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Do Antibiotics Affect Blood Sugar

Zero-calorie Sweeteners May Trigger Blood Sugar Risk By Screwing With Gut Bacteria

Zero-calorie Sweeteners May Trigger Blood Sugar Risk By Screwing With Gut Bacteria

When artificial sweeteners are in the news, it’s rarely positive. In the last few years, sweeteners have been linked to everything from Type 2 diabetes to cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure, and stroke. Still, products like Splenda and Sweet‘N Low remain a cornerstone of many a weight-loss strategy, mostly because doctors don’t quite understand how sweeteners contribute to disease. That may soon change, however, as results from a study, published today in Nature, point to a possible mechanism behind these adverse health effects. "Our results suggest that in a subset of individuals, artificial sweeteners may affect the composition and function of the gut microbiome" in a way that would lead to high blood-sugar levels, said Eran Elinav, an immunologist at the Weizmann Institute of Health in Israel and a co-author of the study, during a press conference yesterday. This, the researchers say, is bad for human health because when sugar levels are high in the blood, the body can’t break it down, so it ends up being stored as fat. To reach these conclusions, Elinav and his team first tested the effect of three common artificial sweeteners — aspartame, sucralose, saccharin — on rodents. They found that each of the sweeteners induced a change in blood sugar levels that surpassed that of the mice who consumed actual sugar. And later tests involving the main sweetening agent in Sweet‘N Low, saccharin, yielded similar results in both lean and obese mice. But mammals don’t actually digest artificial sweeteners — that’s why they’re "calorie-free" — so the reasons why these mice were experiencing blood-glucose alterations was still mysterious, Elinav said. Still, the researchers had an idea: maybe the bacteria that lived in the guts of the mice were int Continue reading >>

Dealing With Cough In Diabetics

Dealing With Cough In Diabetics

A constant cough can be disruptive for any person but when it comes to diabetics, it does complicate matters. For starters, a person with diabetes cannot just reach out for any over the counter (OTC) cough syrup because it is likely to be rich in sugar. Secondly, the cough is often the result of a cold and this puts additional stress on the body, causing blood sugar levels to rise. Therefore, dealing with in diabetics requires much greater care and attention. Cold, cough and blood sugar – what’s the link? If the cough and cold is the result of an infection, the body seeks to combat it by releasing greater quantities of hormones to fight the infection. While this is good for people without diabetes, it can create complications for diabetic persons because, as the American Diabetes Association explains, these hormones interfere with the action of insulin in the body. Whether it is the natural insulin produced by the pancreas or the insulin a person receives as part of anti-diabetic therapy, this hormonal interference is likely to result in higher blood sugar levels.[1](Reference) If a diabetic person has and cold that lasts for more than a week, the chronically elevated blood glucose levels can lead to other complications such as where too much acid builds up in the blood.[4](Reference) This makes it even more crucial for diabetics to deal with their cough and cold symptoms at once, without waiting for it to go away on its own. Composition of cough products Like all pharmaceutical formulations, OTC cough syrups contain certain active ingredients (the actual drugs responsible for the therapeutic effect) and some inactive materials (solvents, coloring agents, flavoring agents and preservatives) that help to give a palatable and aesthetic product. Both active as well as Continue reading >>

The Elegance Of Low Dose Naltrexone

The Elegance Of Low Dose Naltrexone

When we think about our highest intention in the natural healing of disease, our goal is to stimulate the body-mind to be the healer – to be the driver of the healing work. There can be significant consequences when we try to force changes in the body – even with the best of intentions. This is a much more of an issue when treating chronic disease. What are commonly called “side effects” are just some of the consequences of “directed” healing. Antibiotics for chronic infections are a good example. It is necessary to reduce the bacterial count in infections. Thus the goal of antibiotics is to kill off as many bacteria as possible. However, the body has many of its own mechanisms to do this. The issue with antibiotics is they kill off many important “good” bugs (located in the gut flora which lines our intestines). The gut flora is estimated to house approximately 70% of the active immune system. Some studies have shown that there may be long term negative consequences on our gut flora and beyond1,2. In some cases of chronic infections, using antibiotics may kill off bacteria, but at the same time, it is weakening the immune system – which is what we rely on to prevent infections in the first place. There are instances where antibiotics are a good choice. However, it is wiser to look for ways that engage our body’s own intelligence to solve the problem. The body-mind has its own competent and complex system to maintain health and balance (called homeostasis). Homeostasis is a beautiful thing. For instance, our bodies “know” that too much glucose in the blood stream can be dangerous. It utilizes a hormone called insulin to help tuck away any excess glucose and convert some of that glucose into glycogen for later use. This is one way that an optimal Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

