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Does Blood Sugar Increase With Infection

Can Uti Cause An Increase In Blood Sugar Levels In A Non-diabetic Person?

Can Uti Cause An Increase In Blood Sugar Levels In A Non-diabetic Person?

No, he is a diabetic, which very often goes undetected for many years, until because of having another medical condition blood tests are done and diabetes is detected. It is rather odd that a male would have recurrent UTIs. Has anatomic abnormalities e.g. an obstructive prostate, kidney/bladder stones, anatomical variants been ruled out by imagining studies? Continue reading >>

Elevated Blood Sugars Increase Risks For Infections

Elevated Blood Sugars Increase Risks For Infections

Elevated blood glucose levels can lead to an assortment of health problems, one of which is damage to cells of the immune system. The cells of the immune system circulate through the body via the lymph and blood vessels, often settling in tissues to await an encounter with an infectious agent. When immune cells come in contact with germs, they become activated and notify other immune cells to detect and destroy the infectious agent. Elevated blood sugars weaken the immune system Glucose exhausts immune cells. Glucose binds proteins on the surface of cells through a mechanism called glycosylation. Extra glucose in the blood of those with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes can result in glycosylated immune cells. These immune cells are activated in the absence of an infection and become exhausted and desensitized. Glycosylated immune cells are thus unable to respond effectively to infection and the immune system is weakened as a result. Glucose can be food for germs. The excess circulating glucose in the body can act as food for invading germs. For example, people with diabetes are particularly susceptible to oral thrush, which is an overgrowth of the fungus candida in the mouth. Although candida is naturally present in the mouth, it can become overgrown as it feeds on excess glucose in the saliva of people with type 2 diabetes. Clinical research has demonstrated that people with diabetes have an elevated risk of contracting certain infections. Salmonellosis. The bacteria Salmonella is often contracted by eating uncooked poultry and eggs, resulting in an infection called salmonellosis. People with diabetes are 3 times more likely to get this infection than those with normal insulin resistance. Listeriosis. The bacteria Listeria monocytogenes causes this infection, which can be Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia

Hyperglycemia

Hyperglycemia means high blood sugar. It is the primary symptom of diabetes. Unlike its opposite, hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia is not immediately life-threatening. This doesn't mean it's not dangerous, though. For "how high is high", see blood glucose levels, and also the long-term symptoms discussion at the end of this page. Increasing physical activity can mean lowering blood sugar levels for some pets and people with this disease. It can also raise them; much depends on individual reaction and knowing how you or your pet responds. For most with diabetes, excitement or stress can cause temporary hyperglycemia. There are others who can find themselves going toward hypoglycemia because of it. Cats in general, with or without diabetes, appear to be prone to hyperglycemia. This 1954 Lilly study[1] was an early one with regard to the insulin/hypoglycemia countering hormone glucagon. Cats were selected because of their sensitivity to high blood sugar and their well-known responses to it. It should be remembered that back in 1954, most of the work which had been done with regard to improving insulins had dealt with various ways to extend their activity. At the time this study was done, highly purified insulin was still a long way off, so it was possible to have insulin which might contain some glucagon via the extraction process. Some unexpected causes of hyperglycemia are discussed in detail under obstacles to regulation An untreated diabetic suffers primarily from lack of insulin to let nourishment into the cells, and therefore is starving to death. But hyperglycemia can kill faster than starvation; it's not unusual for one of the effects below, or diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) brought on by the combination, to be the actual fatal blow. Hyperglycemia and glycosuria are the sy Continue reading >>

Infections And Blood Glucose

Infections And Blood Glucose

Will an infection cause the blood glucose level to decrease? Answer During illness and infection, most people with diabetes find their blood glucose concentration tends to rise rather than fall. There may be readings of heavy sugar in the urine or blood. It is important your normal treatment regimen is continued at such times and that your diet continues as normal whenever possible. Very high blood glucose levels should be reported to your doctor or diabetes nurse in case treatment needs to be altered during an illness. Yours sincerely The NetDoctor Medical Team Other Qs & As Last updated 03.04.2011 Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar Levels Increase Infection Risk From General Surgery

