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Does Drinking Water Lower Your Blood Sugar

High Blood Sugar Remedies

High Blood Sugar Remedies

Posted by Sheila (Wicks, Arkansas) on 06/18/2008 Hi, I'm a diabetic, overweight, Had a hysterectomy, and do NOT do hormone replacement, have suffered from yeast infections on my skin, not in my vagina, ever since I had the Hysterectomy, i am 40 years old, I have been in so much pain, I was ready to go, throw myself overboard if I could find a boat. I went to (ask.com) typed in yeast infection it brought me to this web sight, and thank GOD IN HEAVEN, I tried 3 cups apple cider vinegar store bought and 2 cups idozied salt with half tub of water and soaked for 1 hour. While drinking a glass of water with 2 tablespoons of apple cider vinegar, it helped me so much, it is a true Miracle! By drinking the apple cider vinegar it has lowered my blood sugar by 20 points, which is great cause I run about 250, on my blood sugar count, I can't thank you all enough for sharing your stories, I know you have all been in much pain as I have but, you have helped me so much. THANKS AGAIN, and GOD BLESS EACH OF YOU! and May we all be HEALTHY once again. After discovering this website and reading all the benefits that Apple Cider Vinegar has. I've been taken apple cider vinegar for about 3 weeks now (3 tbls. with 8 ounces of water three times a day) and I have noticed that it has kept my sugar and my blood pressure in normal ranges, it has also lowered my body fat percentage, I'm losing weight and it has also cured my sore throat and I feel more energetic. I love your website. Keep up the good work. Posted by Bill (Philadelphia, Pa.) on 04/19/2015 I am a 57 year old prediabetic male and have had FBS readings as high as 120 for quite some time. I recently began using 2 tablespoons of Apple Cider Vinegar and 1 tablespoon of Coconut Oil 20 minutes before meals and was astonished to see my blood Continue reading >>

Really? The Claim: Drinking Water Can Help Lower The Risk Of Diabetes.

Really? The Claim: Drinking Water Can Help Lower The Risk Of Diabetes.

THE FACTS There are many reasons to stay properly hydrated, but only recently have scientists begun to consider diabetes prevention one of them. The amount of water you drink can play a role in how your body regulates blood sugar, researchers have found. The reason: a hormone called vasopressin, which helps regulate water retention. When the body is dehydrated, vasopressin levels rise, prompting the kidneys to hold onto water. At the same time, the hormone pushes the liver to produce blood sugar, which over time may strain the ability to produce or respond to insulin. One of the largest studies to look at the consequences was published last year in Diabetes Care, a publication of the American Diabetes Association. French scientists tracked more than 3,000 healthy men and women ages 30 to 65 for nearly a decade. All had normal blood sugar levels at the start of the research. After nine years, about 800 had developed Type 2 diabetes or high blood sugar. But those who consumed the most water, 17 to 34 ounces a day, had a risk roughly 30 percent lower than that of those who drank the least. The researchers controlled for the subjects’ intake of other liquids that could have affected the results, mainly sugary and alcoholic drinks, as well as exercise, weight and other factors affecting health. The researchers did not look at eating habits, something future studies may take into account. THE BOTTOM LINE There is some evidence that proper hydration can help protect against high blood sugar, though more research is needed. Continue reading >>

How Does Fiber Affect Blood Glucose Levels?

How Does Fiber Affect Blood Glucose Levels?

Fiber is a type of carbohydrate (just like sugars and starches) but since it is not broken down by the human body, it does not contribute any calories. Yet, on a food label, fiber is listed under total carbohydrate. So this gets kind of confusing for people who have diabetes. Carbohydrate is the one nutrient that has the biggest impact on blood glucose. So, does fiber have any effect on your blood glucose? The answer is that fiber does not raise blood glucose levels. Because it is not broken down by the body, the fiber in an apple or a slice of whole grain bread has no effect on blood glucose levels because it isn't digested. The grams of fiber can actually be subtracted from the total grams of carb you are eating if you are using carbohydrate counting for meal planning. So, fiber is a good thing for people with diabetes. Of course, most of the foods that contain fiber (fruits, vegetables, whole grain breads, cereals, and pastas) also contain other types of non-fiber carbohydrate (sugar, starch) that must be accounted for in your meal plan. The average person should eat between 20-35 grams of fiber each day. Most Americans eat about half that amount. A study in the New England Journal of Medicine showed that people with diabetes who ate 50 grams of fiber a day — particularly soluble fiber — were able to control their blood glucose better than those who ate far less. So if fiber does not give us any calories, why exactly should you eat it? There are two types of fiber: insoluble and soluble. Insoluble fiber keeps your digestive tract working well. Whole wheat bran is an example of this type of fiber. Soluble fiber can help lower your cholesterol level and improve blood glucose control if eaten in large amounts. Oatmeal is an example of this type of fiber. Another ben Continue reading >>

