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Diabetic Coma Treatment First Aid

> Hyperglycemia And Diabetic Ketoacidosis

> Hyperglycemia And Diabetic Ketoacidosis

When blood glucose levels (also called blood sugar levels) are too high, it's called hyperglycemia. Glucose is a sugar that comes from foods, and is formed and stored inside the body. It's the main source of energy for the body's cells and is carried to each through the bloodstream. But even though we need glucose for energy, too much glucose in the blood can be unhealthy. Hyperglycemia is the hallmark of diabetes — it happens when the body either can't make insulin (type 1 diabetes) or can't respond to insulin properly (type 2 diabetes). The body needs insulin so glucose in the blood can enter the cells to be used for energy. In people who have developed diabetes, glucose builds up in the blood, resulting in hyperglycemia. If it's not treated, hyperglycemia can cause serious health problems. Too much sugar in the bloodstream for long periods of time can damage the vessels that supply blood to vital organs. And, too much sugar in the bloodstream can cause other types of damage to body tissues, which can increase the risk of heart disease and stroke, kidney disease, vision problems, and nerve problems in people with diabetes. These problems don't usually show up in kids or teens with diabetes who have had the disease for only a few years. However, they can happen in adulthood in some people, particularly if they haven't managed or controlled their diabetes properly. Blood sugar levels are considered high when they're above someone's target range. The diabetes health care team will let you know what your child's target blood sugar levels are, which will vary based on factors like your child's age. A major goal in controlling diabetes is to keep blood sugar levels as close to the desired range as possible. It's a three-way balancing act of: diabetes medicines (such as in Continue reading >>

First Aid Management Of Diabetic Emergencies

First Aid Management Of Diabetic Emergencies

Diabetes mellitus is a chronic medical condition that is commonly prevalent and increasing in incidence throughout the world. It is a clinical syndrome characterized by hyperglycemia (high blood sugar level) due to relative or absolute deficiency of insulin (a hormone produced by the pancreas to regulate glucose metabolism in human body). This long standing metabolic derangement is associated with structural as well as functional changes in cells affecting all the systems of the body. There are various types of diabetes mellitus, • Type 1- Is an autoimmune type of diabetes. And due to absolute deficiency of insulin. Commonly seen in children and young adults. • Type 2- Adult onset disease and due to insulin resistant in target organ. Has a genetic predisposition. • Gestational diabetes mellitus – diabetes during pregnancy. • Other causes- Acromegaly- excessive growth hormone secretion Cushing’s syndrome Thyrotoxicosis- excessive thyroxin hormone secretion Drug induce- corticosteroid, thiazide diuretics, phenytoin Viral infection- congenital rubella syndrome, mumps, coxsackie B Associated genetic conditions- Down’s syndrome, Klinefelter syndrome There are various complications of diabetes mellitus Acute – o Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) o Non ketotic hyperosmolar coma o Hypoglycemia Chronic – o Nephropathy – damage to kidney o Neuropathy – damage to nerves o Retinopathy – damage to eyes Out of above conditions three acute conditions require prompt first aid and emergency measures to save the life of the patient as well as to prevent lifelong disability. First aid training should include identification of these conditions clinically and necessary first aid measures to be taken in each of these conditions. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) management- This Continue reading >>

