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Diabetes Tracker Device

To Fitbit Or Not To Fitbit?

To Fitbit Or Not To Fitbit?

Home / Resources / Featured Writers / To Fitbit or Not to Fitbit? Having recently just tried a Fitbit physical activity tracking device (the Charge HR model) for the first time, I have noticed that in this post-Thanksgiving holiday sales time, everyone is selling them! But they are far from inexpensive. The American Diabetes Association also recently was involved in a FitForGood promotion that Fitbit ran that allowed them and two other nonprofit organizations to earn some extra money. Racking up extra steps for the ADA certainly motivated me and my family members to be more activefor a few days at least! What you may be wondering is, do you need a Fitbit? What if you cant afford one? Are you then doomed to fail at meeting your physical activity goals, including taking more daily steps? No physical activity device is the only determining factor in becoming and staying more physically active. Most people struggle with sticking with an exercise program long term, not just getting started on it. Simply taking more steps on a given day is not that difficult to dowith a bit of motivationbut doing it every day for the rest of your lifetime is a different story. To stick with it, you have to change your behavior so that being more active becomes a habit. So, what can a Fitbit device do for you? Unlike the more traditional pedometers (step counters), the Fitbit in particular can measure multiple factors and allow you to track your data on a mobile device or a computer, which may be motivating since you can see the data in real time if you sync it with your device/computer. Using a GPS-aided accelerometer and heart rate monitor, the Fitbit Charge HR counts steps, distance covered, heart rate (hence the HR part), exercise intensity (moderate, and vigorous), calories burned, and f Continue reading >>

New Ways For Monitoring Diabetes

New Ways For Monitoring Diabetes

A few months ago, WT published an article about diabetes. The facts are simple and the consequences are rapidly effecting today´s generation. The statistics published by International Diabetes Federation are astonishing and should be a warning to all people. You can learn more about the numbers concerning some of the studies at, Modern Man Disease. Unfortunately, diabetes has no immediate cure. Thousands of people are diagnosed each day. There are many options for monitoring glucose levels; from old invasive and painful devices, to now non-invasive Blood Glucose monitoring devices. For diabetics that are interested in learn about new, noninvasive technology, keep reading for a short review of the latest trends. DIA-VIT is a non-invasive glucose self-monitoring device. It measures the glucose level in your blood. Their smartphone app keeps a diary of your daily data, so you can track patterns in your fluctuation glucose level. By monitoring your condition, you are then able to be more aware of your condition. SugarBeat is a non-invasive patch. It contains an electronic sensor that detects real time measurements. The patch is disposable and is about 1mm thick. Your glucose level is measured through the skin every 5 minutes. SugarBeat is connected to an app where also all the readings are forwarded. GlucoTrack clippes to your earlobe in order to test your blood sugar level. The device contains 2 parts: Main Unit (MU) and ear clip. The ear clip doesn’t hurt, in fact it’s really simple. Just clip it on and tap-da! Your glucose level appears on the MU. GlucoTrack uses three independent technologies, simultaneously: ultrasonic, electromagnetic and thermal. All measurements are combined by a unique proprietary algorithm, which calculates the weighted average and returns th Continue reading >>

Soon, Diabetics Will Be Able To Check Their Glucose Levels On Their Fitbit Smartwatch

Soon, Diabetics Will Be Able To Check Their Glucose Levels On Their Fitbit Smartwatch

The Dexcom G5 Mobile sensor gives people who suffer from diabetes a way to consistently monitor their glucose levels without pricking their fingers. Starting next year, users will be able to access that valuable data via the Fitbit Ionic smartwatch. Next month, Fitbit will release their new smartwatch, the Ionic. Ahead of the device’s launch, the fitness tracker specialists have announced a partnership with glucose monitor firm Dexcom that will allow people with diabetes to use the device to track their glucose levels. The Fitbit Ionic will be capable of displaying data collected by the Dexcom G5 Mobile sensor, which is implanted under the skin. Currently, the sensor delivers updates on the user’s glucose levels every five minutes via a companion app, but starting in 2018, those updates will be accessible through the Ionic. The Dexcom G5 system is already compatible with Apple Watch, but communication must go through an iPhone rather than happening directly between the sensor and the smartwatch itself. That requirement is expected to change when Apple releases their watchOS4 update later this year. Making the Dexcom sensor compatible with major smartwatch brands is a great way to help the more than 400 million people with diabetes keep an eye on their condition. However, they’ll need to make a significant financial investment in order to take advantage of this technology — Fitbit’s Ionic is priced at $300 and the Dexcom sensor itself costs $900. Continue reading >>

