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Do You Have To Fast For A Glucose Test When Pregnant?

Did You Fast For The Glucose Test?

Did You Fast For The Glucose Test?

My doctor is not having me fast before the one hour glucose test. My appt is at 3pm so I would have been eating all day. I'm afraid that's going to mess up my results. Anyone else NOT fast and still have normal glucose levels? I didn't fast before my bloods were taken, and my results came back fine. :) I wasn't told to fast before the one hour glucose test, but I had to for the three hour. I don't think they want you to fast to get accurate results, but don't eat sugary things right before. I think of your don't follow instructions you risk PASSING when you might have GD. Which means you might be risking LO health. I don't think it is a 12 hour fast, check with your dr or call the center that is doing the test. They take your blood and give you sugary drink and test again after an hour... Insult to injury , if you FAIL they make you do it again with a three hour test. I heard that one sucks. Going today for my 1hr glucose test and was told not to fast I had mine last week and doc told me just water up to 2 hrs before. How many weeks pregnant when you get this test? The 3 hour one was fasting but not the initial 1 hr. I think they told asked me if I was fasting when I did it last pregnancy and I said no, I thought I didn't have to. They said you don't have to fast but it can be more accurate. That being said, I did have to go back and do the 3 hr but it was ok. It's hard to fast while pregnant, I think that's why they say it's ok to go nonfasting. I would just avoid high sugar items. I've had diabetes since I was four so this is one test that I don't have to do, but let me confirm that you do NOT have to fast for this one. If you have GD, the levels that you're looking at will be elevated regardless of whether you just ate or not. Even though my diabetes is controlled, Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

What Is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes sometimes develops when a woman is pregnant. It’s when the blood glucose level (blood sugar level) of the mother goes too high during pregnancy. Having an elevated blood glucose level during pregnancy can cause problems for your baby—if it’s left untreated. Fortunately, doctors are vigilant about checking for gestational diabetes so that it can be identified and effectively managed. A pro-active treatment plan helps you have a good pregnancy and protects the health of your baby. Gestational Diabetes Symptoms Gestational diabetes doesn’t often cause noticeable symptoms for the mother. Other types of diabetes (eg, type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes) do cause symptoms such as increased thirst, but that is hardly ever noticed in gestational diabetes. Because there aren’t often symptoms, it’s very important to be tested for a high blood glucose level when you’re pregnant. (Your doctor will most likely test you for gestational diabetes sometime between the 24th and 28th week. You can learn more about the diagnostic process here.) Then your doctor will know if you need to be treated for gestational diabetes. Gestational Diabetes Causes and Risk Factors Gestational diabetes develops when your body isn’t able to produce enough of the hormone insulin during pregnancy. Insulin is necessary to transport glucose—what your body uses for energy—into the cells. Without enough insulin, you can build up too much glucose in your blood, leading to a higher-than-normal blood glucose level and perhaps gestational diabetes. The elevated blood glucose level in gestational diabetes is caused by hormones released by the placenta during pregnancy. The placenta produces a hormone called the human placental lactogen (HPL), also Continue reading >>

What To Eat Before Getting A Glucose Tolerance Test

What To Eat Before Getting A Glucose Tolerance Test

I had mine done this week, and the doctor told me I could eat an egg omelet, bacon, sausage, milk, water. Things I had to avoid: Juices, Fruits, Breads, Oatmeal, Cereals... I ended up having 2 eggs, with a piece of fat free american cheese, 3 small pieces of canadian bacon, and a glass of milk. I went yesterday for the results and passed! So that breakfast didn't seem to interefere with the test. If you need to ask the doctor. Mine was great and gave me a whole sheet of what to do/not do before. Hope that helps. Anybody who tells you to fast before your 1 hour glucose test is giving you false information. Most lab techs will ask you if you ate anything and what you ate before administering the test. Doing the 1 hour test on an empty stomach will give a false result, and most likely make you sick! As far as what to eat, I always tell my patients to eat a high protein breakfast, such as eggs, bacon, sausage and milk. Stay away from juice, fruit, breads, and cereals. Just make sure the bacon and/or sausage isn't maple. Your best bet is to check the nutrition info on the packaging and look at the sugar and carb content!! Good luck! FYI, you do have to fast for the 3 hour test, but that is only necessary if the 1 hour is failed! Unfortunately, my doc gave me the instructions to "not fast, eat as you normally would". I had a glass of milk and one slice of whole wheat toast with peanut butter, and my test came back with a slightly elevated glucose level, so I had to take the 3 hr glucose tolerance test. The techs at the lab where I had the 3 hr test done told me the food I ate would have been enough for me to fail the 1st test. My Advice: DO NOT EAT before the 1 hr test! The 3 hr test was tolerable, but a big waste of time and money! Instead of the 50 gram sugar drin Continue reading >>