Talk:diabetic Coma

Talk:diabetic Coma

Links from this article with broken #section links : [[diabetes mellitus#complications|acute complications]] You can remove this template after fixing the problems | FAQ | Report a problem Ideal sources for Wikipedia's health content are defined in the guideline Wikipedia:Identifying reliable sources (medicine) and are typically review articles. Here are links to possibly useful sources of information about Diabetic coma. PubMed provides review articles from the past five years (limit to free review articles or to systematic reviews) The TRIP database provides clinical publications about evidence-based medicine. Other potential sources include: Centre for Reviews and Dissemination and CDC WikiProject Medicine [hide](Rated Start-class, Mid-importance) This article is within the scope of WikiProject Medicine, which recommends that medicine-related articles follow the Manual of Style for medicine-related articles and that biomedical information in any article use high-quality medical sources. Please visit the project page for details or ask questions at Wikipedia talk:WikiProject Medicine. Start This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale. Mid This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale. Moved in from Talk: Diabetes Shock It's fair to point out that the origindkkal author of this piece wanted it spelt CHOCK - please see (slightly edited) text below from AntonioMartin who said (inter alia): I have to tell you that the word chock needs to be changed back on the title from shock to chock. ( ... ) how doctors like spelling the word that describes a sugar reaction. ( ... ) doctors have told me that the word Shock means something different to them, like the shock from seeing something big happen, I guess. Having s Continue reading >>

Insulin Shock: Warning Signs And Treatment Options

Insulin Shock: Warning Signs And Treatment Options

What is insulin shock? After taking an insulin shot, a person with diabetes might on occasion forget to eat (or eat less than they normally do). If this happens, they may end up with too much insulin in their blood. This, in turn, can lead to hypoglycemia, also called low blood sugar. A serious condition called insulin shock may occur if a person: ignores mild hypoglycemia takes too much insulin by mistake misses a meal completely does excessive unusual exercise without changing their carbohydrate intake Insulin shock is a diabetic emergency. It involves symptoms that, if left untreated, can lead to diabetic coma, brain damage, and even death. How insulin works When we consume food or beverages that contain carbohydrates, the body converts them into glucose. Glucose is a type of sugar that fuels the body, giving it the energy it needs to perform everyday functions. Insulin is a hormone that works like a key. It opens the door in the body’s cells so they can absorb glucose and use it as fuel. People with diabetes may lack enough insulin or have cells that aren’t able to use insulin as they should. If the cells of the body aren’t able to absorb the glucose properly, it causes excess glucose in blood. This is called high blood glucose, which is linked with a number of health issues. High blood glucose can cause eye and foot problems, heart disease, stroke, kidney problems, and nerve damage. Insulin shots help people with diabetes use glucose more efficiently. Taking an insulin shot before eating helps the body absorb and use glucose from the food. The result is a more balanced and healthy blood sugar level. Usually, it works great. Sometimes, however, things go wrong. What causes insulin shock? Having too much insulin in your blood can lead to having too little gluco Continue reading >>

Diabetic Coma

Diabetic Coma

Diabetic coma is a reversible form of coma found in people with diabetes mellitus. It is a medical emergency.[1] Three different types of diabetic coma are identified: Severe low blood sugar in a diabetic person Diabetic ketoacidosis (usually type 1) advanced enough to result in unconsciousness from a combination of a severely increased blood sugar level, dehydration and shock, and exhaustion Hyperosmolar nonketotic coma (usually type 2) in which an extremely high blood sugar level and dehydration alone are sufficient to cause unconsciousness. In most medical contexts, the term diabetic coma refers to the diagnostical dilemma posed when a physician is confronted with an unconscious patient about whom nothing is known except that they have diabetes. An example might be a physician working in an emergency department who receives an unconscious patient wearing a medical identification tag saying DIABETIC. Paramedics may be called to rescue an unconscious person by friends who identify them as diabetic. Brief descriptions of the three major conditions are followed by a discussion of the diagnostic process used to distinguish among them, as well as a few other conditions which must be considered. An estimated 2 to 15 percent of diabetics will suffer from at least one episode of diabetic coma in their lifetimes as a result of severe hypoglycemia. Types[edit] Severe hypoglycemia[edit] People with type 1 diabetes mellitus who must take insulin in full replacement doses are most vulnerable to episodes of hypoglycemia. It is usually mild enough to reverse by eating or drinking carbohydrates, but blood glucose occasionally can fall fast enough and low enough to produce unconsciousness before hypoglycemia can be recognized and reversed. Hypoglycemia can be severe enough to cause un Continue reading >>

