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Does Vitamin C Raise Blood Sugar

What Medicines Can Make Your Blood Sugar Spike?

What Medicines Can Make Your Blood Sugar Spike?

If you have diabetes or high blood sugar, you probably know some of the things that cause your glucose (another name for blood sugar) to go up. Like a meal with too many carbohydrates, or not enough exercise. But other medicines you might take to keep yourself healthy can cause a spike, too. Know Your Meds Medicines you get with a prescription and some that you buy over the counter (OTC) can be a problem for people who need to control their blood sugar. Prescription medicines that can raise your glucose include: Steroids (also called corticosteroids). They treat diseases caused by inflammation, like rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and allergies. Common steroids include hydrocortisone and prednisone. But steroid creams (for a rash) or inhalers (for asthma) aren’t a problem. Drugs that treat high blood pressure, such as beta-blockers and thiazide diuretics High doses of asthma medicines, or drugs that you inject for asthma treatment OTC medicines that can raise your blood sugar include: Cough syrup. Ask your doctor if you should take regular or sugar-free. How Do You Decide What to Take? Even though these medicines can raise your blood sugar, it doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t take them if you need them. The most important thing is to work with your doctor on the right way to use them. If you have diabetes or you’re watching your blood sugar, ask your doctor before you take new medicines or change any medicines, even if it’s just something for a cough or cold. (Remember, just being sick can raise your blood sugar.) Make sure your doctor knows all the medicines you take -- for diabetes or any other reason. If one of them may affect your blood sugar, she may prescribe a lower dose or tell you to take the medicine for a shorter time. You may need to check your blood s Continue reading >>

Can Taking Cinnamon Supplements Lower Your Blood Sugar?

Can Taking Cinnamon Supplements Lower Your Blood Sugar?

A slew of supplements on the market claim to help reduce blood sugar levels and cut the risk of heart attack for people with diabetes. Garlic, magnesium and coenzyme Q10 are among the most common that people try. But it may surprise you to know that an old favorite — cinnamon — is getting more attention. While results are still unclear, there have been some small studies about cinnamon and blood sugar that show promising results. However, to date, there isn’t strong enough evidence to recommend cinnamon to people with diabetes for medicinal purposes. Here’s what we know Cinnamon, a spice made from tree bark, is often touted for its potential medicinal properties. People have tried cinnamon to reduce inflammation, lower cholesterol and fight bacteria. For more than a decade, researchers have been working to understand if it can help people with diabetes. Numerous studies have looked at this issue, and some have found no benefit at all from cinnamon. Other small studies have found that cinnamon can lower levels of glucose, cholesterol and triglycerides (fat in the blood). Here’s a sampling of small studies that show a potential benefit for taking cinnamon: 2003 study In a small study in Diabetes Care, 30 people with type 2 diabetes were split into three groups taking 1 gram, 3 grams or 6 grams of cinnamon supplements daily. Thirty other people took a placebo. After 40 days, everyone taking cinnamon had lower glucose, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein (LDL or “bad”) cholesterol and total cholesterol levels. The placebo group saw no change. 2012 study A more recent study in Nutrition Research analyzed 69 patients in China with type 2 diabetes. One group took 120 milligrams of cinnamon daily, another 360 milligrams and a third a placebo. After three months Continue reading >>

