diabetestalk.net

Does Constipation Cause High Blood Sugar

How Constipation And Blood Sugar May Cause A Dangerous Mix

How Constipation And Blood Sugar May Cause A Dangerous Mix

When you think of the problems constipation causes you may think of the physical problems you notice, like bloating, cramping and having to strain when you are trying to make a bowel movement. But there may be something else happening inside your body that is showing through that bout of constipation. Doctors have noticed that those who have high blood sugar levels seem to be more prone to bouts of constipation. That caused them to start asking questions about constipation and blood sugar. What is it about one of those ailments that makes people more prone to suffering the effects of the other? Their studies showed them that there is a correlation between the two, and they are even willing to say now that those who have diabetes are more likely to become sufferers of constipation and always on the hunt for constipation relief. As a matter of fact about 60 % of diabetics (an ailment that is often characterized with high blood sugar levels that the body has a tough time controlling) also are regularly plagued with constipation. Here's why: Blood Sugar Impact High blood sugar levels in the body can impact the body's nervous system. This impact on the nervous system means the nerves are less likely to do their job properly and the brain is having a tough time passing on messages to the nerves. Your body relies on brain waves and nervous reactions to contract the muscles that tell your body to remove waste from its system. Unfortunately, high blood sugar levels can impact the blood vessels that are supposed to be delivering nutrients and oxygen to the nerves so they will work properly. Once they are not getting what they need, the nerves can go into a state of shock and stop working. Without these signals, waste will build up in your body and lead to constipation. Another im Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Constipation How It Happens, And Some Answers

Diabetes And Constipation How It Happens, And Some Answers

When diabetes and constipation combine, it can raise blood sugar Studies say constipation can raise blood sugar by as much as 10%. When food is not moving properly through the digestive tract, it affects absorption. Therefore, a diabetic may be able to lower their blood sugar by dealing with constipation. Diabetes can cause constipation In this article I list 6 ways that diabetes may cause constipation, and the best ways to overcome each of these. High blood sugar can cause decreased hydration A low carb diet can lead to constipation Diabetic medications can cause constipation Aging can bring cumulative constipation effects Delayed emptying can cause bacterial overgrowth Diabetic neuropathy. Nerve damage can hinder elimination The Six Ways Diabetes Can Lead to Constipation, With Answers for Each 1. Decreased hydration because of high blood sugar When blood sugar is elevated, the body needs water to flush this excess sugar from the blood. If this fluid is not replaced, it can cause those with uncontrolled diabetes to live in a constant state of dehydration. You see, when the body is dehydrated, it becomes desperate, and tries to pull the water it needs from the colon. This causes stool to dry out and become hard, making it painful to eliminate. The Answer First, work hard to control blood sugar levels. Limit caffeine, since excessive caffeine works like a diuretic to flush water from the system. Drink a lot of water. Nothing hydrates like water. Replacing lost water and staying hydrated is an important first step in avoiding the effect of diabetes and constipation. Just picture the difference between a grape and a raisin, then make it a point to stay hydrated. 2. Altering one’s diet to improve blood sugar No doubt you know how important it is for someone with diabetes Continue reading >>

13 Surprising Causes Of Constipation

13 Surprising Causes Of Constipation

Everyone is affected by constipation now and then — your diet, travel, and a lack of activity can all trigger a brief bout. But you might be surprised by the conditions and other factors that can be responsible for longer term or chronic constipation. The list is wide-ranging, from pregnancy constipation to a side effect of antidepressants. Some of these causes of constipation can be handled at home with an over-the-counter product or changes in your medicine cabinet, but serious constipation warrants a prompt doctor's visit. "Constipation that's new, different, associated with bleeding or weight loss, and lasts a couple of days may be a sign of colon cancer," says gastroenterologist Benjamin Krevsky, MD, associate chief of the section of gastroenterology at Temple University in Philadelphia, Pa. But since there are several more common causes of constipation that aren't as serious, don't worry too much. Your doctor can help you determine what's really behind your constipation. Sneaky Causes of Constipation Here's an overview of some of the conditions that may be to blame for your discomfort: Hypothyroidism. "The thyroid is a general regulator and affects organs all over the body," explains Dr. Krevsky. This includes the bowel. Your family doctor might miss this, but a gastroenterologist who sees this effect several times a year will probably test you for hyperthyroidism and can treat it to relieve your chronic constipation. Hyperparathyroidism. Less common than hypothyroidism, an overactive parathyroid — a gland close to the thyroid — can also be a cause of constipation. Simple testing and treatment will also bring relief. Prescription painkillers. Opioids — not over-the-counter pain relievers — can cause constipation. For people recovering from surgery or man Continue reading >>

