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Diabetes Vomiting Low Blood Sugar

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

What Is It? Diabetic ketoacidosis is a potentially fatal complication of diabetes that occurs when you have much less insulin than your body needs. This problem causes the blood to become acidic and the body to become dangerously dehydrated. Diabetic ketoacidosis can occur when diabetes is not treated adequately, or it can occur during times of serious sickness. To understand this illness, you need to understand the way your body powers itself with sugar and other fuels. Foods we eat are broken down by the body, and much of what we eat becomes glucose (a type of sugar), which enters the bloodstream. Insulin helps glucose to pass from the bloodstream into body cells, where it is used for energy. Insulin normally is made by the pancreas, but people with type 1 diabetes (insulin-dependent diabetes) don't produce enough insulin and must inject it daily. Your body needs a constant source of energy. When you have plenty of insulin, your body cells can get all the energy they need from glucose. If you don't have enough insulin in your blood, your liver is programmed to manufacture emergency fuels. These fuels, made from fat, are called ketones (or keto acids). In a pinch, ketones can give you energy. However, if your body stays dependent on ketones for energy for too long, you soon will become ill. Ketones are acidic chemicals that are toxic at high concentrations. In diabetic ketoacidosis, ketones build up in the blood, seriously altering the normal chemistry of the blood and interfering with the function of multiple organs. They make the blood acidic, which causes vomiting and abdominal pain. If the acid level of the blood becomes extreme, ketoacidosis can cause falling blood pressure, coma and death. Ketoacidosis is always accompanied by dehydration, which is caused by high Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia And Low Blood Sugar | Symptoms And Causes

Hypoglycemia And Low Blood Sugar | Symptoms And Causes

What are the symptoms of hypoglycemia? While each child may experience symptoms of hypoglycemia differently, the most common include: shakiness dizziness sweating hunger headache irritability pale skin color sudden moodiness or behavior changes, such as crying for no apparent reason clumsy or jerky movements difficulty paying attention or confusion What causes hypoglycemia? The vast majority of episodes of hypoglycemia in children and adolescents occur when a child with diabetes takes too much insulin, eats too little, or exercises strenuously or for a prolonged period of time. For young children who do not have diabetes, hypoglycemia may be caused by: Single episodes: Stomach flu, or another illness that may cause them to not eat enough fasting for a prolonged period of time prolonged strenuous exercise and lack of food Recurrent episodes: accelerated starvation, also known as “ketotic hypoglycemia,” a tendency for children without diabetes, or any other known cause of hypoglycemia, to experience repeated hypoglycemic episodes. medications your child may be taking a congenital (present at birth) error in metabolism or unusual disorder such as hypopituitarism or hyperinsulinism. Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar) In People Without Diabetes - Topic Overview

Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar) In People Without Diabetes - Topic Overview

Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is most common in people who have diabetes. If you have already been diagnosed with diabetes and need more information about low blood sugar, see the topics: You may have briefly felt the effects of low blood sugar when you've gotten really hungry or exercised hard without eating enough. This happens to nearly everyone from time to time. It's easy to correct and usually nothing to worry about. But low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, can also be an ongoing problem. It occurs when the level of sugar in your blood drops too low to give your body energy. Ongoing problems with low blood sugar can be caused by: Medicines. Metabolic problems. Alcohol use. Symptoms can be different depending on how low your blood sugar level drops. Mild hypoglycemia can make you feel hungry or like you want to vomit. You could also feel jittery or nervous. Your heart may beat fast. You may sweat. Or your skin might turn cold and clammy. Moderate hypoglycemia often makes people feel short-tempered, nervous, afraid, or confused. Your vision may blur. You could also feel unsteady or have trouble walking. Severe hypoglycemia can cause you to pass out. You could have seizures. It could even cause a coma or death. If you've had hypoglycemia during the night, you may wake up tired or with a headache. And you may have nightmares. Or you may sweat so much during the night that your pajamas or sheets are damp when you wake up. To diagnose hypoglycemia, your doctor will do a physical exam and ask you questions about your health and any medicines you take. You will need blood tests to check your blood sugar levels. Some tests might include not eating (fasting) and watching for symptoms. Other tests might involve eating a meal that could cause symptoms of low blood sugar seve Continue reading >>

How Do I Manage My Blood Sugar When I’m Sick?

How Do I Manage My Blood Sugar When I’m Sick?

