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Do Blood Sugar Apps Work

What Your Blood Sugar Meter Data Is Telling You

What Your Blood Sugar Meter Data Is Telling You

Modern blood sugar meters are great because they offer inside looks into your patterns and allow you to make changes to help reach your goals. Most healthcare providers and members of your diabetic care team simply don’t have the time available to take a look through all your blood sugar numbers and interpret all data. They have a long list of patients they see which makes it difficult to spend personalized time with everyone. What this means is, it’s time for you to take a step into the spotlight and learn more about what your meter is actually telling you.Virtually all modern meters offer the ability to download content to a PC or even Mac system. They include a date and time stamp to each blood sugar level. This allows the software program for interpreting your data to develop charts, graphs and even general statistics about where your levels are. One thing you must make sure of, so that all data is accurate, is that you keep the date and time properly adjusted. Otherwise, your time schedule may be off. We’re going to take a look at what you can learn from your meter and how this can help your diabetes management. Downloadable Data Accessories Typically, each meter requires a data cable to ensure the proper download of all important blood sugar information. Most data cables are available free from the meter companies. If you are in need of the proper cord with your meter, you can contact the company directly by calling their toll free number. Below you will find some of the most common modern meters and the software they require. Meter Company Meter Type Software Abbott Freestyle and Precision CoPilot Management System Abbott Insulinx FreeStyle Auto Assist (Software built directly into the meter) Bayer Contour and Contour Next Glucofacts Deluxe Bayer Contour US Continue reading >>

Apple Picks 13 Apps For People With Diabetes

Apple Picks 13 Apps For People With Diabetes

Apple periodically updates its app store with lists of apps for particular groups of people. Even as the new iOS 8, with a built in Health app, goes into beta, Apple has added a new list: "Apple's Apps for Diabetics." According to the CDC's 2011 fact sheet, diabetes affects 25.8 million people, or 8.3 percent of the US population. The apps on Apple's list aren't all from the US, and they don't all target diabetes specifically. While many are tracking and management apps for blood glucose and insulin levels, others are more general purpose apps for eating specific diets, which people with diabetes could benefit from. The list includes mostly consumer-facing apps but one app for doctors, as well as one for kids and one for pregnant women with diabetes. The list has some overlap with the list of top-grossing diabetes apps Research2Guidance released in March, but app developer Azumio, which Research2Guidance identified as the market leader, has no apps on Apple's list. Read on for 13 apps Apple has highlighted for its users with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. Diabetik by UglyApps (free) This British-made diabetes app raised $11,600 on Kickstarter in February 2013. It's a free app for diabetes management that focuses on quick data entry and aesthetically designed interactive charts, as well as reminders that can trigger either at a particular time or in particular location. The app helps people with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes monitor how much and how often they’re eating, their blood glucose levels, and whether they’ve taken their medication. Diabetes in Check by Everyday Health (free) Diabetes in Check, from the recently-IPO'd Everyday Health is a type 2 diabetes management app that features a wide range of tools. It includes diabetes coaching designed by a certified d Continue reading >>

Check Your Blood Sugar With Your Smartphone’s Camera

Check Your Blood Sugar With Your Smartphone’s Camera

Around 29 million people with diabetes have to poke their fingers for a blood sample daily. That's painful! What if you could check your glucose levels without drawing blood? There's a groundbreaking piece of technology that's going to do just that. How to check glucose levels without drawing blood This is really exciting news, and not just for diabetic patients. Everyone needs to take care of their health and monitoring glucose levels is essential. What we're talking about is a free health app that lets you check glucose levels without drawing blood. The app is called Epic Health and will be released sometime before the end of the year for both Android and iOS gadgets. It's currently going through clinical trials. The app not only gives the user the ability to accurately measure blood glucose levels, but it also measures Insulin Resistance levels. This is key in determining if you are pre-diabetic. Watch the following video for a brief demonstration. The app works by placing one fingertip over your smartphone's camera lens. A series of close-up images are taken that show data on the user's blood flow. These images are then sent to the cloud for analysis and can provide feedback on vitals including heart rate, temperature, blood pressure to respiration rate and blood oxygen saturation. Users will also find out how different foods affect their body. This will be a big help in setting up the perfect diet for you. Diabetes has become an epidemic in America. According to the American Diabetes Association, over 30 million people in the U.S. had diabetes in 2015. That's nearly 10 percent of the population. Advances in technology, like the Epic Health app, might be able to help get this epidemic under control. We can sure hope anyway. Click here if you would like to sign up fo Continue reading >>

