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Do Beta Blockers Raise Blood Sugar

Diabetes Update: Beta Blockers Worsen Blood Sugar--may Cause Diabetes

Diabetes Update: Beta Blockers Worsen Blood Sugar--may Cause Diabetes

Beta Blockers Worsen Blood Sugar--May Cause Diabetes Many people know that it is a bad idea for anyone who takes insulin or a sulfonylurea drug to take a beta blocker. This is because it has long been known that these drugs block the counter-regulatory response that prevents a dangerous hypo or--if it cannot prevent the hypo--at least gives the victim some warning that one is coming by causing shakes and pounding pulse. Now evidence from a huge study of almost 20,000 people has learned that beta blockers are dangerous to anyone with any blood sugar abnormality. The study is Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial-Blood Pressure Lowering Arm (ASCOT-BPLA,). It was published in Diabetes Care in May. Determinants of new-onset diabetes among 19,257 hypertensive patients randomized in the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial--Blood Pressure Lowering Arm and the relative influence of antihypertensive medication. It concluded: "Baseline FPG >5 mmol/l, BMI, and use of an atenolol +/- diuretic regimen were among the major determinants of NOD [Non-insulin dependent diabetes i.e. Type 2] in hypertensive patients." An analysis of the study (which is still only available as an abstract to non-subscribers) published in Irish Medical News explains "Hypertensive patients allocated to amlodipine and perindopril were found 34% less likely to develop NOD [Type 2] compared with those allocated to the -blocker/diuretic combination." Diabetes in Control adds the following: "Says Dr Anoop Misra, director and head (diabetes and metabolic diseases) Fortis Hospitals: "In patients with hypertension, beta blocker drugs are no longer frontline therapy. These drugs may not only increase blood sugar levels in those who don't have diabetes, but may worsen sugar control in those with diabetes an Continue reading >>

Beta Blockers And Blood Sugar

Beta Blockers And Blood Sugar

Do beta blockers raise blood sugar? If so, do some meds raise it more than others? Does dose make a difference? Last edited by lbehel; 05-04-2010 at 10:54 AM. I wish they did! But as far as I know, they don't - and haven't for me. Yes - some beta blockers can raise blood sugar. Bystolic (a newer beta-blocker) has raised my blood sugar by about 10 points. It's not supposed to have this glucose effect, but nevertheless, 3 different set of blood tests in approx. one year have shown an increase. Metoprolol was neutral in my past blood glucose readings. Though both drugs tend to raise my cholesterol and triglyceride levels. The only beta blocker which I sampled for about 4 months and did not raise my sugar or cholesterol levels was "Betaxolol". It raised my triglycerides only slightly. Betaxolol research has shown that the effect on lipids and glucose has been neutral, and I tend to believe the research because my numbers improved. Other beta blockers (mainly Bystolic) tend to exagerate their claims and were also cited by the FDA for making these claims. If you read the Prescribing Information for Bystolic, you will see that increased cholesterol, triglycerides and Uric Acid levels are being reported. Glucose and HDL are also mentioned. I take nadalol (Corgard is brand name). It is an older one. How would I find out if that one can raise sugar levels. I have a family history of diatetes and stumbled over an article a few weeks ago about betas raising blood sugar. So now I am trying to decide if I just want to wean off the med or not. I have mitral valve prolapse and take it for heart palps so it isn't for blood pressure reasons. I was taking toprol and changed because nadalol was cheaper. Maybe if I decide to stay on the drug I should just go back to toprol xl since you sai Continue reading >>

Beta Blocker's Effect On Blood Sugar-anyone With Experience?

Beta Blocker's Effect On Blood Sugar-anyone With Experience?