When you have diabetes, sick days often mean more than a runny nose and sneezing. An illness like a cold, the flu, or any condition that makes you throw up or gives you diarrhea can also boost your blood sugar. So can an infection. That means you have to stay on top of your blood sugar levels. Here are some guidelines: Check your blood sugar every 4 hours. Test for ketones if you have type 1 diabetes and your sugar level is above 240mg/dL -- or if your doctor tells you to. Ketones are a form of waste that people with type 1 make when they’re under stress (like an illness). Call the doctor if you find ketones in your urine. Depending on how sick you are, he may suggest you go to the emergency room. Check your temperature regularly. Drink liquids if you can’t keep solid food down. Have one cup of liquid every hour while you’re awake to prevent dehydration. If you can’t hold down liquids, you may need to go to the emergency room or hospital. Don’t stop taking insulin, even if you can’t eat solid food. You may need to eat or drink something with sugar so that your blood sugar doesn't drop too low. You may need to stop taking medicines by mouth for type 2 diabetes while you’re sick. Check with your doctor if you’re not sure what to do. If you need an over-the-counter drug to control symptoms like cough and nasal congestion, ask your doctor or pharmacist for a list of sugar-free products. Eat or drink 30 to 50 grams of carbohydrates every 3 to 4 hours. That will keep your body nourished, stop if from making ketones, and prevent your blood sugar from dropping too low. If you’re having trouble eating, try bland foods like the ones listed below. Each equals one carbohydrate choice. 1/2 cup regular gelatin 1/2 cup regular soft drink, like 7-up or Sprite 1/2 Pops Continue reading >>

What Is

What Is "diabetic Stomach"?

My niece takes an oral medicine for diabetes. At least once a week, she throws up at night. The doctor calls it "diabetic stomach." I have never heard of this, and I have had diabetes for 36 years. What could be the cause of her stomach problems, and what foods may be causing flare-ups? Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar Symptoms

Low Blood Sugar Symptoms

A low blood sugar, also called hypoglycemia or an insulin reaction, is defined as a blood glucose level below 60 to 70 mg/dl. It is usually companied by one or more of the symptoms described below. Low blood sugars or insulin reactions can occur whenever insulin is used. Although less frequent, it can also occur with use of drugs that stimulate insulin production in Type 2 diabetes, such as Diabenese, Glyburide, Glipizide, and Starlix. Hypoglycemia symptoms vary greatly. Lows may occur with no symptoms, minor symptoms, or full-blown symptoms. They will vary from person to person and from one low to the next in the same person. A single symptom may make you aware that your blood sugar has become low, or you may suddenly become aware of several symptoms at once. Symptoms are created both by the effect of the low blood sugar on the brain and other organs, and by the effects of adrenaline and glucagon which are released in large quantities to raise the blood sugar. Anytime you suspect a low blood sugar, check it to be sure and, if you are low, raise your sugar quickly with glucose tablets or other fast carbohydrates. If you're too confused to check, eat quick carbs and check later. The faster you recognize hypoglycemia, the faster you can respond and bring the blood sugar back to normal. Keep in mind that you do not want to eat too much when you treat a low blood sugar, or you can begin a blood sugar rollercoaster. Identify the symptoms for insulin reactions so you can take action quickly. Insulin Reaction Symptoms shaking sweating irritability headache tingling hunger blurred vision dizziness and confusion numbness of the lips nausea or vomiting fast heart rate sudden tiredness seizures pale appearance frequent sighing personality change confusion or poor concentation loss Continue reading >>