The Best Diabetes Apps Of The Year

The Best Diabetes Apps Of The Year

We’ve selected these apps based on their quality, user reviews, and overall reliability as a source of support for people living with diabetes. If you want to nominate an app for this list, email us at [email protected] The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimate that type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes impacts 29 million Americans, about 9 percent of the population. Someone with diabetes may experience complications such as kidney problems, blindness, or heart failure, according to the CDC. The good news is that with increased education, people are recognizing symptoms, like going to the bathroom often, having blurry vision, losing weight, experiencing tingling or numbness in lower limbs, and feeling very thirsty, hungry, or tired. Thanks to earlier diagnoses, improved treatment tools, and better self-care, people are living better with diabetes. Part of that care includes eating healthy foods, exercising, taking medicines like insulin, sticking to your treatment plan, and being proactive about colds and other sicknesses. Keeping all the pieces of your care plan straightforward can be a challenge, but several apps have emerged to help you track your day and your health. While some of these apps are specifically for diabetes and some are geared for general diet, they can all help you take control of your health. Here are this year’s top picks for the best diabetes apps. iPhone rating: ★★★★★ Android rating: ★★★★★ Price: Free Fooducate promises to be your weight loss coach. This app has a grading system designed to help you make smarter choices. It will help you understand the pros and cons of certain foods. In addition to sugar counts, the app helps you monitor carbs, colorings, mood, hunger, sleep, and exercise. R Continue reading >>

Smartphone Test Could Help You Track Glucose, Without The Pain

Smartphone Test Could Help You Track Glucose, Without The Pain

Smartphone users may soon be able to check their blood glucose level without having to take a blood sample, using a new app for iOS and Android. Checking your blood sugar level usually needs at least a drop of blood for testing. This new method could mean users don't have to give any blood at all. The app works when the user places one fingertip over the camera lens of their smartphone. A series of close-up images are taken, and show information about the user's blood flow. These are sent to the cloud for analysis and give feedback on various vital signs from heart rate, temperature, and blood pressure, to respiration rate and blood oxygen saturation, said Epic Health, the company behind the app. The app is currently in clinical trials but the company said it could be available to download, free of charge, for Androind and iOS in the fourth quarter of this year. Self-monitoring of blood glucose is recommended for all people with diabetes but can also be useful for those who just want to keep a check on their sugar level. Epic Health's CEO Dominic Wood said that the company is currently focused on the preventative market. But in 2018 the company also aims to launch "a non-invasive, clinically validated diabetes product," Wood said. "But before we release any of our products to the market we will undertake to publish clinically validated data." According to Wood, the product is based on "existing technology that is already out there, like the numerous heart-rate checking apps that are available". It will use the optical sensor of your smart phone, Wood said, and "you just put your finger over the optical sensor for 30 to 60 seconds and then we'll gather all of the information we need, non-invasively". Tech companies are increasingly looking at smartphones and wearables as Continue reading >>