What Is It? Hypoglycemia is an abnormally low level of blood sugar (blood glucose). Because the brain depends on blood sugar as its primary source of energy, hypoglycemia interferes with the brain's ability to function properly. This can cause dizziness, headache, blurred vision, difficulty concentrating and other neurological symptoms. Hypoglycemia also triggers the release of body hormones, such as epinephrine and norepinephrine. Your brain relies on these hormones to raise blood sugar levels. The release of these hormones causes additional symptoms of tremor, sweating, rapid heartbeat, anxiety and hunger. Hypoglycemia is most common in people with diabetes. For a person with diabetes, hypoglycemia occurs because of too high a dose of diabetic medication, especially insulin, or a change in diet or exercise. Insulin and exercise both lower blood sugar and food raises it. Hypoglycemia is common in people who are taking insulin or oral medications that lower blood glucose, especially drugs in the sulfonylurea group (Glyburide and others). Subscribe to Harvard Health Online for immediate access to health news and information from Harvard Medical School. Continue reading >>

Can A Simple Fever Be That Bad For A Diabetes Patient?

Can A Simple Fever Be That Bad For A Diabetes Patient?

No doubt you’ve heard the advice, “Drink plenty of fluids,” for a fever. This is because fever causes considerable fluid loss through the skin as perspiration. Your loss of fluid can be difficult to estimate, so your physician may want to assume that you’d require 1–2 more quarts of fluid daily than you’d normally need. Ordinarily, a mild fever helps to destroy the infectious agent (virus or bacteria) that caused the fever. The tendency to sleep out fever may also be beneficial. For a diabetic, however, the somnolence that you experience with fever may discourage you from checking your blood sugar, covering with insulin, drinking adequate fluid, and calling your physician every few hours. If you don’t have someone awaken you every 20 minutes, you should use aspirin, acetaminophen (Tylenol), or ibuprofen (Advil or Motrin), in accordance with your doctor’s instructions, to help fight the fever. Beware, however, that aspirin can cause false positive readings on tests for urinary ketones, so don’t even test for ketones if you are using aspirin. Never use aspirin or ibuprofen (or any of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, NSAIDs) for fever in children because of the risk of Reye’s syndrome. Excessive doses of aspirin or NSAIDs (naproxen, ibuprofen, and many others) can cause severe hypoglycemia. If at all possible, try not to use NSAIDs, as the combination of these drugs with dehydration can cause kidney failure. Acetaminophen can be highly toxic if used in doses greater than those indicated on the package label. If you have fever, the guidelines for blood sugar control and replacement of fluid are almost the same as indicated previously for vomiting. There is one difference, however. Since there is very little electrolyte loss in perspiration, it Continue reading >>

What Is Hypoglycemia?

What Is Hypoglycemia?

