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Diabetes Daily Sugar Intake Grams

Let's Talk About How Much Sugar You Eat & Prediabetes

Let's Talk About How Much Sugar You Eat & Prediabetes

I know you get it. Cut down on sugar. Then, you won’t be obese and get diabetes. But do you know how much sugar you are eating? When I have clients come in for nutrition consultations, they are always shocked by how much more sugar they are eating than they should. Let’s review the numbers and tips on how to make sure your sugar intake is sweet, not bittersweet. National surveys have found that the average American consumes around 85 grams of sugar every day. According to the new USDA guidelines, we should really be eating a fraction of that amount. The recommended sugar intake for adult women is 22 grams of sugar per day, for adult men, it’s 36 grams daily, and for children, it's 12 grams a day. Over time, consistently taking in more sugar will lead to insulin resistance disease, otherwise known as diabetes. What’s alarming is that many people do not realize they are on the road to diabetes. This epidemic of “on the way to diabetes” is called prediabetes. Type 2 diabetes doesn’t appear all of a sudden and the slow, long and invisible road there is prediabetes, which is where blood sugar levels are consistently higher than normal over a long time slowly affecting insulin signaling. Many people focus on calories rather than sugar since diabetics are supposed to look at sugar not you and me. But unfortunately, a new report from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention shows that among Americans age 20 and older, as many as 73 million Americans have prediabetes, which is about 1 in 3 Americans! That’s a lot of missed opportunities to prevent diabetes by cutting down on sugar intake. You can check with your doctor if you have prediabetes, which is a fasting glucose level of 100-125 mg/dL. Being prediabetic is a serious game changer since it is much easi Continue reading >>

Can You Get Diabetes From Eating Too Much Sugar?

Can You Get Diabetes From Eating Too Much Sugar?

Sugar is irresistible to most people. So irresistible, in fact, that sugar cravings might be rooted in evolution. Craving sugary foods, or so the theory goes, could help prevent starvation. In a modern world, however, where food is often plentiful, sugar consumption is linked to diabetes, obesity, and other health problems. Research into the connection between sugar consumption and diabetes is ongoing. Most doctors argue that sugar alone does not trigger diabetes. But some emerging research suggests a closer link between sugar consumption and diabetes than was previously thought. Can people get diabetes from eating too much sugar? Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes affect the body's ability to regulate blood glucose levels. But eating sugar will not cause type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition, which causes the body to attack cells that produce insulin. Damage to these cells undermines the body's ability to manage blood glucose. Type 2 diabetes is more complex. Sugar consumption will not directly cause diabetes. However, excess sugar consumption can cause weight gain. Obesity increases the risk of diabetes. Once a person has diabetes, eating too much sugar can make symptoms worse, since diabetes makes it more difficult for the body to manage blood sugar levels. Understanding the link between sugar and diabetes Although eating sugar is not directly linked to developing diabetes, some evidence suggests that increased overall availability of sugar makes diabetes more common. A 2013 study that looked at 175 different countries found that more sugar in the food supply increased diabetes rates. Specifically, for every additional 150 calories of sugar available per day per person, diabetes levels rose 1 percent. This change continued even when researchers con Continue reading >>

If I Have Diabetes, Will I Have To Stop Eating Sugar?

If I Have Diabetes, Will I Have To Stop Eating Sugar?