Apple’s Needleless Blood Sugar Tracker Has An Uphill Battle In Front Of It

Apple’s Needleless Blood Sugar Tracker Has An Uphill Battle In Front Of It

Rumors are flying that Apple is developing some kind of wearable that would continuously track the user’s blood sugar without breaking their skin. For people with diabetes, this would be a huge improvement over the somewhat invasive or downright painful options they currently rely on. But experts warn that if the rumors are true, Apple will be facing a scientific and technological battlefield littered with decades of other companies’ failures. If Apple is chasing a needleless blood sugar monitor, it wouldn’t be that surprising. (Apple declined to comment.) After all, the market would be massive. About 30 million Americans have diabetes, a disease caused when there’s too much sugar, or glucose, in the blood. People with diabetes have to carefully titrate their food intake, or even inject the hormone insulin in order to keep their blood sugar from spiking or dropping to dangerous levels. So regularly measuring blood glucose is key. Right now, it’s also unpleasant. People with diabetes have to prick their fingers to draw blood, or wear a monitor that inserts a tiny tube beneath their skin to continuously measure glucose in the fluid between cells (the same fluid that spills out when you pop a blister). So a needleless device — preferably one that continuously monitors glucose levels and spits them out in real time — would be a huge upgrade. “That is the holy grail,” says Eric Topol, the director of the Scripps Translational Science Institute who also sits on the board of glucose monitor manufacturer Dexcom. And that’s why so many before Apple have made the attempt. Google tried to develop a contact lens to detect glucose in tears, but ever since pharmaceutical giant Novartis licensed the technology in 2014, the project’s gone quiet. (A spokesperson fo Continue reading >>

Free Blood Sugar Monitor & Tracker Apps

Free Blood Sugar Monitor & Tracker Apps

This page provides basic information only, on free Blood Sugar Monitor & Tracker Apps. For specific information on the MedSimple Free Medicine (Med) Reminder & Tracker App Android & IPhone links. Just like you can use MedSimple to manage your medications, you can also use MedSimple as a free blood sugar log, reminder & tracker app to help you remember to test your blood sugar each day. Living with diabetes can be a daily challenge but the MedSimple free blood sugar log, reminder & tracker app for Android, iPhone & other mobile devices can help alleviate some of the related stress by helping you to remember when to test and when to take your medications. Careful blood sugar control is the best way to prevent complications with your diabetes. By keeping your blood sugar within the goal set by your doctor, you are lowering your risk of developing other health conditions that can result from uncontrolled diabetes, such as heart conditions and neuropathy. Blood sugar reminder & tracker apps work the same way as medication reminders -- but instead of selecting a medication, you select your test strips. You can also use the MedSimple free blood sugar log, reminder & tracker app, to keep track of your diabetes medications as well as medications used to treat your other health conditions. This article will focus on using the MedSimple Dose Reminder feature to organize your blood sugar testing schedule. Med List: You can use the MedSimple free blood sugar log, reminder & tracker app’s med list feature to list all of your medications and instructions to go with them. This is where you can add your blood sugar testing schedule. Add your test strips by selecting (+) to add a new medication. Select the name of your blood sugar testing meter. The app will then prompt you to “Selec Continue reading >>

New Smartphone App Can Help Monitor Diabetes Without Using A Drop Of Blood

New Smartphone App Can Help Monitor Diabetes Without Using A Drop Of Blood

LONDON: British scientists have developed a new smartphone app that can help measure and monitor blood glucose levels without using a drop of blood, a finding that can transform lives of millions of people with diabetes. The app -- called as Epic Health -- replaces the need for diabetics to prick their fingers several times a day. The app, suitable for both Type 1 and 2 diabetics, works by placing a fingertip over the camera lens of a smartphone and capturing a series of close-up images that convey information about the user's heart rate, temperature and blood pressure to respiration rate and blood oxygen saturation, the researchers said. "The app uses a simple protocol which prompts the user to take a noninvasive test and this allows us to capture the vital information in a systematic way which produces the most consistent results," Dominic Wood, founder of the app, was quoted as saying to the express.co.uk. "This is a massive driver of prevention," and even tartgets, "everyone yet to be diagnosed with or in the general risk of diabetes when it's still preventable", Wood added. Importantly, the Epic app can measure insulin resistance levels -- a key way of determining whether someone is pre-diabetic. It does this by measuring the variation in the patient's pulse which is related to blood glucose concentration. This would allow someone to alter their lifestyle to avoid developing full-blown Type 2 diabetes, the researchers said. "The prospect of a non-invasive app that monitors blood glucose levels without a drop of blood and without even an accompanying piece of technology is an exciting one," said Dan Howarth from Diabetes UK. The app, which has been in development for three years, will undergo clinical trials in the coming months. It will be available to download, fr Continue reading >>