Hypoglycemia is a dangerous condition in which your blood sugar drops perilously low. Low blood sugar will most often make you feel shaky and weak. In extreme cases, you could lose consciousness and slip into a coma. People develop hypoglycemia for different reasons, but those with diabetes run the greatest risk of developing the condition. Glucose and Hypoglycemia Your body uses glucose as its main fuel source. Glucose is derived from food, and it's delivered to cells through the bloodstream. The body uses different hormones to regulate the amount of glucose in your blood. Glucagon, cortisol, and epinephrine are some hormones that help regulate glucose. Your body uses another hormone called insulin to help your cells absorb glucose and burn it for fuel. If your blood sugar level drops below a certain point, your body can develop various symptoms and sensations. For people with diabetes, this typically happens when blood sugar drops below 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), although the exact level may vary from person to person. Causes of Hypoglycemia Low blood sugar often happens in people with diabetes who are using insulin or other medicines that increase insulin production or its actions. Too much insulin can make your blood glucose drop too low. Low blood sugar can happen if: Your body's supply of glucose is used up too quickly. Glucose is released into your bloodstream too slowly. There's too much insulin in your bloodstream. Hypoglycemia Symptoms Although no two people will have the exact same symptoms of low blood sugar, there are some common signs to watch out for: Sudden, intense hunger Dizziness or light-headedness Excessive sweating (often sudden and without regard to temperature) Shaking or tremors Sudden feelings of anxiety Irritability, mood swings, and Continue reading >>

Do Antibiotics Cause Weight Gain

Do Antibiotics Cause Weight Gain

Antibiotics are often criticized and purported to damage to metabolism. The theory suggests that by negatively altering bacteria in your gut, antibiotics then damage your metabolism and cause weight gain, high blood sugar, etc.. But is this actually true? Lets discuss. Get help with metabolism or weight gain. Get a free gut health eBook and be notified when my print book becomes available. Healthcare providers looking to sharpen their clinical skills, check out the Future of Functional Medicine Review Clinical Newsletter. Do Antibiotics Cause Weight Gain Dr. Michael Ruscio: Hey, everyone. This is Dr. Ruscio. Let’s talk about if antibiotics actually damage your metabolism. Now, if you haven’t heard much about this argument, there is a concern, a hypothesis, that antibiotics, by damaging or altering the bacteria in your gut, can have a negative impact on your metabolism. And as you’ve been learning more about the world of bacteria in your gut called the microbiota, we are seeing associations between diabetes and obesity and alterations in these gut bacteria. So it’s understandable to think that an antibiotic, something that alters and may cause the loss of some bacteria in the gut, may have a negative impact on those bacteria, which may then translate to a negative impact on diabetes, obesity, weight gain, what-have-you. So it’s one thing to have a theory or a hypothesis or to show observation or correlation, it’s another thing to show cause. And there was a study done that looked into and tried to answer the question of: “Does the administration of antibiotic therapy affect the bacteria in the gut and does that cause impairments in metabolism?” So, I want to read you a few quotes from the study. The name of the study, “Effects of Gut Microbiota Manipula Continue reading >>

390 Drugs That Can Affect Blood Glucose Levels

390 Drugs That Can Affect Blood Glucose Levels

Knowing the drugs that can affect blood glucose levels is essential in properly caring for your diabetes patients. Some medicines raise blood sugar in patients while others might lower their levels. However, not all drugs affect patients the same way. 390 Drugs that Can Affect Blood Glucose Levels is also available for purchase in ebook format. 390 Drugs that can affect blood glucose Level Table of Contents: Drugs that May Cause Hyper- or Hypoglycemia Drugs That May Cause Hyperglycemia (High Blood Sugar) (GENERIC NAME | BRAND NAME) Abacavir | (Ziagen®) Abacavir + lamivudine,zidovudine | (Trizivir®) Abacavir + dolutegravir + lamivudine | (Triumeq®) Abiraterone | (Zytiga®) Acetazolamide | (Diamox®) Acitretin | (Soriatane®) Aletinib | (Alecensa®) Albuterol | (Ventolin®, Proventil®) Albuterol + ipratropium | (Combivent®) Aliskiren + amlodipine + hydrochlorothiazide | (Amturnide®) Aliskiren + amlodipine | (Tekamlo®) Ammonium chloride Amphotericin B | (Amphocin®, Fungizone®) Amphotericin B lipid formulations IV | (Abelcet®) Amprenavir | (Agenerase®) Anidulafungin | (Eraxis®) Aripiprazole | (Abilify®) Arsenic trioxide | (Trisenox®) Asparaginase | (Elspar®, Erwinaze®) Atazanavir | (Reyataz ®) Atazanavir + cobistat | (Evotaz®) Atenolol + chlorthalidone | (Tenoretic®) Atorvastatin | (Lipitor®) Atovaquone | (Mepron®) Baclofen | (Lioresal®) Belatacept | (Nulojix®) Benazepril + hydrochlorothiazide | (Lotension®) Drugs That May Cause Hyperglycemia (High Blood Sugar) – Continued (GENERIC NAME | BRAND NAME) Betamethasone topical | (Alphatrex®, Betatrex®, Beta-Val®, Diprolene®, Diprolene® AF, Diprolene® Lotion, Luxiq®, Maxivate®) Betamethasone +clotrimazole | (Lotrisone® topical) Betaxolol Betoptic® eyedrops, | (Kerlone® oral) Bexarotene | (Targ Continue reading >>