How One Start-up Is Using Fitness Trackers To Help Diabetes Patients

How One Start-up Is Using Fitness Trackers To Help Diabetes Patients

How One Start-Up Is Using Fitness Trackers To Help Diabetes Patients Glooko, a mobile diabetes management app, said it is integrating its tool with biometric trackers from Fitbit, Jawbone, iHealth, and Withings to enable patients to better control their blood sugar. The three-year-old start-up will chart patients glucose levels in correlation with exercise, blood pressure, and weight, and relay the information to their health care providers. Were well ahead of the industry in terms of combination with fitness trackers, says Rick Altinger, Glookos CEO. Long the realm of health fanatics, wearables and fitness devices are slowly making their way into the clinic, where they stand to make a more meaningful impact on people with chronic diseases, such as diabetes, hypertension or weight issues. and electronic health record vendor Epic Systems in June. Several digital health companies have since integrated their tools with HealthKit. Glooko sells an FDA-cleared diabetes management app on a subscription basis to hospitals, such as Joslin Diabetes Center, Mount Sinai Hospital, and Scripps Health, where providers recommend it to patients. The app allows them to monitor their blood sugar between visits, and intervene if a patient hasnt uploaded readings in a timely manner (Glooko connects to more than 30 glucose meters), or is experiencing severe fluctuations in glucose levels. By recommending their patients use a device to track steps, for example, doctors at Joslin hope to prevent drops in blood sugar that are often provoked by physical activity. They can spot on a chart the correlation between number of steps and glucose levels, and ask patients to adjust their insulin dose accordingly. One obstacle is the price of monitors, which can be prohibitive for many diabetes sufferers Continue reading >>

Developing A New Tool With Fitbit For Simplified Type 2 Diabetes Management

Developing A New Tool With Fitbit For Simplified Type 2 Diabetes Management

Home Integrated Care Developing A New Tool with Fitbit for Simplified Type 2 Diabetes Management Developing A New Tool with Fitbit for Simplified Type 2 Diabetes Management Posted by Laura Stoltenberg On December 7, 2016 In Integrated Care Today we announced a partnership with Fitbit to integrate health and activity data into new CGM solutions for simplified type 2 diabetes management. This partnership brings together our sophisticated medical technology with the convenience of automatic activity tracking from Fitbit. Together we can provide meaningful insights into how exercise impacts glucose levels for more effective diabetes care management. As you know, maintaining and tracking glucose levels are critical to effectively managing diabetes. For many people with type 2 diabetes, understanding how exercise affects glucose levels is a critical element to proper glucose management and long-term health. Additionally, many people are manually tracking and recording their physical activity, requiring them to recall and communicate that information to their physician from memory. As such, there is tremendous potential to use activity data captured by Fitbits leading wearable technology devices to provide actionable insights that paint a more accurate picture of how exercise frequency, intensity, and timing may impact a persons blood glucose level. Our new myLog mobile app automatically combines data generated by the Fitbit activity tracker with our iPro2 Professional continuous glucose monitor (CGM) , eliminating the need to track and enter this data manually. Through this partnership, we are able to leverage Fitbits strong consumer brand to reach more people with type 2 diabetes with fitness tracker-based apps that are specifically designed to manage diabetes in a more pro Continue reading >>

Smart Technology For Diabetes Self-care

Smart Technology For Diabetes Self-care

Wearables, Implants, and Apps, Oh My! If you have diabetes, you must consistently monitor your diet, lifestyle, and glucose levels, and keeping track of everything can be both inconvenient and difficult. Matters can become even more complicated if you have other health conditions with which to contend. Fortunately, technology can help. Technological innovations Strides have been made to ensure technology keeps pace with assisting people in self-managing their diabetes. By incorporating a personalized approach, technology has become a useful tool; in particular, mobile and Internet-ready smartphones have been found to be the most effective for integrating diabetes care into day-to-day living. A 2009 study conducted by Julie Polisena and her team at the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health found storing or sharing self-monitored blood glucose using home telehealth tools such as PDAs or fax machines, supported with physician feedback, showed improved glycemic levels and reduced hospitalizations. Technology now has evolved beyond telehealth. Smart technology exists as wearables, implants, and mobile applications to track glucose levels, share data, access relevant information, communicate with both health-care providers and others with diabetes, and, ultimately, guide you in making better decisions. Wearable technology Wearable technology comprises gadgets that can be worn and are equipped with sensors and wireless connectivity to assist with monitoring blood sugar levels, personalizing treatment, connecting with health-care providers, and even delivering medication into the body. It’s a huge departure from the traditional finger pricking method of glucose monitoring. Some wearables on the horizon for diabetes include smart skin patches, contact lens, and Continue reading >>