The App

The App

Giving you the knowledge, tools, and support towards improved diabetes management.. The Dario App provides users with a complete solution for personal diabetes management. The Dario app supports users by tracking all your blood glucose levels in real-time and with actionable insights to allow for optimal self-management of diabetes. Get the support you need to understand your glucose levels in the moment and over time. The digital health platform of Dario makes it simple to share your health information with your healthcare team. Why You’ll Love the Dario App Real-time, easy-to-access information – all available at your fingertips Saves time and makes life easier – your results are automatically logged and synced – no more need to write in paper log books Data insights, analysis, and pattern recognition – understand why your blood glucose levels change Actionable alerts and reminders – enhance situation awareness and keep on track of your readings Track your insulin doses easily Log your carbs and calories – our localized food menu makes your favorite foods quickly available to you Key Features Automatic Download and Synchronization of Glucose Meter Results Simply open the Dario Diabetes Management Solution App on your phone and plug into your smartphone. After apply your blood sample to the meter, your blood glucose readings will automatically appear and sync to the app. Statistics Snapshot Dario gives you a quick snapshot of your statistical information, including your number of in-range readings, hypos, and hypers. Personalized Logbook All of your recorded data – blood glucose levels, carbs & insulin intake, physical activity as well as your mood, tags, and notes are easily accessed in your logbook. Your data can be viewed as a chronological list, gra Continue reading >>

Predictbgl Is A Diabetes Management App Predicting Fluctuations In Blood Sugar Levels

Predictbgl Is A Diabetes Management App Predicting Fluctuations In Blood Sugar Levels

A chronic disorder that touches more than 1.5 million Australians, diabetes requires careful and lifelong management. Seeking a way to streamline the diabetes management process for himself and his daughter led entrepreneur Simon Carter to create PredictBGL, an insulin dosage app for people for Type 1 diabetes. The app allows users track their food intake and exercise, meshing it together to calculate insulin dosages and predict fluctuations in blood sugar levels. Typically, Carter explained, parents of children with Type 1 diabetes patients have to buy expensive devices such as glucose trackers to help monitor blood sugar levels. The device, he said, sits under the skin and measures the blood sugar level of the person every five minutes, notifying parents if the user’s blood sugar levels gets too low. “It’s $5,000 to buy one and $2,000 a year to run it,” Carter said. The device is predominantly used to monitor people with Type 1 diabetes overnight, a time when patients can be at higher risk due to their blood sugar level dropping while they sleep. This risk factor, Carter explained, is even higher in children. “If they have too much insulin overnight they’re not aware if their blood sugar gets low, and can actually die overnight. It’s something that is a huge concern to both parents of kids and adults with Type 1 diabetes,” he said. “You never really know what’s going to happen when you inject. You’re really relying on getting the right amount and the right sleep. And often you have to take a ballpark guess of the amount of insulin to take.” Finding himself struggling with the overnight dangers, Carter, an electrical engineer, began developing a web-based system to log things such as food, and eventually calculate the dosage of insulin to take. Continue reading >>

Will Apple’s New Iphone Monitor Blood Sugar Levels—without Pricking Your Skin?

Will Apple’s New Iphone Monitor Blood Sugar Levels—without Pricking Your Skin?

