diabetestalk.net

Diabetes Goal Setting Worksheet

Disentangling Self-management Goal Setting And Action Planning: A Scoping Review

Disentangling Self-management Goal Setting And Action Planning: A Scoping Review

Disentangling self-management goal setting and action planning: A scoping review Affiliations Research Centre for Autonomy and Participation for People with a Chronic Illness, Zuyd University of Applied Sciences, Heerlen, the Netherlands, Department of Family Medicine, CAPHRI School for Public Health and Primary Care, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands Roles Conceptualization, Funding acquisition, Methodology, Supervision, Writing review & editing Affiliation Research Centre for Autonomy and Participation for People with a Chronic Illness, Zuyd University of Applied Sciences, Heerlen, the Netherlands Roles Conceptualization, Funding acquisition, Methodology, Supervision, Writing review & editing Affiliation Department of Family Medicine, CAPHRI School for Public Health and Primary Care, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands Roles Conceptualization, Funding acquisition, Supervision, Writing review & editing Affiliation Department of Family Medicine, CAPHRI School for Public Health and Primary Care, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands Roles Conceptualization, Funding acquisition, Writing review & editing Affiliations Research Centre for Autonomy and Participation for People with a Chronic Illness, Zuyd University of Applied Sciences, Heerlen, the Netherlands, Department of Family Medicine, CAPHRI School for Public Health and Primary Care, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands Disentangling self-management goal setting and action planning: A scoping review Continue reading >>

S.m.a.r.t. Weight Loss With Type 2 Diabetes

S.m.a.r.t. Weight Loss With Type 2 Diabetes

Make losing weight with diabetes easier by setting S.M.A.R.T. goals. S.M.A.R.T. stands for Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant, and Time-bound. When your goals are S.M.A.R.T., it will be simpler to stay on track with your diet. To help manage your diabetes, you need to spread carbs out more evenly throughout the day. So, for example, a S.M.A.R.T. goal is “I will eat a breakfast containing 45 grams of carbohydrates every day for the next 2 weeks.” Here’s the S.M.A.R.T. breakdown: Specific: targeted to breakfast Measurable: 45 grams, every day Attainable: Breakfasts with about 45 grams of carbs are very doable. A few options: 1 cup cooked oatmeal (32 grams), 1/2 medium banana (13 grams), a hard-boiled egg, black coffee 2 scrambled eggs, 1 small whole wheat pita (15 grams), 1 orange (18 grams), 1 cup 1% milk (14 grams) 3 rye crispbreads (24 grams), 1/2 cup nonfat cottage cheese (5 grams), 1 cup of blackberries (15 grams) Relevant: Spreading carbs out is relevant because it helps you curb hunger, so you don’t overeat. To hit 45 grams, you have to plan to eat protein and fat in addition to carbs at a meal. A piece of toast with an egg, for instance, will keep you feeling full longer than two slices of toast with jam. When you’re more satisfied, you’re likely to eat less overall. Time-bound: This goal will be your focus for 2 weeks. At the end of that time, you can decide if you want to do it again or set a different goal. Setting S.M.A.R.T. goals helps keep big projects, like losing weight or managing blood sugar, from being overwhelming. Your steps for success are clearly spelled out so that you know when you’ve met the goal. The biggest payoff comes from turning short-term goals into long-lasting, healthy habits. Continue reading >>

Self-management Tools

Self-management Tools

Diabetes Self-Management is one of the most influential tools in diabetes care. Below you will find some examples of Diabetes Self-Management that are currently in use in practices around the area. Advancing Diabetes Self Management Diabetes Initiative, a program by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation that provides program materials including self management resources. Assessment of Care for Chronic Conditions Worksheet developed by the MacColl Institute for Healthcare Innovation to assess care. Diabetes 24/7 Personal Health Record created by the American Diabetes Association that helps patients manage their diabetes and share their collection of information with their physician. Diabetes Management Resources University of Wisconsin Hospitals & Clinics Authoritys webpage with food and meal planning tools and diabetes resources. The Diabetes Self-Management Assessment Report Tool (D-SMART) tool used by providers to help assist the patients with tracking their behavior change for DSME. My Diabetes Self-Management Goal Sheet SMS sheet that provides goals on a weekly basis which includes an execution plan, measurement of confidence, and follow up plan Facilitating Behavior Change Guide on Readiness to Change and Motivational Interviewing by the American Society on Aging. Goals for Patients with Diabetes SMS sheet that provides guidelines established by the American Diabetes Association Morisky 8-Item Medication Adherence Questionnaire Questionnaire to assess patient medication adherence. My Personal Goals Available in English & Spanish. SMS sheet logging specific goals and specific plans on how to accomplish them Patient Health Questionnaire ( PHQ-9) Health questionnaire developed by Washington University. Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-2) Health questionnaire developed Continue reading >>