Beta blocker's effect on blood sugar-anyone with experience? Beta blocker's effect on blood sugar-anyone with experience? OK, short synopsis of me again: low blood sugar for 15 years, recently having high fasting sugars around 95-110. I usually drop 3 hours after eating. Doctor wants me on Metformin to try and control the liver's contribution to upping the glucose. I used it for 3 day, roughly 3 weeks ago, and quit in order to have a CT scan. I have not restarted it. I am also supposed to begin a beta blocker, Atenolol, for my standing higher b/p and heart rate, although everything is waaay normal sitting(105/70). So, I started the bb by 1/4 of a pill at bedtime four days ago. Every morning I check my fasting blood sugar, that used to be highish. The first morning after my bb my morning glucose was 70!! Ever since, it has been mid-70s. I took a PP glucose the other day and it was 112 about 1 1/2 hours after eating. Is this a normal reaction to beta blockers? And, wouldn't this be a sign that maybe I shouldn't restart the Metformin? I got off Attenolol because my Dr. said it can mask symptoms of Hypoglycemia. I switched to a "calcium channel blocker". Yea, I questioned that with the doctor. In my mind immediately I was thinking it would mask the symptoms. But, oh well. It's kind of like they don't think it through! I have told my husband if he finds me passed out to have the EMTs first check blood sugar. I think my blood sugar is higher before bb, because I have some problem where I make too much adrenaline. While I was in the hospital for a three day fast to see how low my glucose would go, it really jumped alot. I was sooo hot and my heart was racing by the third day. I think the adrenaline was on high and not letting the glucose go down like it usually does. So, I ca Continue reading >>

Beta-blockers For The Treatment Of Hypertension In Patients With Diabetes: Exploring The Contraindication Myth

Beta-blockers For The Treatment Of Hypertension In Patients With Diabetes: Exploring The Contraindication Myth

, Volume 13, Issue5 , pp 435439 | Cite as Beta-blockers for the Treatment of Hypertension in Patients with Diabetes: Exploring the Contraindication Myth Purpose: To review the evidence supporting the contraindications (hypoglycemic unawareness, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia) usually given as the reasons by physicians for not using beta blockers for treating hypertension in patients with diabetes mellitus. Methods: A research synthesis based on MEDLINE (January 1966 through January 1999), hand searches of pertinent references and textbooks, and consultation with experts. Results: There is little evidence to support the assertion that beta blockers should be routinely contraindicated in diabetes. Beta blockers have few clinically important effects on hypoglycemic awareness and recovery, insulin resistance and hyperglycemia, or lipid profiles. Moreover, when diabetics have been treated with beta blockers for hypertension or for the secondary prevention of myocardial infarction, they benefit as much, if not more, than nondiabetic patients. There may be many circumstances (e.g., hypertensive patients with coronary disease) under which beta blockers are the drugs of first choice for diabetic patients. Recommendations to use agents other than beta blockers (or low dose thiazide diuretics) for the treatment of hypertension in diabetes are based on these agents' effectiveness against surrogate endpoints, and not their proven benefit in preventing important clinical endpoints. Conclusions: Except for patients with brittle glycemic control, manifest hypoglycemic unawareness, renal parenchymal disease, or documented intolerance, beta blockers should no longer be considered routinely contraindicated in the presence of diabetes. hypertensiondiabetes mellitustreatmentbeta bloc Continue reading >>

Antihypertensive Medications And Blood Sugar: Theories And Implications

Antihypertensive Medications And Blood Sugar: Theories And Implications

Go to: MECHANISMS OF ADVERSE GLYCEMIC EFFECTS Various theories about the mechanisms of antihypertensive-induced glycemic defects have been postulated. Few of these theories have been confirmed and some are conflicting. In general, postulated mechanisms can be classified into four categories: effects on peripheral blood flow, effects on the insulin receptor, effects on the liver and effects on insulin release (Figure 1). Improved peripheral blood flow to skeletal muscles is thought to facilitate glucose disposal to the tissues. In this way, medications such as alpha-blockers, which promote peripheral vasodilation, may improve insulin sensitivity and glucose uptake (20). Through the same mechanism, ACEIs or ARBs may improve insulin sensitivity by reducing angiotensin II-mediated vasoconstriction and/or increasing vasodilators such as bradykinin, prostaglandins or nitric oxide (21,22). Conversely, medications that reduce peripheral blood flow could direct blood away from sites of glucose uptake, reducing glucose disposal (20). Nonselective beta-blockers limit peripheral blood flow by reducing cardiac output, a beta-1-mediated effect, and preventing peripheral vasodilation, a beta-2-mediated effect (20,23). Beta-blockers with intrinsic sympathomimetic activity are less likely than nonselective agents to reduce peripheral blood flow because of neutral or stimulatory effects on beta-2 receptors (20,23). Therefore, these agents may have a reduced impact on glucose disposal and insulin sensitivity compared with nonselective beta-blockers. Cardioselective beta-blockers are also less likely to reduce peripheral blood flow than nonselective agents; however, cardioselective beta-blockers still exhibit some glycemic adverse effects (23). In support of the blood flow hypothesis is th Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Beta-blockers: What You Need To Know