Glucose Tolerance Test

Glucose Tolerance Test

What is a glucose tolerance test? A glucose tolerance test, also called an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), checks how your body regulates your sugar levels. Sugar, or glucose, is found in many of the foods you eat. The test is used to diagnose diabetes in pregnancy (gestational diabetes) and is offered to all pregnant women. Why might I need to have the test? The test will detect whether or not you have gestational diabetes. Globally, up to 14 per cent of pregnant women develop gestational diabetes however experts believe that figure is closer to 7 per cent in Australia. Gestational diabetes is caused by your pancreas failing to produce enough of the hormone insulin. Insulin regulates the amount of sugar in your blood and enables your body to store sugar that isn't immediately needed for energy. Your body has to produce extra insulin to meet your baby's needs during pregnancy, especially from about five months, when he is growing rapidly. If your body isn't able to keep up, you may develop gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes doesn't always show obvious signs, which is why testing is important. If gestational diabetes isn't recognised and treated it may put you and your baby at risk of complications. The main complication of too much sugar in your blood is that your baby may grow large, which may make a vaginal birth more difficult. Am I at risk of developing gestational diabetes? You're more likely to develop gestational diabetes if: Your body mass index (BMI) is 30 or above. You are over 35 years of age You have previously given birth to a large baby weighing 4.5kg or more. You have had gestational diabetes before. You have a parent, sibling or child with diabetes. You have a family origin with a higher prevalence of diabetes, for example, if you're of South Continue reading >>

One Hour Glucose Test Instructions

One Hour Glucose Test Instructions

Your one hour glucose test (also called “28 week labs”) can be done at any time of day. Drink all of the glucola beverage within a five minute period. Do not eat or drink other fluids after drinking the glucola. (A small amount of water is okay.) Arrive at the lab (with your lab) slip 40 minutes after you finished drinking your glucola to allow time for check in. Your blood needs to be drawn 1 hour after you have finished drinking the glucola. Bring a high-protein snack (such as crackers and cheese or peanut butter) to eat after your lab is drawn. Please note that although you may eat prior to drinking the glucola it is important not to have eaten sugary foods. This may alter your test results. We will have your test results available at your next scheduled office visit. If your results are abnormal, additional testing will be ordered and we will call you to schedule those tests. Continue reading >>

How To Prepare For A Glucose Screening Test

How To Prepare For A Glucose Screening Test

Expert Reviewed Four Methods:Preparing for the A1C TestPreparing for the Fasting Plasma Glucose TestPreparing for the Oral Glucose TestPreparing for the Gestational Glucose TestCommunity Q&A A glucose screening test measures your blood sugar level and/or your body’s response to sugar and is used for diagnosing diabetes. There are three types of diabetes recognized (Type 1, Type 2 and gestational) and although they are all slightly different, a common feature for all three conditions is higher than normal blood sugar level. Blood glucose can be screened in a few different ways. If your doctor suggests that you take a glucose screening test, the way you prepare depends on the type of test that is being done.[1] Continue reading >>