First Aid/diabetes

First Aid/diabetes

Hypoglycemia is a diabetic condition where the body has an insufficient amount of blood sugar. It presents suddenly and should always be considered an emergency. Lack of food (low glucose) Excessive exercise Too much insulin Vomited meal The hypoglycemic victim will present with the following symptoms and may appear to be under the influence of drugs or alcohol. It can also be confused with stroke or cardiac disorders. Pale, cool, clammy Dizziness, weakness Hunger Confusion (like being drunk) Strong, rapid pulse (May be normal in some patients) Seizures When hypoglycemia is suspected, notify EMS immediately. The victim should be transported to a hospital as soon as possible. Treat the victim for shock and monitor their vital signs, including blood sugar readings (if possible). If the patient is conscious and able to swallow, administer any form of glucose (candy juice, soda, Monogel) carefully. Only give crushed glucose, glucose gel and/or very small amounts of fluid behind the lips of an unconscious victim as objects or fluid in the oral cavity easily can become an airway obstruction. Some victims carry with them glucagon injections as a rapid treatment for severe insulin shock. The victim should know how to administer it, and should administer it themselves. Hyperglycemia is a condition in which the body's blood sugar level is too high to maintain. This condition presents less commonly than hypoglycemia and usually occurs very slowly, over the course of several days. Although it is most commonly observed in diabetics, a mild form can also occur in anyone who consumes too much sugar. While the mild form can be harmless, aside from a general feeling of malaise, hyperglycemia in a diabetic is a serious, potentially life threatening situation that requires prompt identifi Continue reading >>

Diabetic Coma

Diabetic Coma

The three types of diabetic coma include diabetic ketoacidosis coma, hyperosmolar coma and hypoglycaemic coma. Diabetic coma is a medical emergency and needs prompt medical treatment. Uncontrolled blood glucose levels may lead to hyperglycaemia or hypoglycaemia. Low or persistently high blood glucose levels mean your diabetes treatment needs to be adjusted. Speak to your doctor or registered diabetes healthcare professional. Prevention is always the best strategy. If it is a while since you have had diabetes education, make an appointment with your diabetes educator for a review. On this page: Diabetes mellitus is a condition characterised by high blood glucose (sugar) levels. Uncontrolled diabetes may lead to a diabetic coma or unconsciousness. The three types of coma associated with diabetes are diabetic ketoacidosis coma, hyperosmolar coma and hypoglycaemic coma. Diabetic ketoacidosis coma Diabetic ketoacidosis typically occurs in people with type 1 diabetes, which was previously known as juvenile diabetes or insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), though it can occasionally occur in type 2 diabetes. This type of coma is triggered by the build-up of chemicals called ketones. Ketones are strongly acidic and cause the blood to become too acidic. When there is not enough insulin circulating, the body cannot use glucose for energy. Instead, fat is broken down and then converted to ketones in the liver. The ketones can build up excessively when insulin levels remain too low. Common causes of ketoacidosis include a missed dose of insulin or an acute infection in a person with type 1 diabetes. Ketoacidosis may be the first sign that a person has developed type 1 diabetes. Symptoms of ketoacidosis Symptoms of ketoacidosis are: extreme thirst lethargy frequent urination ( Continue reading >>

Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary - Pacific

Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary - Pacific

Introduction Some medical conditions can cause a casualty to become extremely ill and require immediate first aid and emergency medical care. There may be no warning signals. In some cases the person may feel ill or feel something is wrong. CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC Introduction These can include: Diabetes Convulsions Heat Emergencies Hypothermia Childbirth?? CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC Diabetes A diabetic emergency can happen only to someone who has diabetes. Diabetic emergencies are caused by an imbalance in the person’s sugar and insulin levels. Any imbalance can be an emergency. CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC Hyperglycemia When the insulin level in the body is too low, the sugar will be come too high causing “hyperglycemiaâ€. This can then lead to a diabetic coma. CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC Hypoglycemia When the insulin is too high, the person will develop a low sugar level, causing hypoglycemia. It is caused by the diabetic: 1. Taking too much insulin 2. Failing to eat enough 3. Overexercising and burning of sugar faster than normal CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC Hypoglycemia The small amount of sugar is used up rapidly, and there is not enough for the brain to work. This will cause the person to become unconscious. CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC Signs and Symptoms of Diabetes There is a difference between the signs and symptoms of hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia - however the major ones are similar. 1. Changes in consciousness including dizziness, drowsiness and confusion, leading to coma 2. Rapid breathing and pulse 3. Feeling and looking ill CANADIAN COAST GUARD AUXILIARY - PACIFIC First Aid for Diabetes The first aid treatment for both hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia is the sa Continue reading >>

Signs And Symptoms Of Diabetic Coma And Its First Aid

Signs And Symptoms Of Diabetic Coma And Its First Aid

What are the Signs and Symptoms for Diabetic Coma? Extreme rise in the level of your blood sugar or extreme lowering of the level of your blood sugar is generally the usual sign and symptom noticed before a sudden diabetic coma attack. People suffering from high levels of blood sugar may experience the following before a diabetic coma: Increased thirst for water Frequent urgency of urinating Tiredness Vertigo and feeling of vomiting Breathlessness Pain in stomach Breath odor seems to be fruity Feeling of dry mouth Increased heartbeat People suffering from low levels of blood sugar may experience before a diabetic coma: Nervousness or weakness Anxiousness Tiredness Increased production of body sweat Starvation Nausea Light headedness Trouble in normal speaking Ambiguity/ confusion Hypoglycemia unawareness is one syndrome which happens to people with prolonged diabetic conditions. People under such syndrome cannot understand the signals of dropped blood sugar in them. All the diabetic patients should check our sugar level in the blood at regular intervals. If possible it is suggested to buy diabetes device which can give you correct information on your blood sugar levels. Thus you would be able to remain alert about the growth of diabetes in the body and get immediate medical treatment. You can remain aware of the conditions of diabetes and can support yourselves better during emergencies. Diabetic coma is a severe medical emergency that needs immediate support. Dial 911 immediately for support if you start feeling like somebody with you who has diabetes is about to faint or has already fainted. Any person suffering from diabetes can get affected by diabetic coma. People with diabetes of the type 1 are in bigger risk due to hypoglycemia and diabetic ketoacidosis. People w Continue reading >>

First Aid For People With Diabetes

First Aid For People With Diabetes

The prevalence of diabetes increased 382% from 1988 to 2014. According to the National Diabetes Statistics Report, this growth correlates with the upsurge of visits to the emergency room from people in a life-threatening diabetic crisis. As the condition continues to rise so does the likelihood of providing first aid for someone with diabetes. Understanding Diabetes First-aid providers have important choices to make before providing care to a diabetic. The best way to effectively manage a diabetic emergency is through understanding the mechanisms behind the medical condition. Every cell in the body requires glucose as a foundation of energy. People with diabetes, though needing glucose, have an inability to process, or metabolize, it efficiently because the pancreas is either producing too little insulin or none at all—either way, glucose can accumulate to dangerously high levels. A healthy pancreas regulates the production of insulin proportionate to the amount of glucose in the blood. Classification of Diabetes Type 1 diabetes is primarily an autoimmune condition manifesting in children and young adults. These people do not produce insulin; they require routine injections of insulin to aid in glucose metabolism. Without insulin injections type 1 diabetics cannot use the sugar in their blood for energy. People with Type 2 diabetes produce small amounts of insulin, or they cannot properly use the insulin hormone, also known as insulin resistance. This condition usually develops later in life. Many people with type 2 diabetes use diet, exercise, and other non-insulin medications. Some Type 2 diabetics however, may require supplemental insulin. What is a Diabetic Emergency? With six million people using insulin in the United States, the incidence of too much or too litt Continue reading >>