High Blood Sugar Levels Increase Infection Risk From General Surgery

Reducing high blood glucose might bring down odds of surgical site infection, researchers say Please note: This article was published more than one year ago. The facts and conclusions presented may have since changed and may no longer be accurate. And "More information" links may no longer work. Questions about personal health should always be referred to a physician or other health care professional. HealthDay Reporter TUESDAY, Sept. 21, 2010 (HealthDay News) -- High blood sugar levels can increase the risk of surgical site infections in patients having general surgery, researchers report. Doctors have long been aware that people with diabetes are more prone to surgical infections, and the relationship between high blood sugar and increased risk of infection after surgery is well known in heart and intensive care unit surgery, where blood sugar is carefully monitored. But this appears to be the first study to quantify the risk after general surgery, noted the study authors, from Albany Medical College in New York. "We wanted to find out how much increased glucose in your blood had a role in infection in general surgery," said lead researcher Ashar Ata, from the College's Department of Surgery. "Surprisingly, we did find that by the time your glucose is higher than 140 milligrams per deciliter, the infection went from 1.8 percent to almost 10 percent." When blood sugar levels reach that point, medical staff should intervene to control them, Ata said, adding, "We found the higher the blood glucose, starting at about 110 milligrams per deciliter, the more likely you are to have an infection." The report is published in the September issue of the Archives of Surgery. The procedures Ata's group looked at included appendectomy, colon surgery, hemorrhoid removal and gallbladd Continue reading >>

Must Read Articles Related To High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

Must Read Articles Related To High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

A A A High Blood Sugar (Hyperglycemia) Whenever the glucose (sugar) level in one's blood rises high temporarily, this condition is known as hyperglycemia. The opposite condition, low blood sugar, is called hypoglycemia. Glucose comes from most foods, and the body uses other chemicals to create glucose in the liver and muscles. The blood carries glucose (blood sugar) to all the cells in the body. To carry glucose into the cells as an energy supply, cells need help from insulin. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas, an organ near the stomach. The pancreas releases insulin into the blood, based upon the blood sugar level. Insulin helps move glucose from digested food into cells. Sometimes, the body stops making insulin (as in type 1 diabetes), or the insulin does not work properly (as in type 2 diabetes). In diabetic patients, glucose does not enter the cells sufficiently, thus staying in the blood and creating high blood sugar levels. Blood sugar levels can be measured in seconds by using a blood glucose meter, also known as a glucometer. A tiny drop of blood from the finger or forearm is placed on a test strip and inserted into the glucometer. The blood sugar (or glucose) level is displayed digitally within seconds. Blood glucose levels vary widely throughout the day and night in people with diabetes. Ideally, blood glucose levels range from 90 to 130 mg/dL before meals, and below 180 mg/dL within 1 to 2 hours after a meal. Adolescents and adults with diabetes strive to keep their blood sugar levels within a controlled range, usually 80-150 mg/dL before meals. Doctors and diabetes health educators guide each patient to determine their optimal range of blood glucose control. When blood sugar levels remain high for several hours, dehydration and more serious complicat Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus And Infectious Diseases: Controlling Chronic Hyperglycemia

Diabetes Mellitus And Infectious Diseases: Controlling Chronic Hyperglycemia

As the incidence of diabetes mellitus continues to rise, common focus areas for diabetes control are blood glucose levels, diet, and exercise. Addressing and controlling these factors as well as other factors associated with diabetes are essential for a better quality of life; however, awareness of an increased risk of infections is also warranted in diabetes patients with chronic hyperglycemia. The immune system is comprised of two subcategories: innate immunity and adaptive immunity. Innate immunity, the first line of defense, is activated when a pathogen initially presents itself. This portion of immunity is inherited at birth and is not specific in its mechanism of defense. In addition, it serves the overall immune system by alerting specific cells of pathogen invasion to activate the adaptive immune system. The innate immune system has physical and chemical mechanisms of response. These include but are not limited to sneezing, coughing, sweating, maintenance of normal body temperature, and gram-positive normal flora on the skin. Adaptive immunity is a very specific aspect of a properly functioning immune system that provides protection against previous infections experienced by the host. These responses are mediated by lymphocytes, which consist of natural killer (NK) cells, B cells and T cells. Vaccinations and exposure to pathogens benefit the adaptive immune system by establishing immunologic memory. In the event of another attack by the same foreign organism, the adaptive immune system is able to provide a more efficient response. Complications of Chronic Hyperglycemia Patients with uncontrolled diabetes are considered immunosuppressed due to the negative effects of elevated blood sugars on the immune system. Hyperglycemia impairs overall immunity through diffe Continue reading >>