Blood Tests For Type 1, Type 2 And Gestational Diabetes

Blood Tests For Type 1, Type 2 And Gestational Diabetes

If you have diabetes or your doctor thinks you might, certain blood tests can tell a lot about how your body processes blood sugar. Sometimes you'll need to fast. That means not eating or drinking anything except water for a specific amount of time before a blood sample is taken. This will ensure all the food you've eaten has been digested. But you don't need to fast for all blood sugar tests. Doctors use this test to diagnose diabetes. You'll be asked to fast for 8 hours beforehand. The test is usually done early in the morning so you don't have to go too long without eating. A blood glucose level of 126 milligrams per deciliter or higher is a sign of diabetes. A healthy score is below 100 milligrams per deciliter. This is another test used for diagnosis. You'll also need to fast for 8 hours for this one before it's done. A nurse will start the test by taking a sample of your blood. Then you'll drink a sugary liquid and stay in the doctor's office. Two hours later, a nurse will take another blood sample for testing. If that shows a blood glucose level of 200 milligrams per deciliter or higher, you'll be diagnosed with diabetes. A level of 140 to 199 milligrams per deciliter is a sign of prediabetes. That's when your blood sugar is higher than normal but you might be able to keep diabetes at bay with some lifestyle changes. This test is also used to diagnose a condition called gestational diabetes. That's a type some women develop when they're pregnant. It's done the same way except a third sample is taken after 3 hours. Doctors use this test to diagnose people who have serious diabetes symptoms. It can be given at any time on a moment's notice. So there's no need to fast before the blood sample is taken. If your blood glucose level is 200 milligrams per deciliter or h Continue reading >>

Learning About Glucose Testing During Pregnancy

Learning About Glucose Testing During Pregnancy

Learning About Glucose Testing During Pregnancy A glucose test measures the body's ability to use a type of sugar, called glucose. Glucose is the body's main source of energy. This test is used to check pregnant women for gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes is a form of diabetes that develops during pregnancy and then usually goes away after the baby is born. When you have this condition, the insulin in your body is not able to keep your blood sugar in a normal range. If you do not control your blood sugar, your baby can grow too big and may have problems after birth. There are different ways to test for gestational diabetes. You do not need to stop eating or drinking before the first step. You will drink a liquid that contains 50 grams of sugar (glucose). Your blood sample is taken 1 hour later. If you don't have a lot of sugar in your blood, you do not have gestational diabetes. If you do have a lot of sugar in your blood, you are asked to do the second step, the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). With the OGTT, you cannot eat or drink for at least 8 hours before the test. Then a blood sample is taken when you arrive for the test. This is your fasting blood glucose value. It provides a baseline for comparing other glucose values. You drink a liquid that contains 100 grams of sugar (glucose). Your blood sample is taken 3 hours later to see how much sugar is in your blood. If you don't have a lot of sugar in your blood, you don't have gestational diabetes. If you do have a lot of sugar in your blood, you may have gestational diabetes. A different method is done in one step. It is another version of the OGTT. You cannot eat or drink for at least 8 hours before the test. Then a blood sample is taken when you arrive for the test. This is your fasting blood glucose Continue reading >>

Can I Eat Bread Before My Pregnancy Glucose Testing?

Can I Eat Bread Before My Pregnancy Glucose Testing?

Doctors test the blood glucose levels of pregnant women to see if they have developed gestational diabetes. If you have gestational diabetes and do not receive proper treatment, it can cause problems for your baby, including difficulty breathing, hypoglycemia at birth and a difficult delivery due to the baby's large size. There are two glucose tests that pregnant woman may take -- one has no food stipulations, and the other requires fasting. Pregnancy Glucose Tests The first pregnancy glucose test administered is called a glucose challenge screening, which involves drinking a specially designed beverage that contains large amounts of sugar. An hour after consumption, you will receive a blood test and your glucose levels will be evaluated. If you sugar levels are too high, your doctor will then do a longer test called a glucose tolerance test, in which you consume the sugary drink once again and have your blood tested every hour for three hours to determine whether you have gestational diabetes. Pre-Test Instructions Before the glucose challenge screening, you can eat normally, so you may eat bread if you like. However, before the glucose tolerance test, you have to fast for eight to 14 hours. All you can have is a few sips of water during this time, so most women schedule the test early in the morning. You should follow these instructions since eating anything -- including bread -- could skew the results. Results Normal results for the glucose tolerance test are less than 95 mg per dL after fasting, less than 180 mg per dL one hour after drinking the beverage containing 100 g of glucose, less than 155 mg per dL after two hours and less than 140 mg per dL after three hours. If your levels are higher than this for at least two out of the four blood draws, you have gestati Continue reading >>

