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Cvs Employee Accused Of Stealing $2.5 Million Worth Of Diabetic Test Strips

Cvs Employee Accused Of Stealing $2.5 Million Worth Of Diabetic Test Strips

CVS employee accused of stealing $2.5 million worth of diabetic test strips FILE - This Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2017, file photo shows a CVS Pharmacy. (Gene J. Puskar / AP) A former CVS employee in western New York State could spend 20 years in prison and be subject to a $250,000 fine for his blatant theft of $2.5 million worth of diabetic test strips, authorities say. Antonio Rivera, 35, of Williamsville, N.Y., was charged on Friday with theft of pre-retail medical products; trafficking in stolen pre-retail medical products; conspiracy to sell and distribute stolen pre-retail medical products; and wire fraud, the U.S. Attorneys office of the Western District of New York announced. Diabetes Indicator Strips For Blood Glucose Testing (Laures / Getty Images/iStockphoto) Since February 2007, Rivera had worked as a senior assistant purchasing associate for CVS Pharmacy, assistant U.S. Attorney Melissa Marangola said in the statement. His job entailed ordering a variety of retail products sold by CVS, including diabetic test strips, the statement said. Last summer the Humboldt CVS in Rochester was red-flagged with an unusual volume of diabetic test strip purchases, and Riveras alleged caper unraveled from there. Rand Paul names alleged Ukraine whistleblower after chief justice refuses to read his question at Trump impeachment trial A package located in the stores shipping area did not have a CVS label, included Riveras return address, and came from a company with which CVS does not do business, the justice department statement said. A subsequent internal investigation by CVS determined that Rivera routinely purchased diabetic test strips in excessive amounts, well over the need for the Humboldt location. The audit could not account for 20,203 boxes purchased by Rivera, for a to Continue reading >>

Feds: Rochester Cvs Employee Stole $2.5 Million Worth Of Diabetic Test Strips

Feds: Rochester Cvs Employee Stole $2.5 Million Worth Of Diabetic Test Strips

To find out more about Facebook commenting please read the Conversation Guidelines and FAQs Welcome to our new and improved comments, which are for subscribers only. This is a test to see whether we can improve the experience for you. You do not need a Facebook profile to participate. You will need to register before adding a comment. Typed comments will be lost if you are not logged in. Please be polite. It's OK to disagree with someone's ideas, but personal attacks, insults, threats, hate speech, advocating violence and other violations can result in a ban. If you see comments in violation of our community guidelines , please report them. Feds: Rochester CVS employee stole $2.5 million worth of diabetic test strips Will Cleveland , Rochester Democrat and Chronicle Published 6:53 p.m. ET Feb. 8, 2019 | Updated 5:05 p.m. ET Feb. 10, 2019 An Erie County man is accused of stealing more than $2.5 million worth of diabetic teststrips from his Rochester employer, the U.S. Attorney's Office announced Friday. Antonio Rivera, 35, of Williamsville was charged by complaint with theft of pre-retail medical products; trafficking in stolen pre-retail medical products; conspiracy to sell and distribute stolen pre-retail medical products; and wire fraud. The charges carry a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison, prosecutors said. Rivera is accused of stealing 20,203 boxes of diabetic teststrips worth $2,535,307.62 At one point, Rivera allegedly had $718,629.68 in "wire fraud proceeds" in his PayPal account, according to the criminal complaint. Since February 2007, Rivera was employed as a senior assistant purchasing manager for CVS Pharmacy. In June 2017, he was transferred to CVS in Rochester. "This position required Rivera to order a variety of retail products sold by CVS, includi Continue reading >>

