diabetestalk.net

Does Dehydration Cause High Blood Sugar

Dehydration Can Lead To Kidney Stones, Kidney Failure, And Cardiac Arrest

Dehydration Can Lead To Kidney Stones, Kidney Failure, And Cardiac Arrest

Dehydration can lead to kidney stones, kidney failure, and cardiac arrest. The risk of dehydration is much higher in the summertime, as the weather is hotter and people are outdoors and being active more often. While running low on liquid intake is usually associated with weakness and malaise, you should also know without proper hydration you may be putting your kidneys and heart at risk. Less than 75 percent of Americans consume the recommended amount of water throughout the year, according to the Institute of Medicine. Sixty percent of our bodies is comprised of water, so hydration throughout the day is essential – particularly when you are sweating more. Dr. Robert G. Silverman, a New York-based doctor, said, “Dehydration means you have a negative fluid balance in your body — you’ve lost more water than you’ve taken in.” “Mild dehydration is common and easily treated simply by drinking plain water. If you get badly dehydrated, however, you might need an IV to replace lost fluids and get your electrolytes back into balance. If more severe dehydration isn’t treated promptly, it can cause fainting, low blood pressure, heart palpitations, dizziness, and decreased urine output. Severe dehydration can even lead to death from kidney failure or cardiac arrest… If you have diabetes, getting dehydrated can raise your blood sugar to dangerously high levels. Fortunately, if dehydration is treated promptly, a quick and complete recovery is very likely,” he continued. It is worth noting that dehydration is not a seasonal problem that loses its relevancy once the summer is over. In fact, it can happen any season if you aren’t taking in adequate amounts of water. Summertime dehydration often results from excess sweating, especially during an outdoor physical ac Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose And Dehydration

Blood Glucose And Dehydration

In the past, I assumed that the only association between diabetes and dehydration was that severe hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) would cause dehydration as one of the symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). However, over the years I’ve noticed the occasional unexpected high blood sugar when I was mildly dehydrated due to exercise without consuming enough water. I figured that was anecdotal and never gave it serious thought as a health issue worth pursuing. When I did consider the possibility, it seemed logical to me that since diabetics are told to drink water to help bring down high blood glucose, perhaps the absence of hydration would cause blood sugar to rise. Maybe? Last week summer came to San Diego in one hot wave We moved to northeast San Diego in April, so this was our first experience of the inland heat in our non-air-conditioned house. We’ve been sweaty and uncomfortable, especially while home most of the weekend. During this stint, I noticed my blood sugars were running high despite healthy eating, normal insulin doses, and plenty of activity. A nagging thought kept occurring to me, "Am I dehydrated?" I tend to be better about drinking water when I’m at work during the week, sitting at my desk. I certainly wasn’t drinking enough to maintain hydration during this hot spell. I got online and goggled, "dehydration and blood sugar" to see if I could locate information to confirm my suspicions. Oh, wonderful internet! I found dozens of articles and posts that explained that, in fact, dehydration can contribute to hyperglycemia. It’s actually pretty straightforward. Basically, when we’re dehydrated (even mildly) there is less liquid in our blood which means that the concentration of glucose (and other nutrients) is higher. As the heat and humidity Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