Diabetes And Beta-blockers: What You Need To Know

People with diabetes tend to develop heart disease or stroke at an earlier age than the general population. One reason for this is that high glucose levels increase your risk of high blood pressure (hypertension). According to the American Diabetes Association, almost one in three American adults has high blood pressure. Two out of three people with diabetes have high blood pressure. Type 2 Diabetes and Hypertension High blood pressure doesn’t necessarily cause symptoms. You may feel just fine, but don’t let that fool you. Your heart is working harder than it should. It’s a serious condition, especially for people with diabetes. High blood pressure puts a lot of extra stress on your body. Over time, it can cause hardening of the arteries. It can also damage your brain, kidneys, eyes, and other organs. Treating High Blood Pressure If you have high blood pressure, your doctor may want to try other methods of treating it before turning to beta-blockers. These may include lifestyle changes and taking better control of blood glucose levels. The decision to use medication, including beta-blockers, will depend on your personal medical history. A 2015 study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association recommends drug therapy with a blood pressure reading of above 140 systolic and above 90 diastolic (140/90). For people with diabetes, lowering high blood pressure reduces the risk of developing cardiovascular problems, kidney disease, and neuropathy. Beta-Blockers Beta-blockers (beta-adrenergic blocking agents) are a class of prescription drug. They are used to treat a variety of conditions such as glaucoma, migraines, and anxiety disorders. They are also used to treat heart failure and high blood pressure. High blood pressure can increase your risk for hear Continue reading >>

What Medicines Can Make Your Blood Sugar Spike?

What Medicines Can Make Your Blood Sugar Spike?

If you have diabetes or high blood sugar, you probably know some of the things that cause your glucose (another name for blood sugar) to go up. Like a meal with too many carbohydrates, or not enough exercise. But other medicines you might take to keep yourself healthy can cause a spike, too. Know Your Meds Medicines you get with a prescription and some that you buy over the counter (OTC) can be a problem for people who need to control their blood sugar. Prescription medicines that can raise your glucose include: Steroids (also called corticosteroids). They treat diseases caused by inflammation, like rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and allergies. Common steroids include hydrocortisone and prednisone. But steroid creams (for a rash) or inhalers (for asthma) aren’t a problem. Drugs that treat high blood pressure, such as beta-blockers and thiazide diuretics High doses of asthma medicines, or drugs that you inject for asthma treatment OTC medicines that can raise your blood sugar include: Cough syrup. Ask your doctor if you should take regular or sugar-free. How Do You Decide What to Take? Even though these medicines can raise your blood sugar, it doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t take them if you need them. The most important thing is to work with your doctor on the right way to use them. If you have diabetes or you’re watching your blood sugar, ask your doctor before you take new medicines or change any medicines, even if it’s just something for a cough or cold. (Remember, just being sick can raise your blood sugar.) Make sure your doctor knows all the medicines you take -- for diabetes or any other reason. If one of them may affect your blood sugar, she may prescribe a lower dose or tell you to take the medicine for a shorter time. You may need to check your blood s Continue reading >>