What is that saying? Everything is good but only in moderation? Well this rings true when it comes to eating sugar with diabetes too. You probably already know that eating a lot of sugar is not great for your body. The problem is that sugar comes in a natural form and in an added form, so sometimes you have no idea that you are consuming it. Also, it is in many foods that you don’t even think to consider. Foods that you think are healthy, such as tomato sauce and protein bars, are packed full of sugar. This article breaks down the facts about eating sugar with diabetes and how you can make the best choices for your body in order to effectively manage your diabetes. How does sugar impact the blood sugar levels? Normally, when you eat something that contains sugar, your pancreas releases insulin. This insulin partners up with the sugar molecules and together they enter into the cells and provide energy to your body. When you have diabetes, your body either isn’t making enough insulin anymore, or your body is resistant to the insulin that you are creating. This prevents the sugar from being used by your cells and it just hangs out in your bloodstream causing high blood sugar levels. Having sugar in your bloodstream can lead to many problems and is dangerous for your health. Sugar, which is also known as carbohydrates or glucose, is found naturally in many different foods such as dairy, fruits, and starchy vegetables. It is also added to many foods like pastas, grains, baked goods, processed foods, and beverages. Since liquids are digested faster, they increase your blood sugar faster than solids do. More about what contains sugar is found later in this article. The myth about sugar and diabetes There are many myths about diabetes in general. One of the biggest ones is Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs Should A Diabetic Eat?

How Many Carbs Should A Diabetic Eat?

Figuring out how many carbs to eat when you have diabetes can seem confusing. Meal plans created by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) provide about 45% of calories from carbs. This includes 45–60 grams per meal and 10–25 grams per snack, totaling about 135–230 grams of carbs per day. However, a growing number of experts believe people with diabetes should be eating far fewer carbs than this. In fact, many recommend fewer carbs per day than what the ADA allows per meal. This article takes a look at the research supporting low-carb diets for diabetics and provides guidance for determining optimal carb intake. Glucose, or blood sugar, is the main source of fuel for your body's cells. In people with diabetes, the body's ability to process and use blood sugar is impaired. Although there are several types of diabetes, the two most common forms are type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Type 1 Diabetes In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas is unable to produce insulin, a hormone that allows sugar from the bloodstream to enter the body's cells. Instead, insulin must be injected to ensure that sugar enters cells. Type 1 diabetes develops because of an autoimmune process in which the body attacks its own insulin-producing cells, which are called beta cells. This disease is usually diagnosed in children, but it can start at any age, even in late adulthood (1). Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes is more common, accounting for about 90% of people with diabetes. Like type 1 diabetes, it can develop in both adults and children. However, it isn't as common in children and typically occurs in people who are overweight or obese. In this form of the disease, either the pancreas does not produce enough insulin or the body's cells are resistant to insulin's effects. Therefore, too much sugar stays Continue reading >>

Get Sugar Smart

Get Sugar Smart

Our intakes of sugar have increased dramatically over the last 10 years. Fizzy drinks and sweet foods are the obvious culprits, but many people are not aware of other foods which also contain large amounts of ‘free sugars’. Free sugars have been classified as simple sugars added to foods by the manufacturer or consumer. Free sugars also includes sugars that are naturally in honey, syrups and fruit juices. The WHO (World Health organisation) recently published guidelines on sugar intake for adults and children saying that no more than 10% of a person’s energy intake (calories) should come from free sugars. In Ireland, the National Adult Nutritional Survey in 2011 showed that on average our diets contained 14.6% energy from free sugars. High intakes of this type of sugar need to be addressed because it is associated with: • Poor dietary quality • Tooth decay • Obesity. It also increases the risk of preventable diseases like: • Coronary heart disease (CHD) • Type 2 diabetes. An average adult requires 1,500-2,000 calories per day. If 10% of this was to come from free sugars, this would equal 10-14 teaspoons of sugar per day. A teaspoon of sugar is approximately 4g, or one sugar cube. How can we become sugar smart? Understanding food labels is a great tool in becoming sugar smart. Added sugars can come under many different names like: • Glucose • Sucrose • Maltose • Corn syrup • Honey • Invert sugar • Hydrolysed starch • Fructose. The higher up on the ingredients list any of these sugars is then the more it contains in the products. Look for the carbohydrate on the label, and the words ‘of which sugars’. That will tell you how much sugar the item contains per 100g. • More than 15g per 100g is considered high • Less than 5g per 100g is Continue reading >>

How Many Grams Of Sugar Can A Diabetic Have Per Day?

How Many Grams Of Sugar Can A Diabetic Have Per Day?

