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Diabetes And Too Much Sleep

Is It Possible To Get Too Much Sleep?

Is It Possible To Get Too Much Sleep?

Experts often talk about how Americans aren’t getting nearly enough sleep these days. But what about the opposite problem? Sure, it’s a lot less common, but is it bad to get way more than the recommended amount of sleep? The answer is yes. First, a quick note: This is not referring to people who sleep slightly more than seven to nine hours a night. For instance, routinely getting 10 hours of sleep is still healthy, even though most people don’t need it (only about two percent of the population does). It’s also not about people who sleep in super late one Saturday after a long week, are dealing with jet lag, are exercising intensely (like training for a marathon), or are sick with the flu. This is about people who sleep 11 or more hours a night, day in and day out. So if most people need seven to nine hours a night, what’s causing some people to sleep much longer? One cause could be that the quality of sleep is very poor, possibly due to a sleep disorder, like sleep apnea. There could also be an underlying physical condition, like hypothyroidism. The cause could also be a mental health problem, like depression. In fact, even if you don’t feel sad, you might have a low-grade depression—meaning, your brain chemicals are off-balance and causing you to sleep for an extended amount of time. Whatever the cause, certain medical issues are associated with chronically oversleeping. For example, the risk for diabetes, obesity, headaches, back pain, and heart disease are all higher in people who oversleep. Oversleeping also can throw your circadian rhythm off balance and stop you from getting enough sunlight exposure—two problems that can weaken your immune system and make it likelier that you’ll catch a disease. Due to these risks, anyone who is sleeping longer t Continue reading >>

Is There A Link Between Too Much Sleep And Type 2 Diabetes?

Is There A Link Between Too Much Sleep And Type 2 Diabetes?

By Maria Masters We hear a lot about the consequences of too little sleep — but what about the problems (if any) that come with too much shut-eye? It’s a question that more and more researchers have been asking lately. And now, a new study published in the November 2015 issue of Diabetologia has made a surprising finding: that staying in bed for an extra two hours might be linked to an increased risk for type 2 diabetes. The researchers found that women who increased their shut-eye by at least two hours a day had a higher risk of type 2 diabetes compared to those who stuck to a consistent sleep routine. In fact, even when the women who used to get less than six hours of sleep a night started logging seven to eight hours (the recommended levels), they still experienced an increased risk of developing the disease. What’s so Bad About Too Much Sleep? Well, it’s complicated. Study author Elizabeth Cespedes, a doctor of science and postdoctoral research fellow at Kaiser Permanente’s division of research in Oakland, California, says that her study was purely observational. (Cue the famous saying: “Causation does not equal correlation.”) But one theory is that getting extra sleep later in life simply isn’t enough to stave off conditions like type 2 diabetes in the future, she says. In other words, those all-nighters are likely to catch up with you sooner or later. Another idea: Just because people said they logged nine hours of sleep doesn’t mean that they were actually sleeping — “they may be spending more time in bed and in the dark, but not necessarily more time asleep,” she says. Still a third option: It’s possible that extra time in bed might increase a person’s odds of developing type 2 diabetes in and of itself. For example, many experts beli Continue reading >>

Why Is Too Much Sleep Bad For You?

Why Is Too Much Sleep Bad For You?

First, we have to understand what happens during sleep. Why do we need sleep at all? During sleep, our brain clears out toxins and delivers key nutrients and chemicals that keep our brains functioning via the glymphatic system. This does not and cannot happen when we’re awake. Memory formation and consolidation also happens largely during sleep. So do things like muscle and wound repair. It’s basically when your body shuts down for maintenance. It’s generally the case that, if a person is sleeping too much, their health is already not good. Oversleeping can be a sign of serious depression, diseases, or neurological ailments, and is a sign that your metabolism is slower than it should be. So these studies showing that oversleeping is linked to things like diabetes aren’t really showing that oversleeping causes diabetes. It shows that oversleeping may be an early sign that you are likely to develop diabetes. This is why we hear the phrase “Correlation does not equal causation” when we talk about science. After childhood, your sleep should actually stay the same throughout your life (unless you get sick, get a tbi or other serious injury, or get a neurological disorder - all of which may increase your need for sleep). So if you need 8.5 hours of sleep per night when you’re 28, that will be the same in 10, 20, 30 years if you’re still healthy. Things like medication can also mess with your sleep needs, so it’s important to talk to your doctor if you find you need more sleep (an hour or greater change) than you used to. We all have differing sleep needs. It is the case that most humans need between 7 and 9.5 hours of sleep per night, but there are rare people who need a little less or a little more than that. It’s not a sign of weakness if you’re the ra Continue reading >>

Sleeping Too Little – Or Too Much – Associated With Heart Disease, Diabetes, Obesity

Sleeping Too Little – Or Too Much – Associated With Heart Disease, Diabetes, Obesity