Type 2 Diabetes: High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

Diabetes management: High blood sugar and its symptoms What is high blood sugar? High blood sugar, technically known as hyperglycemia, can occur when blood glucose stays too high -- typically over 180 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) -- for too long. High blood sugar is an indication that the body doesn't have enough insulin. It can happen if someone with diabetes skips doses of diabetes medications, eats too much, or doesn't get enough exercise. Sometimes the medications taken for other ailments cause high blood sugar. In addition, an infection, illness, injury, surgery, or stress can also make blood glucose soar to harmful heights. What are the symptoms of high blood sugar? Excessive thirst Fatigue Increased urination Blurry vision Nausea More frequent infections Slow-healing cuts and sores Unexplained weight loss Diabetes management: Treating and preventing high blood sugar How to treat high blood sugar Make sure that the person you're caring for drinks plenty of water to avoid dehydration and the potential for high blood sugar to spiral out of control. If blood glucose is above 250 mg/dL, a person with diabetes should test his urine for ketones, acids that can build up in his body and cause potentially life-threatening problems. Ketone test strips are available over the counter at pharmacies. If blood glucose readings are routinely above target range, the person in your care may consider taking pills or injecting insulin. If he already does, he may need to have the dose increased. Discuss these concerns with his main diabetes care provider. How to prevent high blood sugar Help the person figure out what foods tend to trigger a high blood sugar reaction so he can avoid them or compensate by adjusting his medications or becoming more active. Check the size of his port Continue reading >>

High Blood Pressure, Dehydration & Electrolyte Imbalance

High Blood Pressure, Dehydration & Electrolyte Imbalance

Elevated blood pressure affects one out of three Americans. The #1 cause of death that is associated with elevated blood pressure is Hypertensive Heart Disease. There can be many causes to hypertension. Chronic elevation of blood pressure results in a shortened life expectancy as well as the quality of one's life. There is an intrinsic link between chronic hypertension, renal failure, dehydration and a deficiency of certain electrolyte minerals. The real irony is that pharmaceutical medications to treat high blood pressure further exacerbate dehydration and mineral loss in the body, which contributes to and in many cases causes renal dysfunction and sets up pictures for heart disease and congestive heart failure. Water and electrolytes are absolutely two of the most critical components of normal, physiological function. Without a correct balance of fluid and electrolytes, the cells of our body lack the essential electrical conductivity necessary for cellular energy production. When fluid retention (also called edema) accompanies hypertension, it is a primary indicator of intracellular fluid loss, and an accumulation of extracellular tissue fluids. Edema has very damaging effects upon cellular function. This is due to the destruction of the electronegative colloidal properties of body fluids, a destructive, catabolic scenario. Blood pressure medications, such as thiazide diuretics deplete the body of potassium and magnesium, two critical electrolytes which maintain normal blood pressure and cellular function. The Epidemic Of Magnesium Deficiency Magnesium is one of the most vitally important electrolyte minerals. It is responsible for initiating more than 300 enzymatic reactions in the human body. Deficiencies of magnesium began to occur with soil depletion from the indu Continue reading >>

How Does Dehydration Affect Blood Glucose Levels?

How Does Dehydration Affect Blood Glucose Levels?

Definition Dehydration occurs when your body does not have enough fluid to carry out its normal functions. Dehydration can be mild, or it can be severe and life threatening, resulting in coma and death. Low fluid intake, illness, exercise, excessive sweating, too much sun exposure, heat and humidity, burns, certain medications and alcohol can all cause dehydration. Glucose Levels Rise When you become dehydrated, the amount of liquid in your blood is low in relation to the nutrients and waste products in the blood. Therefore, concentrations of glucose increase. As glucose levels increase, blood circulation through the capillaries, the smallest blood vessels, diminishes. Over time, this decreased blood supply can cause high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, blindness, nervous system damage, kidney disease and dental disease. In the short term, increased blood glucose levels can cause fatigue, blurred vision, increased thirst and an increased need to urinate. Since diabetes is characterized by increased thirst and urination anyway, if you are diabetic, dehydration can rapidly become a serious problem. Symptoms Mild dehydration, even without the complication of diabetes, can make you feel tired, thirsty and weak and give you a headache. Severe dehydration adds irritability, dry mouth and mucous membranes, sunken eyes, low blood pressure, overly rapid heartbeat and fever. Delirium, unconsciousness and death can follow. Avoid Dehydration As a diabetic, you should know what causes dehydration and take steps to avoid it. Vigorous exercise in high heat and humidity conditions require a greater fluid intake, as does spending the day at the beach. Pay attention to your body's thirst signals. Have a plan to prevent or minimize dehydration caused by fever, vomiting or diarrhea. Continue reading >>