Diabetes mellitus (MEL-ih-tus), often referred to as diabetes, is characterized by high blood glucose (sugar) levels that result from the body’s inability to produce enough insulin and/or effectively utilize the insulin. Diabetes is a serious, life-long condition and the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism (the body's way of digesting food and converting it into energy). There are three forms of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that accounts for five- to 10-percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes. Type 2 diabetes may account for 90- to 95-percent of all diagnosed cases. The third type of diabetes occurs in pregnancy and is referred to as gestational diabetes. Left untreated, gestational diabetes can cause health issues for pregnant women and their babies. People with diabetes can take preventive steps to control this disease and decrease the risk of further complications. Continue reading >>

How Much Sugar Can A Person With Diabetes Have?

How Much Sugar Can A Person With Diabetes Have?

If you have diabetes, you've probably been told to watch your sugar intake or eliminate sugar altogether. But does that mean you can't ever eat any sugar or can you still enjoy a sweet treat now and then? While it's best to speak with your doctor, dietitian, and diabetes educator about how much sugar you can have each day, chances are you'll be able to eat some sugar as along as you're careful about how much and how often. For most people, whether or not they have diabetes, a healthy diet can include some sugar, probably about 20 to 35 grams of sugar a day. For reference, a teaspoon of sugar has about 4 grams of sugar. A candy bar can easily have 30 grams sugar, and a can of sugar-sweetened soda has around 40 grams of sugar. So, one sweet treat could put anyone over the healthy limit. And, keep in mind many foods have sugar in them even though they're not sweet tasting. But Didn't Eating Sugar Cause My Diabetes? Technically, no. Eating sugar doesn't cause diabetes, or at least not all by itself. Being overweight or obese increases your risk of having type 2 diabetes and eating lots of sugary foods may have been part of the reason for your weight gain. Managing your weight can be an important part of treating your diabetes and that probably means cutting back on added sugars and high-fat foods and eating a balanced diet with more whole-grains, fresh veggies, healthy fruit, and lean protein sources. As far as the amount of sugar you can have? It really depends on how many calories you are taking in every day, and the amount has to fit into your overall carbohydrate intake. Choosing Better Carbohydrates The American Diabetes Association recommends that people with diabetes "follow a dietary pattern that includes carbohydrate from fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, Continue reading >>

Treatment Of Diabetes: The Diabetic Diet

Treatment Of Diabetes: The Diabetic Diet

The mainstays of diabetes treatment are: Working towards obtaining ideal body weight Following a diabetic diet Regular exercise Diabetic medication if needed Note: Type 1 diabetes must be treated with insulin; if you have type 2 diabetes, you may not need to take insulin. This involves injecting insulin under the skin for it to work. Insulin cannot be taken as a pill because the digestive juices in the stomach would destroy the insulin before it could work. Scientists are looking for new ways to give insulin. But today, shots are the only method. There are, however, new methods to give the shots. Insulin pumps are now being widely used and many people are having great results. In this Article Working towards obtaining ideal body weight An estimate of ideal body weight can be calculated using this formula: For women: Start with 100 pounds for 5 feet tall. Add 5 pounds for every inch over 5 feet. If you are under 5 feet, subtract 5 pounds for each inch under 5 feet. This will give you your ideal weight. If you have a large frame, add 10%. If you have a small frame, subtract 10%. A good way to decide your frame size is to look at your wrist size compared to other women's. Example: A woman who is 5' 4" tall and has a large frame 100 pounds + 20 pounds (4 inches times 5 pounds per inch) = 120 pounds. Add 10% for large frame (in this case 10% of 120 pounds is 12 pounds). 120 pounds + 12 pounds = 132 pounds ideal body weight. For men: Start with 106 pounds for a height of 5 foot. Add 6 pounds for every inch above 5 foot. For a large frame, add 10%. For a small frame, subtract 10%. (See above for further details.) Learn More about Treating Type 2 Diabetes The Diabetic Diet Diet is very important in diabetes. There are differing philosophies on what is the best diet but below is Continue reading >>