New Beta Blocker May Help Diabetic Patients With High Blood Pressure

New Beta Blocker May Help Diabetic Patients With High Blood Pressure

New beta blocker may help diabetic patients with high blood pressure A medication that is commonly used to control high blood pressure does not raise blood sugar levels in diabetics who also have high blood pressure, according to researchers from Rush University Medical Center . The results of the study appear in the November 10 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) and were presented today at the 2004 American Heart Association Scientific Sessions. Beta blockers have been shown to be effective at lowering high blood pressure but many physicians have been reluctant to prescribe them to patients with diabetes because some beta-blockers have been shown to raise blood sugar levels in diabetics. Especially at risk are the estimated 47 million people with metabolic syndrome, a combination of several risk factors in one person that includes, but is not limited to, high blood pressure, insulin dependence or glucose intolerance, and obesity. "The results of this study suggest that physicians treating diabetic patients may want to consider the role that a newer beta-blocker such as carvedilol could play in managing certain cardiovascular risk factors and components of the metabolic syndrome ," said Dr. George L. Bakris, director, hypertension research center at Rush University Medical Center. "By improving these crucial risk factors, carvedilol could, theoretically, improve overall outcomes in this high-risk patient population." Bakris was the principal investigator of this 1,235-patient study, which is known as GEMINI (Glycemic Effects in Diabetes Mellitus: Carvedilol - Metoprolol Comparison in Hypertensives). Bakris and colleagues compared the effects of carvedilol to metoprolol tartrate in diabetic, hypertensive patients. Patients were randomized to Continue reading >>

Beta Blocker Drug Therapy

Beta Blocker Drug Therapy

Beta blockers block the effect of adrenaline (the hormone norepinephrine) on the body's beta receptors. This slows down the nerve impulses that travel through the heart. As a result, the resting heart rate is lower, the heart does not have to work as hard and the heart requires less blood and oxygen. Beta blockers can also block the impulses that can cause an arrhythmia (irregular heartbeat). This type of drug is generally prescribed for: If these medications are prescribed, the doctor should be made aware of any other drug, vitamin, mineral or herbal supplement the patient is taking, especially: Drugs for treating asthma , chronic bronchitis and emphysema Insulin and other medicines used to treat diabetes Medicines for high blood pressure, which may increase the effect of beta blockers The doctor should be told if the patient has: A slow heart rate (bradycardia) or heart block Allergies to foods or dyes, which can be made worse by beta blockers Asthma, which beta blockers can make worse Diabetes or hypoglycemia because beta blockers can cause the blood sugar levels to rise or hide the symptoms of low blood sugar Heart disease or poor circulation in the hands or feet Symptoms of hay fever, chronic bronchitis or emphysema Patients should avoid foods and beverages that have caffeine, antacids that have aluminum or over-the-counter cough and cold medications and antihistamines. Alcohol should also be avoided because it can decrease the effects of the beta blockers. To learn more about these types of drugs and their side effects, click on the links below: Continue reading >>

Statins And Beta-blockers Increase Risk Of Developing Diabetes, New Study Confirms

Statins And Beta-blockers Increase Risk Of Developing Diabetes, New Study Confirms

November 12, 2012 – There was also a borderline effect towards developing new-onset diabetes among patients who started taking beta-blockers but it was not significant after adjusting for key clinical factors. Beta-blockers, statins, and diuretics are routinely used to lower the risk of death or serious events such as heart attacks in patients with cardiovascular disease. Despite the benefits, data suggests that these medications, particularly statins, can also increase fasting glucose levels and raise a patient’s risk of developing diabetes. A new study was the first to use serial glucose measurements to determine the effect of diuretics, beta-blockers, and statins on glucose levels. DCRI fellow Lan Shen, MD, (pictured) presented the findings at the 2012 American Heart Association Scientific Sessions. More than 9,500 patients with impaired glucose tolerance and other cardiovascular risk factors were enrolled in a sub-study of the NAVIGATOR trial. This sub-study is based on a population that was naïve to treatment with beta-blockers, diuretics, and statins at baseline enrollment. Patients had glucose measurements taken every six months for the first three years then annually thereafter. Average follow-up time for the trial was 5 years for new diabetes onset and 6.5 years for vital statistics. While enrolled in the study, approximately 17 percent of patients who were beta-blocker naïve at baseline began taking beta-blockers, 22 percent who were diuretic naïve at baseline started taking diuretics, and 24 percent who were statin naïve at baseline started taking statins. Patients who began taking diuretics and statins were significantly more likely to develop new-onset diabetes than patients who did not begin taking those medications. There was also a borderline eff Continue reading >>