Daonil

Daonil

NOTICE: This Consumer Medicine Information (CMI) is intended for persons living in Australia. What is in this leaflet This leaflet answers some common questions about Daonil. It does not contain all the available information. It does not take the place of talking to your doctor, pharmacist or diabetes educator. All medicines have risks and benefits. Your doctor has weighed the risks of you taking Daonil against the benefits they expect it will have for you. If you have any concerns about taking this medicine, ask your doctor, pharmacist or diabetes educator. What Daonil is used for Daonil is used to control blood glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. This type of diabetes is also known as non-insulin-dependent diabetes (NIDDM) or maturity onset diabetes. Daonil is used in conjunction with diet control and exercise to control blood sugar. Daonil can be used alone, or in combination with insulin or other anti-diabetes medicines. Daonil lowers high blood glucose by increasing the amount of insulin released by your pancreas. If your blood glucose is not properly controlled, you may experience hypoglycaemia (low blood glucose) or hyperglycaemia (high blood glucose). High blood glucose can lead to serious problems with your heart, eyes, circulation or kidneys. If not treated promptly, these may progress to: High blood glucose usually occurs more slowly than low blood glucose. Signs of high blood glucose may include: Ask your doctor if you have any questions about why this medicine has been prescribed for you. This medicine is not expected to affect your ability to drive a car or operate machinery. There is not enough information to recommend the use of this medicine for children. Before you take Daonil When you must not take it type 1 diabetes mellitus (in Continue reading >>

Use Of Antibiotics And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes: A Population-based Case-control Study

Use Of Antibiotics And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes: A Population-based Case-control Study

Go to: Abstract Context and objective: Evidence that bacteria in the human gut may influence nutrient metabolism is accumulating. We investigated whether use of antibiotics influences the risk of developing type 2 diabetes and whether the effect can be attributed to specific types of antibiotics. We conducted a population-based case-control study of incident type 2 diabetes cases in Denmark (population 5.6 million) between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2012. Data from the Danish National Registry of Patients, the Danish National Prescription Registry, and the Danish Person Registry were combined. Results: The odds ratio (OR) associating type 2 diabetes with exposure to antibiotics of any type was 1.53 (95% confidence interval 1.50–1.55) with redemption of more than or equal to 5 versus 0–1 prescriptions. Although no individual group of antibiotics was specifically associated with type 2 diabetes risk, slightly higher ORs for type 2 diabetes were seen with narrow-spectrum and bactericidal antibiotics (OR 1.55 and 1.48) compared to broad-spectrum and bacteriostatic types of antibiotics (OR 1.31 and 1.39), respectively. A clear dose-response effect was seen with increasing cumulative load of antibiotics. The increased use of antibiotics in patients with type 2 diabetes was found up to 15 years before diagnosis of type 2 diabetes as well as after the diagnosis. Our results could support the possibility that antibiotics exposure increases type 2 diabetes risk. However, the findings may also represent an increased demand for antibiotics from increased risk of infections in patients with yet-undiagnosed diabetes. Continue reading >>

Prednisone And Diabetes: What Is The Connection?

Prednisone And Diabetes: What Is The Connection?