Take Care Of Yourself When Sick Or Under Stress

Take Care Of Yourself When Sick Or Under Stress

When we're stressed, our bodies need extra energy to help us cope and recover. This is true whether bodies are under stress from illness or injury or are dealing with the effects of emotional stress, both good and bad. To meet the demand for more energy, the body responds by releasing into the bloodstream sugar that's been stored in the liver, causing blood sugar levels to rise. In someone without diabetes, the pancreas responds to the rise in blood sugar by releasing enough insulin into the bloodstream to help convert the sugar into energy. This brings blood sugar levels back down to normal. In someone with diabetes, the extra demand usually means needing to take more diabetes medicine (insulin or pills.) To make sure your body is getting enough medicine to help keep your blood sugar levels close to normal, you'll need to test more often when you are: Sick Recovering from surgery Fighting an infection Feeling upset Under more stress than usual Traveling Type 1 Diabetes In people with type 1 diabetes, blood sugar levels rise in response to stress, but the body doesn't have enough insulin to turn the sugar into energy. Instead, the body burns stored fat to meet energy needs. When fat is burned for energy, it creates waste products called ketones. As fat is broken down, ketones start to build up in the bloodstream. High levels of ketones in the blood can lead to a serious condition known as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), which can cause a person to lose consciousness and go into a diabetic coma. Type 2 Diabetes In people with type 2 diabetes, the body usually has enough insulin available to turn sugar into energy, so it doesn't need to burn fat. However, stress hormones can cause blood sugar levels to rise to very high and even dangerous levels. People with type 2 diabetes Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) happens when your blood sugar is high and your insulin level is low. This imbalance in the body causes a build-up of ketones. Ketones are toxic. If DKA isn’t treated, it can lead to diabetic coma and even death. DKA mainly affects people who have type 1 diabetes. But it can also happen with other types of diabetes, including type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes (during pregnancy). DKA is a very serious condition. If you have diabetes and think you may have DKA, contact your doctor or get to a hospital right away. The first symptoms to appear are usually: frequent urination. The next stage of DKA symptoms include: vomiting (usually more than once) confusion or trouble concentrating a fruity odor on the breath. The main cause of DKA is not enough insulin. A lack of insulin means sugar can’t get into your cells. Your cells need sugar for energy. This causes your body’s glucose levels to rise. To get energy, the body starts to burn fat. This process causes ketones to build up. Ketones can poison the body. High blood glucose levels can also cause you to urinate often. This leads to a lack of fluids in the body (dehydration). DKA can be caused by missing an insulin dose, eating poorly, or feeling stressed. An infection or other illness (such as pneumonia or a urinary tract infection) can also lead to DKA. If you have signs of infection (fever, cough, or sore throat), contact your doctor. You will want to make sure you are getting the right treatment. For some people, DKA may be the first sign that they have diabetes. When you are sick, you need to watch your blood sugar level very closely so that it doesn’t get too high or too low. Ask your doctor what your critical blood sugar level is. Most patients should watch their glucose levels c Continue reading >>

Nausea And Vomiting

Nausea And Vomiting

Tweet Most, if not all of us will be familiar with the feeling of nausea, which is basically the feeling of needing to be sick, felt in the stomach area. Both nausea and vomiting can be a sign of a number of underlying health conditions, including diabetes. When there is an issue that can affect the stomach or gastric system of their body, people can feel sick. Even if it is a fairly tenuous connection, such as angina affecting blood flow, the sufferer may still feel queasy. Causes of nausea Both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes can cause nausea or vomiting in several ways. Hyperglycemia and Hypoglycemia As the blood glucose levels rise and fall, the body's metabolism can get interrupted and confused which can lead to a mixed feeling of nausea. Low blood pressure (Hypotension) Low blood pressure often leads to dizzy spells which, for some people, can induce a feeling of nausea as the world appears to spin around them. Certain medications The side effect of a lot of drugs is a feeling of nausea, and even vomiting. Metformin, the most widely used diabetes drug, is known to have nauseating side effects. Gastroparesis Due to neuropathy, the body may not be able to move food from the stomach or along the intestines. This can cause a back log of food, which can result in sickness. Bezoars Bezoars are stone like formations created from undigested food matter, which can block the gastro-intestinal track and stop food processing and digesting. This can eventually cause nausea and vomiting. When to see your doctor If you are having recurrent or consistent bouts of nausea or vomiting, then it is a good idea to go and see your doctor to get the issue sorted as soon as possible. Keeping a diary of nausea or vomiting episodes and what you ate or were doing beforehand may help the Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar) In People Without Diabetes

Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar) In People Without Diabetes