Child Health Library

Child Health Library

Topic Overview Diabetes-related blood sugar levels When you have diabetes, you may have high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia) or low blood sugar levels (hypoglycemia) from time to time. A cold, the flu, or other sudden illness can cause high blood sugar levels. You will learn to recognize the symptoms and distinguish between high and low blood sugar levels. Insulin and some types of diabetes medicines can cause low blood sugar levels. Learn how to recognize and manage high and low blood sugar levels to help you avoid levels that can lead to medical emergencies, such as diabetic ketoacidosis or dehydration from high blood sugar levels or loss of consciousness from severe low blood sugar levels. Most high or low blood sugar problems can be managed at home by following your doctor's instructions. You can help avoid blood sugar problems by following your doctor's instructions on the use of insulin or diabetes medicines, diet, and exercise. Home blood sugar testing will help you determine whether your blood sugar is within your target range. If you have had very low blood sugar, you may be tempted to let your sugar level run high so that you do not have another low blood sugar problem. But it is most important that you keep your blood sugar in your target range. You can do this by following your treatment plan and checking your blood sugar regularly. Sometimes a pregnant woman can get diabetes during her pregnancy. This is called gestational diabetes. Blood sugar levels are checked regularly during the pregnancy to keep levels within a target range. Children who have diabetes need their parents' help to keep their blood sugar levels in a target range and to exercise safely. Be sure that children learn the symptoms of both high and low blood sugar so they can tell others wh Continue reading >>

What Your Doctor Doesn't Know About Glucose Testing.

What Your Doctor Doesn't Know About Glucose Testing.

Blood sugar management is important for preventing everything from hypoglycemia to full blown diabetes. However, monitoring blood glucose is rarely as straightforward as it seems. In this article we’ll discuss the current gold standard for measuring a person’s blood sugar. We’ll share some problems with the most popular tests. And we’ll review the best ways to interpret your results. (Even if your doctor doesn’t know how). [Note: We’ve also prepared an audio recording of this article for you to listen to. So, if you’d rather listen to the piece, click here.] ++ Homeostasis is a fancy scientific word for “body balance”. Essentially, our bodies must keep internal levels of thousands of chemicals in check. Or else health can go awry. One of the most important homeostatic systems in our body is our blood sugar management system. When blood sugar is kept at a healthy range, we feel healthy, strong, energetic. On the other hand, unbalanced blood sugars put us at risk for problems ranging from reactive hypoglycemia to insulin resistance to full blown diabetes. But estimating blood sugar levels can be tricky. First, these levels change throughout the day, and with meals and exercise. So, unless you’re monitoring blood sugar levels continuously, every second of every day, it’s hard to get a complete picture of your glucose health. Second, the convenient glucose meters that many Type 1 diabetics use only give us a snapshot instead of a movie. They don’t show us how patients regulate blood sugars over time. And that may be the most important information of all when it comes to disease prevention. That’s why doctors and scientists have become obsessed with finding a test that measures blood glucose balance across days, weeks, or months. In other words, a t Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes During Ramadan Is All About Smart Management And Making Healthy Choices. Some Interesting Information To Note:

Managing Diabetes During Ramadan Is All About Smart Management And Making Healthy Choices. Some Interesting Information To Note:

