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Differential Effects Of Honey, Sucrose, And Fructose On Blood Sugar Levels.

Sweet Stuffed

Sweet Stuffed

America's sweet tooth is growing. Like many other mammals, we are hooked on sugar because it is packed with energy and our bodies have evolved ways of encouraging us to consume more of it. The trouble is, foods and beverages with added sugars are plentiful today and usually cheaper on a per-calorie basis than vegetables or naturally sweet fruits. Between 1970 and 2005, consumption of added sugars in the typical American diet increased by 19% to a total of 64 kilograms per year. Last week, the American Heart Assn. issued a statement calling on Americans to cut back on added sugars of all types. Foods are sweetened with various sugars: sucrose, fructose, honey, corn syrup and more. Is there much to choose between them? Passions burn fiercely here. Some people are convinced that high fructose corn syrup has properties that link it to the fattening of America -- partly for that reason, today regular sugar is almost achieving health-food status in some circles. Others swear by less-purified brown sugars or honey. And many people don't know what all this sweet stuff even is. Here's a primer on common sweeteners, as well as some not-so-common ones. Sucrose Table sugar, or sucrose, is the familiar stuff we use in cubes or by the spoonful. We sweeten our coffee with it, bake with it and know its flavor so well that it is the yardstick to which we compare other sweet flavors. "When you say sweet, you have the image in your mind of sucrose," says Sidney Simon, a professor of neurobiology at Duke University who studies taste. Most commercial sucrose comes from sugar beets and sugar cane. The natural sugar content of the plants is refined to varying degrees to produce granulated, powdered, brown and specialty sugars, such as demerara and muscovado. Molasses, a byproduct of the refin Continue reading >>

Differential Effects Of Honey, Sucrose, And Fructose On Blood Sugar Levels.

Differential Effects Of Honey, Sucrose, And Fructose On Blood Sugar Levels.

1. J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 1990 Jul-Aug;13(6):322-5. Differential effects of honey, sucrose, and fructose on blood sugar levels. Comment in J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 1991 Jan;14(1):91-2. It is now recognized that dietary carbohydrate components influence theprevalence and severity of common degenerative diseases such as dental problems, diabetes, heart disease and obesity. Fructose and sucrose have been evaluated andcompared to glucose using glucose tolerance tests, but few such comparisons have been performed for a "natural" sugar source such as honey. In this study, 33upper trimester chiropractic students volunteered for oral glucose tolerancetesting comparing sucrose, fructose and honey during successive weeks. A 75-gmcarbohydrate load in 250 ml of water was ingested and blood sugar readings weretaken at 0, 30, 60, 90, 120 and 240 minutes. Fructose showed minimal changes inblood sugar levels, consistent with other studies. Sucrose gave higher bloodsugar readings than honey at every measurement, producing significantly (p lessthan .05) greater glucose intolerance. Honey provided the fewest subjectivesymptoms of discomfort. Given that honey has a gentler effect on blood sugarlevels on a per gram basis, and tastes sweeter than sucrose so that fewer gramswould be consumed, it would seem prudent to recommend honey over sucrose. Continue reading >>

Differential Effects Of Honey, Sucrose, And Fructose On Blood Sugar Levels.

Differential Effects Of Honey, Sucrose, And Fructose On Blood Sugar Levels.

Differential effects of honey, sucrose, and fructose on blood sugar levels. Journal article : Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics 1990 Vol.13 No.6 pp.322-325 Abstract : Thirty-three volunteers were fed a 75-g dose of carbohydrate (sucrosesucroseSubject Category: Chemicals and Chemical Groups see more details or honeyhoneySubject Category: Commodities and Products see more details ) in 250 ml of water and blood sugarblood sugarSubject Category: Chemicals and Chemical Groups see more details readings were taken at 0, 30, 60, 90, 120 and 240 min. Subjects fed fructose showed minimal changes in blood sugar levels. Those fed with sucrose gave higher blood sugar readings than those fed with honey at every measurement, producing significantly greater glucose intolerance. Honey produced the fewest subjective symptoms of discomfort. Because of these findings, together with the fact that honey tastes sweeter than sucrose and a lower level would therefore be consumed, it is suggested that it be recommended as a sweetener over sucrose. Continue reading >>

Does Sucrose Increase The Sugar Level?

Does Sucrose Increase The Sugar Level?

