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Does Protein Raise Insulin Levels

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High-Protein Diets Impair Insulin Sensitivity https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tEhAL... High-protein diets are the primary recommendation for people living with diabetes.They are told to eat high-protein diets to preserve lean muscle mass, but this study shows that high-protein diets actually cause insulin resistance despite large amounts of weight loss. Link to study: http://www.cell.com/cell-reports/full... Make sure not to miss a our future videos! Click here to Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/user/mindfuldi... ?sub_confirmation=1 Mastering Diabetes Cyrus Khambatta, PhD Robby Barbaro Diabetes Nutrition and Fitness Coaches http://www.masteringdiabetes.org/ Robby Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/mindfuldiab... Cyrus Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/mangomannut... Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/masteringdia... High-Protein Diets lead to other problems, see how Adam Sud reversed his diabetes and lost weight without worrying about his protein consumption: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mwd3I... High-Protein Diets Impair Insulin Sensitivity https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tEhAL...

High-protein Diets Promote Weight Loss But Impair Insulin Sensitivity

High-Protein Diets Promote Weight Loss but Impair Insulin Sensitivity When it comes to reversing insulin resistance and simplifying your life with diabetes, one of the most effective ways to gain insulin sensitivity is to lose weight. The reason for this is simple: in overweight individuals, weight gain is associated with a reduction in insulin action. Conversely, weight loss in overweight individuals is associated with a significant increase in insulin action, which results in a reduction in the amount of insulin secreted by your pancreas (in non-insulin dependent individuals), or a reduction in the amount of injected insulin (in insulin-dependent individuals). Think of an increase in insulin sensitivity as a convenient "side effect" of weight loss that happens as a result of burning fat in adipose tissue, liver, and muscle. To learn more about how intracellular fat significantly reduces insulin sensitivity, read the following articles: The Causes of Insulin Resistance in Type 1 Diabetes, Type 2 Diabetes and Prediabetes When losing weight, you lose both adipose tissue mass as well as lean muscle mass. In an ideal world, you would be able to lose only fat mass while preserving lea Continue reading >>

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  1. gogge

    Protein still gives a similar insulin response as carbs, and the insulin response is still elevated for roughly the same period of time. Here's comparing 50 grams of glucose to 50 grams of protein (ground beef):
    Graph.
    Nuttall FQ, et al. "Effect of protein ingestion on the glucose and insulin response to a standardized oral glucose load" Diabetes Care. 1984 Sep-Oct;7(5):465-70.
    The glucagon response from protein doesn't matter for this, see Stephan Guyenet's "Glucagon, Dietary Protein, and Low-Carbohydrate Diets".
    But most people don't eat more than ~100 grams of protein per day, and you only digest roughly 10 grams per hour, compared to 60-100 grams per hour for carbs, so won't get the same big "spike".
    The rate of amino acid absorption from protein is quite slow (~ 5 to 8 g/h, from Table 2) when compared to that of other macronutrients, with fatty acids at ~ 0.175 g ∙ kg-1 ∙ h-1 (~ 14 g/h) (55) and glucose 60 to 100 g/h (0.8 to 1.2 g carbohydrate ∙ kg-1 ∙ h-1) for an 80 kg individual (56).
    Bilsborough S, Mann N. "A review of issues of dietary protein intake in human" Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab. 2006 Apr;16(2):129-52.
    The level of processing is also a big deal for carbs, compare whole apples to purée:
    Chart.
    Stubbs JR "Carbohydrates, Appetite and Feeding Behavior in Humans" J. Nutr. October 1, 2001 vol. 131 no. 10 2775S-2781S
    And this is probably the real problem with carbs, processing makes them quick to eat, quick to digest, quick to absorb, and quick to store. They taste awesome and you eat too much.
    Take this example; if carbs were categorically bad how can the kitavans have a 70% carb intake without getting the same problems with obesity, diabetes, cancer, and heart disease as we do? It doesn't makes sense that all carbs would always be bad. Chris Masterjohn discusses different levels of carb intakes and people thriving on high carb in "Oxidative Stress & Carbohydrate Intolerance: An Ancestral Perspective".
    So the problem isn't just carbs, or just insulin (protein would be bad in that case), it's the combination of carbs and too many calories. Which seems to be a multifaceted problem, but probably boils down to a problem with processed foods (mainly carbs) and how/why we eat them. The BBC has a great video on this, "The Men Who Made Us Fat". Yoni Freedhof's "What's a Food Industry to Do?" also highlights some issues with advertising.
    Here's an article that covers some of it if you prefer reading:
    What follows is a series of small case studies of a handful of characters whose work then, and perspective now, sheds light on how the foods are created and sold to people who, while not powerless, are extremely vulnerable to the intensity of these companies’ industrial formulations and selling campaigns.
    Michael Moss, "The Extraordinary Science of Addictive Junk Food".
    Stephan Guyenet has two good videos on how our diets have changed over the last hundred years or so:
    Stephan Guyenet, "The American Diet" also covers some historical changes.
    Stephan Guyenet, "Obesity; Old Solutions for a New Problem".
    In the general population high levels of insulin is just a marker for a high intake of processed food (or calories), it's likely not what's driving obesity.