3. Self Management Goal Sheets

3. Self Management Goal Sheets

Summa Health System developed this worksheet to assist patients with diabetes in setting goals for controlling their diabetes. Setting a Self-Management GoalFamily Medicine Center of Akron Self management is what you do every day; you decide what to eat, you decide whether to exercise, you decide if and when you will check your blood sugar or blood pressure, and you decide if you will take your medications. Every one does self management, but the best self management leads to good control of diabetes and better health. Your systolic blood pressure (top number) is less than 130. Your diastolic blood pressure (bottom number) is less than 70. Your LDL (bad) cholesterol is less than 100. You do not have frequent low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) attacks. If your diabetes is not in good control, something needs to change. Some changes that you can do to help get diabetes into good control include: Choosing healthier types and amounts of food. Including walking or other exercise in your normal daily routine. Changing your medications to lower your blood sugar. Changing medication to improve your cholesterol or lower your blood pressure. You must decide what changes you are willing and able to make. To start, answer this question" What is the one thing you would like to do this week to improve your health?" Write your answer below: ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ To reach your goal, you need to have a plan. Your plan needs to be specific. Now, turn the page and write down your answers to these questions. Your doctor or nurse will discuss your goal and help you plan for success. Continue reading >>

Living With Diabetes

Living With Diabetes

Managing diabetes is a daily challenge. There are so many variables to keep in mind -- food, exercise, stress, general health, etc. -- that keeping blood sugar levels in the desired range is a constant balancing act. We want to make managing diabetes easier. So, the DRI's Education Team hasdeveloped short brochures about the topics listed below -- offering useful tips on many of the day-to-day issues facing people living with diabetes. And, most of the materials are offered in English and Spanish. If you can benefit by learning about one or more of these subjects, just click on the title to expand. Do you know what foods have the greatest impact on your blood sugars? If you answered CARBOHYDRATE FOODS...youre right! Carbohydrates -- "carbs" -- are broken down into glucose. So if you eat too much of them, your blood sugar level may rise. For this reason, people with diabetes find it helpful to keep track of the carbs they eat in order to manage their blood sugars. Carb counting is easy. It just takes some practice at first. Caring for older people with diabetes requires special thought and consideration. The older individual is more likely to have other health problems and may be taking a variety of different medications. Many people are frightened to check their blood sugar -- or "blood glucose" -- levels because they do not want to see levels that are higher or lower than their target range. But, checking blood sugar at home, in school, and in the workplace is key to managing diabetes. It puts you in control of your diabetes. Remember, your blood sugar levels remain the same whether you know about them or not. Checking blood sugar levels is the most accurate way to see if your lifestyle changes and medications are helping you to better manage your diabetes. If levels Continue reading >>

Setting Goals For Healthy Living

Setting Goals For Healthy Living

The value of a goal lies in the goal itself; and therefore the goal cannot be attained unless it is pursued for its own sake. –Arnold J. Toynbee Staying healthy with diabetes requires efforts on a variety of fronts. These include eating healthfully, being physically active, taking prescribed medicines at the right times in the right doses, scheduling and keeping numerous medical appointments every year, and being aware of not just blood glucose levels, but also blood pressure and blood cholesterol levels, the state of one’s feet, and the sources and level of stress in one’s life. Most people feel more confident about their efforts in some of these areas than in others. So what do you do when the areas you feel less confident about need attending to, such as when your doctor tells you that you need to “tighten up” your control to prevent diabetes complications? For starters, ask your doctor what action or actions on your part would be most beneficial to your health. Then talk about specific goals and the steps you would need to take to reach them. Ask yourself whether those steps sound like actions you are willing and able to take. And keep in mind that you are more likely to be willing to make the effort required to reach a goal that feels important and meaningful to you. If you don’t see the point to what your doctor or another health-care provider is recommending, ask for a more detailed explanation of how a particular change or action will improve your health. Diabetes care areas A tool that can be helpful in determining which actions may be most effective at improving your health with diabetes is the AADE7. This trademarked list of seven self-care behaviors was developed by the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) to help people with diabete Continue reading >>

