insulin. It is not uncommon to see either fluctuations in glucose level or extremely high levels of glucose even though we are on a high level of insulin. Have you done a glucose curve on Chester, or are you just having occasional blood glucose tests done? You may want to ask your vet about doing a curve as this can tell us a lot about what his glucose levels are doing throughout the day. Sometimes what we will see is that a pet's levels are super high and then they suddenly drop to dangerously low and then the body spikes the levels up high again. If this happened, then during the super low time Continue reading >>

Home Monitoring Of Diabetic Dogs

Home Monitoring Of Diabetic Dogs

Diabetes mellitus is a disorder involving blood sugar and insulin. Glucose (sugar) is the basic substance that supplies energy to the body, and it circulates in the blood until insulin carries it into the cells, where it is metabolized and used for energy. Without the carrying properties of insulin, the glucose cannot be utilized and the body becomes ill. In the diabetic dog, the glucose continues to circulate but there is either not enough insulin to carry the glucose into the cells or the natural insulin is not effective. Treatment for diabetes attempts to mimic the body’s natural insulin. Some pets respond to diet changes and weight loss while some require insulin injections. Monitoring Your Diabetic at Home Without testing your pet’s blood sugar repeatedly through the day, it’s difficult to determine if the medication is working. However, by closely watching and monitoring your pet, you can determine the effectiveness of the treatment. 1. Monitor Your Dogs Symptoms. Typically, unregulated diabetic patients drink a lot of water and, therefore, urinate significantly more than non-diabetic animals. Noting your pet’s water consumption and urination habits while on medication can help you and your veterinarian determine if the treatment is working. Once the blood sugar level is under control, diabetic patients return to normal drinking and elimination habits. Your pet’s attitude, appetite and activity level can also provide invaluable information. As the blood sugar levels stabilize, your diabetic pet should have a more normal appetite and be more alert and active. Keeping track of your pet’s body weight is also important. Weigh your pet weekly or at least every other week. Keep a record so you can monitor any weight gain or loss. 2. Test Your Dog’s Urine. Continue reading >>

Annabessacook Veterinary Clinic

Annabessacook Veterinary Clinic

Annabessacook Veterinary Clinic 417 Route 135 Monmouth, Maine 04259 (207)933-2165 _____________________________________________________________________________ Diabetes Mellitus in Dogs There are two forms of diabetes in dogs: diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus. Diabetes insipidus is a very rare disorder that results in failure to regulate body water content. Your dog has the more common type of diabetes: diabetes mellitus. This is a fairly common disorder and is most often seen is dogs 5 years of age or older. There is a congenital form that occurs in puppies, but this is not common. Diabetes mellitus is a disease of the pancreas. This is a small but vital organ that is located near the stomach. It has two significant populations of cells. One group of cells produces the enzymes necessary for proper digestion. The other group, called beta-cells, produces the hormone called insulin. Simply put, diabetes mellitus is a failure of the pancreas to regulate blood sugar. The Types of Diabetes In humans, two types of diabetes mellitus have been discovered. Both types are similar in that there is a failure to regulate blood sugar, but the basic mechanisms of disease differ somewhat between the two groups. 1. Type I, or Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus, results from total or near-complete destruction of the beta-cells. This is the only type of diabetes known in dogs. As the name implies, dogs with this type of diabetes require insulin injections to stabilize blood sugar. 2. Type II, or Non-Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus, is different because some insulin-producing cells remain. However, the amount produced is insufficient, there is a delayed response in secreting it, and the tissues of the dogs body are relatively resistant to it. People with this form may be treat Continue reading >>