  2. maxm

    Good post. I have found that i need to watch my proteins almost as closely as my carbs to loose the last weight on keto. I have been snacking on pork rinds. It suddenly dawned on me that a 100 g of rinds contained 50 g protein. Half of what I need in a day. So now I eat more fats instead. Which have rebooted my loss.

  3. [deleted]

    Wow! I will have to read this A few times.... Very comprehensive post. Thanks a lot. you must be a scientist or something.

  4. -> Continue reading
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Glycemic Index Weight Loss Or Glycemic Charge Or Glycemic Load: Low Glycemic Index Diet http://burn-fat-fast.blogspot.nl/2008... What Are The Difference And Which One To Use? Low Glycemic Index Diet : choosing the right foods with a low glycemic index in the glycemic index foods list is the right way to lose weight http://burn-fat-fast.blogspot.nl/2008... Search terms: glycemic index glycemic index weight loss glycemic index list glycemic index diet glycemic index fruit glycemic index foods glycemic index chart glycemic index food list glycemic index calculator glycemic charge what is glycemic index and glycemic load define glycemic load ideal glycemic load difference between glycemic index and glycemic load list of glycemic index foods define glycemic load glycemic load chart glycemic load calculator glycemic index database sugar glycemic index glycemic index sugar http://burn-fat-fast.blogspot.nl/2008... Synonyms: Insulin Resistance Metformin Glucophage Byetta Diabetes Bariatrics Low Carb Atkins, Littleton Weight Loss Clinic Denver weight loss clinic weight loss Colorado weight loss denver Weight Loss Littleton Weight Loss Highlands Ranch http://burn-fat-fast.blogspot.nl/2008...

Effects Of Fat And Protein On Glycemic Responses In Nondiabetic Humans Vary With Waist Circumference, Fasting Plasma Insulin, And Dietary Fiber Intake | The Journal Of Nutrition | Oxford Academic

The effects of protein and fat on glycemic responses have not been studied systematically. Therefore, our aim was to determine the dose-response effects of protein and fat on the glycemic response elicited by 50 g glucose in humans and whether subjects' fasting plasma insulin (FPI) and diet influenced the results. Nondiabetic humans, 10 with FPI ≥40 pmol/L and 10 with FPI >40 pmol/L, were studied on 18 occasions after 10 14-h overnight fasts. Subjects consumed 50 g glucose dissolved in 250 mL water plus 0, 5, 10, or 30 g fat and/or 0, 5, 10, or 30 g protein. Each level of fat was tested with each level of protein. Dietary intake was measured using a 3-d food record. Gram per gram, protein reduced glucose responses ∼2 times more than fat (P < 0.001) with no significant fat × protein interaction (P = 0.051). The effect of protein on glycemic responses was related to waist circumference (WC) (r = −0.56, P = 0.011) and intake of dietary fiber (r = −0.60, P = 0.005) but was unrelated to FPI or other nutrient intakes. The effect of fat on glycemic responses was related to FPI (r = 0.49, P = 0.029) but was unrelated to WC or diet. We conclude that, across the range of 0–30 g, Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. gogge