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Katie Blyth, L.C. Williams & Associates, 800/837-7123 or 312/565-3900, [email protected] DARIEN, IL – A new study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) links too little sleep (six hours or less) and too much sleep (10 or more hours) with chronic diseases – including coronary heart disease, diabetes, anxiety and obesity – in adults age 45 and older. The American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) encourages patients suffering from these common chronic conditions to speak with a sleep medicine physician who can evaluate their sleep patterns. “It’s critical that adults aim for seven to nine hours of sleep each night to receive the health benefits of sleep, but this is especially true for those battling a chronic condition,” said Dr. M. Safwan Badr, president of the AASM. “Common sleep illnesses – including sleep apnea and insomnia – occur frequently in people with a chronic disease and can hinder your ability to sleep soundly. So if you’re waking up exhausted, speak with a sleep physician to see if there’s a problem. If you are diagnosed with a sleep illness, treating it could significantly improve disease symptoms and your quality of life.” “Some of the relationships between unhealthy sleep durations and chronic diseases were partially explained by frequent mental distress and obesity,” said study co-author Janet B. Croft, PhD, senior chronic disease epidemiologist in CDC’s Division of Population Health. “This suggests that physicians should consider monitoring mental health and body weight in addition to sleep health for patients with chronic diseases.” In the study, published in the October issue of the Journal SLEEP, short sleepers reported a higher prevalence of coronary heart disease, stro Continue reading >>

Sufficient Sleep May Help Protect Men Against Diabetes: Study

Sufficient Sleep May Help Protect Men Against Diabetes: Study

WEDNESDAY, June 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Too much or too little sleep may raise the risk of diabetes in men, but not women, a study by European researchers suggests. "Even when you are healthy, sleeping too much or too little can have detrimental effects on your health. This research shows how important sleep is to a key aspect of health -- glucose [sugar] metabolism," said senior study author Femke Rutters. She's with the VU Medical Center in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. The study involved nearly 800 healthy adults in 14 European countries. Compared to men who slept about seven hours a night, the men who slept the most or the least were more likely to have an impaired ability to break down sugar and to have higher blood sugar levels, the research found. This put them at increased risk for diabetes, the investigators said. But compared to women who slept an average amount, the women who slept the most or least were more responsive to the hormone insulin and also had enhanced function of insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. These findings suggest sleep problems may not increase women's risk of diabetes, the scientists said. The study is the first to show the opposite effect of sleep problems on diabetes risk in men and women, the researchers said, although they did not prove that sleep problems cause diabetes risk to rise in men. During the last 50 years, the average amount of sleep for individuals has decreased by 1.5 to two hours a night, and the prevalence of diabetes has doubled, according to Rutters. The findings were published online June 29 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. More information The U.S. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases explains how to reduce your risk of diabetes. Continue reading >>

6 Bad Things That Happen When You Sleep Too Much

6 Bad Things That Happen When You Sleep Too Much

Doctors agree: Quality sleep is crucial for your health. Not only do you need it to stay focused and alert during the day, but it helps your body recharge and recover from wear and tear and might lower your risk of everything from obesity and diabetes to premature death. But can you have too much of a good thing? Definitely, say experts. "Individuals who sleep more than 10 hours per day generally have worse health profiles than those who sleep 7 to 8 hours," says Susan Redline, MD, MPH, professor of sleep medicine at Harvard and senior physician in the division of sleep and circadian disorders at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. (Always dragging? Here are 7 reasons you're tired all the time.) Nearly 30 percent of adults in the US are in this group of "long sleepers." Logging lots of shut-eye becomes more common as you get older, and it's not entirely clear whether it's a sign that you have a disease or if it can actually make you sick. "The predominant opinion is that long sleep is a marker for underlying health problems," says Redline. But Michael Irwin, MD, Cousins Professor of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, says that sleeping too much can also cause disease. That's because "long" sleep—which he defines as more than 8 hours—is usually poor sleep. "What we're really looking at is a group of people who are spending a long time in bed," says Irwin, who notes that these individuals might not be soundly asleep the whole time. The bottom line? Sleeping too much could turn out to be just as damaging as sleeping too little. Here are a few of the problems you might face if you regularly overdo it. (Feel better starting today with Rodale's The Thyroid Cure, a new book that's helped thousands of people finally sol Continue reading >>

This Is What Can Happen To Your Body When You Get Too Much Sleep

This Is What Can Happen To Your Body When You Get Too Much Sleep

iStock/sanjagrujic The negative health effects of too little sleep are well-documented, but what happens from too much sleep is less clear. The National Sleep Foundation recommends that the average adult get 7 to 9 hours of sleep. But what if your body craves more sleep: Can you get too much? A growing body of research connects oversleeping with bad health outcomes. "Oversleeping is not harmful in and of itself, but it is a sign that you may be sleeping ineffectively, or that there is another problem requiring more sleep," says Carl Bazil, MD, director of the division of sleep and epilepsy at New York-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center. "There are also otherwise normal people who are 'long sleepers'—they function perfectly well if they get 9 or 10 hours but are sleepy on less. It's still important, however, to check for other possibilities." One concerning problem linked with long sleep is cardiovascular disease. Researchers from the Chicago School of Medicine found that people who sleep more than 8 hours per night are twice as likely to have angina (chest pain) and 10 percent more likely to have coronary heart disease. The large Nurse's Health Study found the risk of heart disease was even larger, with a 38 percent greater chance in long sleepers. The risk of stroke also goes up: One study from the UK showed a 46 percent greater chance of stroke in long sleepers, even after adjusting for other risk factors. You might not be sleeping well iStock/geber86 One theory about why too much sleep is linked with other health problems is that your time in bed is disrupted, so you're not actually getting good rest. "Those with untreated sleep apnea [a common breathing problem] have a tendency to oversleep, and we know that undiagnosed and untreated sleep apnea leads Continue reading >>

How Is Diabetes Affected By Insomnia?