If you are planning to fast and you have diabetes, it is important to speak to your diabetes healthcare team as early as possible before Ramadan begins. For some people with diabetes, fasting can be dangerous. Your diabetes team will be able to advise you on whether it is safe for you to fast. If you are able to fast, they will advise you on how to manage your condition throughout the fasting period. Possible Complications of Fasting during Ramadan Fasting among patients with type 1 diabetes, and among those with type 2 diabetes who have inadequately managed blood glucose levels, is associated with multiple risks. Some of the major potential diabetes-related complications of fasting include dangerously low blood glucose (hypoglycemia), excessively high blood glucose (hyperglycemia), diabetic ketoacidosis and thrombosis (blood clots). Hypoglycemia and Hyperglycemia Hypoglycemia is the fall of blood sugar under the normal levels (less than 70mg/dl – 3.9mmol/l). Hyperglycemia is the rise of blood sugar above normal levels (above 200 mg/dl – 11.1 mmol/l) which may lead to diabetic Ketoacidosis in type 1 diabetes patients. Diabetic Ketoacidosis When the body’s cells don’t get enough glucose, it starts to burn fat for energy. When the body burns fat instead of glucose it causes waste products called ketones. Ketones can make the blood acidic and this can be dangerous. The risk for diabetic ketoacidosis may be further increased due to excessive reduction of insulin – based on the assumption that food intake is reduced during the month. Patients with type 1 diabetes who choose to fast during Ramadan are at a higher risk of developing ketoacidosis, especially if they have been experiencing hyperglycemia frequently before Ramadan. Dehydration and Thrombosis Fasting duri Continue reading >>

Diabetes-related High And Low Blood Sugar Levels

Diabetes-related High And Low Blood Sugar Levels

Topic Overview Diabetes-related blood sugar levels When you have diabetes, you may have high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia) or low blood sugar levels (hypoglycemia) from time to time. A cold, the flu, or other sudden illness can cause high blood sugar levels. You will learn to recognize the symptoms and distinguish between high and low blood sugar levels. Insulin and some types of diabetes medicines can cause low blood sugar levels. Learn how to recognize and manage high and low blood sugar levels to help you avoid levels that can lead to medical emergencies, such as diabetic ketoacidosis or dehydration from high blood sugar levels or loss of consciousness from severe low blood sugar levels. Most high or low blood sugar problems can be managed at home by following your doctor's instructions. You can help avoid blood sugar problems by following your doctor's instructions on the use of insulin or diabetes medicines, diet, and exercise. Home blood sugar testing will help you determine whether your blood sugar is within your target range. If you have had very low blood sugar, you may be tempted to let your sugar level run high so that you do not have another low blood sugar problem. But it is most important that you keep your blood sugar in your target range. You can do this by following your treatment plan and checking your blood sugar regularly. Sometimes a pregnant woman can get diabetes during her pregnancy. This is called gestational diabetes. Blood sugar levels are checked regularly during the pregnancy to keep levels within a target range. Children who have diabetes need their parents' help to keep their blood sugar levels in a target range and to exercise safely. Be sure that children learn the symptoms of both high and low blood sugar so they can tell others wh Continue reading >>

Dehydration

Dehydration

Dehydration is a generally dangerous condition for any animal, in which the tissues are low on water. It is particularly likely in poorly-regulated or hyperglycemic diabetics, and also particularly dangerous for them, because it can quickly trigger diabetic ketoacidosis. Those with diabetes are at risk for dehydration as it is triggered by hyperglycemia[1]. Excessive thirst (medical term polydipsia [pah-lee-DIP-see-uh]; abreviated as PD) is a symptom of diabetes. Diabetic animals often drink incessantly because they are dehydrated from the cell-dehydrating effects of hyperglycemia, plus the effects of their bodies casting off the excess glucose through urination, taking hydration with it. The process also removes electrolytes the body needs to function properly such as potassium,[4] sodium and chloride[5] also. Chronic mild dehydration (common in diabetic cats) can lead to bowel motility problems among other things. One thing to check in the case of constipation is hydration level. To check if your pet is dehydrated, look at their gums and their skin. Skin will not snap back quickly when pinched, gums will be tacky or dry; more signs can be found at the link below[6][7]. This condition can be deadly or lead to deadly complications, within a day, so it must be remedied immediately. In any case of dehydration, check frequently for ketones. Mild dehydration may be possible to remedy with lots of water; if this isn't working, the next step is subcutaneous fluid injections, usually performed by your vet. (Though some people see this problem enough to have the equipment and fluids at home.) Untreated dehydration can cause the blood to be more hypertonic, which in turn can suck water from the cells causing more dehydration[8]. It's a vicious circle. Continue reading >>