Prednisone is a steroid that works in a similar way to cortisol, which is the hormone normally made by the body's adrenal glands. Steroids are used to treat a wide range of conditions from autoimmune disorders to problems related to inflammation, such as arthritis. They work by reducing the activity of the body's immune system and reducing inflammation and so are useful in preventing tissue damage. However, steroids may also affect how the body reacts to insulin, a hormone that controls the level of sugar in the blood. Contents of this article: How do steroids affect blood sugar levels? Steroids can cause blood sugar levels to rise by making the liver resistant to the insulin produced by the pancreas. When blood sugar levels are high, insulin is secreted from the pancreas and delivered to the liver. When insulin is delivered to the liver, it signals it to reduce the amount of sugar it normally releases to fuel cells. Instead, sugar is transported straight from the bloodstream to the cells. This process reduces the overall blood sugar concentration. Steroids can make the liver less sensitive to insulin. They can make the liver carry on releasing sugar even if the pancreas is releasing insulin, signalling it to stop. If this continues, it causes insulin resistance, where the cells no longer respond to the insulin produced by the body or injected to control diabetes. This condition is called steroid-induced diabetes. Steroid-induced diabetes Diabetes is a condition that causes a person's blood sugar level to become too high. There are two main types of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes: in which the pancreas fails to produce any insulin. Type 2 diabetes: in which the pancreas fails to produce enough insulin, or the body's cells fail to react to the insulin produced. Steroid-induce Continue reading >>

Antibiotics Can Cause Dangerous Blood Sugar Swings In Diabetics

Antibiotics Can Cause Dangerous Blood Sugar Swings In Diabetics

Diabetes patients who take a certain class of antibiotics are more likely to have severe blood sugar fluctuations than those who take other types of the drugs, a new study finds. The increased risk was low but doctors should consider it when prescribing the class of antibiotics, known as fluoroquinolones, to people with diabetes, the researchers said. This class of antibiotics, which includes drugs such as Cipro (ciprofloxacin), Levaquin (levofloxacin) and Avelox (moxifloxacin), is commonly used to treat conditions such as urinary tract infections and community-acquired pneumonia. One expert said the study should serve as a wake-up call for doctors. "Given a number of alternatives, physicians may consider prescribing alternate antibiotics ... in the place of fluoroquinolones (particularly moxifloxacin) to patients with diabetes," said Dr. Christopher Ochner, assistant professor of pediatrics and adolescent medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, in New York City. "In general, this study demonstrates that closer attention needs to be paid to particular drug-condition interactions." The study included about 78,000 people with diabetes in Taiwan. The researchers looked at the patients' use of three classes of antibiotics: fluoroquinolones; second-generation cephalosporins (cefuroxime, cefaclor, or cefprozil); or macrolides (clarithromycin or azithromycin). The investigators also looked for any emergency-room visits or hospitalizations for severe blood sugar swings among the patients in the 30 days after they started taking the antibiotics. The results showed that patients who took fluoroquinolones were more likely to have severe blood sugar swings than those who took antibiotics in the other classes. The level of risk varied according to the specific fluor Continue reading >>

Aztreonam And Metronidazole With Alcohol; It Is Important Not To Consume Alcohol Until At Least Three Days After Treatment With These Antibiotics

Aztreonam And Metronidazole With Alcohol; It Is Important Not To Consume Alcohol Until At Least Three Days After Treatment With These Antibiotics

Antibiotics Antibiotics Definition Antibiotics are drugs that are used to treat infections caused by bacteria and other organisms, including protozoa, parasites, and fungi. Purpose Many treatments for cancer destroy disease-fighting white blood cells, thereby reducing the body's ability to fight infection. For example, bladder, pulmonary, and urinary tract infections may occur with chemotherapy . Single-celled organisms called protozoa are rarely a problem for healthy individuals. However, they can cause serious infections in individuals with low white blood cell counts. Because of the dangers that infections present for cancer patients, antibiotic treatment often is initiated before the exact nature of the infection has been determined; instead, the choice of antibiotic may depend on the site of the infection and the organism that is likely to be the cause. Often, an antibiotic that kills a broad spectrum of bacteria is chosen and several antibiotics may be used together. Description The common antibiotics that are used during cancer treatment include: Atovaquone (Mapren): antiprotozoal drug used to prevent and treat a very serious type of pneumonia called Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP), in individuals who experience serious side effects with SMZ-TMP (Sulfamethoxazole/Trimethoprim, brand name Bactrim). Aztreonam (Azactam): monobactam antibiotic used to treat gram-negative bacterial infections of the urinary and lower respiratory tracts and the female organs, and infections that are present throughout the body (systemic infections or septicemia). Cefepime (Maxipime), ceftazidime (Ceptaz, Fortaz, Tazicef, Tazidime), and ceftriaxone sodium (Rocephin): members of a group of antibiotics called cephalosporins used to treat bacterial infections of the urinary and lower Continue reading >>