Flaws In Traditional Blood Glucose Testing You Need To Know About

Flaws In Traditional Blood Glucose Testing You Need To Know About

While managing blood sugar levels is important for preventing serious health issues, including everything from hypoglycemia to diabetes, unfortunately there are some flaws in traditional blood glucose testing that may skew the results. A recent report by Precision Nutrition reveals that estimating blood sugar levels can be more challenging than you may have realized, partially due to frequently changing levels that come with eating and exercise. Additionally, the glucose meters that many type 1 diabetics use are only providing a glimpse at part of the picture rather than revealing how a patient regulates blood sugars over time, which is essential for disease prevention. Researchers have been trying to find a test that will provide information about mid-term and long-term glucose health, verses a snapshot of what’s happening right now, but no one has found the perfect test yet. The two top tests measure glycated hemoglobin or hemoglobin A1c and fructosamine, which can provide a better understanding of glucose levels over time, but both have drawbacks that can get in the way of accurate diagnosis, particular in those who are healthy. The glycated hemoglobin test The glycated hemoglobin, or hemoglobin A1c test, allows doctors to estimate a patient’s average blood sugar levels across a period of several months, which is why it’s often considered the gold standard for evaluating glucose levels. Hemoglobin is a protein found inside your red blood cells which carries oxygen from the lungs to all the cells of the body. As red blood cells are always forming and dying, their typical life span is about three months. This is said to be important because when you eat, glucose enters your red blood cells, linking with the molecules of hemoglobin found inside. Ultimately, the mo Continue reading >>

Can Taking Cinnamon Supplements Lower Your Blood Sugar?

Can Taking Cinnamon Supplements Lower Your Blood Sugar?

A slew of supplements on the market claim to help reduce blood sugar levels and cut the risk of heart attack for people with diabetes. Garlic, magnesium and coenzyme Q10 are among the most common that people try. But it may surprise you to know that an old favorite — cinnamon — is getting more attention. While results are still unclear, there have been some small studies about cinnamon and blood sugar that show promising results. However, to date, there isn’t strong enough evidence to recommend cinnamon to people with diabetes for medicinal purposes. Here’s what we know Cinnamon, a spice made from tree bark, is often touted for its potential medicinal properties. People have tried cinnamon to reduce inflammation, lower cholesterol and fight bacteria. For more than a decade, researchers have been working to understand if it can help people with diabetes. Numerous studies have looked at this issue, and some have found no benefit at all from cinnamon. Other small studies have found that cinnamon can lower levels of glucose, cholesterol and triglycerides (fat in the blood). Here’s a sampling of small studies that show a potential benefit for taking cinnamon: 2003 study In a small study in Diabetes Care, 30 people with type 2 diabetes were split into three groups taking 1 gram, 3 grams or 6 grams of cinnamon supplements daily. Thirty other people took a placebo. After 40 days, everyone taking cinnamon had lower glucose, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein (LDL or “bad”) cholesterol and total cholesterol levels. The placebo group saw no change. 2012 study A more recent study in Nutrition Research analyzed 69 patients in China with type 2 diabetes. One group took 120 milligrams of cinnamon daily, another 360 milligrams and a third a placebo. After three months Continue reading >>

Top 10 Supplements For Blood Sugar Control

Top 10 Supplements For Blood Sugar Control

We all know the sugar rush feeling after a particularly indulgent meal or beverage—a brief sensation of hyperactivity quickly followed by a sugar crash, that bone-weary exhaustion that makes you just want to crawl in bed. If this sounds familiar, you’ve had a glimpse into the roller coaster effect that sugar can have on our energy levels and how hard our body must work to keep it all in balance. You see, we quite literally run on sugar—every cell and organ in our body requires glucose. The food we eat gets broken down into glucose for ready absorption into our bloodstream and insulin, a hormone produced in the pancreas, helps our body take glucose out of the bloodstream and put it into our cells to be converted into energy or stored for later use. If we eat too much sugar or high-glycemic carbohydrates (think cakes, crackers, bread, and cookies), we experience a rapid influx of blood sugar. Our body must rush in to compensate with a spike of insulin to take care of the sudden overabundance of glucose, leaving us tired and irritable from the yo-yo effect. Keeping your blood sugar levels balanced is one of the most important steps you can take for overall health and vitality. Besides eating a wholesome diet rich in low-glycemic whole fruits, vegetables, protein, and complex carbohydrates, you can optimize your blood sugar levels by including supplements that promote glucose balance. Here are our picks for the top 10 supplements you can take to support healthy blood sugar levels. Alpha-Lipoic Acid This fat- and water-soluble antioxidant attacks free radicals in the body, protecting our organs and tissues. To balance blood sugar, alpha-lipoic acid helps convert glucose into energy in our body’s cells and can increase insulin sensitivity after just four weeks of supp Continue reading >>