Your blood sugar levels vary throughout the day in response to the foods you eat, your physical activity level, your stress and even your hormones. Many of these factors can interact to increase your blood sugar levels; regularly monitoring your blood sugars with a glucometer can help you better understand how your body works. Although foods can affect different people differently, grains, flours and sugars increase blood sugar levels in almost everyone. Sucrose is a type of sugar that can elevate your blood sugar levels in the minutes and hours following its consumption. Sucrose in Foods The main source of sucrose in your diet is table sugar, as well as most sweetened foods and beverages. For example, white sugar, brown sugar and maple syrup are mainly made of sucrose, which means that any foods sweetened with these sugars will also be high in sucrose, such as cakes, cookies, fruit punches, muffins, pancakes and granola bars. Although much of the sugar naturally found in fruits is in the form of free fructose, some fruits, including melons, peaches, pineapples, oranges and dates, also provide significant amounts of sucrose, albeit less than sugary foods. Avoid sucrose and sucrose-containing foods, with the exception of fruits, to prevent your blood sugar levels from increasing dramatically after your meals. Sucrose Sucrose is a type of sugar called a disaccharide. Disaccharide means that it is a carbohydrate made from two molecules of sugar. In the case of sucrose, the two molecules are glucose and fructose. Another common disaccharide in your diet is lactose, which is made of a molecule of glucose attached to a molecule of galactose. When you eat sucrose, it is easily broken down by digestive enzymes in your digestive system into single molecules of glucose and fructo Continue reading >>

Eat, Sleep And Slim With Honey: The New Scientific Breakthrough

Eat, Sleep And Slim With Honey: The New Scientific Breakthrough

Eat, Sleep And Slim With Honey: The new scientific breakthrough 0 Reviews 'A revolutionary new, scientifically backed way to stay slim.' Daily Mail Just a spoon full of honey is all it takes to lose weight according to the sweetest, easiest diet - fall asleep and the weight will fall off. Honey has always been regarded as a food with almost magical, health-giving and healing properties. Now the latest scientific research backs it up. We are always being told that sugar is bad for us, and that is true of most types of sugar - but science shows that honey is good sugar. Just a tablespoon of honey every night before you go to bed will: Give your body exactly the right type and quantity of food it needs to burn off excess weight during the night Reduce your craving for other - bad - sugars during the day Give golden slumbers, deep long-lasting, dream-filled sleep that will help you wake up happy and refreshed Help restore your immune system and your body's natural balances Nutrition expert and former Boots chemist Mike McInnes here reveals the secrets of his revolutionary diet, giving a step by step guide to complementary meals and simple, easy resistance exercises, suitable for people of all ages and fitness levels.

The Role Of Pure Honey In The Treatment Of Diabetes Mellitus

The Role Of Pure Honey In The Treatment Of Diabetes Mellitus

Research Article - Biomedical Research (2017) Volume 28, Issue 7 The role of pure honey in the treatment of diabetes mellitus Ozgur Enginyurt 1 * , Lutfullah Cakir 1 , Ahmet Karatas 2 , Soner Cankaya 3 , Yasemin Kaya 2 , HandanTugcu H 4 , Dogan Iscanli M 5 , Necda Cankaya 6 and Seyma Yarilgac 7 1 Family Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine, Ordu University, Ordu, Turkey 2 Internal Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine, Ordu University, Ordu, Turkey 3 Department of Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine, Ordu University, Ordu, Turkey 4 Dietetics Department, Ordu University Training and Research Hospital, Ordu, Turkey 5 Emergency Medicine Department, Ankara Numune Training and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey 6 Black Sea Agricultural Research Institute, Samsun, Turkey 7 Science and Literature Faculty, Ordu, Turkey Visit for more related articles at Biomedical Research Today, there are approximately 415 million diabetics worldwide. It is expected to increase to nearly 642 million in 2040. The incidence of type 2 diabetes Mellitus in these patients is 90%. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a disease could not be provided definite improvement, although there have been numerous scientific studies on its treatment for many years. Recently, similar to the treatment for other diseases, the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus is being tested using alternative medicinal methods. One of the alternative methods is the application of pure honey. The main sweeteners in honey are fructose and glucose. The absorption of fructose in the gastrointestinal tract is slower than glucose, and metabolism of fructose occurs independently from insulin. Many studies have shown that honey has antioxidant effects, as well as healing properties for wounds. However, only few studies have examined the Continue reading >>

Honey Therapy In A Patient Volunteer With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Case Report

Honey Therapy In A Patient Volunteer With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Case Report