For Anyone Suffering From Constipation

For Anyone Suffering From Constipation

You are here: Home Forums Fast 800 For anyone suffering from constipation Viewing 32 posts - 1 through 32 (of 32 total) I can thoroughly recommend using Potters Herbals Cleansing Herbs Tea from the health food shop. Thank you Spirit, it is a bit of a problem but I have read that fewer movements will happen on this diet and thats ok as long as there is no discomfort. Mine are smaller I have noticed. Apologies for the indelicate nature of my post Dont worry SOS, many of us have had/are having this. I eat plenty of veg and have flax seed etc. they dont really help. but the herb tea certainly does! Its ok for me as I work from home but dont recommend taking it the night before you have to get a busdrive anywhere I will be recommending this Digestic by Mimonis also as it is an herbal supplement that greatly helps me in my constipation problem. It just take few days of taking this supplement and I was totally relieved from constipation. I am hoping that I can help a lot here who is suffering from this problem. Thank you for the tips I am constipated have a movement every 4 days!!!! I have to say my poo is just like childhood pooand I going to be indelicate here too.smell is not as potent either. I guess less bacteria in the gut? I read somewhere its bacteria in the gut which produces the odours.. Right no more details .! Food tips for constipation. I eat 45g dried seedless prunes (for a snack) and include kumara (65g at lunch & 65g at dinner) every day as well as drinking plenty of water. Both these foods are chock full of fibre and low GI so great for blood sugar. Easy to work them into the overall 800 cal count. A little tip if you are not that fond of prunes keep them in the freezer. They dont freeze solid and the texture is nice. 23g of fibre every day will help with con Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Spikes: Causes, Symptoms, And Prevention

Blood Sugar Spikes: Causes, Symptoms, And Prevention

Diabetes is a disease that causes a person's blood sugar to become too high. This can lead to various complications. A person with diabetes must be careful to keep their blood sugar levels under control. Glucose comes from the food we eat. It is the main source of energy for the body. The pancreas secretes substances, including the hormone insulin, and enzymes. Enzymes break down food. Insulin makes it possible for body cells to absorb the glucose we consume. With diabetes, either the pancreas is unable to produce insulin to help the glucose get into the body cells, or the body becomes resistant to the insulin. The glucose stays in the blood instead. This is what raises blood sugar levels. High blood sugar is known as hyperglycemia. Contents of this article: Causes of blood sugar spikes People with diabetes have to be especially careful about keeping their blood sugar levels under control. There are several reasons why blood glucose levels may spike. These are: Sleep: A lack of sleep can be especially bad for people with diabetes, because it can also raise blood sugar levels. One study performed on Japanese men found that getting under 6.5 hours of sleep each night increases a person's risk for high blood glucose levels. Prioritizing healthy sleep and promoting sleep hygiene are good habits for everyone, but especially for people with diabetes. Stress: When under a lot of stress, the body produces hormones that make it difficult for insulin to do its job, so more glucose stays in the bloodstream. Finding a way to keep stress levels down, such as yoga or meditation, is essential for people with diabetes. Exercise: Having a sedentary lifestyle can cause blood sugar levels to go up. In addition, exercise that is too difficult can cause stress and blood glucose levels to ri Continue reading >>

Constipation And Diabetes

Constipation And Diabetes

Tweet Constipation affects most people from time to time and can vary from being infrequent to being a chronic, long term condition. A few different conditions and factors related to diabetes may increase the likelihood of experiencing constipation. Symptoms Signs of constipation include passing stools infrequently, and passing hard stools that can involve straining. The NHS notes that each person will tend to have slightly different bowel habits. Constipation can cause problems if it leads to: Bloating Stomach pains Discomfort or difficulty in passing stools Causes There are a number of possible causes of constipation. A common cause is a change in diet, particularly related to a reduction in intake of insoluble fibre. Other causes may include: Medications that may result in constipation include antidepressants, water tablets and calcium or iron supplements. It is common for women in the early stages of pregnancy to experience constipation. Treating constipation with diet Constipation can be eased through dietary changes. The NHS notes that many people in the UK don’t eat enough fibre. The recommendation is to eat between 18g and 30g of fibre a day. Insoluble fibre, as found in whole grains, vegetables and fruit, is particularly recommended for helping to move food through the gut. The NHS recommends adding a source of wheat bran to you diet to help make stools easier to pass. This is not recommended, however, for people with coeliac disease or a gluten allergy or intolerance. Keeping well hydrated will help to keep stools softer. Treating constipation with medication Taking laxatives may help in easing constipation. Different types of laxatives are available including bulk-forming laxatives, which help you to retain water in your stools, osmotic laxatives, which inc Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar Can Cause Constipation!?