7 Morning Rituals Proven To Lower Morning Blood Sugar Naturally

7 Morning Rituals Proven To Lower Morning Blood Sugar Naturally

If you’re a diabetic, you may find that your blood sugar levels are at their peak in the morning. This is due to the fasting period overnight. It’s common for blood sugar tests to require a period of fasting beforehand to get the best natural levels. You need to get your blood sugar levels down right away. The good news is you don’t necessarily need to rely on medication. While you will want to take medication in the way that your doctor has prescribed, you will still want to follow these seven-morning rituals. It is possible to reverse type II diabetes and focus on a healthier and more natural lifestyle. Even if you’re not a diabetic, you will want to keep your morning blood sugar levels down. Here are the seven must-follow morning rituals that have proven to lower the blood sugar levels on a morning completely naturally. Wait, Why Is Your Blood Sugar Up In the Morning? Why is it that your blood sugar levels will rise overnight? You don’t eat anything, so how can you possibly add any glucose to your system? Well, those who suffer from type II diabetes will find this is most problematic. The body still creates glucose throughout the night. It needs to, whether you’ve eaten something or not. This natural process is called gluconeogenesis, and there is nothing you can do to stop it – nor would you want to. In a healthy person, this process doesn’t cause a major problem. Those with diabetes will find the gluconeogenesis process is increased. That means your body produces more glucose naturally than it would if you were healthy. Let’s not forget that the stress hormone cortisol also plays a part. This increases slowly on a morning until it reaches a peak early in the morning. The cortisol will elevate the blood sugar levels, so you end up with naturally hi Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia: Treat It Early

Hyperglycemia: Treat It Early

Hyperglycemia is when your blood glucose level goes too high; it is high blood sugar. Part of managing diabetes (either type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes) on a daily basis is learning how to avoid hyperglycemia. Being able to recognize the signs and symptoms of hyperglycemia early is helpful. If your blood sugar shoots up too high, it can be dangerous—and it can possibly land you in the hospital, especially if it leads to diabetic ketoacidosis. Also, if your blood sugar is continually in the high range, your likelihood of developing long-term diabetes complications such as nerve damage, kidney failure, and heart disease rises dramatically. So it is important to detect when your blood glucose reaches unacceptable levels. Early Signs and Symptoms of Hyperglycemia The best defensive tactic for identifying elevated blood glucose is testing with a glucose meter. Your doctor will advise you how frequently you should test and what levels you should be aiming for. However, your body can also let you know when there is too much glucose circulating in your blood. It may prompt you with: thirst dry mouth blurry vision fatigue If you experience these symptoms, check your blood glucose right away. Hyperglycemia Treatments If your blood glucose is high (based on the target levels your doctor said you should be aiming for), it is time to act. Your physician and diabetes educator have likely taught you how to treat high blood glucose levels—how to bring them back to a target range. Some possible ideas for treating hyperglycemia: Exercise: Exercise can help your body use the extra glucose, whether you have type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes. But please note, if your blood glucose level is above 250 mg/dL and you have type 1 diabetes, you’ll need to check for ketones before exerci Continue reading >>

How To Lower Blood Sugar With Diet

How To Lower Blood Sugar With Diet

Reader Approved High blood sugar can cause a number of health problems. Most notably, it can trigger the onset of diabetes, especially in people with a family history of the disease. Diabetics must monitor their diet to prevent their blood sugar from running dangerously high or too low. Pre-diabetics, or those with a genetic disposition to the disease, can keep blood sugar levels low by being careful with their diet, possibly reducing the risk of needing medication. Once you are diagnosed as Diabetic, it is dangerous to assume that diet and exercise alone can help you manage your blood sugar. If you are disciplined, then a doctor could agree that minimal medication is all that you need. It is not advised that a diagnosed diabetic to take charge of managing his or her blood sugar with diet and exercise alone. Continue reading >>

Does Drinking Water Bring High Glucose Levels Down?

Does Drinking Water Bring High Glucose Levels Down?