Apple’s Needleless Blood Sugar Tracker Has An Uphill Battle In Front Of It

Apple’s Needleless Blood Sugar Tracker Has An Uphill Battle In Front Of It

Rumors are flying that Apple is developing some kind of wearable that would continuously track the user’s blood sugar without breaking their skin. For people with diabetes, this would be a huge improvement over the somewhat invasive or downright painful options they currently rely on. But experts warn that if the rumors are true, Apple will be facing a scientific and technological battlefield littered with decades of other companies’ failures. If Apple is chasing a needleless blood sugar monitor, it wouldn’t be that surprising. (Apple declined to comment.) After all, the market would be massive. About 30 million Americans have diabetes, a disease caused when there’s too much sugar, or glucose, in the blood. People with diabetes have to carefully titrate their food intake, or even inject the hormone insulin in order to keep their blood sugar from spiking or dropping to dangerous levels. So regularly measuring blood glucose is key. Right now, it’s also unpleasant. People with diabetes have to prick their fingers to draw blood, or wear a monitor that inserts a tiny tube beneath their skin to continuously measure glucose in the fluid between cells (the same fluid that spills out when you pop a blister). So a needleless device — preferably one that continuously monitors glucose levels and spits them out in real time — would be a huge upgrade. “That is the holy grail,” says Eric Topol, the director of the Scripps Translational Science Institute who also sits on the board of glucose monitor manufacturer Dexcom. And that’s why so many before Apple have made the attempt. Google tried to develop a contact lens to detect glucose in tears, but ever since pharmaceutical giant Novartis licensed the technology in 2014, the project’s gone quiet. (A spokesperson fo Continue reading >>

Find The Best Activity Tracker For You

Find The Best Activity Tracker For You

Terry Doran/Mittera (pedometers); Chris Hennessey/Mittera (watches and phones) Not long ago, if you wanted to track your activity at a fancy affair, youd have to clip a pedometer to your waistband. Thankfully, todays activity trackers blur the line between fashion accessory and health monitoring device. While trackers vary in appearance and features, their goals are the same: to help you boost activity and lose or maintain weight. But whether youll respond to these techniques isnt so clear-cut. While activity-tracking devices dont work as well for weight loss as weekly weigh-ins with a trained professional, they can help you establish a baseline for activity, says Sheri Colberg-Ochs, PhD, a professor of exercise science at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia, particularly if you have no idea how much youre moving on a daily basis. Trackers provide self-monitoring and feedback, two important factors in weight-loss successat least in the short-term. And many trackers offer apps to help you succeed. Extra features include social support, goal-setting, and the ability to plan workouts. Tracking activity is useful for diabetes management, too. Users can compare their activity levels on days when their blood glucose is in range with levels on out-of-range days to see how activity affects their blood glucose, says John Jakicic, PhD, professor and chair of the Department of Health and Physical Activity and director of the Physical Activity and Weight Management Research Center at the University of Pittsburgh. When it comes to activity trackers, one size doesnt fit all. Some people may seek out something competitive (like the app Zombies, Run!, which turns an ordinary workout into a game of survival). Some might prefer to get social with a group. And others may want to Continue reading >>

Tracking Devices For People With Diabetes

Tracking Devices For People With Diabetes

Different types of gadgets, from fitness trackers to wireless scales, can be your allies when youre trying to manage your diabetes. Theyll provide a simpler, more accurate, and even a more fun way to stay healthy and keep your condition under control. Ever get a high phone bill? Then you know how looking closely at the specific charges can help you change your behavior. The next month, you'll be more careful about how much data you use or the number of texts you send. It's the same with tracking when you have diabetes. By getting an accurate view of your blood sugar along with how much you're exercising, eating, and sleeping -- not just what you want to believe is true -- you can make some real improvements. Research shows that tracking -- and the awareness that comes with it -- really works. Studies have found that people with diabetes who used apps -- to record food, exercise, and other behavior -- had better long-term blood sugar control. Another found that people who wore pedometers naturally increased their activity by 27%. By tracking steps and the calories you burn, fitness trackers can help anyone get fitter. But they have special benefits for people with diabetes. Here's why. Exercise.Physical activity is essential to controlling diabetes. It helps lower your blood sugar, helps your body use insulin better, and makes you less likely to have other health complications. A fitness tracker could be just what you need to jump-start your exercise routine. Walking is great for people with diabetes, and counting your steps with a fitness device is an easy way to stay on track. Devices often track the number of calories you use throughout the day. Step up your daily calorie burn, and your blood sugar will benefit. Sleep. Many trackers have motion sensors that track you Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Blood Glucose Tracker By Mynetdiary