Glucose Screening Tests During Pregnancy

Glucose Screening Tests During Pregnancy

TWO-STEP TESTING During the first step, you will have a glucose screening test: You DO NOT need to prepare or change your diet in any way. You will be asked to drink a liquid that contains glucose. Your blood will be drawn 1 hour after you drink the glucose solution to check your blood glucose level. If your blood glucose from the first step is too high, you will need to come back for a 3-hour glucose tolerance test. For this test: DO NOT eat or drink anything (other than sips of water) for 8 to 14 hours before your test. (You also cannot eat during the test.) You will be asked to drink a liquid that contains glucose, 100 grams (g) . You will have blood drawn before you drink the liquid, and again 3 more times every 60 minutes after you drink it. Each time, your blood glucose level will be checked. Allow at least 3 hours for this test. ONE-STEP TESTING You need to go to the lab one time for a 2-hour glucose tolerance test. For this test: DO NOT eat or drink anything (other than sips of water) for 8 to 14 hours before your test. (You also cannot eat during the test.) You will be asked to drink a liquid that contains glucose (75 g). You will have blood drawn before you drink the liquid, and again 2 more times every 60 minutes after you drink it. Each time, your blood glucose level will be checked. Allow at least 2 hours for this test. Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Between three and eight per cent of women will get gestational diabetes between the 24th and the 28th week of pregnancy, sometimes earlier. It usually goes away after the baby is born. Women who are more likely to get gestational diabetes are: older mothers women who have a family history of type 2 diabetes women who are overweight women who are from certain ethnic backgrounds, including South Asian, Vietnamese, Chinese, Middle Eastern and Polynesian/Melanesian. Other women at risk include those who have had gestational diabetes, polycystic ovarian syndrome, large babies or birth complications in the past What is gestational diabetes? The hormone insulin moves glucose or sugar from your blood and into your body’s cells, where it is used for energy. When you have diabetes, this process is blocked and your cells become 'insulin resistant'. This causes you to have too much glucose in your blood. In pregnancy, the hormones from the placenta, which help your baby to grow, can cause your cells to become insulin resistant. Usually in pregnancy the body produces more insulin to counter this. In some women, however, this doesn’t happen and they develop gestational diabetes. There are many health issues associated with gestational diabetes, including that both the mother and baby will have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life. During the pregnancy, gestational diabetes can lead to excessive sugars and fats crossing the placenta, which can have an effect on the baby’s growth, usually making them bigger. Giving birth to larger babies can also lead to problems with the birth. Sometimes, even though it might not seem to make sense, some babies (particularly larger babies) are born with blood sugar levels that are too low – this is called hypoglycaemia Continue reading >>

Pregnancy And Gestational Diabetes Screening

Pregnancy And Gestational Diabetes Screening

All pregnant women should be screened for gestational diabetes during their pregnancy. Screening may be done by taking the woman's medical history and examining certain risk factors, but an oral glucose tolerance test is also recommended. The oral glucose tolerance test is used to screen for gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes is a specific type of diabetes that can develop in some women late in pregnancy (usually after the 24th week). Women who develop this complication do not have diabetes before becoming pregnant. The test is generally given between the 24th and 28th week of pregnancy. If you have had gestational diabetes before, or if your health care provider is concerned about your risk of developing gestational diabetes, the test may be performed before the 13th week of pregnancy. The oral glucose tolerance test involves quickly drinking a sweetened liquid (called Glucola), which contains 50g of glucose. The body absorbs this glucose rapidly, causing blood glucose levels to rise within 30 to 60 minutes. A blood sample will be taken from a vein in your arm about 60 minutes after drinking the solution. The blood test measures how the glucose solution was metabolized (processed by the body). A blood glucose level of 140mg/dL or higher will identify 80% of women with gestational diabetes. When that cutoff is lowered to 130mg/dL, the identification increases to 90%. If your blood glucose level was greater than 130 mg/dL, your provider will likely recommend you take another diabetes screening test that requires you to fast (not eat anything) before the test. During this second test, called the 100-gram oral glucose tolerance test, your blood glucose level will be tested four times during a three-hour period after drinking the sweetened (many flavors are availabl Continue reading >>