Grams Of Sugar Permitted In A Diabetic Diet

Grams Of Sugar Permitted In A Diabetic Diet

So you’ve just been diagnosed with diabetes, and you’re told to watch your sugar intake by your doctor. It is a common misconception that sugar alone will raise your blood sugar and lead to the development or worsening of diabetes. In reality, all carbohydrates will raise your blood sugar, but all carbohydrates, including sugar, are permitted in a diabetic diet. Video of the Day The preferred energy source for your brain and muscles is sugar. Sugar is a form of carbohydrate that includes more than just the white, sandy granules you pour into your morning coffee. All carbohydrates are broken down into sugar when they are digested, and they contribute to the overall concentration of sugar in your blood. Therefore, it is more important to monitor the total number of grams of carbohydrates you consume rather than sugar alone. When looking at "Nutrition Facts" labels, notice that both sugar and fiber are listed indented underneath the boldfaced word "Carbohydrates." This is because both sugar and fiber are types of carbohydrates and are already included in the total. Added Sugar Vs. Natural Sugar The type of carbohydrate that is easily broken down and digested by your body is referred to as sugar. Some sugar occurs naturally in foods, while other sugar is added to foods to give them a sweeter taste. Foods with naturally occurring sugar include milk, fruit and starchy vegetables like winter squash, peas, corn and potatoes. Although these foods provide sugar, they also provide essential vitamins, minerals and fiber. The sugar they contain is not added. Identify foods with added sugar by examining the nutrition facts label. Added sugars are listed with the ingredients under names like sucrose, corn syrup and raw sugar. Although all sugar contributes to a rise in blood sugar Continue reading >>

How Low Is Low Carb?

How Low Is Low Carb?

Many agree: People with diabetes should eat a low-carb diet. Last week we looked at what “carbs” are. But what is meant by “low?” How much carbohydrate should you eat? The Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010, (PDF) recommend that healthy people get 50–65% of their calories from carbohydrates. A study posted on the American Diabetes Association (ADA) Web site agrees. For a woman eating a below-average 2,000 calories a day, 50–65% would be 250–325 grams of carb a day. The Dietary Guidelines call for “a balanced diet that includes six one-ounce (28.3 g) servings of grain foods each day.” This would mean 170 grams of carbohydrate from grains alone each day. And the average American diet includes many other carb sources. Most men eat closer to 3,000 calories a day, so their numbers would be higher. Sixty percent of 3,000 would be 1,800 calories, equivalent to 450 grams of carbohydrate each day. Anything less than the recommended range is sometimes considered “low-carb.” Most popular low-carb diets, like Atkins, South Beach, Zone, and Protein Power, are much lower, from 45% of calories down to 5%. Many diabetes experts recommend somewhat lower carb intakes than ADA does. On our site, dietitian Jacquie Craig wrote, “Most people need between 30–75 grams of carbohydrate per meal and 15–30 grams for snacks.” So that sounds like between 120 and 300 grams a day. Dr. Richard Bernstein, an MD with Type 1 diabetes and a long-time advocate of the low-carb approach to diabetes, suggests much lower intakes. He says eat 6 grams of carbs at breakfast, and snacks, 12 grams each at lunch and dinner. So that would be about 40 grams of carbs per day. If 12 grams per meal sounds like a small amount, it is. It’s about the amount in an average slice of bread. An Continue reading >>