The one major feature uniting Types 1 and 2 diabetes is high blood sugar levels resulting from your body producing too little insulin. Increasing your water intake helps to treat and prevent these spikes in blood glucose levels in a variety of ways. The beneficial effects of water on blood glucose levels extend to people without diabetes, as a study published in 2011 in "Diabetes Care" indicates that drinking adequate amounts of water decreases your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. Video of the Day Water Intake and Glucose Levels When your blood glucose levels are too high, your body tries to rid itself of some of this glucose in your urine. Drinking more water can help to replenish your fluids, potentially helping your body excrete more glucose in your urine. Increasing your water intake has the added benefit of potentially decreasing the amount of glucose you get from food. According to Dr. Richard Holt and colleagues, people who drink too little water tend to consume as much as 30 percent more calories than those who drink adequate amounts of water, potentially leading to dangerous spikes in blood sugar. Continue reading >>

5 Foods To Help Lower Blood Sugar Levels

5 Foods To Help Lower Blood Sugar Levels

As we know chronically elevated blood sugar levels significantly increases the risk of developing type II diabetes. Excess sugar and insulin floating around in the bloodstream results in increased inflammation throughout the body thereby contributing to metabolic X syndrome. Bottom line is if you’re at risk for type II diabetes, your primary objective is to get blood sugar levels in check. Cleaning up your diet is the obvious first step. Eliminating processed and refined foods, cutting out the sodas, and pulling back on the starches is sound advice. While I typically recommend more of a Primal Blueprint type diet for individuals dealing with high blood sugar, there are a handful of specific foods that can be especially helpful. I’ll spotlight 5 of these foods in today’s post. More after the jump… #1: Cocoa Surprised? Don’t be, cocoa has been shown in recent research studies to help improve insulin sensitivity. The key here is we’re not talking about chocolate candy bars. Cocoa in its natural state is very high in antioxidants, we only screw it up when processing with sugar, milk, and other ingredients. Cocoa powder is my first choice here. I love Navitas Naturals Organic Cacao Powder, available at health food supermarkets like Whole Foods or from Amazon.com. Here’s link if you’re interested in Navitas Naturals Organic Cacao Powder. This is the real deal and has zero added sugar. Great for blending into protein shakes, coffee, sprinkled on fruit, added to drinks, or used in recipes. A secondary choice would be dark chocolate with a high cocoa count and minimal sugar. The darker the better, but just know it’s going to be somewhat bitter. A small piece of dark chocolate makes for a much better dessert than that Fudgesicle or other high sugar treat. Go eas Continue reading >>

Ten Ways To Take A Bite Out Of Blood Sugar

Ten Ways To Take A Bite Out Of Blood Sugar

Simple tips on how to lower blood sugar that you can integrate into your daily life. By Wil Dubois Let’s talk about blood sugar management today. Sounds boring, huh? Not at all, really. Done right, taking steps to lower blood sugar can be highly empowering. Sweet numbers on a blood sugar log will bring a smile to your face faster than an ice cream cone in July. I know a lot of you who take pills for your diabetes feel powerless to change a high blood sugar reading, so you’d rather not know that your sugar is high—but there are things you can do to lower your blood sugar that don’t involve opening your medicine cabinet. Here are my top ten tips for lowering blood sugar: 1. Test, Don’t Guess The first step—the mantra of dLife from the very beginning—is test, don’t guess! To master your blood sugar, you must first know where it is. And if you only check first thing in the morning, you’re cheating at solitaire. If you want to truly master your blood sugar, you should fearlessly seek out your very worst, highest numbers. That means checking after meals. Don’t let that high number flashing on your meter get you down. Rejoice that you’ve found it. It’s just a problem to be fixed—and as you roll out the rest of these tips, those high numbers, like the walls of Jericho, are going to come a-tumblin’ down. 2. No More Monochrome Meals! While there’s no such thing as a diabetic diet anymore, there’s only so much your system can handle at once when it comes to foods that turn into sugar quickly. Here’s my advice: deprive yourself of no food, but limit yourself to one carb portion per meal. Carbs tend to be white in color: things made of flour (including pasta), potato, rice, and sugar. Oh, and corn is pale yellow, so it’s a white food, too. If you Continue reading >>

Can Lemon Water Lower Fasting Sugar Levels?

Can Lemon Water Lower Fasting Sugar Levels?