Pediatric Department, Ain Shams University, 4/11 El Sefarat- Misr Lltaameer Bds- Madinat Nasr- Cairo, Egypt Pediatric Department, Ain Shams University 4/11 El Sefarat-Misr Lltaameer Bds-Madinat Nasr-Cairo, Egypt Received October 08, 2013; Accepted November 13, 2013; Published November 15, 2013 Citation: Abdulrhman M (2013) Honey Therapy in a Patient Volunteer with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Case Report. J Clin Trials 3:148.doi:10.4172/2167-0870.1000148 Copyright: 2013 Abdulrhman M. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Honey; Diabetes; Coronary heart disease; Dyslipidemia; Hypertension; Neuropathy ; Retinopathy; Micro-albuminuria In spite of recent advances in the management of Diabetes Mellitus (DM) the mortality from macro-vascular complications, particularly Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) is still high. For many decades researchers have been trying to solve the puzzles surrounding the pathogenesis of diabetes and its complications, aiming at achieving the main goal; prevention or remission of diabetes; or at least prevention of its complications. These complications are responsible not only for significant morbidity and mortality but also for a large economic burden. For this; several treatment strategies, including drugs, have been used in DM to control hyperglycemia and other associated metabolic derangements; and to treat complications particularly CHD. However control of hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia, at least in some patients, has failed to prevent or reduce these complications. Honey is a natural substance produced by honey bees. It has many benefits for nutrition and Continue reading >>

Agave Nectar Vs Honey: Health Benefits

Agave Nectar Vs Honey: Health Benefits

Youve probably heard about the dangers of processed sugars and high-fructose corn syrup. And chances are youve sought out a healthier sugar source to satisfy your sweet tooth. Honey and agave nectar are both trendy alternatives right now, but which one is healthier? Both are all-natural sweeteners and less-refined than white sugar. In a head-to-head show down, you might be surprised by the results. Heres a look at the nutritional value and health benefits of these sugar substitutes. Both honey and agave nectar are considered natural products, but they differ in how they end up on the grocery store shelf. Agave nectar is actually a syrup (nectar is really just a marketing term). It comes from the fluid inside the blue agave plant. This is the same plant that is used to make tequila. Agave nectar is made by the following steps: The fluid is first extracted from the plant. The filtered juice is heated to break down its components into a simple sugar called fructose. The resulting liquid is then concentrated into a syrup. Agave nectar requires multiple processing steps before it can be consumed. Processed food may be less healthy because the process of refining foods often means losing some (or all) of its natural health benefits. Honey comes from bees. These busy little insects produce honey by collecting the nectar of plants. Unlike agave nectar, honey doesnt have to be processed before consuming. But certain brands of honey are heated (pasteurized) to prevent crystallization and to kill bacteria before storage. Raw honey is all-natural and unprocessed, making it the wiser choice. Agave nectar and honey have about the same number of calories. Both a tablespoon of agave nectar and a tablespoon of honey contain roughly 64 calories . The two are also a bit sweeter than whit Continue reading >>

Honey Vs. Sugar: Differences, Benefits, And Disadvantages

Honey Vs. Sugar: Differences, Benefits, And Disadvantages

Honey and sugar are two of the most commonly used sweeteners. Honey is often regarded as the more healthful option, but is this really the case? Both honey and sugar add sweetness to meals and snacks. However, they have different tastes, textures, and nutritional profiles. This article explores the benefits and disadvantages of both honey and sugar for health and diet. Honey contains less fructose and glucose when compared to sugar, but contains more calories. Honey and sugar are both carbohydrates , consisting of the two types of sugar: glucose and fructose. Refined fructose, which is found in sweeteners, is metabolized by the liver and has been associated with: Both fructose and glucose are broken down quickly by the body and can cause spikes in blood sugar levels. The proportions of glucose and fructose in honey and sugar are different: sugar is 50 percent fructose and 50 percent glucose honey contains 40 percent fructose and 30 percent glucose minerals, including magnesium and potassium These additional components may be responsible for some of the health benefits of honey. Sugar is higher on the glycemic index (GI) than honey, meaning it raises blood sugar levels more quickly. This is due to its higher fructose content, and the absence of trace minerals. But honey has slightly more calories than sugar, although it is sweeter, so less may be required. Both sweeteners can lead to weight gain if overused. Honey has been used since ancient times as both a sweetener and medicine. It is a viscous liquid produced by honeybees and ranges in color from straw yellow to dark brown. The bees collect nectar from flowers and mix it with enzymes to form honey before storing it in honeycomb cells to keep it fresh. Honey is associated with several benefits: More nutrients and less Continue reading >>