Glucose Screening And Glucose Tolerance Test

Glucose Screening And Glucose Tolerance Test

Nearly 1 in 10 women will develop gestational diabetes (GD or GDM) during pregnancy — which is why almost all practitioners screen for it in all their patients. Fortunately, gestational diabetes is also one of the most easily managed pregnancy complications. When blood sugar is closely controlled through diet, exercise and, if necessary, medication, women with gestational diabetes are likely to have perfectly normal pregnancies and healthy babies. When a glucose screening is done The glucose screen is usually done between week 24 of pregnancy and week 28 of pregnancy. Some practitioners may test earlier if you're at higher risk for the disorder, including if you're obese, 35 or older, have a family history of diabetes or had gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy. How a glucose screening is done The glucose screening is simple, especially if you have a sweet tooth. First, you'll drink a very sweet glucose (aka sugar) drink, which usually tastes like flat orange soda. Then you'll wait for one hour before having some blood drawn and tested for glucose. Most women chug the stuff with no problem and no side effects; a few, especially those who don't have a taste for sweet liquids, feel a little queasy afterwards. How a glucose tolerance test is done If the results of your glucose screening show elevated levels of glucose in your blood, it's possible that you might not be producing enough insulin to process the extra glucose in your system. Your doctor may then order a glucose tolerance test. For this diagnostic test, you'll be asked to fast overnight. Your blood will be drawn in the morning, and then you'll drink a higher-concentration glucose mixture. Your blood will be drawn three more times, at one, two, and three hours later. If a glucose tolerance test diagnose Continue reading >>

Glucose Tolerance Test - And What The Results Mean

Glucose Tolerance Test - And What The Results Mean

If you've been told you've got to have a GTT, here's what you need to do, what to expect on the day and how this could indicate gestational diabetes The Glucose Tolerance Test (aka the GTT - not to be mixed up with a G&T) is a test carried out during pregnancy to detect whether you may have Gestational Diabetes (GD). No, not everyone who's pregnant has one. You'll only be offered one if your midwife thinks there's a likelihood you could develop Gestational Diabetes during your pregnancy. "Not every hospital routinely carries out glucose tolerance tests," says independent midwife Pam Wild, "but you can ask for one if you are worried and you think you need to be tested." While most tests are carried out between 26 and 28 weeks, sometimes you may be given the test around 16 weeks, depending on your medical history. Main reasons your midwife or GP will recommend you take a Glucose Tolerance Test (GTT) are: you have previously had diabetes in pregnancy you have a history of diabetes in your immediate family if you have previously had a very big baby (4.5kg or heavier) if they have found sugar or ketones in your urine for pregnant women of certain ethnic origins (Black Caribbean, South Asian and Middle Eastern) if your BMI (body mass index) is 30 or above A glucose tolerance test (GTT) or oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) measures your blood glucose levels. In the test, your blood is taken, and you're then given a glucose drink. After 2 hours your blood is taken again to see how quickly your body is able to clear the glucose from your blood. That gives an indication of whether you're showing signs of GD. How do I take a glucose tolerance test? Make sure you have a good meal as you'll have to fast from midnight and won't be able to eat anything until after the test - although Continue reading >>

Glucose Tolerence Test - American Pregnancy Association

Glucose Tolerence Test - American Pregnancy Association

Home / Prenatal Testing / Glucose Tolerance Test Pregnant women can develop a condition known as Gestational Diabetes ( diabetes brought on by pregnancy ) whichcan pose arisk to both mother and baby. A glucose tolerance test is a common type of testing for potential gestational diabetes. There are several tests intended to identify gestational diabetes in pregnant women. The first, called the Glucose Challenge Screening, is a preliminary screening test performed between 26-28 weeks. If a woman tests positive during this screening test, the second test, called the Glucose Tolerance Test, may be performed. This test will diagnose whether diabetes exists or not by indicating whether or not the body is using glucose (a type of sugar) effectively. The Glucose Challenge Screening is now considered to be a standard test performed during the early part of the third trimester of pregnancy. What is the Glucose Challenge Screening Test? No preparation is required prior to the test. During the test, the mother is asked to drink a sweet liquid (glucose) and then will have blood drawn one hour from having the drink, as blood glucose levels normally peak within one hour. No fasting is required prior to this test. The test evaluates how your body processes sugar. A high level in your blood may indicate your body is not processing sugar effectively (positive test). If the results of this screen are positive, the woman may have the Glucose Tolerance Test performed. It is important to note that not all women who test positive for the Glucose Challenge Screening test are found to have diabetes upon further diagnosis. Prior to the taking the glucose tolerance test, your doctor will ask you to make sure and eatat least 150mg of carbohydrates(about what you will get from a slice or two of br Continue reading >>

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