(Tamil Nadu, India) I find my fasting sugar to be around 140 and pp to be around 150. I don't want to medicate myself. Will a regular intake of warm lemon water first thing in the morning help to lower fasting sugar? Should I also take it last thing at night to help my pre-diabetic condition? Thanks, Usha Sridhar Nancy's response: I encourage all of my nutrition clients (including diabetics) to drink lemon water once or twice a day, preferably first thing in the morning and before going to bed at night. The numerous health benefits of drinking lemon water may help with a pre-diabetic condition, especially the alkalizing effect, the liver and blood cleansing, and the gastrointestinal benefits. I can't say whether drinking lemon water will lower your fasting blood sugar levels. I am not aware of any clinical studies to that effect. However, drinking lemon water will aid in the overall health of your body but will not override any dietary or lifestyle factors that may be contributing to your pre-diabetic condition. In my experience, eating too much starchy carbohydrates (breads, pastas, cereals, snack foods, and other processed grains) and sugars are the main food culprits that contribute to diabetes. If you start drinking lemon water to help cleanse the body and significantly reduce your intake of starches and sugars, while eating moderate amounts of lean protein, healthy fats (nuts, seeds, avocadoes, olives, olive oil, wild salmon, etc.) and LOTS of fresh vegetables, you can reverse the pre-diabetic condition. Daily exercise (15 min. walk), proper hydration, deep breathing, and stress management will also help. In summary, as long as you don't have any ulcers or citrus allergies, drinking lemon water twice a day certainly could not hurt and you will most likely notice th Continue reading >>

How To Lower Your Blood Sugar Levels Naturally

How To Lower Your Blood Sugar Levels Naturally

How to safely bring down your blood glucose levels and keep it under control. Hyperglycaemia (otherwise known as “high blood sugars”) occurs when your body is unable to utilize the sugars it consumes by turning them into energy. Although it mainly occurs with people who have the serious condition diabetes, there can be other causes. Hyperglycaemia can cause serious symptoms and lead to potentially-dangerous complications, but the good news is that it can be tackled, with effort and a few simple lifestyle changes. What Could Cause High Blood Sugar? There are two predominate types of hyperglycaemia (high blood sugar). These are: Fasting hyperglycaemia, which is blood sugar levels higher than 130mg/dL (that’s milligrams of sugar per decilitre of blood) after not eating or drinking (other than plain water) for eight hours. Postprandial (after-meal) hyperglycaemia, which is blood sugar levels higher than 180 mg/dL two hours after you eat. A diabetic can have hyperglycaemia for a large number of reasons. The most common reasons are: forgetting to take your insulin or other glucose-lowering medication at the right time, eating too many carbohydrates for the amount of insulin you did take, or being less physically active than usual. However, there are other causes that are less obvious. Being under the weather, feeling stressed, or having an infection could all affect your blood sugars, making them more prone to rise where they wouldn’t normally. What Are The Common Symptoms Of Hyperglycaemia/High Blood Sugar? There are two stages of symptoms in hyperglycaemia. If you are experiencing a large number of the early symptoms, take notice and monitor your blood sugars, attempting to lower them if they are too high, as the later symptoms are particularly serious and uncomfort Continue reading >>

How To Bring A Sugar Level Down Fast

How To Bring A Sugar Level Down Fast

If you have any form of diabetes you know that you never want your blood sugar to spike over 300 as it can severely harm your organs and the rest of your body. But things like diet, stress, illness and infection can cause your blood sugar levels to go temporarily out of whack. If your blood sugar level spikes past 300, see a doctor immediately if possible. If you have to wait to see a doctor or can’t get to one, there are a few quick fixes you can do to get the level to drop. Exercise vigorously for at least an half hour. If there is too much sugar in your blood stream, exercising will help use up some of that sugar and energy and thus your blood sugar level should go down. After working out for a half hour, use a blood sugar monitoring device to check your level again. If it still is not low enough, consider exercising for a longer period. Activities such as aerobics, jogging and doing jumping jacks are great cardiovascular exercises that get your heart rate up and burn energy fast. Drink three to four glasses of water consecutively and urinate as soon as possible. Large amounts of water will help dilute the sugar in your blood stream and urinating will help flush some of the sugar out of your body. After drinking the water and urinating, test your blood sugar level again. Drink more water and repeat the process if your level is still not low enough. If possible, do this step in conjunction with step one as vigorous exercise requires you to hydrate your body and drink water. Eat a collection of foods that are low on the glycemic index, or that will help bring you blood sugar level down. Foods like garlic, eggs, onions, peanuts and peanut butter are all low on the glycemic index and will help stabilize your blood sugar levels. Eat scrambled eggs with chopped onions, a Continue reading >>