Diabetes And Blood Glucose Tracker By Mynetdiary

Description MyNetDiary’s Diabetes Tracker app is the easiest and most comprehensive diabetes tracker app for the iPhone. MyNetDiary can help you better understand and control diabetes and pre-diabetes - along with improving your diet, losing weight and providing feedback, support and motivation. MyNetDiary was featured in the 2017 Consumer Guide of Diabetes Forecast magazine, published by the American Diabetes Association, the world’s most trusted source of diabetes information. Designed for diabetes type 1, type 2, pre-diabetes and gestational diabetes. USER REVIEWS * This App (and website) has been a tremendous help in making lifestyle changes after being newly diagnosed as Type 2. * This is the best app for diabetics trying to recover their health - without question. * I spent a lot of time researching diabetes apps, then chose this one over a year ago and have been using it everyday since then. It has exceeded my expectations for diet management (still can't believe how much info they have on foods, food groups, and packaged foods!), lab and exercise tracking, and especially all aspects and ease of diabetes management. It gives me good personal feedback, keeps me on track, and has helped me and my physician meet my DM treatment goals. WHAT MAKES MYNETDIARY THE BEST DIABETES TRACKER * Quick and easy logging * Comprehensive blood glucose tracking. Custom pre- and post-meal target ranges. Highlights out-of-range readings. * The best food and carb tracking - with a great food database, built-in barcode scanner and quickest entry. THE DATABASE IS UPDATED DAILY. * Practical BG reminders * Optional insulin tracking * Medication tracking * Supports total carbs, net carbs, and diabetes carb count * Exercise tracking with built-in GPS Tracker, keeping track of walking, ru Continue reading >>

Continuous Glucose Monitoring

Continuous Glucose Monitoring

With Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM), you get a more complete picture of your glucose levels, which can lead to better treatment decisions and better glucose control. Without diabetes, your body tracks glucose levels all day and night to ensure the right amount of insulin is released at the right time. To successfully manage diabetes, a monitoring system is needed to consistently check your glucose levels. The most common glucose monitoring solutions are blood glucose meters and continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) systems. Sensor overtape not shown in depiction How Does CGM Work? CGM is a way to measure glucose levels in real-time throughout the day and night. A tiny electrode called a glucose sensor is inserted under the skin to measure glucose levels in tissue fluid. It is connected to a transmitter that sends the information via wireless radio frequency to a monitoring and display device. The device can detect and notify you if your glucose is reaching a high or low limit. The latest Medtronic CGM systems can actually alert you before you reach your glucose limits. CGM systems usually consist of a glucose sensor, a transmitter, and a small external monitor to view your glucose levels. MiniMed insulin pumps have built-in CGM so the information can be conveniently seen on your pump screen. The CGM monitor or insulin pump is small, discreet, and easy-to-wear. It can be attached to your belt, hidden in your pocket, or placed under your clothing. This component will show your current glucose levels and your historical glucose trends. It also notifies you before you reach your low or high glucose limits and if your glucose level rises or falls too quickly. The CGM transmitter is a small, lightweight device that attaches to the glucose sensor, gathers your glucose data, Continue reading >>

Pkvitality

Pkvitality

painless blood-free glucose monitoring K’Watch Glucose is the first wearable tracker that measures your glucose effortlessly, painlessly and in just a matter of seconds. K’Watch allows diabetics to self-monitor their glucose levels without the need for cumbersome and painful blood-based tests. K’Watch Glucose requires no calibration, just a simple press gesture on the watch to display the glucose level. How does it work ? K’Watch Glucose is equipped with K’apsul®, utilizing a revolutionary biosensor which, when in contact with the skin, tests glucose levels without the need of blood samples. Quite imperceptible and totally painless, K’apsul can take unlimited measurements within a 30-day period with results being displayed on the K’Watch screen as well as synced to its dedicated app. No bulky material, K’Watch Glucose can be discreetly worn all day long and in all conditions. Monitoring your blood glucose in every social setting becomes possible, whether you are at work or even when exercising – when glucose level are prone to spike. K’Watch Glucose can also track steps taken, distance traveled and calories burnt. K’Watch Glucose makes a diabetic’s life easier. In order to better monitor their health, users can connect K’Watch Glucose with its dedicated iOS and Android app to show a complete data history over time and share those results with a relative or a professional. K’Watch can also send alerts to remind users to check their glucose level. Diabetes is characterized by chronic hyperglycaemia, which is an excess of sugar in the blood. With 415M people affected (1 in 11 worldwide), diabetes is widespread and is progressing rapidly. It is a major cause of blindness, kidney failure, heart disease, stroke, lower limb amputation, and 1.5 mill Continue reading >>