The Effect Of Prednisone On Pancreatic Islet Autografts In Dogs

The Effect Of Prednisone On Pancreatic Islet Autografts In Dogs

Go to: MATERIAL AND METHODS Fourteen adult mongrel dogs weighing 19 to 25 kg were randomly divided into three groups. Each dog was made diabetic by total pancreatectomy, and the excised pancreas was used as the source of islet autografts. Dogs in group I (control group; n = 6) were not given prednisone or insulin after islet autotransplantation. Dogs in group II (prednisone group; n = 4) were treated with prednisone, 1 mg/kg body weight/day (The Upjohn Co., Kalamazoo, Mich.), orally for 10 days after islet autotransplantation. Dogs in group III (prednisone plus insulin; n = 4) were treated with prednisone, 1 mg/kg/day, plus 25 to 30 units/day regular human insulin given subcutaneously (Eli Lilly & Co., Indianapolis, Ind.) for 10 days after islet autotransplantation. The method used for islet isolation was a modification of those published previously.13, 14 The dog’s pancreatic ducts were cannulated during the pancreatectomy, and 250 ml Hanks’ solution containing 1 mg/ml collagenase (type p, lot 09; Boehringer Mannheim Biochemicals, Indianapolis, Ind.) was injected. The pancreas was then placed in a digestion chamber and subjected to 20 to 25 minutes of enzymatic digestion.14 The separated islets were purified with Euro-Collins Ficoll gradients9 (densities were 1.108, 1.096, and 1.037) in a cell separator (COBE 2991; Cobe Laboratories, Lake-wood, Colo.).15, 16 The purified islets were cultured overnight in CMRL 1066 plus 10% fetal calf serum plus penicillin (100 units/ml) plus streptomycin (100 μm/ml) at 37° C, 95% air, 5% CO2. The islets were injected into the portal vein 1 day after pancreatectomy. The islet yield expressed as 150 unit size equivalents/kg recipient weight17 was not significantly different in the three groups. Fasting plasma glucose levels were de Continue reading >>

Pet Diabetes - Story Of A Canine With Diabetes Alex And Margo Hupe

Pet Diabetes - Story Of A Canine With Diabetes Alex And Margo Hupe

About eleven years ago some uncaring human dumped this helpless puppy on one of our sod farms. Our son, Brian, had seen the dog but paid little attention the first few days. When a severe thunderstorm came up one night Brian went out to the farm looking for this puppy. There was an old train caboose on the property and lightening, thunder and pouring rain did not dissuade our son from going out and retrieving this hapless pup from underneath the caboose. Brian brought Alex to our house, everyone soaking wet, and asked me if I could keep him until another home was found. I reluctantly agreed for a one-week period because we already had three other dogs at the time. The rest is history. Alex never had an accident in the house and was easily trained except for some chewing that went on during the puppy stage. The usual items chewed were throw pillows and shoes. However, the bedclothes were another issue. We have a king-sized bed and that was an expensive period of time. After we got through this period Alex was an exemplary example of a fine mutt, always well-behaved and loving, with one exception. My mom, shown with Alex, was staying here recouping from a broken arm and her minister came to visit. I had to actually put Alex in the bedroom....he didn't like this man one little bit and made it totally obvious to everyone....especially the minister! About four years ago I noticed a drastic change in his coat and behavior and had repeatedly asked about possible thyroid problems but was told he was fine. This last spring, when I took the gang (4) in for their usual heartworm check, I again asked about thyroid problems and told the vet that I suspected that he may be diabetic. I was simply told there was not a problem and he was fine. We go to a local veterinary clinic where th Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus (diabetes) In Dogs