    Protein still gives a similar insulin response as carbs, and the insulin response is still elevated for roughly the same period of time. Here's comparing 50 grams of glucose to 50 grams of protein (ground beef):
    Graph.
    Nuttall FQ, et al. "Effect of protein ingestion on the glucose and insulin response to a standardized oral glucose load" Diabetes Care. 1984 Sep-Oct;7(5):465-70.
    The glucagon response from protein doesn't matter for this, see Stephan Guyenet's "Glucagon, Dietary Protein, and Low-Carbohydrate Diets".
    But most people don't eat more than ~100 grams of protein per day, and you only digest roughly 10 grams per hour, compared to 60-100 grams per hour for carbs, so won't get the same big "spike".
    The rate of amino acid absorption from protein is quite slow (~ 5 to 8 g/h, from Table 2) when compared to that of other macronutrients, with fatty acids at ~ 0.175 g ∙ kg-1 ∙ h-1 (~ 14 g/h) (55) and glucose 60 to 100 g/h (0.8 to 1.2 g carbohydrate ∙ kg-1 ∙ h-1) for an 80 kg individual (56).
    Bilsborough S, Mann N. "A review of issues of dietary protein intake in human" Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab. 2006 Apr;16(2):129-52.
    The level of processing is also a big deal for carbs, compare whole apples to purée:
    Chart.
    Stubbs JR "Carbohydrates, Appetite and Feeding Behavior in Humans" J. Nutr. October 1, 2001 vol. 131 no. 10 2775S-2781S
    And this is probably the real problem with carbs, processing makes them quick to eat, quick to digest, quick to absorb, and quick to store. They taste awesome and you eat too much.
    Take this example; if carbs were categorically bad how can the kitavans have a 70% carb intake without getting the same problems with obesity, diabetes, cancer, and heart disease as we do? It doesn't makes sense that all carbs would always be bad. Chris Masterjohn discusses different levels of carb intakes and people thriving on high carb in "Oxidative Stress & Carbohydrate Intolerance: An Ancestral Perspective".
    So the problem isn't just carbs, or just insulin (protein would be bad in that case), it's the combination of carbs and too many calories. Which seems to be a multifaceted problem, but probably boils down to a problem with processed foods (mainly carbs) and how/why we eat them. The BBC has a great video on this, "The Men Who Made Us Fat". Yoni Freedhof's "What's a Food Industry to Do?" also highlights some issues with advertising.
    Here's an article that covers some of it if you prefer reading:
    What follows is a series of small case studies of a handful of characters whose work then, and perspective now, sheds light on how the foods are created and sold to people who, while not powerless, are extremely vulnerable to the intensity of these companies’ industrial formulations and selling campaigns.
    Michael Moss, "The Extraordinary Science of Addictive Junk Food".
    Stephan Guyenet has two good videos on how our diets have changed over the last hundred years or so:
    Stephan Guyenet, "The American Diet" also covers some historical changes.
    Stephan Guyenet, "Obesity; Old Solutions for a New Problem".
    In the general population high levels of insulin is just a marker for a high intake of processed food (or calories), it's likely not what's driving obesity.

  2. maxm

    Good post. I have found that i need to watch my proteins almost as closely as my carbs to loose the last weight on keto. I have been snacking on pork rinds. It suddenly dawned on me that a 100 g of rinds contained 50 g protein. Half of what I need in a day. So now I eat more fats instead. Which have rebooted my loss.

  3. [deleted]

    Wow! I will have to read this A few times.... Very comprehensive post. Thanks a lot. you must be a scientist or something.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
Share on facebook

How to do a Glucometer calibration . Having a blood sugar levels monitor, or glucometer, that is reading accurately every time is essential. After all, you are making decisions about how to manage your diabetes as a result of the reading that this machine is giving you. Ensuring that the machine is giving you the right reading will mean that you are making the right decisions for your diabetes at that particular time. Phill shows you the step by step the technique for calibrating a blood sugar levels unit . Even a few tips thrown in. Blood sugar level testing is vital for every diabetic person. Knowing how to correctly take a blood sugar level accurately is vital. Rapid changes in blood sugar levels can have life threatening effects. A well serviced glucometer is essential tool for monitoring blood sugar levels. This Nurse on the go video produced by inightingale shows you how to correctly take a blood sugar level. If you need more information or want help go to www.inightingale.net and speak to Phill directly

Animal-protein Intake Is Associated With Insulin Resistance In Adventist Health Study 2 (ahs-2) Calibration Substudy Participants: A Cross-sectional Analysis