Honey Nutrition - Doctor Sunder

Honey Nutrition - Doctor Sunder

In this article, we review the nutritional properties and qualities of honey . Then, we do an in-depth comparison between the nutritional value of honey vs. refined sugar. At the end, we welcome all of your honey-inspired questions in the comments section. We do our best to respond personally to all of our reader's legitimate concerns. Honey contains 80 different substances important to human nutrition. The exact composition of these ingredients in honey depends a lot on the influence of plants, climate, environmental conditions, and the skills of the beekeeper. In general, raw honey will include the following micro-nutrients: Amino Acids / Proteins such a proline, phenylalanine,tyrosine, lysine, arginine, glutamic acid, histidine and valin. Antioxidants like polyphenols and phytonutrients like pinocembrin, pinostrobin, and chrysin. Enzymes called diastase (amylase), invertase (?- glucosidase), and glucose oxidase. Minerals including calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorous, potassium, selenium, and zinc. Organic Acids including acetic, butyric, citric, formic, gluconic, lactic, malic, pyroglutamic, and succinic acid. Vitamins such as vitamin C, vitamin A, vitamin K, vitamin D, and the vitamin B complex - vitamin B6, thiamin, riboflavin, pantothenic acid and niacin. Honey also contains hormones, as well as antimicrobial and antibacterial factors. Further, raw honey, due to its natural and unprocessed nature, is likely to include bee pollen and propolis. Raw honey is rich in vitamin C. As one of the most effective vitamins available, vitamin C has a multitude of nutritional benefits. The top 3 benefits of vitamin C found in honey include: It helps to protect the body from infections and disease. It's good for the skin and can be used to soothe burns, rashes and dry skin. H Continue reading >>

Honey And Diabetes: The Importance Of Natural Simple Sugars In Diet For Preventing And Treating Different Type Of Diabetes

Honey And Diabetes: The Importance Of Natural Simple Sugars In Diet For Preventing And Treating Different Type Of Diabetes

Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity Volume 2018 (2018), Article ID 4757893, 12 pages Honey and Diabetes: The Importance of Natural Simple Sugars in Diet for Preventing and Treating Different Type of Diabetes 1Life Sciences Institute King Michael I of Romania, University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine, Cluj-Napoca, Romania 2Faculty of Animal Breeding and Biotechnology, Technology Department, University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine, Cluj-Napoca, Romania Correspondence should be addressed to Adela Ramona Moise Received 21 August 2017; Revised 21 November 2017; Accepted 24 December 2017; Published 4 February 2018 Copyright 2018 Otilia Bobi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Diabetes is a metabolic disorder with multifactorial and heterogeneous etiologies. Two types of diabetes are common among humans: type 1 diabetes that occurs when the immune system attacks and destroys insulin and type 2 diabetes, the most common form, that may be caused by several factors, the most important being lifestyle, but also may be determined by different genes. Honey was used in folk medicine for a long time, but the health benefits were explained in the last decades, when the scientific world was concerned in testing and thus explaining the benefits of honey. Different studies demonstrate the hypoglycemic effect of honey, but the mechanism of this effect remains unclear. This review presents the experimental studies completed in the recent years, which support honey as a novel antidiabetic agent that might be of potential significance for the management of diabete Continue reading >>

We Know Too Much Sugar Is Bad For Us, But Do Different Sugars Have Different Healtheffects?

We Know Too Much Sugar Is Bad For Us, But Do Different Sugars Have Different Healtheffects?

We know too much sugar is bad for us, but do different sugars have different healtheffects? The type of sugar in popular soft drinks varies from country to country even if the brand name is the same. from shutterstock.com We know too much sugar is bad for us, but do different sugars have different healtheffects? Postdoctural Research Fellow in Nutritional Biochemistry, Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute Bronwyn Kingwell receives funding from the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia. Pia Varsamis and Robyn Larsen do not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organization that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment. Our recent article published in the Medical Journal of Australia found that Australian and European soft drinks contained higher concentrations of glucose, and less fructose, than soft drinks in the United States. The total glucose concentration of Australian soft drinks was on average 22% higher than in US formulations. We compared the composition of sugars in four popular, globally marketed brands Coca-Cola, Fanta, Sprite and Pepsi using samples from Australia, Europe and the US. While the total sugar concentration did not differ significantly between brands or geographical location, there were differences between countries in the concentrations of particular sugars, even when drinks were marketed under the same trade name. Sucrose is made up of one glucose molecule and one fructose molecule. from shutterstock.com Whether these differences have distinct effects on long-term health is currently unclear. Certainly, over-consumption of either glucose or fructose will contribute to weight gain , which is associated with a host of health c Continue reading >>