High Blood Sugar Can Cause Constipation!?

Last Updated March 18, 2012 by Paup Jose High blood sugar can cause constipation!? home The Candida Forum Candida Questions High blood sugar can cause constipation!? This topic contains 3 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by Viewing 4 posts - 1 through 4 (of 4 total) I think everyone know my story now: I have sugar cravings all time cause Im addict to it. Well with help of internet, Able and some other forum people I arrive to a conclusion. Sugar is a drug and can cause depression, fatigue, bloating and constipation. I always think I have candida infection but my symptoms are not so bad. So today a search on internet and I found that article: Now I know why I have depression, fatigue and bloated stomach. I always related my symptoms with candida but maybe my problem is with high blood sugar cause I eat so much sugar. Well my actualy question is: If I dont have a candida problem my diet for down blood sugar should be the same? For how long? Thanks guys. If you dont have candida, you dont have to be as strict with your food choices, but you obviously need to avoid simple sugars and starches completely and choose foods that have a low GI. This means you can enjoy things like cheese, butter, meat, and low-GI fruits and grains. Basically, as long as the food is low in carbohydrate and doesnt contain added sugar, itll be suitable for overcoming a sugar addiction. Obviously, constantly eating animal products and other unhealthy foods will damage you in other ways though. It should only take something like a few months to reverse insulin resistance (assuming theres no damage to any organs), and exercising regularly will speed up the process. This should be long enough to work out a diet youd like to stick to 95% of the time on a permanent basis. An occasional treat w Continue reading >>

Constipation And High Blood Sugar

Constipation And High Blood Sugar

Most people experience constipation at some point in their life. They make a note to eat more fiber and expect everything to go back to normal in a day or two. Luckily, for the better percentage of those inflicted, this method works. Not so lucky are the ones who are battling something much more serious than the occasional bout of constipation. Constipation is a condition that can be very difficult to find the originating cause. There are so many different causes, from medicines to lifestyle changes, that pin-pointing the true cause of the constipation can be like finding a needle in a haystack. google_ad_layout="in-article";google_ad_format="482x121";google_ad_client="ca-pub-0933858739464409";google_ad_slot="4476998658";google_adsbygoogle_status="done";google_ad_width=482;google_ad_height=121;google_ad_resizable=true;google_override_format=1;google_responsive_auto_format=11;google_loader_features_used=128;google_ad_modifications={"plle":true,"eids":["21061122","191880502"],"loeids":[]};google_loader_used="aa";google_reactive_tag_first=false;google_ad_unit_key="462139141";google_ad_dom_fingerprint="194122047";google_sailm=false;google_unique_id=2;google_async_iframe_id="aswift_1";google_start_time=1514564383425;google_pub_vars="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 Continue reading >>

Constipation And Diarrhea From Diabetes

Constipation And Diarrhea From Diabetes

Many people know diabetes can raise their odds of having heart disease and stroke. But it can affect your digestive tract, too. Digestion begins the minute you take a bite of food and ends a day or two later with a trip to the bathroom. The whole process is handled by the same part of your nervous system that controls other body functions that happen automatically, like your heartbeat and breathing. But over time, high blood sugar can damage the tiny blood vessels and nerves in your body, including your digestive system. A speed-up or slow-down of the process in your intestines could result in diarrhea or constipation. Diabetes medications, certain foods, and related illnesses can cause diarrhea, too. Nerve Damage About 60% to 70% of people with diabetes have some form of nerve damage, or diabetic neuropathy. It can develop at any time, but the longer you have diabetes, the more likely it is. When diabetes damages the nerves in your stomach and intestines, they may not be able to move food through normally. Most often, this causes constipation, but you can also get alternating bouts of constipation and diarrhea, especially at night. Misfiring nerves may not contract the muscles that mix and move the stuff in your intestines, so everything slows down. Your colon absorbs more moisture from the waste, which makes your poop harder -- and harder to pass. Constipation that lasts a long time can cause other health problems, such as fecal impaction, a hard lump of poop that blocks your rectum so nothing can get out. Fluid that lingers in your small intestine too long can allow too much bacteria to grow. This could lead to bloating, belly pain, and diarrhea. Nerve damage in your large intestine may let fluids move through too fast, or cause problems with absorbing and releasing Continue reading >>