Best Vitamins For Diabetics

Best Vitamins For Diabetics

Eating a varied diet rich in natural sources of vitamins is a good idea for diabetics. Nutritional support is critical for diabetics because diabetes tends to drain nutrients. When levels of glucose are high in the blood, the body tries to ‘wash’ the excess sugar out. This is why diabetics need to use the washroom frequently. Unfortunately, diabetics also lose nutrients via their urine. Research studies show that diabetics are repeatedly found to be deficient in important water-soluble vitamins and minerals. What’s more, the loss of these vitamins worsens the body’s ability to manage blood sugar, creating a vicious cycle. Combining a healthy diabetes diet plan and a daily exercise routine with the best vitamin supplements for diabetics goes a long way in achieving stable blood sugar levels. What Vitamins Are Diabetics Deficient In? The term vitamin is short for “Vital Amino Acid”. This means that these are vital for the proper functioning of hundreds of chemical processes in the body which the body cannot manage by itself. Proper blood sugar control is one such function for which vitamins are critical. There are 13 essential vitamins that the human body requires and they must be obtained from an external source — through food and/or supplements. Diabetics need two kinds of vitamins: Water Soluble – Vitamins B1, B2, B3, B6, B12, C, Biotin, and Folate are water-soluble and cannot be stored in the body for longer periods of time. Diabetics are often deficient in these vitamins since they pass greater amounts of urine daily. As their body tries to get rid of extra sugar, diabetics lose more water-soluble vitamins than most others. That’s why diabetics need to to get these vitamins daily in doses larger than what normal people need. Luckily, you can get all Continue reading >>

10 Blood Sugar–lowering Foods

10 Blood Sugar–lowering Foods

Adapted from The Carb Sensitivity Program It is no exaggeration—balancing your blood sugar could be a matter of life or death. Chronic high blood sugar levels are toxic to your body, destroying organs and blood vessels and paving the way to a heart attack, type 2 diabetes, stroke, dialysis, nerve damage, erectile dysfunction, or even blindness. The good news? Out-of-control sugar levels can be reigned in and regulated with the right foods. Here are most potent blood sugar-lowering foods so you know how to lower blood sugar levels naturally. Blood Sugar Benefit: A groundbreaking study published in the Journal of Nutrition in 2010 found a daily dose of the bioactive ingredients from blueberries increases sensitivity to insulin and may reduce the risk of developing diabetes in at-risk individuals. That's important because too many carbs produces too much insulin, which could lead to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Adding blueberries to daily smoothies for six weeks also improves insulin sensitivity, so feel free to eat healthy doses of the superfood fruit, too. Added Perk: Low in naturally occurring sugars, blueberries are also packed with antioxidants that fight damage from free radicals, accelerated aging, and diseases like cancer and Alzheimer's. Blood Sugar Benefit: Don't let the fat content of avocados fool you—they're still good for you! Avocados are full of monounsaturated fat, the kind that helps slow the release of sugars into the bloodstream, prompting less insulin release, and can even help to lower your cholesterol. Added Perk: Avocados contain beta-sitosterol, a compound that could help quell inflammation after an intense workout. Just limit yourself to one-quarter of an avocado at a time to avoid calorie overload. Or, try avocado oil drizzled on a Continue reading >>