High Blood Glucose: What It Means And How To Treat It

High Blood Glucose: What It Means And How To Treat It

What is high blood glucose? People who do not have diabetes typically have fasting plasma blood glucose levels that run under 100 mg/dl. Your physician will define for you what your target blood glucose should be — identifying a blood glucose target that is as close to normal as possible that you can safely achieve given your overall medical health. In general, high blood glucose, also called 'hyperglycemia', is considered "high" when it is 160 mg/dl or above your individual blood glucose target. Be sure to ask your healthcare provider what he or she thinks is a safe target for you for blood glucose before and after meals. If your blood glucose runs high for long periods of time, this can pose significant problems for you long-term — increased risk of complications, such as eye disease, kidney disease, heart attacks and strokes and more. High blood glucose can pose health problems in the short-term as well. Your treatment plan may need adjustment if the blood glucose stays over 180 mg/dl for 3 days in a row. It is important to aim to keep your blood glucose under control, and treat hyperglycemia when it occurs. What are the symptoms of high blood glucose? Increased thirst Increased urination Dry mouth or skin Tiredness or fatigue Blurred vision More frequent infections Slow healing cuts and sores Unexplained weight loss What causes high blood glucose? Too much food Too little exercise or physical activity Skipped or not enough diabetes pills or insulin Insulin that has spoiled after being exposed to extreme heat or freezing cold Stress, illness, infection, injury or surgery A blood glucose meter that is not reading accurately What should you do for high blood glucose? Be sure to drink plenty of water. It is recommended to drink a minimum of 8 glasses each day. If yo Continue reading >>

Can Infection Raise Blood Sugar Levels In Nondiabetics?

Can Infection Raise Blood Sugar Levels In Nondiabetics?

Even if you do not have diabetes, you can experience drops and spikes in blood sugar levels for many reasons. If your blood sugar level gets too high or too low, you might develop many symptoms and/or health problems. Stress, poor diet, illness and infections can all cause your blood sugar level to change, and if you notice the warning signs, it is important to talk to your physician about the best treatment approach. Video of the Day After a meal, your body breaks food down into glucose either for immediate use, or else it's stored for later use. The hormone insulin, as well as other chemicals, regulate how much glucose is in your system. If the level of glucose in your bloodstream gets too high, many complications can result. A general goal for everyone is to keep your blood sugar levels no higher than 100 mg/dL, says MedlinePlus. A blood sugar level higher than this can indicate not just diabetes, but also some forms of cancer, Cushing syndrome, an imbalance of various hormones, thyroid disorders or it might be the body's reaction to stress, trauma or an infection. Infections and Blood Glucose Levels When your body is under mental or physical stress, such as when fighting off an infection, hormones such as cortisol are released to help your body cope. The hormones that are released to fight off the infection might have the side effect of raising your blood sugar levels, so your body has the energy it needs to get better. This effect can happen to both diabetics and nondiabetics. If you have an infection and are concerned about your blood sugar levels, it is important to know the warning signs of nondiabetic hyperglycemia, which are the same symptoms that occur in diabetics: hunger, sweating, shakiness, dizziness, lightheadedness, thirst, sleepiness, confusion, diffic Continue reading >>