Talking To Your Doctor About Type 2 Diabetes

Talking To Your Doctor About Type 2 Diabetes

Talking to your Doctor about Type 2 Diabetes want to save this for later?My Favorites is a feature for registered users only. Sign up today to get started. Log in / Register Now >> INVOKANA is a prescription medicine used along with diet and exercise to lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes. INVOKANA is not for people with type 1 diabetes or with diabetic ketoacidosis (increased ketones in blood or urine). It is not known if INVOKANA is safe and effective in children under 18 years of age. INVOKANA can cause important side effects, including: Amputations. INVOKANA may increase your risk of lower-limb amputations. Amputations mainly involve removal of the toe or part of the foot; however, amputations involving the leg, below and above the knee, have also occurred. Some people had more than one amputation, some on both sides of the body. You may be at a higher risk of lower-limb amputation if you: have a history of amputation, have heart disease or are at risk for heart disease, have had blocked or narrowed blood vessels (usually in leg), have damage to the nerves (neuropathy) in the leg, or have had diabetic foot ulcers or sores. Call your doctor right away if you have new pain or tenderness, any sores, ulcers, or infections in your leg or foot. Your doctor may decide to stop your INVOKANAfor a while if you have any of these signs or symptoms. Talk to your doctor about proper foot care Dehydration. INVOKANA can cause some people to become dehydrated (the loss of too much body water), which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, especially when you stand up (orthostatic hypotension). You may be at higher risk of dehydration if you have low blood pressure, take medicines to lower your blood pressure (including diuretics [water pills]), are on Continue reading >>

Self-management Model

Self-management Model

Diabetic care requires constant, full-time maintenance. To be effective, it must continue outside of the clinical care system, beyond the community, and into the home. Homes are opportunities for entire families to contribute to diabetes prevention and management, by offering emotional support, eating healthier meals and snacks, taking family walks or bike rides, monitoring glucose levels, and taking/administering insulin and medications. Effective home care may enable diabetics to overcome literacy, transportation, and access barriers. Self-management is an individual's ability to manage their own diabetic needs. Improved self-management skills include maintaining diet, exercise, as well as blood sugar values and monitoring medications. Self-management should also include self-foot checks and monitoring other symptoms that are caused by diabetes. Developing self-management practices are important for the individual with diabetes but should also include family members, friends, or other individuals that can provide support. Peer support with other community members facing diabetes facilitates self-management by opening communication channels to discuss strategies and challenges to maintaining effective self-management practice. Self-efficacy is the individual's belief that they can manage their own diabetic needs. Without self-efficacy it is difficult to develop problem solving self-management skills in diabetic patients, especially when also combating health literacy issues. Family and friends can also act as a support network to help directly with diabetes management as well as social and mental support. Mental health is a critical component to individual self-efficacy and can impact self-management ability. Improved self-efficacy paired with mental health can demons Continue reading >>

3-step Plan For Setting Fool-proof Goals!

3-step Plan For Setting Fool-proof Goals!

3-Step Plan For Setting Fool-Proof Goals! By Cyrus Khambatta, MangoMan Nutrition and Fitness Editors Note:Cyrus Khambatta, PhD, lives with type 1 diabetes and coaches his clients in anon-traditional nutritional approach to diabetes management. The views expressed in this article are his own. The problem when it comes time to setting goals is that most of us never concretely define our intentions, and even worse, we never develop a battle plan to succeed. Simply saying words likeI want to get stronger and eat bettercreate a vague intention that is difficult to turn into a successful long-term approach. When you set the goal:I want to get stronger and eat better, you dont answer the following questions: What specific changes are you going to make? The answers to each of these questions should be encoded in the goal itself. Constructing a SMART goal does just that. I have been setting foolproof goals at the beginning of every year for the past seven years. Every year, I sit down with a pen and paper and outline exactly what I would like to accomplish over the next year. It has fundamentally changed my approach to health and fitness, and holds me accountable to the intentions that I set. Setting a goal at the beginning of the year is a great way to outline where you would like to see yourself 365 days from now. And the best part is that its super simple to do. When setting a foolproof goal, it is important to be very concrete not only about what the goal is, but how long it will take. When you create a SMART goal, its easy to make sure that all of this is taken into account at once. SMART is an acronym, and each of the letters are described below: Lets start with a simple example of a big goal, and make it specific and actionable using the smart technique. S stands for spe Continue reading >>