Diabetic

Diabetic

Classification There are two different categories of emergencies when it comes to diabetes. Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) and Hyperglycemia (high blood sugar). Below is a little information and some signs and symptoms of each. Hyperglycemia Hyperglycemia (high blood sugar)- onset of this condition is usually slower, and may occur when the diabetic consumes a large amount of sugar when they are remotely inactive. It may also be a sign of ketoacidosis. Hot dry skin Extreme thirst, or excessive thirst Frequent need to urinate Smell of acetone (nail polish remover) on the persons breath Drowsiness Unconsciousness, which may lead into diabetic coma if untreated Blurred vision Treatment for Hyperglycemia Do not give the person something sweet to eat or drink as it will raise their blood sugar even more. Do not give the person an insulin shot. If the person is conscious and able, allow them to give themselves a shot. If they ask, you may give assistance. call a 911 or bring the person to the ER if blood sugar is abnormally high, or if person is unconscious. If help is delayed, give the person sugar free liquids. Hypoglycemia Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar)- the onset of this imbalance is usually rapid, and commonly happens when the diabetic is physically active and are not doing enough to maintain their sugar levels. Pale skin Weak and tired Confused (may act drunk) Aggressive or cranky Hungry Excessive sweating Rapid pulse May go to sleep and become unconscious Seizure Treatment for Hypoglycemia A diabetic should always try to carry something sweet with them, be it a non-diet soda, fruit, or some candy in case they go ‘low’. Administering this sweet drink or food item will help reverse the effects of hypoglycemia and raise the persons’ blood sugar levels. Glucose tabs a Continue reading >>

How To Treat Insulin Shock

How To Treat Insulin Shock

Edit Article Four Parts:Spotting the signs of insulin shockResponding quicklyGetting help from emergency servicesAvoiding future instances of insulin shockCommunity Q&A A person suffering from diabetes can experience low blood sugar, as diabetes prevents the body from regulating blood sugar levels. Early warning symptoms of insulin shock include the shakes, confusion or aggression, cold and sweaty skin, paleness and feeling tired, hungry or claiming to have a headache. All of this can happen rapidly when the blood sugar levels are low. And once a diabetic person goes into shock, he or she is liable to quickly become unconscious. Insulin shock is a medical emergency in need of immediate response. Note: This article is for a person without knowledge of diabetes care who needs to give first aid to a diabetic. If you are not familiar with invasive testing for blood sugar levels or giving injections, do not attempt either; as such, these are not covered in this article. 1 Recognize the symptoms of insulin shock. If a person begins to show any or all of the following symptoms, respond quickly to decrease the severity of the attack: The shakes Dizziness Weakness The sweats Headache Nervousness Moodiness (a key sign; may be irritability, confusion, anger, aggression, etc.) Increased heart rate Hunger Pale skin Disoriented behavior. 2 Expect the symptoms to begin and progress very quickly. Be aware that sometimes people mistake a diabetic person as someone who has drunk too much alcohol (aggression, slurring, sweating, odor, etc.). It may help to look for a medic bracelet but, provided you are safe, try to attend to helping the person regardless of the cause of the behavior. If the person is very aggressive, get help. It can be difficult sometimes to argue with a very determined Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