Questions And Answers About Fructose

Questions And Answers About Fructose

What is fructose? Fructose is a monosaccharide, or single sugar, that has the same chemical formula as glucose but a different molecular structure. Sometimes called fruit sugar, fructose is found in fruit, some vegetables, honey, and other plants. Fructose and other sugars are carbohydrates, an important source of energy for the body. What other types of sugars are there? The food supply contains a variety of sugars called monosaccharides (single sugar units like fructose and glucose) and disaccharides (two monosaccharides linked together). Glucose is the main source of energy for the body because most complex sugars and carbohydrates break down into glucose during digestion. Starches contain many single sugar units linked together. The various sugars perform different functions in the body, but they all can provide energy. Sucrose is a disaccharide that contains equal parts of glucose and fructose. Known as table or white sugar, sucrose is found naturally in sugar cane and sugar beets. Other sugars in foods and beverages include: Lactose Disaccharide containing glucose and galactose Naturally occurring in milk Maltose Disaccharide containing two glucoses Crystallized from starch Dextrose Another name for glucose Crystallized from sugar cane, sugar beets and starches Corn Syrup Primarily single glucose units Produced from corn starch High Fructose Corn Syrup Primarily a mixture of glucose and fructose single units Produced from corn starch Is fructose safe? High fructose corn syrup and all other sugars are “generally recognized as safe” by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The Surgeon General's Report on Nutrition and Health, the National Academy of Sciences report Diet and Health, and Healthy People 2000: National Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Objec Continue reading >>

Sugar Explained

Sugar Explained

You've probably heard the terms fructose, glucose, lactose and sucrose before, and you may know that they're all types of sugar. But do you know how they differ from one another, or whether some are better for you than others? Use our handy guide to shed some light on the secrets of sugar... What are complex and simple carbohydrates? Carbohydrates are classified into two basic groups, complex and simple. Complex carbohydrates are composed of multiple simple sugars, joined together by chemical bonds. The more chains and branches of simple sugars, the more complex a carbohydrate is and in turn, the longer it takes to be broken down by the body and the less impact it has on blood sugar levels. Examples of complex carbohydrates include wholegrains such as jumbo oats, brown rice, spelt, rye and barley. Simple carbohydrates are either monosaccharides (one sugar molecule) or disaccharides (two sugar molecules). They are digested quickly and release sugars rapidly into the bloodstream. The two main monosaccharides are glucose and fructose. The two major disaccharides are sucrose (composed of glucose and fructose) and lactose (which is made up of galactose and glucose). Glucose What is glucose? Glucose is the primary source of energy your body uses and every cell relies on it to function. When we talk about blood sugar we are referring to glucose in the blood. When we eat carbohydrates, our body breaks them down into units of glucose. When blood glucose levels rise, cells in the pancreas release insulin, signalling cells to take up glucose from the blood. As the cells absorb sugar from the blood, levels start to drop. The nutritional profile of glucose The glycemic index is a ranking of how quickly foods make your blood sugar levels rise after eating them. High GI foods are very Continue reading >>

Differential Effects Of Honey, Sucrose And Fructose On Blood Sugar Levels

Differential Effects Of Honey, Sucrose And Fructose On Blood Sugar Levels

It is now recognized that dietary carbohydrate components influence the prevalence and severity of common degenerative diseases such as dental problems, diabetes, heart disease and obesity. Fructose and sucrose have been evaluated and compared to glucose using glucose tolerance tests, but few such comparisons have been performed for a "natural" sugar source such as honey. In this study, 33 upper trimester chiropractic students volunteered for oral glucose tolerance testing comparing sucrose, fructose and honey during successive weeks. A 75-gm carbohydrate load in 250 ml of water was ingested and blood sugar readings were taken at 0, 30, 60, 90, 120 and 240 minutes. Fructose showed minimal changes in blood sugar levels, consistent with other studies. Sucrose gave higher blood sugar readings than honey at every measurement, producing significantly (p less than .05) greater glucose intolerance. Honey provided the fewest subjective symptoms of discomfort. Given that honey has a gentler effect on blood sugar levels on a per gram basis, and tastes sweeter than sucrose so that fewer grams would be consumed, it would seem prudent to recommend honey over sucrose. Do you want to read the rest of this article? ... The effective use of honey in diabetes is advised due to its multicharacteristics constituents mainly the presence of abundant antioxidants. Shambaugh et al. (1990) recruited 33 students for oral glucose tolerance test comparing sucrose, fructose and honey. Fructose showed slight adjustment in blood sugar, while sucrose gave upper blood sugar readings than honey at every measurement producing significantly greater glucose intolerance and this concludes that honey has effect on blood sugar levels. ... Continue reading >>

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