What You Need To Know About Utis

What You Need To Know About Utis

Burning when you urinate. A frequent urge to urinate. Pain in your back or abdomen. Do any of these symptoms sound familiar? These are all symptoms of a urinary tract infection, or UTI, for short. Studies show that people with Type 2 diabetes have a greater risk of getting a UTI than people without diabetes. Despite the fact that UTIs are all too common and downright annoying, they can also lead to more serious situations if they’re not caught and treated. What is a UTI, anyway? A UTI is an infection in your urinary tract. Your urinary tract includes your kidneys, bladder, ureters, urethra, and, in men, prostate. Most UTIs occur in your bladder, the organ that stores your urine. What causes a UTI? A UTI is caused by bacteria, usually from the bowels. Normally, the urinary tract system has safeguards to protect against infection. For example, the ureters, which are the tubes that carry urine from the kidneys to the bladder, have one-way valves to prevent urine from backing up into the kidneys. The process of emptying your bladder (called urination) also helps to flush out bacteria and other microbes. And a healthy immune system helps protect against infection, as well. Why are UTIs more common in people with diabetes? UTIs are the second most common type of infection. Women are 10 times more likely to get a UTI than men because of their anatomy. In fact, more than 50% of women will have a UTI at some point in their lives. If you’re a woman with Type 2 diabetes, your risk may be even higher, according to two recent studies. In one study, 9% of the subjects with diabetes had UTIs compared with 6% of those without diabetes. And the second study showed that people with diabetes had a 60% higher risk of getting a UTI compared to those without diabetes. Why are people with Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar Can Increase Post-surgery Wound Complications

High Blood Sugar Can Increase Post-surgery Wound Complications

High blood glucose levels can lead to wound infection. Diabetes is a disease that can not only lead to serious issues like amputation, but can also affect the way your body handles the wound healing process. Researchers have recently analyzed how maintaining a high blood sugar level could eventually lead to an increase in wound complications after undergoing a surgical procedure. Members of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons analyzed the rates of 79 patients who had endured wound-related complications after receiving surgery to close up chronic wounds. The doctors measured the blood glucose levels of the patients five days leading up to the medical procedure as well as five days after, and extensively tested the subjects for measurements of hemoglobin A1c, which is a primary indicator of long-term diabetes control in the body. High levels of blood glucose as well as diabetes control are the main risk factors that can influence an occurrence of wound infection, additional surgery and wound dehiscence, which is when a wound is re-opened after already receiving surgery to close it. Blood glucose levels that are considered higher than average are measured at 200 milligrams per deciliter or greater. The researchers found that 44 percent of the patients who exhibited high blood glucose levels either before or after surgery underwent experiences of wound dehiscence, while only 19 percent of diabetic patients who had normal blood glucose levels received any type of wound complication. The records of those who had high hemoglobin A1c levels, which are primary indicators of poor diabetes control, also showed significant spikes in the rates of wound infection or re-opening occurring. Dr. Christopher Attinger, a professor at Georgetown University as well as one of the lead st Continue reading >>

Relationship Between Hyperglycemia And Infection In Critically Ill Patients.

Relationship Between Hyperglycemia And Infection In Critically Ill Patients.

Abstract Hyperglycemia is a common problem encountered in hospitalized patients, especially in critically ill patients and those with diabetes mellitus. Uncontrolled hyperglycemia may be associated with complications such as fluid and electrolyte disturbances and increased infection risk. Studies have demonstrated impairment of host defenses, including decreased polymorphonuclear leukocyte mobilization, chemotaxis, and phagocytic activity related to hyperglycemia. Until 2001, hyperglycemia (blood glucose concentrations up to 220 mg/dl) had been tolerated in critically ill patients not only because high blood glucose concentrations were believed to be a normal physiologic reaction in stressed patients and excess glucose is necessary to support the energy needs of glucose-dependent organs, but also because the true significance of short-term hyperglycemia was not known. Recent clinical data show that the use of intensive insulin therapy to maintain tight blood glucose concentrations between 80 and 110 mg/dl decreases morbidity and mortality in critically ill surgical patients. Intensive insulin therapy minimizes derangements in normal host defense mechanisms and modulates release of inflammatory mediators. The principal benefit of intensive insulin therapy is a decrease in infection-related complications and mortality. Further research will define which patient populations will benefit most from intensive insulin therapy and firmly establish the blood glucose concentration at which benefits will be realized. Continue reading >>