Effects Of Vitamins C And D In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Effects Of Vitamins C And D In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Authors Christie-David D, Girgis C, Gunton J Received 24 September 2014 Accepted for publication 26 November 2014 Checked for plagiarism Yes Peer reviewer comments 3 1Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Westmead Hospital, 2Faculty of Medicine, University of Sydney, 3Westmead Millennium Institute, 4Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, NSW, Australia Abstract: Scurvy and rickets are largely considered historical diseases in developed countries. However, deficiencies in vitamins C and D are re-emerging due to increased consumption of processed foods and reduced fresh foods in the Western diet, as well as to an indoor sedentary lifestyle away from sun exposure. These dietary and lifestyle factors also predispose one to diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Our understanding of the potential roles of vitamin C (an antioxidant) and vitamin D (a biologically active hormone) in disease is increasing. In this review, we present observational, interventional, and mechanistic studies that examine the potential links between vitamins C and D in reversing defects in glucose homeostasis and the prevention of type 2 diabetes. Studies suggest an association between vitamin C deficiency and diabetes. An association between vitamin D and insulin resistance has been well described; however, the role of vitamin C and D supplementation in diabetes and its prevention requires further controlled trials. Keywords: glucose homeostasis, diabetes, insulin resistance, vitamin C, vitamin D Nutrients play essential roles in health and the prevention of disease. Nutrients, including vitamins, are vital to cardiovascular health (ie, vitamin B1), nerve function (ie, vitamins B6 and B12), the production of red blood cells (ie, folate and vitamin B12), and coagulation (ie, vitamin K), among man Continue reading >>

Is It Safe To Take Supplements If You Have Diabetes?

Is It Safe To Take Supplements If You Have Diabetes?

You will find supplements for anything and everything these days. Even when you do not suffer from an ailment, supplements are suggested to keep you healthy and ailment-free. According to CDC, use of supplements is common among US adult population – over 50% adults used supplements during 2003-2006, with multivitamins/multiminerals being the most commonly used. So when you are a diabetic, especially if you have prediabetes and type-2 diabetes, you may find yourself confronting a large number of options for supplements that claim to support, reduce and even cure your diabetes. Diabetes is quite a frustrating disorder and you may find yourself tempted to try out these supplements one after another. But is it really safe to take supplements when you are a diabetic? Let us find out. But before that you need to understand what exactly supplements are. Defining Supplements As the name suggests, a supplement is anything that adds on to something. A dietary supplement is therefore something that one takes in addition to one’s diet to get proper nutrition. US Congress in the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act defines dietary supplements as having the following characteristics: It is a product that is intended to supplement the diet; It contains one or more dietary ingredients (including vitamins, minerals, herbs and other botanicals, amino acids, and other substances) or their constituents; It is intended to be taken by mouth as a pill, capsule, tablet, or liquid; It is not represented for use as a conventional food or as sole item of a mean or a diet; and, It is labeled on the front panel as being a dietary supplement. Now let us look at some general benefits and risks of taking supplements. We will discuss these in context of diabetes later in the article. Benefit Continue reading >>

How Mangoes Might Affect Blood Sugar And Obesity

How Mangoes Might Affect Blood Sugar And Obesity

Originally from South Asia, mangoes are now one of the most cultivated fruits in tropical regions. In recent years, the potential health benefits of mangoes have been widely investigated. There are a number of varieties of mango, all of which belong to the flowering plant family Anacardiaceae. Globally, India grows the most mangoes, producing more than 18 million tons per year. Mangoes contain a variety of vitamins and minerals, such as vitamin C, A, E, K, and a range of B vitamins. Other constituents include polyphenols, triterpene, and lupeol, which can benefit our health by providing antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. In this article, we will discuss some of the recent findings regarding mangoes and their effects on blood sugar, cholesterol, obesity, and diabetes. Contents of this article: Here are some key points about mangoes. More detail and supporting information is in the main article. Some evidence suggests that mango consumption can help regulate blood sugar Mangoes contain a range of vitamins, including B vitamins In South Asia, mangoes have been cultivated for thousands of years Mangoes and cholesterol High cholesterol levels can be dangerous. If it builds up, cholesterol can block the arteries, potentially leading to heart disease, stroke, or heart attack. Currently, an estimated 73.5 million Americans have high cholesterol levels. Because of the huge number of people at risk, any simple dietary changes that might help reduce this figure are likely to be investigated. A study, published in The British Journal of Nutrition in 2011, looked at the effect of mangoes on cholesterol levels in mice. The mice were fed a high-fat diet either with or without the addition of freeze-dried mangoes. The team measured the mice's fat content, blood sugar levels, Continue reading >>

What Your Doctor Doesn't Know About Glucose Testing.