Beta-blockers 'increase Diabetes Risk By 50 Per Cent'

Beta-blockers 'increase Diabetes Risk By 50 Per Cent'

Beta-blockers 'increase diabetes risk by 50 per cent' Patients taking beta-blockers for their blood pressure have a 50 per cent higher risk of developing diabetes compared to being on newer drugs, researchers have revealed. For the first time, a new study reveals the risk of using the older drugs which are no longer recommended for treating high blood pressure. Patients taking beta-blockers and diuretics - standard medication for over 30 years - are at far greater risk of becoming diabetic. Not only are they less effective than newer medication, but they actually hasten and, in some cases, induce the disease in blood pressure patients - who are already at high risk. This means at least 8,000 Britons taking the older drugs are getting diabetes unnecessarily each year as a result. Until earlier this year, around two million patients have been on beta blocker based treatments at any one time. But new guidance to doctors says newer ace inhibitors and calcium channel blockers should be the first choice treatment for the millions of Britons treated for high blood pressure. The change came after research found the older drugs were only half as effective at stopping strokes and heart attacks. Beta blockers such as atenolol should no longer be prescribed for the problem, said the guidelines from the National Institute for Clinical Excellence. But now a new clinical trial released yesterday show they also bring a 50 per cent higher risk of developing diabetes. Although many patients currently taking them are being switched by their GPs to newer drugs when they go for a scheduled check-up, they remain in wide use. Beta blockers are still considered the best treatment for other conditions such as angina, and doctors have warned patients not to stop taking them without medical advi Continue reading >>

Drugs That Can Worsen Diabetes Control

Drugs That Can Worsen Diabetes Control

One of the main goals of any diabetes control regimen is keeping blood glucose levels in the near-normal range. The cornerstones of most plans to achieve that goal include following a healthy diet, getting regular exercise, and taking insulin or other medicines as necessary. However, it’s not uncommon for people with diabetes to have other medical conditions that also require taking medicines, and sometimes these drugs can interfere with efforts to control blood glucose. A few medicines, including some commonly prescribed to treat high blood pressure and heart disease, have even been implicated as the cause of some cases of diabetes. This article lists some of the medicines that can worsen blood glucose control, the reasons they have that effect, the usual magnitude of the blood glucose changes, as well as the pros and cons of using these drugs in people who have diabetes. Where the problems occur To understand how various medicines can worsen blood glucose control, it helps to understand how insulin, the hormone responsible for lowering blood glucose, works in the body. Insulin is released from the beta cells of the pancreas in response to rising levels of glucose in the bloodstream, rising levels of a hormone called GLP-1 (which is released from the intestines in response to glucose), and signals from the nerve connections to the pancreas. The secretion of insulin occurs in two phases: a rapid first phase and a delayed second phase. Both of these phases are dependent on levels of potassium and calcium in the pancreas. Insulin acts on three major organs: the liver, the muscles, and fat tissue. In the liver, insulin enhances the uptake of glucose and prevents the liver from forming new glucose, which it normally does to maintain fasting glucose levels. In muscle and f Continue reading >>

Beta Blockers

Beta Blockers

Beta blockers, also called beta-adrenergic blocking agents, treat a variety of conditions, such as high blood pressure and migraines. Find out more about this class of medication. Beta blockers, also known as beta-adrenergic blocking agents, are medications that reduce your blood pressure. Beta blockers work by blocking the effects of the hormone epinephrine, also known as adrenaline. When you take beta blockers, your heart beats more slowly and with less force, thereby reducing blood pressure. Beta blockers also help blood vessels open up to improve blood flow. Examples of beta blockers Some beta blockers mainly affect your heart, while others affect both your heart and your blood vessels. Which one is best for you depends on your health and the condition being treated. Examples of oral beta blockers include: Acebutolol (Sectral) Atenolol (Tenormin) Bisoprolol (Zebeta) Metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol-XL) Nadolol (Corgard) Nebivolol (Bystolic) Propranolol (Inderal LA, InnoPran XL) Doctors prescribe beta blockers to prevent, treat or improve symptoms in a variety of conditions, such as: High blood pressure Irregular heart rhythm (arrhythmia) Heart failure Chest pain (angina) Heart attacks Migraine Certain types of tremors Beta blockers aren't usually prescribed for blood pressure until other medications, such as diuretics, haven't worked effectively. Your doctor may prescribe beta blockers as one of several medications to lower your blood pressure, including angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, diuretics or calcium channel blockers. Beta blockers may not work as effectively for black and older people, especially when taken without other blood pressure medications. Side effects and cautions Side effects may occur in people taking beta blockers. However, many peop Continue reading >>