Cda: Sugars Position Statement

Cda: Sugars Position Statement

Page 1 Canadian Diabetes Association: Sugars Position Statement The Canadian Diabetes Association recommends Canadians: 1. Limit intake of free sugarsa to less than 10% of total daily calorie (energy) intake. This is approximately 50g (12 teaspoons) of free sugars consumption per day based on a 2000 calorie diet.b 2. Limit intake of sugar sweetened beverages (SSB) and drink water in its place. 3. Promote intake of whole foods and reduce intake of free sugars throughout life for overall health. The Canadian Diabetes Association recommends that: 1. The Government of Canada introduce a tax on SSBs and use the revenues generated to promote the health of Canadians. 2. The Government of Canada ensures clear nutrition labelling for packaged foods including the amount of free sugars on the Nutrition Facts Table. 3. Federal, Provincial and Territorial Governments immediately operationalize the World Health Organization (WHO) set of recommendations to prevent the marketing of foods and beverages to children. 4. A Federal, Provincial and Territorial Working Group on Food and Beverage Marketing to Children is convened to develop, implement and monitor policies to restrict food and beverage marketing to children. 5. Federal, Provincial and Territorial governments support improved access to and affordability of nutritious foods in all regions. 6. The Government of Canada implement legislation to require labeling of free sugars on menu labels in restaurants so Canadians can make more informed choices about the foods they eat. 7. Recreational events, schools, recreation facilities, and government spaces not offer SSBs for purchase. 8. Recreational events, schools, recreation facilities, and government spaces provide free water for consumption. a Free sugars are those sugars that are re Continue reading >>

How To Prevent (and Even Reverse) Prediabetes

How To Prevent (and Even Reverse) Prediabetes

More than 25.8 million children and adults in the United States live with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and experts say as many as 79 million more have prediabetes—a condition where elevated blood glucose levels raise your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. So how can you avoid or reverse prediabetes? Start by asking your doctor for fasting plasma glucose (FPG), A1C, and oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT); then follow these expert recommendations for staying diabetes-free. Diabetes lifestyle educator Get moving. If you are overweight, have high cholesterol, or have a family history of diabetes, you’re at risk. You can lower that risk by up to 58 percent by losing 7 percent of your body weight, which means exercise is essential. Start with 30 minutes of brisk walking five to six times per week; then try low-impact workouts like biking or swimming. Eat better. Reduce sugar intake to less than 6 teaspoons (24 grams) daily for women and less than 9 teaspoons (36 grams) per day for men. People at risk for prediabetes should follow a reduced-calorie and reduced-fat diet. Avoid trans fats and regulate high-caloric healthy fats like olive oil, nuts, and avocado. Make measureable changes. Wear a pedometer to calculate daily movement, start a food journal, and download online applications that track your weight-loss successes with graphs. –Jennifer Pells, PhD, Wellspring at Structure House, Durham, North Carolina Integrative physician Reduce stress. Chronic stress taxes the pancreas (the insulin-producing organ) and increases prediabetes risk. Honokiol, a magnolia bark extract, reduces stress and supports the pancreas by taming inflammation and oxidative stress. Take 250 mg twice per day with meals, for long-term use. Choose the right fiber. Fiber slows sugar’s release in Continue reading >>

Fitting Sugar Into Your Meals

Fitting Sugar Into Your Meals

It is commonly thought that people with diabetes should avoid all forms of sugar. Most people with diabetes can eat foods containing sugar as long as the total amount of carbohydrate for that meal or snack is consistent and sugar foods are added within the context of healthy eating. Many research studies have shown that meals which contain sugar do not make the blood sugar rise higher than meals of equal carbohydrate levels which do not contain sugar. However, if the sugar-containing meal contains more carbohydrates, the blood sugar levels will go up. Which will have the greater effect on blood sugar? ____ 1 tsp sugar or ____ 1/2 cup potatoes The potatoes will contribute about 15 grams of carbohydrates, while a level teaspoon of sugar will only give 4 grams of carbohydrates. Therefore, the potatoes will have about three times the effect on blood sugar as compared to the table sugar. Meal Planning Practice Using the following foods, plan two breakfast meals containing approximately 45 grams of carbohydrate. Notice that there are some foods on this list you might think would not be "allowed" on your meal plan. But again, any of these foods can be used as long as you limit the amount of carbohydrates you eat at a given meal to what is indicated on your individualized meal plan. (In the example below, this means you can choose whatever foods you want as long as the total carbohydrate equals no more than 45 grams). Food Amount Carbohydrate Grams 1% fat milk 1 cup 12 Bran Chex 2/3 cup 23 Frosted Flakes 3/4 cup 26 Raisin Bran 3/4 cup 28 bread/toast 1 slice 15 sugar. white table 1 teaspoon 4 pancakes - 4 inches 2 15 low-fat granola 1/2 cup 30 yogurt, fruited 1 cup 40 yogurt, fruit with NutraSweet fruit juice 1 cup 19 fruit juice 1/2 cup 15 banana 1/2 15 pancake syrup 2 tablespo Continue reading >>