A Rare But Serious Side Effect Of Levofloxacin

A Rare But Serious Side Effect Of Levofloxacin

Hypoglycemia in a geriatric patient Drugs should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of hypoglycemia. Fluoroquinolones have rarely been associated with hypoglycemia (1,2). Levofloxacine, which belongs to the fluoroquinolone group of antibiotics, has previously been reported to cause hypoglycemia in only one patient who was also receiving oral antidiabetic drugs (2). Herein, we describe an elderly patient with hypoglycemia associated with levofloxacine therapy who did use oral antidiabetic drugs or insulin. A 64-year-old female with type 2 diabetes treated only by diet was interned for urinary infection and pneumonia. She had no history of malabsorbtion or oral intolerance. The patient’s weight was 84 kg, and she was 157 cm tall (corresponding to a BMI of 34.1 kg/m2). Her current medications included coraspin, omeprazole, and atorvastatin. Cefuroxime 3 × 750 mg/day i.v. was started. During cefuroxime therapy, her blood glucose levels were within normal limits with diet. C-reactive protein level was not decreased. On the 3rd day of treatment, cefuroxime was replaced with levofloxacin (500 mg/day) because of unresponsiveness. During treatment with levofloxacin, the symptoms of diseases diminished significantly, but the patient complained of generalized weakness. On the 2nd day of levofloxacin therapy, the patient became lethargic and disoriented. Blood pressure was 126/72 mmHg, heart rate was 82 bpm and regular, and body temperature was normal. Meningial irritation signs were absent, and pupils were intermediate, symmetric, and reactive. Optic fundi were normal, and no focal neurologic deficit was detected. Other physical findings were unremarkable. Her blood glucose level was measured as 32 mg/dl. The simultaneous blood insulin level was 6.7 IU (normal r Continue reading >>

Www.cardiosmart.org

Www.cardiosmart.org

Diabetes: How to Care for Wounds Good wound care is very important if you have diabetes. Having diabetes makes it harder for wounds to heal. It also makes infection more likely because high blood sugar causes problems with your immune system. Your white blood cells kill bacteria, viruses, and fungi that cause infection. High blood sugar makes it hard for these cells to do their job. If you have a wound, carefully follow your treatment plan and take good care of yourself at home. This will help your wound heal and help your body fight infection. How often should you follow up with your doctor? • Always go to scheduled appointments. • Call your doctor right away anytime you have concerns about a wound. Often it is hard to tell how serious a wound may be by just looking at it. Your doctor needs to do a thorough exam to see what treatment you need, or to see how well treatment is working. What can help your wound heal? • Carefully follow your doctor's treatment plan, including how to clean your wound. If you have any questions or problems, call your doctor right away. • Keep your blood sugar levels within your target range. • Do not smoke. • Eat healthy foods. Your body needs good nutrition to heal. • Prevent infection by keeping your wound clean. • Do not use Betadine or hydrogen peroxide. They can injure and dry out healing tissue. Instead, use a thin layer of petroleum jelly, like Vaseline, and a nonstick bandage. • With some wounds, it may be important not to walk or put weight on a wound. Ask your doctor. • If you are on antibiotics, keep taking them and always take the amount prescribed. Stopping antibiotic treatment early can cause serious problems. When should you call your doctor? Call your doctor if you h Continue reading >>

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