A A A Topic Overview Is this topic for you? Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is most common in people who have diabetes. If you have already been diagnosed with diabetes and need more information about low blood sugar, see the topics: What is low blood sugar? You may have briefly felt the effects of low blood sugar when you've gotten really hungry or exercised hard without eating enough. This happens to nearly everyone from time to time. It's easy to correct and usually nothing to worry about. But low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, can also be an ongoing problem. It occurs when the level of sugar in your blood drops too low to give your body energy. What causes hypoglycemia in people who don't have diabetes? Ongoing problems with low blood sugar can be caused by: Medicines. Diseases of the liver, kidneys, or pancreas. Metabolic problems. Alcohol use. Stomach surgery. What are the symptoms? Symptoms can be different depending on how low your blood sugar level drops. Mild hypoglycemia can make you feel hungry or like you want to vomit. You could also feel jittery or nervous. Your heart may beat fast. You may sweat. Or your skin might turn cold and clammy. Moderate hypoglycemia often makes people feel short-tempered, nervous, afraid, or confused. Your vision may blur. You could also feel unsteady or have trouble walking. Severe hypoglycemia can cause you to pass out. You could have seizures. It could even cause a coma or death. If you've had hypoglycemia during the night, you may wake up tired or with a headache. And you may have nightmares. Or you may sweat so much during the night that your pajamas or sheets are damp when you wake up. How is hypoglycemia diagnosed? To diagnose hypoglycemia, your doctor will do a physical exam and ask you questions about your health and a Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia is what every diabetic fears -- very low blood glucose. Since the brain requires glucose for fuel at every second, it's possible to induce coma, seizures,brain damage[1][2][3] and death by letting blood glucose drop too low. Because the brain is almost totally dependent on glucose to make use of oxygen[4], it is somewhat like having severe breathing problems. Though the causes and mechanisms are different, in both cases the brain does not have enough oxygen, and similar symptoms and problems can occur. It is caused by giving too much insulin for the body's current needs. The blood glucose level at which an animal (or person) is dangerously hypoglycemic is fuzzy, and depends on several factors.[5] The line is different for diabetics and non-diabetics, and differs between individuals and depending on exogenous insulin and what the individual is accustomed to. The most likely time for an acute hypoglycemia episode is when the insulin is working hardest, or at its peak; mild lows may cause lethargy and sleepiness[6]. An acute hypoglycemic episode can happen even if you are careful, since pets' insulin requirements sometimes change without warning. Pets and people can have hypoglycemic episodes because of increases to physical activity. What makes those with diabetes prone to hypoglycemia is that muscles require glucose for proper function. The more active muscles become, the more their need for glucose increases[7]. Conversely, there can also be hyperglycemic reactions from this; it depends on the individual/caregiver knowing him/herself and the pet's reactions. According to a 2000 JAVMA study, dogs receiving insulin injections only once daily at high doses[9] are more likely to have hypoglycemic episodes than those who receive insulin twice daily. The symptoms Continue reading >>

Norovirus And Diabetes

Norovirus And Diabetes

Tweet Norovirus is a form of stomach bug that can cause severe vomiting, diarrhoea and dehydration. As with other forms of viral infections, Norovirus can make diabetes control more difficult. Norovirus has been called the winter vomiting bug because it is more prevalent in the winter months. Symptoms The most prominent signs that you may have caught Norovirus are: Other symptoms which may accompany the above, include: Headache Stomach ache Aching muscles in the arms or legs Having a high temperature (over 38C/100.4F) How long does the Norovirus infection last? Symptoms of the infection will usually pass after a couple of days but it is possible the symptoms may persist longer in some people. What are the causes of Norovirus? Norovirus is a stomach bug which can be passed through contact with someone who has the infection or via contaminated food, objects or surfaces. Regularly washing hands, cleaning surfaces and practising good food hygiene can help to prevent the virus from spreading. How is Norovirus treated? There is no specific treatment to rid the body of Norovirus but your body’s immune system should be able to fight off the virus. It is important though to treat and prevent dehydration by drinking fluid regularly. The NHS advises we drink more than the 6 to 8 glasses of fluid that is usually recommended for fluid intake per day. This is because vomiting and diarrhoea depletes the fluid available within our body. Norovirus and diabetes control Viral infections usually make diabetes more difficult to control. If you catch the Norovirus it is likely that your blood glucose levels will rise higher than usual as the body attempts to fight off the virus. Preventing dehydration Vomiting and diarrhoea both involve a loss of fluids from the body which can make dehydra Continue reading >>