Ask The Diabetes Team

Ask The Diabetes Team

Question: From Santa Clarita, California, USA: My 13-year-old niece was diagnosed with type 1 three years ago. She has always had a problem with constipation, even before being diagnosed. Lately, I have read a lot of information that claims clearing up constipation can help lower glucose levels. Her glucose levels are frequently high, over 200 mg/dl [11.1 mmol/L]. And, her latest A1c was 10.3. The doctor did say we should try and keep the constipation under control but said constipation has nothing to do with her glucose levels. Is there a link between being constipated and high glucose levels? Will keeping her constipation under control help lower her levels? Answer: These blood glucose levels and A1c levels are extremely high and very dangerous. There is a risk of diabetic ketoacidosis and coma as well as long term risks increased for blindness, cataracts, kidney failure, high blood pressure, early heart attack, nerve damage, etc. If the constipation is caused by the nerves to the intestines not being coordinated, this can occur, but is somewhat rare in children and teenagers. So, I would look for other cause of the constipation. Almost all causes in young people are related to amount of fiber intake. Increasing the bran, vegetable and fruit fiber helps about 90% of the time. If not better and this is being done faithfully, then bowel cleanout procedures and tracking with x-rays would let one know this. Supplementing with psyllium, sennokot, Miralax or POEG, mineral oils, or flaxseed all should work. If the bowel continues to retain stool, then consultation with a gastroenterologist is usually required before going to more severe cleanouts such as oil retention enemas and Fleet enemas. The key to all of this is increasing the fluid intake, increasing the fiber intake Continue reading >>

Diabetes Case Study: A New Perspective On Type 1 And Type 2

Diabetes Case Study: A New Perspective On Type 1 And Type 2

< PREV HOME NEXT > The Cause of Hyperglycemia -- Elevated Blood Glucose On average, I monitor my blood glucose 6-10 times a day and I have through careful observation over time concluded that these factors cause blood glucose concentration to increase, in order of strength: Infections (especially bacterial) -- They feed on sugar in the digestive system and on blood glucose, they increase blood glucose concentrations to very high levels. Elevated and fluctuating blood glucose will feed infections. Carbohydrates -- The strong extended-release version of sugar which increase blood glucose. Sugars -- Potent but short lived. They increase blood glucose. Lactose (sugar from dairy) -- The medium strength extended-release version of sugar. It increases blood glucose. Over consumption -- Food intakes build up in the digestive system, which continually releases glucose into the blood stream. Blood glucose increases. Bowel retention -- because one is not allowed or otherwise unable to use the restroom (WC). Creates a condition similar to over consumption. This may increase blood glucose. Constipation -- Creates a condition similar to over consumption. This can be corrected by adding more fiber to the diet (laxative effect.) Glucagons -- A hormone that is released from the alpha cells of the pancreas into the blood stream, which increases blood glucose concentration. Stress -- Bad stress leads to bowel retention, constipation, and glucagon release. Good stress will decrease blood glucose concentration. Anger -- Causes glucagon release. Fear -- Causes glucagon release. Anxiety -- Causes bowel retention, which increases blood glucose concentration and glucagon release. Other negative thoughts or feelings -- Cause glucagon release. The dawn effect -- Blood glucose concentration decrea Continue reading >>

When Constipation Isn’t About Fiber

When Constipation Isn’t About Fiber

(Advance warning: this is a detailed discussion of bowel movements. There’s no way to be accurate and precise about this without being a little bit gross. Don’t read it over lunch.) If you asked 10 people on the street what dietary changes you should make to treat constipation, 9 of them would probably say “fiber” and the last one would say “fiber and water.” The reason fiber helps some people is because it changes the feces in the colon. Soluble fiber forms a gel when it combines with water, which makes feces softer and slipperier, so they’re easier to pass. Fiber also adds bulk, which can be helpful – although it isn’t necessarily better to produce bulkier feces just because you can. Fiber and osmotic laxatives can be helpful for constipation if the constipation was caused by hard or dry feces in the first place, which it sometimes is. (Although fiber can also make constipation worse if it causes gut flora problems). But there’s actually a completely unrelated problem that can cause constipation, and that doesn’t respond well to fiber: slow-transit constipation. Slow-transit constipation means that there’s something going wrong with the muscle contractions in the colon that actually push feces out of your body. It’s not a problem with the feces themselves, so making the feces more slippery or soft won’t necessarily help. Slow-transit constipation typically doesn’t respond to laxatives or fiber supplements. Slow-transit constipation is not very common. If you have IBS-C, or if your constipation responds to fiber and water, you probably have normal-transit constipation caused by hard/dry feces, not slow-transit constipation. But there’s a very specific reason why slow-transit constipation might be interesting to Paleo people: it’s a com Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Constipation: What’s The Connection?