Are Blood Glucose Meters Accurate? New Data On 18 Meters

Are Blood Glucose Meters Accurate? New Data On 18 Meters

Results from the Diabetes Technology Society’s Blood Glucose Meter Surveillance Program identifies only six out of 18 meters that passed. Did yours make the cut? The Diabetes Technology Society (DTS) recently revealed long-awaited results from its Blood Glucose Monitor System (BGMS) Surveillance Program. The rigorous study tested the accuracy of 18 popular blood glucose meters (BGM) used in the US. These FDA-cleared meters were purchased through retail outlets and tested rigorously at three study sites in over 1,000 people (including 840 people with diabetes). The results were troubling: only six out of the 18 devices met the DTS passing standard for meter accuracy – within 15% or 15 mg/dl of the laboratory value in over 95% of trials. The devices that passed were: Contour Next from Ascensia (formerly Bayer) – 100% Accu-Chek Aviva Plus from Roche – 98% Walmart ReliOn Confirm (Micro) from Arkray – 97% CVS Advanced from Agamatrix – 97% FreeStyle Lite from Abbott – 96% Accu-Chek SmartView from Roche – 95% The devices that failed were: Walmart ReliOn Prime from Arkray – 92% OneTouch Verio from LifeScan – 92% OneTouch Ultra 2 from LifeScan – 90% Walmart ReliOn Ultima from Abbott – 89% Embrace from Omnis Health – 88% True Result from HDI/Nipro (Trividia) – 88% True Track from HDI/Nipro (Trividia) – 81% Solus V2 from BioSense Medical – 76% Advocate Redi-Code+ from Diabetic Supply of Suncoast – 76% Gmate Smart from Philosys – 71% Get the full data and all the accuracy information here. While all of these meters received FDA clearance at some point, this study shows that not all are equivalent in terms of accuracy. The FDA looks at company-reported trials when it reviews new meters; this study took an independent look, purchasing the meters di Continue reading >>

Cvs Health Blood Glucose Test Strips Featuring Truetrack System

Cvs Health Blood Glucose Test Strips Featuring Truetrack System

CVS Health Blood Glucose Test Strips Featuring Truetrack System CVS Health Blood Glucose Test Strips Featuring Truetrack System For self-testing & point-of-care testing. Clinically proven accuracy. 1 microliter sample size. Beveled tip for greater sampling precision. Use with Truetrack meter. Truetrack test strips are used for self-testing and point-of-care testing. As part of the Truetrack system, they deliver clinically accurate results. Featured benefits: easy to handle; small sample size. Advanced technology. Quad-electrode technology enables accurate and precise glucose measurements. Truefill beveled tip allows for greater sampling precision. Blood glucose meters and test strips make it easy to measure your blood sugar, keep a record of your levels, and help you manage your diabetes and overall health. Includes: 50 test strips; code chip; instructions for use. Reagents: glucose oxidase (aspergillus sp.), mediators, buffers & stabilizers. CVS Health quality. Use these strips with Truetrack meter. Please insert enclosed code chip into meter immediately before using strips. Step 1: Insert Truetrack test strip. Step 2: Apply small blood sample. Store in a dry place at room temperature below 86 degrees F (30 degrees C). Do not refrigerate or freeze. For in vitro diagnostic use only. Continue reading >>

Erasing Diabetes

Erasing Diabetes

Your local CVS has their own store brand of glucometer and glucometer strips. You can buy the CVS Advanced Glucose Meter for $17.99 and 100 strips for only $22.99. That's 23 cents per strip. Compare that to $1.78 for Free Style InsuLinx strips. But is it accurate? All glucometers and strips must comply with the same accuracy guidelines: 95% of measured blood glucose values be within 15% of the actual blood glucose level and 99% of the values be within 20% of the actual blood glucose level. Get the best deal. Ask your doctor for a prescription for the CVS Advanced Glucose Meter and CVS Advanced Meter Test Strips and bring it to your CVS pharamacy. CVS will check whether or not the glucometer and strips are covered by your insurance. Even if they are not covered by your insurance, the supplies will probably cost far less than your usual purchase of test strips. These supplies are also available online at cvs.com. Photo: clinidiabet.com Continue reading >>