Sepsis And Diabetes

Sepsis And Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic (life-long) autoimmune disease that has a significant impact on your life. Having diabetes means you must work to control your blood glucose (sugar) levels to be sure that they don’t get too high or too low. The amount of glucose in your blood is important. Your body needs glucose for energy, but too much of it can destroy body tissues and too little can starve your body of nutrients. People who have diabetes are also at risk of developing wounds and sores that don’t heal well. While the wounds are present, they are at high risk of developing infection. And, again because of the diabetes, the infections can get severe quickly. When infection overwhelms the body, the body can respond by developing sepsis and going into septic shock. Sometimes incorrectly called blood poisoning, sepsis is the body’s often deadly response to infection. Sepsis kills and disables millions and requires early suspicion and rapid treatment for survival. Sepsis and septic shock can result from an infection anywhere in the body, such as pneumonia, influenza, or urinary tract infections. Worldwide, one-third of people who develop sepsis die. Many who do survive are left with life-changing effects, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), chronic pain and fatigue, organ dysfunction (organs don’t work properly) and/or amputations. What is diabetes? Your pancreas is a small organ (about 6” by 1.5”) that is part of your digestive system. It is connected to your small intestine and it lies just below your stomach towards the back. Your pancreas has a few roles, one is to help digest the food you eat and another is to secrete (send out) insulin, which stimulates your cells to use the glucose in the food and drink you consume. When a person has diabetes, the pancre Continue reading >>

Cellulitis And Diabetes – What Are The Risks?

Cellulitis And Diabetes – What Are The Risks?

During this week’s diabetes management training, I instructed a 62 year old male who has had type 2 diabetes for over 15 years and was never given the skills of diabetes education. He has always worked as a cab driver and did not have health insurance until the recent introduction of ACA insurance. Since receiving insurance, he has attended some of his appointments and taken 2 pills to help control blood sugars. Unfortunately, he still had very little understanding about diabetes and how to care for himself. He was not testing his sugars with a glucose meter and had no idea what his readings were. He recently noticed some swelling and redness around his left shin and promptly went to the podiatrist for a consultation. He was told he had poor circulation and to wear support hose daily; he found putting the stockings on nearly impossible since he weighed over 350 pounds and could barely reach his lower legs. He became frustrated, stopped wearing them and just ignored the problem. Luckily, during our interview, we assess skin integrity and look for open wounds. He explained how he originally scratched his lower leg while flaking off a patch of dry skin. It was now about a month since his original scratch which he thought would amount to nothing. His A1C was 9.5% (he did not understand what that meant) and his fasting sugar that morning was 340 mg/dl. I explained that elevated blood sugars can increase the risk of skin infection and that the infection could be raising his blood sugars. We also reviewed that reduced blood flow from vascular problems (due to his untreated diabetes over the years) could increase the risk of infection. After checking his leg, I immediately phoned his primary care physician who suggested he come right in. He was diagnosed with cellulitis which Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Affects Wound Healing

How Diabetes Affects Wound Healing

Diabetes is a condition in which the body does not effectively use sugar. It is estimated that there are nearly 18 million Americans with diabetes, and approximately 15 percent of diabetics will develop a foot ulcer at some point. Foot ulcers are the most common wounds for this patient population. Wound healing can be slowed when the patient is diabetic. An important point to remember about a diabetic patient wound is that it heals slowly and can worsen rapidly, so requires close monitoring. There are several factors that influence wound healing in a diabetic patient, and may include: Blood Glucose Levels It all starts here. An elevated blood sugar level stiffens the arteries and causes narrowing of the blood vessels. The effects of this are far-reaching and include the origin of wounds as well as risk factors to proper wound healing. Poor Circulation Narrowed blood vessels lead to decreased blood flow and oxygen to a wound. An elevated blood sugar level decreases the function of red blood cells that carry nutrients to the tissue. This lowers the efficiency of the white blood cells that fight infection. Without sufficient nutrients and oxygen, a wound heals slowly. Diabetic Neuropathy When blood glucose levels are uncontrolled, nerves in the body are affected and patients can develop a loss of sensation. This is called diabetic neuropathy. When there is a loss of sensation, patients cannot feel a developing blister, infection or surgical wound problem. Because a diabetic patient may not be able to feel a change in the status of a wound or the actual wound, the severity can progress and there may be complications with healing. Immune System Deficiency Diabetes lowers the efficiency of the immune system, the body's defense system against infection. A high glucose level ca Continue reading >>

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