Balance Your Blood Sugar With Cinnamon Tea

Balance Your Blood Sugar With Cinnamon Tea

There are approximately 29 million people living with diabetes in the United States — that’s nearly 10 percent of the population. With obesity rates reaching an all-time high, it’s frightening to know that around 90 to 95 percent of all diagnoses are type 2 — meaning lifestyle factors play a significant role. What’s even more frightening is that one out of three American adults is currently living with prediabetes and 90 percent of these individuals are unaware that they have it. For those who are borderline diabetic, if they do not change their lifestyle habits, 15 to 30 percent of this population will develop diabetes within five years. Once you do develop this disease, it’s too late. There is no cure and although symptoms can be managed, serious complications can arise — from heart disease and kidney failure to blindness and the loss of limbs. To avoid these serious complications, you need to take preventative measures far before any issues arise. Cinnamon: the all-natural blood sugar balancer In order to reduce your risk of insulin resistance while maintaining your overall health, you need to make good decisions on a daily basis. That means changing current habits and routines; instead of reaching for a soda with lunch, drink water. Instead of eating processed foods, opt for whole food options. Instead of chowing down a piece of cake after dinner, drink cinnamon tea. Exclusive: Reduce Arthritis Pain And 20 Other Benefits Of Cinnamon There’s no doubt that cinnamon is delicious — but aside from its bold, warming flavor, this spice also offers powerful health benefits. If you’re already living with diabetes, cinnamon has been shown to improve glucose levels. Within one study published in Diabetes Care, 60 people with type 2 diabetes consumed either Continue reading >>

Can I Drink With Diabetes? Does Alcohol Affect Blood Sugar?

Can I Drink With Diabetes? Does Alcohol Affect Blood Sugar?

As a diabetes educator, I frequently get asked from patients, “can I drink alcohol and, if so, how much?” A lot of people don’t know that alcohol can actually lower your blood glucose level. If you use insulin or certain diabetes medications you are at greater risk of having a low blood glucose reaction if you drink alcohol. It’s important to have this conversation with your doctor to see if it’s safe. Keep in mind that alcohol should always be consumed in moderation, however if you choose to have an alcoholic drink, here are some tips to help keep you safe: Don’t drink on an empty stomach or when your blood glucose is low. Drink alcohol with a meal or carbohydrate snack like pretzels or crackers. Don’t carb count your alcohol. If you count carbohydrates, don’t add alcohol to the equation. Replacing alcohol with carbohydrate foods can be risky and lead to low blood glucose or hyperglycemia. Alcohol is considered empty calories. It provides no nutritional value, so drinking too much will add no benefit to you. Drink in moderation. The American Diabetes Association recommends drinking in moderation and people with diabetes should follow the same guidelines as those without diabetes. Women should have no more than 1 drink a day, and men, no more than 2 drinks a day. You might be wondering, what is one drink? To give you an idea, one drink is equal to 12 ounces of beer, 5 ounces of wine or 1 ½ ounces of distilled spirits (American Diabetes Association). Sip on your drink and make it last. By drinking in small sips, you can savor the flavor and make that one drink feel like much more. Hydrate yourself by keeping water close by. It’s easy to forget to drink especially when you’re in the midst of a conversation. Grab a glass of water when you grab your alc Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar Levels: Tips To Help Bring It Down

High Blood Sugar Levels: Tips To Help Bring It Down

Have you suddenly realized that you have high blood sugar levels and not sure how to bring them down? It is important to do something because having high levels for any prolonged length of time is what leads to complications occurring. So let's cover a simple strategy that can help in the short term and talk about lowering levels over the long term. Effective Strategy For Lowering High Blood Sugar Levels 1. Drink water When your blood sugar is high it becomes very thick, like syrup and gets very sluggish. Drinking water helps to dilute your blood and increases your rate of urination, which helps reduce your sugars. Drinking water might sound like a weird thing to do and many doctors would raise their eyebrows at this one but this works very well for the majority of people and is the singular best strategy to help bring your high blood sugar levels down. Simple, yet effective. 2. Exercise Usually water won't be enough to bring down your high levels on it's own. You need to do some gentle exercise to help pump the glucose out of the blood stream and into the muscles. The only way to do that is to MOVE!! Try going for a gentle walk, take the water with you. And if your levels are exceptionally high, it's always a good idea to take someone on the walk with you (just in case). Alternatively just walk around your yard or even just up and down your hallway. It doesn't have to be a fast walk because when blood sugar levels are high you do not want to exert yourself, just get your body moving a bit. Let's emphasize this again: Do not exert yourself when you have high blood sugar levels. If you are unable to walk due to pain or for some other reason, just keep drinking water. 3. Have a high protein snack Eat half an egg, or a tablespoon of natural peanut butter, or a slice of che Continue reading >>

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