Diabetes-related High And Low Blood Sugar Levels

Diabetes-related High And Low Blood Sugar Levels

Topic Overview When you have diabetes, you may have high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia) or low blood sugar levels (hypoglycemia) from time to time. A cold, the flu, or other sudden illness can cause high blood sugar levels. You will learn to recognize the symptoms and distinguish between high and low blood sugar levels. Insulin and some types of diabetes medicines can cause low blood sugar levels. Learn how to recognize and manage high and low blood sugar levels to help you avoid levels that can lead to medical emergencies, such as diabetic ketoacidosis or dehydration from high blood sugar levels or loss of consciousness from severe low blood sugar levels. Most high or low blood sugar problems can be managed at home by following your doctor's instructions. You can help avoid blood sugar problems by following your doctor's instructions on the use of insulin or diabetes medicines, diet, and exercise. Home blood sugar testing will help you determine whether your blood sugar is within your target range. If you have had very low blood sugar, you may be tempted to let your sugar level run high so that you do not have another low blood sugar problem. But it is most important that you keep your blood sugar in your target range. You can do this by following your treatment plan and checking your blood sugar regularly. Sometimes a pregnant woman can get diabetes during her pregnancy. This is called gestational diabetes. Blood sugar levels are checked regularly during the pregnancy to keep levels within a target range. Children who have diabetes need their parents' help to keep their blood sugar levels in a target range and to exercise safely. Be sure that children learn the symptoms of both high and low blood sugar so they can tell others when they need help. There are many su Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia

Hyperglycemia

Not to be confused with the opposite disorder, hypoglycemia. Hyperglycemia, or high blood sugar (also spelled hyperglycaemia or hyperglycæmia) is a condition in which an excessive amount of glucose circulates in the blood plasma. This is generally a blood sugar level higher than 11.1 mmol/l (200 mg/dl), but symptoms may not start to become noticeable until even higher values such as 15–20 mmol/l (~250–300 mg/dl). A subject with a consistent range between ~5.6 and ~7 mmol/l (100–126 mg/dl) (American Diabetes Association guidelines) is considered slightly hyperglycemic, while above 7 mmol/l (126 mg/dl) is generally held to have diabetes. For diabetics, glucose levels that are considered to be too hyperglycemic can vary from person to person, mainly due to the person's renal threshold of glucose and overall glucose tolerance. On average however, chronic levels above 10–12 mmol/L (180–216 mg/dL) can produce noticeable organ damage over time. Signs and symptoms[edit] The degree of hyperglycemia can change over time depending on the metabolic cause, for example, impaired glucose tolerance or fasting glucose, and it can depend on treatment.[1] Temporary hyperglycemia is often benign and asymptomatic. Blood glucose levels can rise well above normal and cause pathological and functional changes for significant periods without producing any permanent effects or symptoms. [1] During this asymptomatic period, an abnormality in carbohydrate metabolism can occur which can be tested by measuring plasma glucose. [1] However, chronic hyperglycemia at above normal levels can produce a very wide variety of serious complications over a period of years, including kidney damage, neurological damage, cardiovascular damage, damage to the retina or damage to feet and legs. Diabetic n Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar In Cats