Diabetes And Constipation: What’s The Connection?

Constipation is a common complication in people with diabetes. Living with diabetes means paying careful attention to all systems of your body. Some complications of diabetes are easily avoided or managed with proper blood sugar control. Depending on the type of diabetes, medication may be required to manage blood sugars and to protect the heart, kidney, brain, and other organs affected by diabetes. When it comes to managing constipation, though, diet and lifestyle changes may not be enough. Here’s what to know about why is occurs more often in people with diabetes and what you can do about it. Constipation can be defined as having fewer than three regular bowel movements each week. It can also be defined as unsatisfactory bowel movements with stools that are infrequent and difficult to pass. It can be unpleasant and even painful. A recent study found that constipation is more common in people with diabetes. It’s estimated that around 60 percent of people with long-standing diabetes deal with constipation. Damage to the nervous system is a known long-term complication of diabetes. High blood sugar levels from type 1 and type 2 diabetes can lead to diabetic neuropathy, or nerve damage. Damage to the nerves controlling the digestive tract can lead to constipation, diarrhea, and incontinence. Poor blood sugar control over a long period of time may increase the likelihood and frequency of constipation. In addition to lifestyle choices and neuropathy, people with diabetes sometimes take medications that can slow gut mobility and cause constipation. Talk to your doctor about the side effects of any medications you take. Read more: 6 natural constipation remedies » If you feel stopped up from time to time, you’re not alone. Recent research indicates that constipation is Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Constipation: Whats The Connection?

Diabetes And Constipation: Whats The Connection?

Treatment strategies for constipation in case of diabetes will depend upon the cause of the condition. If the condition is caused by a medication or a supplement you are taking, your doctor will stop that medication or supplement for the time being. Treatment will also depend upon how bad your constipation is and how long have you been constipated. Your doctor may suggest over-the-counter medications like laxatives to be taken for a short time. Laxatives are substances that help relieve constipation by loosening the stools or inducing bowel movement. Laxatives are available in a variety of forms (tablet, granules, powder, liquid.) The most common types of laxatives that may provide relief fromdiabetic constipation are: Stool Softeners (soften stools to ease their passage) Lubricant laxatives (liquid petrolatum, lubricates the insides of the digestive tract to ease passage of stools) Bulk-forming laxatives like flax seeds and Psyllium husk bulk up stools to induce a bowel movement) Stimulant laxatives (aloe, cascara, senna, bisacodyl, castor oil) Suppositories (docusate, bisacodyl, sodium phosphate) Laxatives should be used strictly under medical supervision. Stimulant laxatives may have a negative effect on the colon (large intestine.) They can actually make your constipation worse if taken for a long time. Laxative abuse can also lead to other severe health problems. Simple dietary practices like increasing your fiber intake, drinking more water and getting some amount of physical exercise daily can help make your stool normal and prevent constipation. Effective management of blood sugar can help prevent neuropathies, which in turn can prevent constipation and other nerve-related health complications. Avoid eating foods like cheese, chips (and other starchy foods), ic Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Constipation, A Secondary Factor

Diabetes And Constipation, A Secondary Factor

You may be shy to talk about it, but the state of affairs with your bowel can provide important clues to your health. Lets face it- diabetes and constipation have a symbiotic relationship. Bowel dysfunctions can erupt from a number of health problems. Regardless of the cause, there are mechanical issues in the intestine resulting in bowel emptying issues. My doctor says its “normal”- Do you believe yourself or your doctor? Here’s what I think… You are the one sitting on the toilet and dealing with stomach aches. You are the one parenting to a child who isn’t feeling well. I think you are the boss in this department. If you are plunging the toilet regularly, hearing complaints about tummy aches from your child, see a decreased appetite, painful bowel movements, and a bloated tummy these are signs that something isn’t right down yonder. Most adults may not want to face the music but they wouldn’t be able to stand the pain without seeking treatment options either. Stomach aches, constipation, diarrhea and other bothersome bowel issues are not “normal”. If a pediatrician tells you not to worry about your child’s continued complaints of stomach aches- you may want to seek another opinion. Just because it is a child, doesn’t mean their complaints lack validity. Just to complicate matters, stomach complaints are very subjective. By this I mean they are open for interpretation. It’s not like a sore throat that we can look at and swab for strep throat. Many things can cause stomach upset and complaints. A good practitioner will start with simple suggestions and step them up accordingly, which is wonderful. Keep in mind that 1 in 10 people with type 1 diabetes has celiac disease. Celiac disease has been getting a lot of press in the past few years but not Continue reading >>

More in blood sugar