Diabetic Test Strips & Lancets

Diabetic Test Strips & Lancets

List of Contracted Diabetic Test Strips and Lancets This spreadsheet contains contracted diabetic test strips and lancets eligible for reimbursement for Medi-Cal fee-for-service recipients billable by pharmacy providers via NCPDP claims processing only. Refer to the Medical Supplies section of the provider manual for coverage criteria, quantity limits and additional billing information. This spreadsheet is subject to change with notification in the provider bulletins. Updates or additions to the spreadsheet will be bolded. Deletions from the spreadsheet will have strikethroughs. 'MAPC' (maximum allowable product cost) is the price on file. The manufacturers have guaranteed, upon request, a maximum acquistion cost for the contracted products to Medi-Cal providers for dispensing to eligible Fee-For-Service Medi-Cal recipeints at or below the MAPC. Unit of Measure (UOM) equals each strip or lancet. To receive reimbursement, the product number (an 11-digit number also referred to as UPN or NDC) on each package (box) dispensed must be an exact match to a billing code in this spreadsheet and the billing code on the claim. Product Type Product Description Billing Code Manufacturer MAPC Effective Date Publication Date Blood Glucose Test Strips ACCUCHEK AVIVA PLUS TEST STRIPS BOX 100 65702040810 Roche Diabetes Care, Inc. 1.0977 Prior to 2/16/2015 April 2016 Blood Glucose Test Strips ACCUCHEK AVIVA PLUS TEST STRIPS BOX 50 65702040710 Roche Diabetes Care, Inc. 1.0977 Prior to 2/16/2015 April 2016 Blood Glucose Test Strips ACCUCHEK COMPACT STRIPS BOX 102 50924088401 Roche Diabetes Care, Inc. 1.1044 Prior to 2/16/2015 April 2016 Blood Glucose Test Strips ACCUCHEK COMPACT STRIPS BOX 51 50924098850 Roche Diabetes Care, Inc. 1.1044 Prior to 2/16/2015 April 2016 Blood Glucose Test Strip Continue reading >>

Cvss 2019 Formulary Removals Negligent Handling Diabetes Test Strip Change

Cvss 2019 Formulary Removals Negligent Handling Diabetes Test Strip Change

Around the first week in August for the past four years, CVS has made an official announcement of its next years formulary changes. It posts these changes on its own websites. But that changed in 2018. During an August 8th 3Q2018 Earning Conference Call , CVS said that 2019 formulary details would be available around October 1, 2018. But, CVS waited until November 16, 2018 to post details on its own website. We believe that there has been a willful intent by CVS to minimize attention to upcoming formulary changes fearing bad publicity would delay government approval of their merger with the insurance company Aetna. The review included the Department of Justice, state Attorney Generals and Judge Richard Leon of the U.S. District Court of the District of Columbia. In particular, CVS has been negligent in giving ample warning to diabetes patients of an upcoming switch in blood glucose test strips from LifeScans OneTouch brand to Roches Accu-Chek brand. We estimate that this change is going to affect up to 7.2% of CVSs 94 Million covered lives, or 6.8 Million people who have Type I or Type II diabetes, as they require daily blood glucose monitoring via a glucometer and test strips. We conclude with a look at the impact of this event on state frozen formulary laws. One of the most effective cost-controls employed by pharmacy benefit managers (PBMs) are their national formularies. Formularies are lookup tables embedded in software at the retail and mail order point of sale that alerts pharmacists as to which drugs are covered by a customers drug benefit plan. Via formularies, PBMs have the power to affect the demand for patented, but therapeutically equivalent drugs. This power enables them to negotiate rebates with pharmaceutical manufacturers (Pharma) in return for formula Continue reading >>

Cvs Health Blood Glucose Test Strips Featuring Truetrack, 100ct

Cvs Health Blood Glucose Test Strips Featuring Truetrack, 100ct

CVS Health Blood Glucose Test Strips Featuring TRUEtrack, 100CT CVS Health Blood Glucose Test Strips Featuring TRUEtrack, 100CT Blood glucose meters and test strips make it easy to measure your blood sugar, keep a record of your levels and help you manage your diabetes and overall health. Includes: 100 Test strips, code chip, instructions for use. Reagents: Glucose oxidase (aspergillus sp.), mediators, buffers and stabilizers. Beveled tip for greater sampling precision TRUEtrack test strips are used for self-testing and point of care testing As part of the TRUEtrack system, they deliver clinically accurate results Featured benefits: Easy to handle, small sample size Quad-electrode technology enables accurate and precise glucose measurements TRUEfill beveled tip allows for greater sampling precision Use these strips with TRUEtrack meter. Please insert enclosed code chip into meter immediately before using strips. Store in a dry place at room temperature below 86 deg F (30 deg C). Do not refrigerate or freeze. Continue reading >>

The Glucose Meter Shuffle.

The Glucose Meter Shuffle.