Get Your Goals: Effective Goal Setting Strategies For Athletes

Get Your Goals: Effective Goal Setting Strategies For Athletes

Carrie Cheadle lives in Petaluma, just north of San Francisco, California and has been working on the performance of teams, organizations, and individual athletes and exercisers since 2002. She is a Certified Consultant through the Association for Applied Sport Psychology and author of the book On Top of Your Game: Mental Skills to Maximize Your Athletic Performance . She has been interviewed as an expert resource for articles that have appeared in publications such as Outside Magazine, Shape Magazine, Men's Fitness, Women's Health, Runners World, Bicycling Magazine, and HuffingtonPost. She is a sought-after speaker and has spoken and consulted with many collegiate teams, cycling teams, and triathlon teams, as well as corporate organizations including CamelBak. She's also been featured in the TrainingPeaks blog and webinar series is an expert in Mental Skills Training. Carrie has worked with athletes of all ages and at every level, from recreational athletes to elite and professional athletes competing at national and international levels. Carrie also specializes in working with athletes and exercisers with Type I Diabetes and she's the director of the Mental Skills Training Program for Diabetes Training Camp . She received her Bachelor of Arts degree in psychology at Sonoma State University and her Master of Arts degree in sport psychology at John F. Kennedy University. Carrie has taught both undergraduate and graduate levels for psychology classes and is currently adjunct faculty for John F. Kennedy University. Carrie is engaging, energetic, and fun. She has a great sense of humor and employs a real-life approach to working on the mental aspects of sport and performance with her clients. Carrie has her own personal commitment to lifelong fitness and when she isn't wo Continue reading >>

Patient-centered Goal Setting As A Tool To Improve Diabetes Self-management.

Patient-centered Goal Setting As A Tool To Improve Diabetes Self-management.

Patient-centered goal setting as a tool to improve diabetes self-management. The Department of Community Health, Saint Louis University, St Louis, Missouri (Ms Langford) St. Peter Family Medicine Residency Program, Olympia, Washington (Dr Sawyer, Ms Gioimo) The National Program Office of the Diabetes Initiative of The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Division of Health Behavior Research, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (Ms Brownson, Dr OToole) Diabetes Educ. 2007 Jun;33 Suppl 6:139S-144S. PURPOSE: The purpose of this article is to describe the process of collaborative goal setting as a means to improve diabetes self-management in primary care. METHODS: The Self-Management Goal Cycle framework illustrates a model of care for patients with diabetes. The Big Bad Sugar War is an approach to patient counseling that includes background, barriers, successes, willingness to change, action plan, and reinforcement. RESULTS: Planned visits occur when a medical assistant performs routine health checks and laboratory tests prior to traditional individual appointments. Mini-group medical visits occur when a provider and medical assistant meet with 3 patients at one time. Open office group visits occur when 7 to 12 patients attend 2-hour sessions staffed by a provider. DISCUSSION: Collaborative goal setting is a valuable tool for improving self-management skills among patients with diabetes. By implementing goal setting techniques, members of the patient care team are better equipped to help patients manage their chronic conditions by making them valued partners of the health care team. Continue reading >>

Goal Setting In Diabetes Self-management: Taking The Baby Steps To Success

Goal Setting In Diabetes Self-management: Taking The Baby Steps To Success

Goal setting in diabetes self-management: Taking the baby steps to success We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. Goal setting in diabetes self-management: Taking the baby steps to success Darren A. DeWalt, Terry C. Davis, [...], and Dean Schillinger To evaluate the usefulness of a diabetes self-management guide and a brief counseling intervention in helping patients set and achieve their behavioral goals. We conducted a quasi-experimental study using a one group pretest posttest design to assess the effectiveness of a goal setting intervention along with a self-management guide. English- and Spanish-speaking patients with diabetes had one in-person session and two telephone follow-up calls with a non-clinical provider over a 1216-week period. At each call and at the end of the study, we assessed success in achieving behavioral goals and problem solving toward those goals. Satisfaction with the self-management guide was assessed at the end of the study. We enrolled 250 patients across three sites and 229 patients completed the study. Most patients chose to set goals in diet and exercise domains. 93% of patients achieved at least one behavioral goal during the study and 73% achieved at least two behavioral goals. Many patients exhibited problem solving behavior to achieve their goals. We found no significant differences in reported achievement of behavior goals by literacy or language. Patients were very satisfied with t Continue reading >>