What Your Doctor Doesn't Know About Glucose Testing.

Blood sugar management is important for preventing everything from hypoglycemia to full blown diabetes. However, monitoring blood glucose is rarely as straightforward as it seems. In this article we’ll discuss the current gold standard for measuring a person’s blood sugar. We’ll share some problems with the most popular tests. And we’ll review the best ways to interpret your results. (Even if your doctor doesn’t know how). [Note: We’ve also prepared an audio recording of this article for you to listen to. So, if you’d rather listen to the piece, click here.] ++ Homeostasis is a fancy scientific word for “body balance”. Essentially, our bodies must keep internal levels of thousands of chemicals in check. Or else health can go awry. One of the most important homeostatic systems in our body is our blood sugar management system. When blood sugar is kept at a healthy range, we feel healthy, strong, energetic. On the other hand, unbalanced blood sugars put us at risk for problems ranging from reactive hypoglycemia to insulin resistance to full blown diabetes. But estimating blood sugar levels can be tricky. First, these levels change throughout the day, and with meals and exercise. So, unless you’re monitoring blood sugar levels continuously, every second of every day, it’s hard to get a complete picture of your glucose health. Second, the convenient glucose meters that many Type 1 diabetics use only give us a snapshot instead of a movie. They don’t show us how patients regulate blood sugars over time. And that may be the most important information of all when it comes to disease prevention. That’s why doctors and scientists have become obsessed with finding a test that measures blood glucose balance across days, weeks, or months. In other words, a t Continue reading >>

Worthless Or Dangerous Supplements

Worthless Or Dangerous Supplements

Because you can make such a difference in your blood sugar just by cutting down on carbohydrates, its easy to think that there must be some other foods and supplements you could take which would have an equally powerful effect on your health and which might even be powerful enough to let you work that fudge sundae back into your food plan. Sadly, such foods and supplements don't exist. What does exist is a huge industry looking to make money off you and other people with chronic diseases, an industry that profits from selling you worthless remedies at highly inflated prices. Many of them advertise on Google Ads. If you're newly diagnosed, it's guaranteed that you are going to shell out for some of them. You're only human! But before you head down to the health food store and drain your bank account, consider the following: Why You Need to Be Suspicious of Dietary Research Boosting Specific Foods Though you may see a lot of media reports for one or other food or supplement that supposedly prevents diabetes or cures it, these reports are almost always based research funded by the companies who sell the food or supplement at obscene markups. Careful scrutiny of this "research" almost always reveals serious flaws. Medical research is expensive, particularly research involving a lot of subjects and expensive lab tests. So virtually all studies that claim health benefits for a food products is funded by the companies that will benefits if the public buys more of that food. The studies that claim health benefits for soy are funded by huge agricultural conglomerates who grow soybeans. They were happy to develop a market that would pay a premium to buy up their excess beans and use them for expensive health food. These industry groups pay for media blitzes when the research they Continue reading >>