Diabetes Mellitus (diabetes) In Dogs

Animals Affected Dogs Overview Diabetes mellitus (known simply as diabetes) is a serious disease of dogs. The main characteristic of diabetes is an inability to control the level of sugar in the blood. This leads to chronically high blood sugar levels, which in turn lead to the symptoms of the disease. Management of diabetes in dogs is challenging but possible. With proper treatment, many diabetic dogs lead essentially normal lives. However, without treatment the disease inevitably leads to serious complications. Diabetes in dogs is similar to type 1 (juvenile onset) diabetes in humans. Symptoms Symptoms of diabetes include: Weight loss Normal or increased appetite in the early stages of the disease; appetite may decline in the later stages. Lethargy A sudden change in the appearance of the eyes due to the formation of cataracts. In the end stages of the disease, coma and death Risk Factors and Prevention A genetic or hereditary predisposition to diabetes appears to be a primary risk factor. Dogs that suffer from one or multiple bouts of pancreatitis may develop diabetes as a consequence of damage to the pancreas. Dogs aged 4 - 14 years are at highest risk of pancreatitis. Female dogs are diagnosed with diabetes more often than males. Miniature Poodles, Miniature Schnauzers, Pugs, Samoyeds, and Toy Poodles suffer diabetes at higher rates than other breeds. Syndromes such as Cushing's disease and periodontal disease predispose dogs to diabetes. Complications Untreated diabetes leads to emaciation, chronic lethargy and weakness. Diabetic dogs are prone to urinary tract infections. House soiling may occur as well, due to increased frequency of urination. Insulin administration is the main method of treating diabetes in dogs. However, some dogs may suffer from accidental ov Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dogs

Diabetes In Dogs

Diabetes Mellitus (Sugar Diabetes) Diabetes in dogs almost always requires insulin administration. Cats can sometimes be maintained for long periods of time using dietary changes and medical treatment, although it may be preferable to start treatment for diabetes with insulin in all cats and then to try to maintain the cat later without insulin if it looks like that might be possible. There is absolutely no question in my mind that the best way to monitor pets with diabetes to aid in regulating insulin levels is for the veterinary client to learn to monitor blood sugar at home using a blood glucose meter. It appears that about 50% of veterinary clients can manage this task readily and most can manage it with encouragement from their vet and the vet's staff. Some vets are not yet ready to take on this task, though. If your vet is one of those who discourages clients from attempting home glucose monitoring I personally think that you ought to change vets, at least for the pet with diabetes, unless there is a really compelling reason to stay for reasons other than the diabetes treatment. Purchasing one of the newer blood glucose meters that require very small blood samples is best. It can be hard at times to get blood from a pet and they tend to move around a lot during the blood drawing process, making it critical that whatever blood you can get can be utilized quickly. Spend a little extra to get a good glucose meter, such as the One Touch (tm) glucometers and it will pay off over the long run in ease of use. Regulating insulin dosages and blood glucose levels requires a lot of communication between the veterinary client and the vet. It can be a frustrating process that can take months in some cases. There are a few patients who are just extremely difficult to regulate. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Coma And Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetic Coma And Type 2 Diabetes

A diabetic coma could happen when your blood sugar gets too high -- 600 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or more -- causing you to become very dehydrated. It usually affects people with type 2 diabetes that isn’t well-controlled. It’s common among those who are elderly, chronically ill, and disabled. Doctors aren’t sure why, but they think they these people may not realize they’re thirsty or may not be able to get enough to drink. This is a serious condition, and if it isn’t spotted soon and treated quickly, it could be fatal. Knowing the symptoms can help you stay safe. If you have diabetes and you’ve had a heavy thirst and gone to the bathroom more often than usual for a few weeks, check with your doctor -- especially if your blood sugar isn’t well-controlled. As your body loses more and more water, you may notice: Drowsiness Altered mental state Restlessness Inability to speak Visual problems Paralysis These factors may lead to dehydration and coma: Once your doctor spots the early signs, he may send you to the hospital. You’ll get an IV to replace lost fluids and electrolytes such as potassium. And you’ll get insulin or other medication to control your blood sugar. The coma can lead to death if left untreated. Take these simple steps to help protect yourself: Check your blood sugar regularly, as your doctor recommends. Know your target blood sugar ranges and what to do if the readings are too high. Plan how often to check your blood sugar when you’re sick. Take extra care of yourself if you’re ill. Continue reading >>