Apple appears to be working on blood glucose monitoring as a way to address type 2 diabetes.“Stick it in your ear.” Literally. Not all Apple product rumors are equal. Speculation that the headphone jack will reappear with the iPhone 8 has been rightly ridiculed. But the evidence Apple will introduce a glucose monitoring device is worthy of our interest. “Glucose monitoring” is a code word for fighting the growing scourge of type 2 diabetes. Unlike type 1 diabetes, which is unpreventable, the type 2 variety is, to be polite, a “lifestyle” disease, meaning we eat too much and don’t exercise enough. (As usual, the French are more brutal: for them, Type 2 is diabète gras, “fat diabetes.”) A 2016 Harvard School of Public Health study places the global cost of type 2 diabetes at $825 billion per year and growing [as always, edits and emphasis mine]: … in the last 35 years, global diabetes among men has more than doubled—from 4.3% in 1980 to 9% in 2014—after adjusting for the effect of aging. Meanwhile diabetes among women has risen from 5% in 1980 to 7.9% in 2014. This rise translates as 422 million adults in the world with diabetes in 2014—which has nearly quadrupled since 1980 (108 million). In theory, there is, of course, an “easy” remedy: Eat less and exercise more…for the rest of your life. A healthy lifestyle adds days to one’s life, and life to one’s days. Easier nagged than done. In reality, a growing percentage of the human population keeps growing. Enter blood glucose monitoring. Devices that tell you your blood sugar concentration, once the province of the lab, have moved into the home. With just a minuscule drop of blood—as little as 0.3 microliters—you can get an answer in seconds. The subject is immediately alerted to an Continue reading >>

Diabetes App Designed To Predict Blood Sugar Levels After Each Meal

Diabetes App Designed To Predict Blood Sugar Levels After Each Meal

For individuals with type 2 diabetes, managing glucose levels can be a daily challenge. However, the introduction of a new algorithm-based app may soon take some of this stress away. A lot of work still needs to be done on the process, but the idea behind the personalized technology is to predict the impact of each meal on a user’s blood sugar levels. Type 2 diabetes now affects more than 29 million people in the United States. An additional 86 million adults are thought to have prediabetes, which can develop into type 2 diabetes if lifestyle changes are not implemented. With type 2 diabetes comes a constant need to monitor food intake to ensure the correct blood glucose levels are maintained. If levels are too high for prolonged periods of time, serious health complications can arise. Medication is given to help manage sugar level fluctuations, but exercise and diet also play a substantial role. Although the impact of specific food types on glucose levels can be estimated, it is not an exact science. Effects can vary substantially between individuals and they can even vary within an individual dependent on a range of factors. A report, published in PLOS Computational Biology this week, explains how a group of scientists have integrated an algorithm into an app called Glucoracle, which goes some way toward solving this problem. David Albers, Ph.D., associate research scientist in biomedical informatics at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) in New York and lead author of the study, explains: “Even with expert guidance, it's difficult for people to understand the true impact of their dietary choices, particularly on a meal-to-meal basis.” To tackle this problem, Albers and his team are attempting to design an algorithm that can help individuals to make more i Continue reading >>