Fitbit’s Ionic Smartwatch Will Help Diabetics Track Glucose Levels

Fitbit’s Ionic Smartwatch Will Help Diabetics Track Glucose Levels

Fitbit is pairing up with Dexcom, a company that creates continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) devices for people with diabetes. In an announcement today, the companies say that their first initiative is to bring Dexcom's monitoring device data to Fitbit's new Ionic smartwatch. For those unfamiliar, Dexcom's CGM devices work with a sensor that sits just under the skin and measures a person's glucose levels every few minutes in order to provide them with a bigger picture of where their glucose levels are and where they're heading. As of now, a transmitter attached to that sensor lets you see readouts of those levels on a smartphone or even an Apple Watch, but soon you'll also be able to see them on Ionic's screen. Dexcom and Fitbit say they're hoping to get this feature available to Ionic users in 2018 and are working to develop other diabetes management tools in the future. "We believe that providing Dexcom CGM data on Fitbit Ionic, and making that experience available to users of both Android and iOS devices, will have a positive impact on the way people manage their diabetes," said Dexcom's CEO, Kevin Sayer, in a statement. Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Testing: Why, When And How

Blood Sugar Testing: Why, When And How

Blood sugar testing is an important part of diabetes care. Find out when to test your blood sugar level, how to use a testing meter, and more. If you have diabetes, self-testing your blood sugar (blood glucose) can be an important tool in managing your treatment plan and preventing long-term complications of diabetes. You can test your blood sugar at home with a portable electronic device (glucose meter) that measures sugar level in a small drop of your blood. Why test your blood sugar Blood sugar testing — or self-monitoring blood glucose — provides useful information for diabetes management. It can help you: Judge how well you're reaching overall treatment goals Understand how diet and exercise affect blood sugar levels Understand how other factors, such as illness or stress, affect blood sugar levels Monitor the effect of diabetes medications on blood sugar levels Identify blood sugar levels that are high or low When to test your blood sugar Your doctor will advise you on how often you should check your blood sugar level. In general, the frequency of testing depends on the type of diabetes you have and your treatment plan. Type 1 diabetes. Your doctor may recommend blood sugar testing four to eight times a day if you have type 1 diabetes. You may need to test before meals and snacks, before and after exercise, before bed, and occasionally during the night. You may also need to check your blood sugar level more often if you are ill, change your daily routine or begin a new medication. Type 2 diabetes. If you take insulin to manage type 2 diabetes, your doctor may recommend blood sugar testing two or more times a day, depending on the type and amount of insulin you need. Testing is usually recommended before meals, and sometimes before bedtime. If you manage type 2 Continue reading >>

Fitbit's Ionic To Offer Glucose Monitoring For Diabetics

Fitbit's Ionic To Offer Glucose Monitoring For Diabetics

5 pictures Launched late last month, Fitbit's Ionic is the company's attempt at claiming some territory from smartwatch heavyweights like Apple and Garmin. Now the feature-packed wearable is set to gain a handy new piece of functionality, with the ability to display glucose levels on the user's wrist. Glucose monitoring has long shaped as a high-potential application for wearable devices. These could one day come in the form of contact lenses that change color as glucose levels hit dangerous levels, or small biosensors that monitor bodily fluids and send alerts via a smartphone app instead. The less time you spend thinking about your cargo, the more time you can spend running your busin... Dexcom, developer of glucose monitoring products, has taken the latter approach, and that seems to gel well with Fitbit's vision for wearable computing. Dexcom's CGM (continuous glucose monitoring system) consists of a small sensor that measures levels just beneath the skin and transmits data wirelessly to a smartphone app. But Dexcom and Fitbit have now joined forces to bring this data to the Ionic smartwatch. That means users of both Android and iOS devices will be able to have Dexcom's glucose data displayed on their wrist, beginning sometime in 2018. "The strength of our brand and our ability to track critical health metrics continuously for up to 4-plus days, coupled with Dexcom's market leadership in CGM, present a powerful combination that we hope will help millions of people better manage their diabetes," says James Park, CEO of Fitbit. "With Ionic, we are focused on driving positive health outcomes and more health focused tools, and this collaboration is a wonderful example of how we plan to bring that vision to our users." The Fitbit Ionic can be preordered for US$300, with Continue reading >>

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