How Many Grams Of Sugar Per Day Can A Diabetic Have?

How Many Grams Of Sugar Per Day Can A Diabetic Have?

It may surprise you to know that with the exception of sugary beverages, the recommended sugar intake guidelines are the same for people with and without diabetes. Sugar is a form of carbohydrate your body uses for energy, and compared to other food components, carbs have the greatest impact on your blood glucose level. Learn about the types of sugar in your diet and what to choose to best manage your condition. The Deal With Sugar Carbohydrates consist of sugars, starches and fiber, and regardless of the type, your body converts them to blood glucose. In the past, the dietary approach to diabetes focused on eliminating sugar because experts thought it caused blood glucose to rise too high. However, subsequent research found that the total amount, rather than the type of carb you eat, has more of an impact on your blood sugar. For this reason, the current approach is to control the total amount of carbs, regardless of the type, at each meal. Natural Versus Added Sugar While the goal is to focus on the total amount of carbs you eat, this doesn't give you a green card to eat excess sugar. Get sugars and other types of carbohydrates from fruit, vegetables, whole grains, legumes and dairy, according to the American Diabetes Association. These foods contain naturally occurring sugars, and as whole foods, they provide useful nutrients such as protein, calcium, vitamin D and minerals. On the other hand, sugar that is added to foods has no nutritional value and is typically added to nutritionally imbalanced foods. Natural sugar has a place in your diet. For example, the sugar in fruit provides a quick source of energy to replenish you after exercise. Added Sugar Guidelines The recommended amount of added sugar for people with or without diabetes is 6 teaspoons for women and 9 t Continue reading >>

I Ate Only 25 Grams Of Sugar A Day, Heres What I Learned

I Ate Only 25 Grams Of Sugar A Day, Heres What I Learned

About the author View all posts by Jen Picicci Sugar is so delicious , isnt it? I mean, not straight up or anything, but mixed into things, like chocolate chips and chocolate cake and chocolate bars andwell, I guess you can tell I like chocolate. Its not just in things like baked goods and candy, though, its in tons of beverages, coffee drinks, tomato sauces, ketchup, yogurt, salad dressings, and more. In recent years the recommendation for total grams of added sugar had been lowered; the World Health Organization used to say that no more than 10% of your daily calories should come from it, and then they lowered it down to 5%. For most women, that means about 25 grams of sugar per day, which equals 6 teaspoons. (Guys get about 9 teaspoons. Lucky.) Although Im actually a big fan of fruits and veggies and whole grains and all that jazz, I do love me some baked goods. However, I am not a soda-drinker , and I dont eat sweetened yogurts, so I thought keeping my intake to 25 grams or less per day would be pretty easy. I dont want to mislead youit wasnt torture and it wasnt impossible, but it was a real challenge and I had to be super conscious of my choices all the time, which was honestly quite annoying. I did achieve my goal on most days, but certainly not all of them. If youd like to keep your sugar intake low, too, heres what I learned: You probably already know this, but they add so many calories to your diet and, of course, to your sugar intake. I dont eat ketchup all that often, but if I make home fries or sweet potato rounds , I like to dip them in ketchup, and the sugar in that little delicious red blob adds up quickly. Its easy to think youre just squirting out a serving, when really youve got three or four on there. Which is why you should. Lets talk about maple s Continue reading >>

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