Drugs That Can Raise Bg

Drugs That Can Raise Bg

By the dLife Editors Some medicines that are used for treating other medical conditions can cause elevated blood sugar in people with diabetes. You may need to monitor your blood glucose more closely if you take one of the medicines listed below. It’s important to note that just because a medicine has the possibility of raising blood sugar, it does not mean the medicine is unsafe for a person with diabetes. For instance, many people with type 2 diabetes need to take a diuretic and a statin to lower blood pressure and cholesterol. In these and many other cases, the pros will almost always outweigh the cons. Don’t ever take matters of medication into your own hands. Discuss any concerns you have with your healthcare provider. Certain Antibiotics Of all the different antibiotics, the ones known as quinolones are the only ones that may affect blood glucose. They are prescribed for certain types of infection. Levofloxacin (Levaquin) Ofloxacin (Floxin) Moxifloxacin (Avelox) Ciprofloxacin (Cipro, Cipro XR, Proquin XR) Gemifloxacin (Factive) Second Generation Antipsychotics These medicines are used for a variety of mental health conditions. There is a strong association between these medicines and elevated blood sugar, and frequent monitoring is recommended. Clozapine (Clozaril) Olanzapine (Zyprexa) Paliperidone (Invega) Quietiapine (Seroquel, Seroquel XR) Risperidone (Risperdal) Aripiprazole (Abilify) Ziprasidone (Geodon) Iloperidone (Fanapt) Lurasidone (Latuda) Pemavanserin (Nuplazid) Asenapine (Saphris) Beta Blockers Beta blockers are used to treat high blood pressure and certain heart conditions. Not all available beta blockers have been shown to cause high blood sugar. Atenolol Metoprolol Propranolol Corticosteroids Corticosteroids are used to treat conditions where th Continue reading >>

Beta Blockers And High Blood Sugar Readings

Beta Blockers And High Blood Sugar Readings

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Beta Blockers and high blood sugar readings I am a 5' 8" female who weighs 135lbs. I exercise routinely, but love my chocolate! lol! I have been on a beta blocker for the past 11 years for a fast heart rate. Over the course of the past 5 years, during routine blood work, my FBS has been ranging anywhere from 102 to 128. (It should also be noted that I checked my own blood sugars one and two hours after eating on a few occasions and found that my readings went in excess of 200. On my most recent blood work a few months ago, my family doctor voiced his concern that I was indeed pre-diabetic and that I should watch what I eat. I ask him about my beta blocker and if it could cause this. He did not feel that it could, as it is a cardo select version. I decided, (with his approval) that I would wean myself off of the beta blocker and see if my blood sugars improved at all. I needed to prove this to myself...is it the medication OR do I in fact have pre-diabetes. If so, I wanted to get "on the ball" and watch my diet better. I have been off of the medication fully now for the past 12 days. My blood sugar readings have DRAMATICALLY lowered, back to the normal range! I was taking a very low dose of beta blocker, Zebeta (bisoprolol) 2.5 mg daily. This was a very welcome surprise as you can imagine. My point....I want people out there to know that this can happen. So many people are placed on beta blockers for high blood pressure etc, and may be diagnosed with diabetes. Perhaps some folks out there in this world may NOT indeed have it! Please talk to your doctor if you take one of these meds! I know that in most people it does not effect readings. This is shown Continue reading >>

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