Diabetes Breakthrough: New Smartphone App Could Help Million Of Sufferers

Diabetes Breakthrough: New Smartphone App Could Help Million Of Sufferers

Scientists believe revolutionary smartphone technology, which can painlessly measure blood glucose levels without puncturing the skin, could transform the lives of millions of diabetics and prevent others from developing the deadly condition. More than four million people in the UK live with diabetes and it is believed a further 12 million are at risk of developing the illness that can lead to blindness, amputation, heart disease and stroke. High-profile sufferers of the condition include former Olympic rower Sir Steve Redgrave, Hollywood actor Tom Hanks and Prime Minister Theresa May who has revealed that she is a Type 1 diabetic and has to inject insulin up to five times a day. The Epic Health app, which is set to undergo clinical trials in the UK in the coming months, replaces the need for diabetics to prick their fingers several times a day which patients complain is inconvenient and uncomfortable. The app, which is suitable for both Type 1 and 2 diabetics, works by placing a fingertip over the camera lens of a smartphone and capturing a series of close-up images that convey information about the user’s heart rate, temperature and blood pressure to respiration rate and blood oxygen saturation. Similar innovations have been developed using laser technology and sensor pads to avoid using needles but most need an accompanying gadget to interpret the results. But the makers claim that the real breakthrough of the Epic app is its ability to measure insulin resistance levels – a key way of determining whether someone is pre-diabetic. It does this by measuring the variation in the patient’s pulse which is related to blood glucose concentration. Experts say this would allow someone to alter their lifestyle to avoid developing full-blown Type 2 diabetes. The app’s fo Continue reading >>

Smartphone Apps For Diabetes: Do They Really Work?

Smartphone Apps For Diabetes: Do They Really Work?

You can use them to count carbs, log blood sugar, but users say they're no substitute for patient knowledge and a doctor's care Please note: This article was published more than one year ago. The facts and conclusions presented may have since changed and may no longer be accurate. And "More information" links may no longer work. Questions about personal health should always be referred to a physician or other health care professional. HealthDay Reporter WEDNESDAY, Jan. 29, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Managing diabetes requires a great deal of time, memory and math skills. There are carbohydrates to count, medication doses to calculate and blood sugar levels to track. Today, there are numerous applications for smartphones and other devices that can help you keep your diabetes in check, although some people with the disease will tell you the technology still has a ways to go. Applications -- or "apps" -- can help you with nutrition advice, carb counting, tracking blood sugar levels, medication alerts and managing kids with diabetes. Many apps are free, and some offer both paid and free versions. Paid options may offer more bells and whistles, but you might find what you need in a free app. The big question is: Can these apps help make diabetes management easier? That depends largely on whom you ask. Some people are thrilled to have the assistance of these programs, while others feel that the currently available apps don't do enough to make them worthwhile. "It's never been easier to manage diabetes with all the technological stuff we have at our fingertips," said Steve Lisowski, who lives in Chicago. Lisowski has had type 2 diabetes for 15 years, and currently uses an insulin pump and a continuous glucose monitor to help manage his diabetes. He has used nutrition apps and an Continue reading >>

Smartphone Apps For Diabetes: Do They Really Work?

Smartphone Apps For Diabetes: Do They Really Work?

HealthDay Reporter requires a great deal of time, memory and math skills. There are carbohydrates to count, medication doses to calculate and blood sugar levels to track. Today, there are numerous applications for smartphones and other devices that can help you keep your diabetes in check, although some people with the disease will tell you the technology still has a ways to go. Applications -- or "apps" -- can help you with nutrition advice, carb counting, tracking blood sugar levels, medication alerts and managing kids with diabetes. Many apps are free, and some offer both paid and free versions. Paid options may offer more bells and whistles, but you might find what you need in a free app. The big question is: Can these apps help make diabetes management easier? That depends largely on whom you ask. Some people are thrilled to have the assistance of these programs, while others feel that the currently available apps don't do enough to make them worthwhile. "It's never been easier to manage diabetes with all the technological stuff we have at our fingertips," said Steve Lisowski, who lives in Chicago. Lisowski has had type 2 diabetes for 15 years, and currently uses an insulin pump and a continuous glucose monitor to help manage his diabetes. He has used nutrition apps and an overall diabetes-management app. Lisowski said he isn't currently using the diabetes app much because his insulin pump does a lot of the same calculations and tracking. One thing Lisowski said he would like to see is more compatibility between devices so they could all share information. For example, he said, it would be helpful if the information from his pump could be wirelessly transmitted to an app on his phone. Lynn Marie O'Flaherty, whose 4-year-old daughter was diagnosed with type 1 diabet Continue reading >>

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