Feline Diabetes

Feline Diabetes

Insulin injections are the preferred method of managing diabetes in cats. Figure 1: To administer an injection, pull the loose skin between the shoulder blades with one hand. With the other hand, insert the needle directly into the indentation made by holding up the skin, draw back on the plunger slightly, and if no blood appears in the syringe, inject gently. Tips for Treatment 1. You can do it! Treating your cat may sound difficult, but for most owners it soon becomes routine. 2. Work very closely with your veterinarian to get the best results for your cat. 3. Once your cat has been diagnosed, it's best to start insulin therapy as soon as possible. 4. Home glucose monitoring can be very helpful. 5. Tracking your cat's water intake, activity level, appetite, and weight can be beneficial. 6. A low carbohydrate diet helps diabetic cats maintain proper glucose levels. 7. With careful treatment, your cat's diabetes may well go into remission. 8. If your cat shows signs of hypoglycemia (lethargy, weakness, tremors, seizures, vomiting) apply honey, a glucose solution, or dextrose gel to the gums and immediately contact a veterinarian. Possible Complications Insulin therapy lowers blood glucose, possibly to dangerously low levels. Signs of hypoglycemia include weakness, lethargy, vomiting, lack of coordination, seizures, and coma. Hypoglycemia can be fatal if left untreated, so any diabetic cat that shows any of these signs should be offered its regular food immediately. If the cat does not eat voluntarily, it should be given oral glucose in the form of honey, corn syrup, or proprietary dextrose gels (available at most pharmacies) and brought to a veterinarian immediately. It is important, however, that owners not attempt to force fingers, food, or fluids into the mouth of a Continue reading >>

What To Do With Insulin When Your Diabetic Pet Is Vomiting Or Not Eating

What To Do With Insulin When Your Diabetic Pet Is Vomiting Or Not Eating

Once you have your diabetic pet regulated on insulin it’s smooth sailing, right? Well, not necessarily. Even a well-regulated diabetic doggie may mischievously get into the trash and subsequently vomit. Or Fluffy might toss up a random hair ball. Just because your pet is diabetic doesn’t mean it can’t have a dietary indiscretion or gastroenteritis the same as non-diabetic pets! Even if you are new to having a diabetic pet, if you understand the basics of diabetes (most importantly that insulin drops the blood sugar levels) you can work your way through a short-term treatment plan. You know that insulin allows sugar (from the food we eat) to enter our cells. Without food, giving the usual dose of insulin could drop the blood glucose to dangerously low levels. However, if the blood glucose is still quite elevated, you might consider giving a lesser dose of insulin even if a diabetic won’t eat. You know your pet… Some have a sensitive stomach whereas others might have the constitution as sturdy as a goat. Some have ravenous appetites whereas other pets may be finicky. None of us have a crystal ball when it comes to predicting if a pet will vomit more. Not eating and vomiting are both situations that put us in the same boat in regards to insulin dosing. No food in the tummy means there is nothing for the insulin to utilize. Of course, vomiting is worse than simply not eating because we don’t know why the pet is nauseous nor if there will be more vomiting to follow. Not eating may simply be that a pet isn’t hungry. Obviously you need a good relationship with your veterinarian to help you work through contingency plans for these situations, but I want you to understand in general what we might do. Of course making choices to alter the insulin dose mandates that Continue reading >>

Patient Education: Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar) In Diabetes Mellitus (beyond The Basics)

Patient Education: Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar) In Diabetes Mellitus (beyond The Basics)

LOW BLOOD SUGAR OVERVIEW Hypoglycemia, also known as low blood sugar, occurs when levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood are too low. Hypoglycemia is common in people with diabetes who take insulin and some (but not all) oral diabetes medications. WHY DO I GET LOW BLOOD SUGAR? Low blood sugar happens when a person with diabetes does one or more of the following: Takes too much insulin (or an oral diabetes medication that causes your body to secrete insulin) Does not eat enough food Exercises vigorously without eating a snack or decreasing the dose of insulin beforehand Waits too long between meals Drinks excessive alcohol, although even moderate alcohol use can increase the risk of hypoglycemia in people with type 1 diabetes LOW BLOOD SUGAR SYMPTOMS The symptoms of low blood sugar vary from person to person, and can change over time. During the early stages low blood sugar, you may: Sweat Tremble Feel hungry Feel anxious If untreated, your symptoms can become more severe, and can include: Difficulty walking Weakness Difficulty seeing clearly Bizarre behavior or personality changes Confusion Unconsciousness or seizure When possible, you should confirm that you have low blood sugar by measuring your blood sugar level (see "Patient education: Self-monitoring of blood glucose in diabetes mellitus (Beyond the Basics)"). Low blood sugar is generally defined as a blood sugar of 60 mg/dL (3.3 mmol/L) or less. Some people with diabetes develop symptoms of low blood sugar at slightly higher levels. If your blood sugar levels are high for long periods of time, you may have symptoms and feel poorly when your blood sugar is closer to 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L). Getting your blood sugar under better control can help to lower the blood sugar level when you begin to feel symptoms. Hypoglyc Continue reading >>

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