Animal-Protein Intake Is Associated with Insulin Resistance in Adventist Health Study 2 (AHS-2) Calibration Substudy Participants: A Cross-Sectional Analysis Center for Nutrition, Healthy Lifestyle, and Disease Prevention Search for other works by this author on: Center for Nutrition, Healthy Lifestyle, and Disease Prevention Current Developments in Nutrition, Volume 1, Issue 4, 1 April 2017, e000299, Bahar Azemati, Sujatha Rajaram, Karen Jaceldo-Siegl, Joan Sabate, David Shavlik, Gary E Fraser, Ella H Haddad; Animal-Protein Intake Is Associated with Insulin Resistance in Adventist Health Study 2 (AHS-2) Calibration Substudy Participants: A Cross-Sectional Analysis, Current Developments in Nutrition, Volume 1, Issue 4, 1 April 2017, e000299, Background: High intakes of total and animal protein are associated with the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D). The influence of protein type on insulin resistance, a key precursor of T2D, has not been extensively studied. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the associations between dietary total, animal, and plant protein intakes as well as the animal-to-plant protein (AP) intake ratio with insulin resistance in middle-aged and olde Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. gogge

    Protein still gives a similar insulin response as carbs, and the insulin response is still elevated for roughly the same period of time. Here's comparing 50 grams of glucose to 50 grams of protein (ground beef):
    Graph.
    Nuttall FQ, et al. "Effect of protein ingestion on the glucose and insulin response to a standardized oral glucose load" Diabetes Care. 1984 Sep-Oct;7(5):465-70.
    The glucagon response from protein doesn't matter for this, see Stephan Guyenet's "Glucagon, Dietary Protein, and Low-Carbohydrate Diets".
    But most people don't eat more than ~100 grams of protein per day, and you only digest roughly 10 grams per hour, compared to 60-100 grams per hour for carbs, so won't get the same big "spike".
    The rate of amino acid absorption from protein is quite slow (~ 5 to 8 g/h, from Table 2) when compared to that of other macronutrients, with fatty acids at ~ 0.175 g ∙ kg-1 ∙ h-1 (~ 14 g/h) (55) and glucose 60 to 100 g/h (0.8 to 1.2 g carbohydrate ∙ kg-1 ∙ h-1) for an 80 kg individual (56).
    Bilsborough S, Mann N. "A review of issues of dietary protein intake in human" Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab. 2006 Apr;16(2):129-52.
    The level of processing is also a big deal for carbs, compare whole apples to purée:
    Chart.
    Stubbs JR "Carbohydrates, Appetite and Feeding Behavior in Humans" J. Nutr. October 1, 2001 vol. 131 no. 10 2775S-2781S
    And this is probably the real problem with carbs, processing makes them quick to eat, quick to digest, quick to absorb, and quick to store. They taste awesome and you eat too much.
    Take this example; if carbs were categorically bad how can the kitavans have a 70% carb intake without getting the same problems with obesity, diabetes, cancer, and heart disease as we do? It doesn't makes sense that all carbs would always be bad. Chris Masterjohn discusses different levels of carb intakes and people thriving on high carb in "Oxidative Stress & Carbohydrate Intolerance: An Ancestral Perspective".
    So the problem isn't just carbs, or just insulin (protein would be bad in that case), it's the combination of carbs and too many calories. Which seems to be a multifaceted problem, but probably boils down to a problem with processed foods (mainly carbs) and how/why we eat them. The BBC has a great video on this, "The Men Who Made Us Fat". Yoni Freedhof's "What's a Food Industry to Do?" also highlights some issues with advertising.
    Here's an article that covers some of it if you prefer reading:
    What follows is a series of small case studies of a handful of characters whose work then, and perspective now, sheds light on how the foods are created and sold to people who, while not powerless, are extremely vulnerable to the intensity of these companies’ industrial formulations and selling campaigns.
    Michael Moss, "The Extraordinary Science of Addictive Junk Food".
    Stephan Guyenet has two good videos on how our diets have changed over the last hundred years or so:
    Stephan Guyenet, "The American Diet" also covers some historical changes.
    Stephan Guyenet, "Obesity; Old Solutions for a New Problem".
    In the general population high levels of insulin is just a marker for a high intake of processed food (or calories), it's likely not what's driving obesity.

  2. maxm

    Good post. I have found that i need to watch my proteins almost as closely as my carbs to loose the last weight on keto. I have been snacking on pork rinds. It suddenly dawned on me that a 100 g of rinds contained 50 g protein. Half of what I need in a day. So now I eat more fats instead. Which have rebooted my loss.

  3. [deleted]

    Wow! I will have to read this A few times.... Very comprehensive post. Thanks a lot. you must be a scientist or something.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

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