Interpreting The Glucose Curves

Interpreting The Glucose Curves

The blood glucose level in non-diabetic dogs usually runs between about 70mg/dL and 140 mg/dl. In those fortunate dogs, pancreatic beta cells are continuously monitoring blood sugar levels and releasing insulin into the system as required. But dogs that have blood glucose levels persistently greater than 200mg/dL have diabetes. With the medicines of today, there is no way you can duplicate the normal situation with injected insulin. The best you can hope for is to keep your pet's blood sugar level between 100mg/dL and 150mg/dL. Occasional owners can attain that, but most will find that their dogs peak (spike) considerably higher. Larger or more frequent doses of insulin will drive down these glucose spikes. But that can be dangerous. You do not want the valleys (nadirs) in your dogs daily glucose levels to be too low (lower than 80mg/dL) because at slightly less than that, the dog will become hypoglycemic. With AM and PM injections, their should be two nadirs. The morning one is usually the lowest. The safest Low Nadir Point for a dog in insulin therapy is about 90 - 100. That is because, after the insulin injection, glucose follow a skateboard track downward and you will never know from your last glucometer reading how close you are to the bottom. So fudge on the side of caution. If your pet is persistently running over 200 - 250 mg/dL you should at least try to modify its treatment procedure to gain better control and regulation. To obtain tighter regulation, will probably require quite a bit of home blood glucose testing and effort on your part – at least at first. No matter how hard you try, it is not always possible. But please try not to get exasperated or make rash decisions on your own. You get to choose your veterinarian. But the veterinarian, not you, is the Continue reading >>

The Ups And Downs Of Meds And Diabetes (part 1): Steroids

The Ups And Downs Of Meds And Diabetes (part 1): Steroids

If you take any kind of medication for your diabetes management, whether that be metformin, sulfonylureas, exenatide (brand name Byetta), or insulin, for example, hopefully you’re familiar with how that drug works and what the effect is on your blood glucose control. But, just like people who don’t have diabetes, you’re going to come down with a cold or the flu every now and then. You may need to take steroids for a while. Maybe you take medicine for controlling your blood pressure or your cholesterol. How familiar are you with these drugs, particularly in terms of your blood glucose levels? Most of us are prescribed medicines for various reasons at one time or another. Unfortunately, we aren’t always told by our physician or pharmacist how they work and how they might interact with other medicines. And in the case of diabetes, chances are you’re not always given information on how a drug may affect your blood glucose level or how a it may interact with your diabetes medication—and many of them do. Your pharmacist should be your number one source for any questions you have about any drug that you take. But we can scratch the surface and take a look at this important area of diabetes management. We’ll look at steroids this week. Steroids Steroids (corticosteroids, glucocorticoids) are a potent class of medications (meds for short) that are known to raise blood glucose levels, often quite significantly. Steroids are given to help reduce inflammation that may occur with arthritis or asthma. People with certain immune disorders, such as lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, or sarcoidosis, usually need to take steroids as well. While steroids are very effective at doing what they’re supposed to do, one of the side effects is an increase in blood glucose levels. In fa Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Mellitus

Email: [email protected] Note: February 4, 2011 - FDA Announces Upcoming Shortage of Vetsulin for Dogs and Cats in the Critical Need Program Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a disorder where the body is unable to regulate blood sugar levels. Blood sugar levels are controlled, in part, by insulin. Insulin is produced by the pancreas then secreted into the blood, where it travels throughout the body and helps regulate blood sugar. Insulin plays an important role in the body's ability to use and store glucose. Would you like to add a Living with this Disorder journal entry? Signs and Symptoms The classic signs of diabetes are polyuria (PU) - excessive urination polydipsia (PD) - excessive thirst polyphagia - excessive appetite or eating weight loss lethargy As the disease progresses, the signs include anorexia (loss of appetite), depression, and vomiting. Dogs are often diagnosed with diabetes because the owner notices the dog has suddenly gone blind. This is due to the rapid cataract development that often occurs in diabetic dogs. Causes genetic immune-mediated destruction of the pancreatic beta cells infectious viral diseases drugs: glucocorticoids (steroids) and progestagens (reproductive hormones) predisposing diseases: hyperadrenocorticism, acromegaly Risk Factors OBESITY - both obese cats and dogs are at risk for developing type II diabetes. Cats over 15 pounds are at high risk. DIESTRUS in the unspayed female dog. The period of sexual inactivity after the female is receptive. Breed predisposition: Samoyeds are about 12 times more likely to develop diabetes compared to mixed breed dogs. Diagnostic Tests A diagnosis of DM is made based on clinical signs, physical exam, and lab tests. Findings typically include persistent hyperglycemia (elevated blood sugar) and glucosuria Continue reading >>