This week is Diabetes Week 2017 in the UK. Every day, 65 people in the UK die early as a result of diabetes. It is important to know how to help a diabetic whose life is in danger. What is it? Diabetes is a condition where someone is unable to adequately regulate their blood glucose levels. The body produces the hormone insulin which helps the body burn off sugars. If someone’s body has problems with insulin production, they will develop diabetes. Type 1 Diabetes This usually develops early in life and is the most common type of diabetes in children. It occurs when the body is unable to produce any insulin. Type 1 diabetes is treated with insulin injections, or by using an insulin pump. This is the more widespread type. It tends to develop later in life, and is often linked to obesity. Type 2 diabetes develops when the body is unable to make enough insulin, or when the insulin that is produced does not work properly (known as insulin resistance). Type 2 Diabetes is controlled by diet, exercise or oral medication – or a combination of all 3. First aid treatment for diabetes is more likely to be necessary for low blood sugar levels than high. This is because high blood sugar levels usually build over a few days or weeks, whereas low levels can come on very fast. Blood sugar can drop very quickly if the person has missed a meal or done any strenuous exercise. If you are looking after someone who develops weight loss, excessive urination, thirst and tiredness, these are symptoms of hyperglycaemia and they should get urgent medical attention. If they get worse, begin to get drowsy and start to lose consciousness, phone for an ambulance. Low Blood Sugar/Hypoglycaemia Blood glucose levels can drop very fast if someone who is diabetic has skipped a meal, taken a lot of exer Continue reading >>

Diabetic Coma And Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetic Coma And Type 2 Diabetes

A diabetic coma could happen when your blood sugar gets too high -- 600 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or more -- causing you to become very dehydrated. It usually affects people with type 2 diabetes that isn’t well-controlled. It’s common among those who are elderly, chronically ill, and disabled. Doctors aren’t sure why, but they think they these people may not realize they’re thirsty or may not be able to get enough to drink. This is a serious condition, and if it isn’t spotted soon and treated quickly, it could be fatal. Knowing the symptoms can help you stay safe. If you have diabetes and you’ve had a heavy thirst and gone to the bathroom more often than usual for a few weeks, check with your doctor -- especially if your blood sugar isn’t well-controlled. As your body loses more and more water, you may notice: Drowsiness Altered mental state Restlessness Inability to speak Visual problems Paralysis These factors may lead to dehydration and coma: Once your doctor spots the early signs, he may send you to the hospital. You’ll get an IV to replace lost fluids and electrolytes such as potassium. And you’ll get insulin or other medication to control your blood sugar. The coma can lead to death if left untreated. Take these simple steps to help protect yourself: Check your blood sugar regularly, as your doctor recommends. Know your target blood sugar ranges and what to do if the readings are too high. Plan how often to check your blood sugar when you’re sick. Take extra care of yourself if you’re ill. Continue reading >>

First Aid For Hyperglycemia

First Aid For Hyperglycemia

Hyperglycemia refers to a condition that results in high blood glucose levels. It usually occurs in undiagnosed diabetics or diabetics who have not taken their insulin or any other medication to drop glucose levels. This can also be caused by having a heavy meal containing more carbohydrates than the administered amount of insulin can handle. Hyperglycemia is opposite to the condition called, hypoglycemia that results from low blood glucose levels. When your blood glucose levels are drastically lowered down, the body relies on a backup system i.e. burning fats for energy. However, the brain only utilizes glucose as a fuel of energy as it cannot burn fat, thus making the person experience dizziness and confusion. Hyperglycemia on the other hand occurs due to high glucose level, which is often caused due to insufficient insulin produced by the pancreas. Insulin is a hormone responsible for breaking down carbohydrates. Without insulin, carbohydrates cannot be broken down into soluble form that the cells can absorb to generate energy. Therefore, in this case also, fats are burnt down. A diabetic has to take insulin medications to be able to break down carbohydrates. Thus, skipping doses may lead to the symptoms of hyperglycemia. Other causes of hyperglycemia include infections, diseases, stress and reduced physical activity. Symptoms Lethargy Increased thirst as the body is trying to drain out sugar from the system Frequent urination Dry skin Rapid heartbeat Deep yet fatigued breathing Drowsiness Weight loss Skin and breath smell like acetone Treatment Drink plenty of water as it helps prevent dehydration and flush out excess sugar from your system. You should exercise regularly to maintain sugar levels and prevent it from rising. Consult your doctor about the medications, Continue reading >>

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