Goal Setting

Goal Setting

Goal Setting If success is your destination, then let TheGoalsGuy help you make the journey. Since 1998, The GoalsGuyhas been helping individuals, entrepreneurs, and corporationstransform their lives and their businesses to achieve greatersimplicity, focus, balance, confidence, enjoyment, and income.The GoalsGuy is the first, last, and only place you need to visitfor all of your planning needs. We are dedicated to developingand deploying world-class methodologies around goal-setting andstrategic planning initiatives through licensing, consulting,training and publishing services. Goal Setting Goal Setting If success is your destination,then let The GoalsGuy help you make the journey. Since 1998,The GoalsGuy has been helping individuals, entrepreneurs, andcorporations transform their lives and their businesses toachieve greater simplicity, focus, balance, confidence,enjoyment, and income. The GoalsGuy is the first, last, and onlyplace you need to visit for all of your planning needs. We arededicated to developing and deploying world-class methodologiesaround goal-setting and strategic planning initiatives throughlicensing, consulting, training and publishing services. GoalSetting Continue reading >>

Be

Be "smart" About Your Goals: Part 2 - Diabetes Self-management

Have you been thinking about your goals and wondering if they really are SMART? Last week , we talked about resolutions and goals and how most people "fall off the wagon" because they havent come up with a plan of action as to how theyre going to reach their goals. But using the concept of SMART goal-setting can help you keep your resolutions. Just a quick refresher: SMART stands for Specific, Measurable, Action-oriented, Realistic, and Time-limited. You might already be familiar with goal-setting if youve been working with a diabetes care team. Diabetes self-management really is all about goal-setting. If your doctor, dietitian, and/or diabetes educator have been talking to you about checking your feet, for example, or improving your cholesterol levels, or starting on insulin , theyve very likely worked with you to come up with a plan to help get you there. You dont improve your cholesterol levels with a snap of the fingers (unfortunately). You need to make changes in your food choices, be more active, and perhaps start on a cholesterol-lowering medicine. All of these steps are part of your action plan to help you reach your goal of safe and healthy cholesterol levels. But first, you need to know what to do to get there. Remember the old proverb A journey of a thousand miles starts with a single step. This has never been more true than when it comes to taking care of yourself and your diabetes. Back to setting SMART goals, then. The best way to learn about this is to pick a goal and ask yourself if the goal is SMART or not. Ill get you started with one: Whats wrong with that, you might ask? Nothing, except it doesnt meet the criteria for being a SMART goal. First, is it specific? Does it lay out what youll be actually doing for your exercise? Second, is it measurable? Continue reading >>

Diabetes Training And Technical Assistance Center

Diabetes Training And Technical Assistance Center

Determining what your garden will look like when it is in full bloom Upon completion of this module, you should be able to: Define goals, strategies, objectives, and activities. Describe the criteria for a SMART objective. Write objectives using the SMART criteria. Explain the differences between process objectives and outcome objectives. Describe how to create objectives and activities based on logic models, implementation plans, and evaluation plans. It should take approximately 60 minutes to complete this module. While some planning approaches start with writing goals and objectives, and then proceed to describing intervention activities and evaluation, this course follows a different approach. Here, interventions are selected and planned out in detail in implementation and evaluation plans, before objectives and activities are written. This course has been organized this way for two main reasons: It can make the process easier. Goals, strategies, objectives, and activities will naturally emerge as your coalition works through the process of completing intervention selection, implementation planning, and evaluation planning. It can keep momentum going. Focusing on interventions can help the coalition spend more time on the critical decisions that will turn the state plan document into real accomplishments, instead of spending a great deal of time re-writing goals, objectives, and activities. CDC Funding Opportunity Announcements In some cases, a review of the data describing the disease burden in your state may reveal areas of need that do not align with goals prioritized in CDC FOAs. While CDC funding is directed to addressing specific priorities, your coalition may wish to identify other funding sources for the implementation of interventions designed to address t Continue reading >>

More in blood sugar