High Blood Sugar In Cats

Hyperglycemia in Cats The term hyperglycemia refers to higher than normal levels of glucose in the blood. A simple carbohydrate sugar that circulates in the blood, glucose is a major source of energy for the body, of which normal levels range between 75-120mg. Insulin, a hormone that is produced and released by the pancreas into the bloodstream when glucose levels rise, plays a pivotal role in maintaining the blood sugar levels within normal limits. If insulin concentration is too low or there is absolute deficiency of insulin, levels of glucose rise sharply leading to hyperglycemia. Some of the causes for hyperglycemia may be pancreatitis, and the resulting inability to produce insulin; normally occurring hormones, especially in female cats; diet; and infections of the body (such as teeth, or urinary tract). Middle aged and older cats are more at risk for developing hyperglycemia, but otherwise, no breed is particularly disposed to this condition. Neutered male cats are at increased risk. Cats in general are prone to high blood sugar, typically during times of stress, where glucose levels may reach 300-400mg. This is often a temporary increase in blood sugar, and while it warrants further observation, it may not be cause to diagnose chronic hyperglycemia or diabetes mellitus. Symptoms and Types Clinical symptoms may vary depending on the underlying disease/condition. Your cat may not be showing any serious symptoms, especially those if the increased sugar is thought to be temporary, hormonal, or stress induced hyperglycemia. Some of the more common symptoms include: Depression Weight loss Excessive hunger Dehydration Bloodshot eyes (due to inflamed blood vessels) Liver enlargement Nerve damage in legs Severe depression (in cases of very high blood sugar levels) Non-hea Continue reading >>

10 Surprising Causes Of Blood Sugar Swings You Probably Didn’t Know

10 Surprising Causes Of Blood Sugar Swings You Probably Didn’t Know

1 / 11 What Causes Blood Sugar to Rise and Fall? Whether you were recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes or have been living with the disease for several years, you know how fickle blood sugar levels can be, and how important it is that they stay controlled. Proper blood sugar control is key for helping ward off potential diabetes complications, such as kidney disease, nerve damage, vision problems, stroke, and heart disease, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH). If you keep your levels in check on a daily basis, it will help you stay energized, focused, and in a good mood. You’ll know if your diabetes is poorly controlled if you experience symptoms such as frequent urination, sores that won’t heal, blurred vision, and unexplained weight loss. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), proper medication, effective meal planning, regular exercise, and use of a blood glucose meter to track your numbers routinely can all help you keep your levels within a healthy range. The ADA recommends blood glucose be 80 to 130 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) before meals, and below 180 mg/dL two hours after the start of a meal. Furthermore, the organization recommends getting an A1C test, which measures your average blood glucose over the past two to three months, at least twice per year if your levels are stable and you are meeting treatment goals. Learning how different habits can cause your blood sugar to fluctuate can help you better predict how your levels will swing. You may be more likely to experience hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar if you have advanced-stage diabetes, according to the ADA. Meanwhile, high blood sugar, or hyperglycemia, may be caused by factors such as not using enough insulin or other diabetes medication, not following a prop Continue reading >>

Diabetes-related High And Low Blood Sugar Levels

Diabetes-related High And Low Blood Sugar Levels

Topic Overview Diabetes-related blood sugar levels When you have diabetes, you may have high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia) or low blood sugar levels (hypoglycemia) from time to time. A cold, the flu, or other sudden illness can cause high blood sugar levels. You will learn to recognize the symptoms and distinguish between high and low blood sugar levels. Insulin and some types of diabetes medicines can cause low blood sugar levels. Learn how to recognize and manage high and low blood sugar levels to help you avoid levels that can lead to medical emergencies, such as diabetic ketoacidosis or dehydration from high blood sugar levels or loss of consciousness from severe low blood sugar levels. Most high or low blood sugar problems can be managed at home by following your doctor's instructions. You can help avoid blood sugar problems by following your doctor's instructions on the use of insulin or diabetes medicines, diet, and exercise. Home blood sugar testing will help you determine whether your blood sugar is within your target range. If you have had very low blood sugar, you may be tempted to let your sugar level run high so that you do not have another low blood sugar problem. But it is most important that you keep your blood sugar in your target range. You can do this by following your treatment plan and checking your blood sugar regularly. Sometimes a pregnant woman can get diabetes during her pregnancy. This is called gestational diabetes. Blood sugar levels are checked regularly during the pregnancy to keep levels within a target range. Children who have diabetes need their parents' help to keep their blood sugar levels in a target range and to exercise safely. Be sure that children learn the symptoms of both high and low blood sugar so they can tell others wh Continue reading >>

More in blood sugar