I have several One Touch meters, a Freestyle one, and a Dexcom continuous glucose monitor that I consult on a regular basis. (Not usually at the same time, but I have been doing multiple checks recently. More on that below.) I also have an Agamatrix meter and an Accu-chek one, somewhere in the diabetes cupboard in the bathroom, only without any strips that aren't expired. And I have a lot of anxiety when it comes to glucose meters. The variability of these machines makes me crazy in the head, and it caused me a lot of grief when I was pregnant, because my blood sugar goal range at that point was so tight and so specific, and any variability was huge for me. (I shared some samples of wonky results in this post.) In the last few weeks, I've been doing some experimenting with my meters, inspired by at-home research conducted by Stacey at The Girl with the Portable Pancreas. It's an messy process, which includes testing with several meters at one and trying to grab a photo. It's also messy because it involves the people at One Touch (because they provided me with some spare strips after I spoke with them about my meter issues and I have a running dialog with them about this problem), my insurance company (because I had to work with them to get a partial prescription covered for a batch of Freestyle strips), and my patience (because I'm short on that due to the aforementioned). So far, I've noticed a few trends: The Freestyle meter almost always runs higher than my One Touch meters. I'm not sure if that makes it more "accurate" or not, but it is consistently higher. Thing is, there isn't a pattern I've found yet when it comes to syncing up with the Dexcom. For example, the photo below has the Freestyle much higher than the One Touch meters, but my Dexcom was at 98 mg/dl with Continue reading >>

Goodyear Cvs Employee Allegedly Stole $100,000 In Diabetic Test Strips

Goodyear Cvs Employee Allegedly Stole $100,000 In Diabetic Test Strips

GOODYEAR, Ariz. - The Goodyear Police Department said officers arrested a CVS pharmacy technician Tuesday who allegedly stole $100,000 in diabetic test strips from the store located on Dysart and Thomas roads. CVS Pharmacy's Loss Prevention department conducted its own investigation and determined that over the last seven months, 29-year-old Robert Kemple ordered diabetic test strips and stole them from the store once they were shipped. Kemple admitted to selling the test strips to online companies at reduced prices. According to police, Kemple had worked at CVS for 9 years. He is facing charges of theft, trafficking stolen property and fraudulent schemes. Continue reading >>

Cvs Extracare Advantage For Diabetes

Cvs Extracare Advantage For Diabetes

I have spent the past two weeks trying to update all of my prescriptions, mail order pharmacy timelines, and warranty information for all of my various diabetes devices, etc. I am wiped out from the phone calls, the confusion, and the waiting. I have spoken with some great people over the phone and yet I still feel completely isolated on this trek. I miss the time in my life when I knew my pharmacist! I am not trying to be nostalgic. I am all in for modern day advances and conveniences. However, anyone living with diabetes knows that we need a team. I need to feel more confident in my supplies, organization, and shopping for my care. So get ready CVS, here I come! I have decided to take a challenge and see if I can ease the stress and running around town in search of quality and low cost diabetes supplies! My family and I are going to use CVS pharmacies for the next three months! This does not include my Dexcom CGM or my T:Slim pump supplies. However, this does include prescriptions, testing supplies, low blood glucose remedies, snacks, and the use of CVS online services. I have joined ExtraCare advantage for Diabetes online and am determined to stick with a program to reap some benefits! I went online and signed up for their app, which was easy. I went into a store to see how easy it would or would not be to get everything switched over from a competitor. Like many others, I require several prescriptions and getting the auto refill is a much needed service. The pharmacist was nice and efficient. She asked if I wanted all the bells and whistles, such as to be notified by text for updates, etc. I signed up for all of these perks. I plan to use the CVS App to manage my reminders and hopefully keep better track of my prescriptions and prescription history. I also plan to u Continue reading >>

Free Cvs Diabetic Test Strips – No Coupon Needed

Free Cvs Diabetic Test Strips – No Coupon Needed

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Former Cvs Employee Pleads Guilty To Stealing Over $2 Million Dollars Worth Of Diabetic Test Strips

Former Cvs Employee Pleads Guilty To Stealing Over $2 Million Dollars Worth Of Diabetic Test Strips

Former CVS Employee Pleads Guilty To Stealing Over $2 Million Dollars Worth Of Diabetic Test Strips ROCHESTER, N.Y. - U.S. Attorney James P. Kennedy, Jr. announced today that Antonio Rivera, 35, of Williamsville, NY, pleaded guilty before U.S. District Judge Elizabeth A. Wolford to wire fraud. The charge carries a maximum penalty of 20 years in prison and a $250,000 fine. Assistant U.S. Attorney Melissa Marangola, who is handling the case, stated that since February 2007, the defendant was employed as a Senior Assistant Purchasing Associate for CVS Pharmacy. This position required Rivera to order a variety of retail products sold by CVS, including diabetic test strips. In July, 2018, CVS's internal systems red flagged the purchasing of diabetic test strips at a CVS located in Rochester, NY. A package located in the stores shipping area did not have a CVS label, included Riveras return address, and came from a company with which CVS does not do business. A subsequent internal investigation by CVS determined that Rivera routinely purchased diabetic test strips in excessive amounts, well over the need for that CVS location. The audit could not account for 20,203 boxes purchased by Rivera, for a total financial loss of approximately $2,535,307.62. The defendant ordered the excessive amounts of diabetic test strips and then intercepted the shipments once they arrived. He then sold the stolen product to a third party located in the State of Florida. A forensic accounting of Riveras bank accounts identified payments for the fraudulently obtained diabetic test strips that were deposited into the defendants bank accounts. While business owners hate to think that their employees would steal from them, employee theft is, unfortunately, not that uncommon, stated U.S. Attorney Kenn Continue reading >>