About Blood Glucose Over 500

About Blood Glucose Over 500

Glucose is a type of sugar that is found in the bloodstream. Blood glucose is the main energy source of the body. Having a healthy blood glucose or blood sugar level is important to optimal health and survival. As glucose in the blood begins to rise, typically after a meal, the pancreas releases insulin to help the cells of the body use the glucose for fuel and energy. If someone is a diabetic, and his pancreas secretes little to no insulin into the bloodstream, the blood sugar levels begin to rise. If not treated properly with an insulin injection, the levels can quickly rise over 500mg. Any blood glucose level over 500mg is considered a medical emergency. Video of the Day Most people who have had a blood glucose level over 500mg are considered diabetic. According to the American Diabetes Association, over 23.6 million people have diabetes. Diabetes is a serious disease that causes unstable blood sugar levels. There are three main types of diabetes; Type 1, Type 2 and gestational diabetes. Type I generally occurs when a patient is young and is sometimes referred to as juvenile diabetes. Type 2 is a condition in which the body does not produce enough insulin to bring blood sugars down, the patient becomes dependent on insulin injections. Gestational diabetes occurs when a woman becomes pregnant. If blood sugar levels are not brought down or treated, it can lead to serious conditions and birth defects that can harm both mother and child. When a blood glucose level gets over 500mg, one of the first things a doctor will do is determine what is causing the high blood sugar level. Generally, the cause is uncontrolled diabetes. As someone continues to eat foods that may be high in sugar or high in carbohydrate, his blood sugar levels begin to rise over normal levels. If his b Continue reading >>

Glucometer

Glucometer

Most caregivers who test their pets’ blood glucose levels use human glucometers. These two documents[1][2] compare the features of various glucometers and link to the Internet sites for the manufacturers. Ease of use ratings[3] and more specifics can be found at the link below for all major US brands. You can buy a glucometer at a brick-and-mortar or Internet pharmacy that sells diabetic supplies. You can expect to pay $25 to $50 for a glucometer in the US. However, manufacturers often have rebate certificates that can make the meter free. Check the advertising supplements in your newspaper for pharmacies that have rebate offers or “buy the strips, get the meter free” deals. Internet pharmacies also often offer similar rebates and deals. It is the strips, not the meters, that are the pricey part of hometesting blood glucose. Consider checking the price and eBay availability of strips before you decide on a meter. However, even though the strips may be pricey, the cost and stress of performing blood glucose tests at home is far less than at the vet. Also, testing before every insulin shot protects your pet from an accidental overdose of insulin (hypoglycemia) and can provide valuable analytical information for you and your vet to make dosing decisions. Examples of blood glucose meters specifically designed for pets include the Alphatrak glucometer , the iPet glucose meter and the Advocate PetTest Glucose Meter (by Pharma Supply). Read carefully when shopping eBay for test strips; some people are offering expired or very soon to be expired ones. Test strips use chemicals (called reagents) to perform this job[4]. The dating on the strips, like insulin, means this is what the manufacturer considers the last date by which the strips can perform properly. Using expired Continue reading >>

More in blood sugar