Medication Warnings

Medication Warnings

Certain veterinary medications for other conditions may seriously affect diabetic patients. Always check with your nurse before taking. This list is provided because some of these medications don't mention their side effects on diabetics in their literature. Many drugs used in veterinary medicine are also used in human medicine under a differently-trademarked name. Learning the human pharma name (if applicable) or generic name of the drug (same in veterinary & human medicine) can often give you additional information regarding possible side effects and how the drug may affect patients with diabetes. Human pharma drugs provide this information--for some reason, veterinary drugs don't always. If you are considering alternative or herbal medicine for your diabetic pet, see also Alternative medication warnings. Xylitol, a common artificial sweetener, lowers blood sugar dangerously in dogs and sometimes humans, possibly also cats. Some prescription and over-the counter medications, including vitamins and supplements which are made for human use contain Xylitol. Reading labels thoroughly and asking your vet can prevent needless tragedies. Heartworm [8][9] is a global problem, with areas on all continents except Antarctica affected and is a disease that is far easier to prevent than to cure. It can affect both cats and dogs[10][11][12][13]. Should your pet be affected by this, a talk with your vet is in order. Increasing insulin doses to counter this temporary situation may cause hypoglycemia once the systemic medication level has lowered. The phenomenon also does not mean your pet has ceased to respond to the insulin you currently use. Since there are no formal label warnings, he/she needs to be aware that there are temporary side effects for these drugs which apply to some d Continue reading >>

Vitamins And Minerals

Vitamins And Minerals

Tweet Depending on the type of treatment regimen you use to control your diabetes, there are some vitamins and minerals that may be beneficial for your condition. Before adding any vitamins or adding dietary supplements to your daily diet, discuss these changes with your healthcare team and doctor to ensure they are safe alongside any prescribed medication you're on. ALA and GLA ALA (alpha-lipoic acid) is a versatile and potent antioxidant, and may function to help diabetic neuropathy and reduce pain from free-radical damage. Also, some studies link ALA to decreased insulin resistance and thus the control of blood sugar. GLA (gamma-lipoic acid) is another naturally occurring antioxidant that is present in evening primrose oil, borage oil and blackcurrant seed oil. GLA may improve the function of nerves damaged by diabetic neuropathy. Biotin Biotin works in synergy with insulin in the body, and independently increases the activity of the enzyme glucokinase. Glucokinase is responsible for the first step of glucose utilisation, and is therefore an essential component of normal bodily functioning. Glucokinase occurs only in the liver, and in sufferers from diabetes its concentration may be extremely low. Supplements of biotin may have a significant effect on glucose levels for both type 1 and type 2 diabetics. Carnitine (L-Carnitine, Acetyl L-Carnitine) Carnitine is required by the body in order to correctly use body fat in the production of energy. It is naturally occurring and derives from hydrophilic amino acids. Diabetics who try carnitine generally respond well, and high levels of fat in the bloodstream (cholesterol and triglycerides) may fall fast. Carnitine helps to break down fatty acids in the body and binds acyl residues. For these reasons, it may be useful to pre Continue reading >>

Intravenous Vitamin C The Cocktail

Intravenous Vitamin C The Cocktail

LEMMO > Cancer Care > Intravenous Vitamin C the cocktail Dr. Lemmo is considered a leading expert on the use of intravenous vitamin C (i.e. ascorbic acid, ascorbate) and cancer. He has given tens of thousands of infusions of vitamin C-based treatments to people with cancer beginning in 1999. As a consequence, he has pioneered a unique and customized approach that may differ from other physicians, which Dr. Lemmo has found to optimally help his patients with cancer, live stronger, support and harness the immune system, and improve the quality in their lives. Dr. Lemmo has discovered that the classic high dose-model of administering vitamin C-based treatments is not typically needed and may in fact be detrimental or harmful for some. Of course there may be some exceptions. Earlier in his career, Dr Lemmo was using doses upwards to 150,000mg or 150 grams of vitamin C in select patients. However, he had also found that higher-dose treatments can place the body in an increased state of stress and actually further exhaust the body over time more is not necessarily better for every patient or cancer case. It is important to customize the therapy whenever possible. Other physicians who have been using vitamin C-based treatments in people with cancer over time are also noticing a similar trend. Experience can be crucial in this area. Dr. Lemmos work has been discussed throughout North America, bringing him to Arizona in February 2012, where he was invited to speak on the subject at the inaugural Naturopathic Oncology Conference. Lectures in this area has continued at the 45th Annual International Conference Orthomolecular Medicine Today in Vancouver in 2016 and more recently in 2018 at the International College of Integrative Medicine An Orthomolecular Approach to Cancer in Min Continue reading >>

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