Reminder: New Id Cards Include Medical And Pharmacy Information

Reminder: New Id Cards Include Medical And Pharmacy Information

All State Health Plan members should have received a new ID card for their 2017 benefits. This includes active members and those enrolled in one of the UnitedHealthcare Medicare Advantage Plans. Members should use this card, which includes medical and pharmacy information, throughout 2017 to receive medical care or purchase a prescription. For the Consumer-Directed Health Plan (CDHP or 85/15), the Enhanced 80/20 Plan, Traditional 70/30 Plan and the High Deductible Health Plan, cards will include information for the Plan’s new Pharmacy Benefit Manager, CVS Caremark. Members in one of these plans can call CVS Caremark Customer Care at 888-321-3124 for questions about their 2017 pharmacy benefits. Help Employees Reach Their Best Health in 2017 with the Health Engagement Program for CDHP Members! The New Year brings new opportunities for members to get healthy and earn Health Reimbursement Account (HRA) funds through the Health Engagement Program (HEP). HEP is designed to support CDHP members in reaching their best health. And new for 2017, enrolled members can earn HRA funds by completing healthy activities through RivalHealth – an exciting new online fitness-based wellness platform! Processing Members Approved for Extended or Long-Term Disabilty If you have employees who have recently been approved for extended short-term or long-term disability by the State Retirement Systems and also awarded federal Medicare benefits, it is common for the effective date of those benefits to be retroactive. Members who have been approved for these benefits and awarded Medicare coverage are now considered Medicare primary and no longer eligible for enrollment in the Enhanced 80/20 Plan or the Consumer-Directed Health Plan. Do You Have an Employee Eligible for a Free Blood Glucose Mete Continue reading >>

Comparing The Cost Of Diabetes Test Strips At Major Retailers

Comparing The Cost Of Diabetes Test Strips At Major Retailers

Where’s the best place to buy blood glucose monitor test strips over-the-counter? And which test strips are the most affordable? We took a look at the top blood sugar test strip costs at a few of the major retailers to see what the best deals are. Hands down, the ReliOn brand of test strips is the most affordable if you’re paying for test strips out-of-pockt at a meager 18 cents per strip (in a 50 count box) at Walmart and 35 cents (in a 50 count box) if you buy on Amazon. However, it’s only available at Walmart (and Amazon), so that can make it difficult if there isn’t a Walmart in your area. The next most affordable test strip is the Bayer Contour Next, which came it between 77 cents and 86 cents per strip in their 50 count boxes if you buy them at a brick-and-mortar store, or 24 cents per strip on Amazon. Lifescan’s One Touch Ultra Blue, Roche’s Accuchek Aviva, and Abbott’s Freestyle Lite came in at well over a dollar a strip at all the major pharmacy retailers, but all of them in under a dollar a strip if you buy on Amazon. Roche’s Accuchek Aviva came in as the most expensive test strip at every retailer, except Amazon, where it came in a whole 5 cents cheaper than One Touch Ultra Blue. Amazon is for the most part the most affordable place to buy your test strips out-of-pocket, unless you’re buying Walmart’s ReliOn test strips. In that case, you’re better off just driving to Walmart. Here’s the full breakdown: Walmart One Touch Ultra Blue – 50 count: $68.79 / $1.37 per strip Freestyle Lite – 50 count: $81.64 / $1.63 per strip Bayer Contour Next – 50 count: $38.88 / $.77 per strip ReliOn Prime – 50 count: $9.00 / $.18 per strip AccuChek Aviva Plus – 50 count: $82.27 / $1.64 per strip Walgreens One Touch Ultra Blue – 50 count: $79.9 Continue reading >>

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