How Is Diabetes Affected By Insomnia?

Who’s At Risk and Why? Diabetes is worse when combined with insomnia symptoms, doctors have conclusively discovered. In fact, insomnia makes most medical diseases much worse in ways we are only just now finding out and can chemically disrupt the body’s insulin balance enough to even be a root cause for certain types of diabetes. The Chemistry of the Sleep-Wake Cycle Since diabetics are sensitive to blood glucose levels and chemical balances in the body, it’s illustrative to explore just how detrimental disruptions in the sleep cycle can be. Studies have shown that diabetes worsens when adult sufferers sleep less than 6 hours per night or more than 9.(1) The loss of normal sleep hours or addition of sleep hours seems to undo the body’s chemistry and completely throw off-balance the blood glucose levels. Doctors don’t know for sure the exact chemistry behind this phenomenon outside of the observation. This underscores the importance of the sleep cycle chemistry. Further studies have shown that chronic insomnia in healthy people can also instigate diabetes. Loss of sleep interrupts insulin balance—leads to insulin resistance—which in turn can lead to more severe medical problems and Type 2 diabetes. Diabetes Management Much of the challenge for diabetics is proper and long-term management of their diabetes. When the sleep-wake cycle is also mismanaged, so too is the diabetes. Like many other medical diseases and conditions, diabetes is sensitive to sleep disturbances. But insomnia, as a set of symptoms, is usually secondary to something else. Insomnia is characterized in a number of ways: you could have problems going to sleep (sleep onset insomnia), problems waking up and going back to sleep (middle of the night insomnia), or waking up in the early dawn unab Continue reading >>

How Can Type 1 Diabetes Affect Sleep?

How Can Type 1 Diabetes Affect Sleep?

We all know the miserable after-effects of a poor night’s sleep. Unfortunately, that dreary, frazzled, anxious state can be a more common reality for for someone with Type 1 diabetes. Doctors at the Sleep Disorders Program at the Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center estimate that 40-50% of people with diabetes complain of poor sleep. And getting a good night’s rest can help in blood glucose management as well as overall health. So what should you watch out for if you have Type 1? And how can you better your odds of a good night’s rest? Here are the most common sleeping disorders that you may be faced with and some basic advice on how to maintain healthy sleep hygiene. Sleep Apnea A person with sleep apnea stops and starts breathing repeatedly while asleep, preventing them from achieving deeper states of sleep. Warning signs of sleep apnea include: daytime drowsiness excessive nighttime snoring There are two kinds of sleep apnea – Obstructive sleep apnea – occurs when the upper airway or throat region narrows, oxygen levels decrease, and eventually the brain triggers a response to wake the person up (at least enough to take a full breath and reopen the airway). Central sleep apnea – occurs when brain signals to the muscles that control breathing are confused. Both types of sleep apnea prevent a person from getting the kind of deep, restful sleep needed to wake up feeling refreshed. While scientific research has long highlighted a correlation between Type 2 diabetes and obesity and an increased risk for obstructive sleep apnea, sleep apnea occurrences is also high in those with Type 1 diabetes. Some studies have found obstructive sleep apnea in as many as 30% of adults with Type 1 diabetes. And the majority of those tested maintained a healthy, normal weig Continue reading >>

The Dangers Of Sleeping Too Much

The Dangers Of Sleeping Too Much

Seniors who regularly slept more than eight hours per night had a 46 percent increased risk of stroke compared to those who slept between six and eight hours per night Other health effects associated with consistently sleeping too much include depression, diabetes, weight gain, headaches, heart problems, a decline in brain health, and premature death To maintain healthy master clock timing, get bright outdoor light exposure during the day. This helps anchor your circadian rhythm so that light at night has less of an ability to disrupt your biological clocks By Dr. Mercola Sleep is such an important part of your overall health that no amount of healthful food and exercise can counteract the ill effects of poor sleeping habits. Researchers have linked poor sleep to a number of ailments, from short-term memory loss and behavioral problems, to weight gain, diabetes, and even increased risk of cancer, just to mention a few. Yet while most of the literature emphasizes the ramifications of insufficient sleep, research shows too much sleep isn't good either.1 Studies have linked excessive sleep to health risks ranging from depression to an increased risk for stroke, just to name a few. There is, it appears, a "Goldilocks zone" when it comes to sleep. After reviewing more than 300 studies to ascertain how many hours of sleep most people need to maintain good health, the panel of experts concluded that most adults need seven to nine hours, or right around eight hours, of sleep each night. Studies suggest consistently sleeping less than eight hours, and more than nine — with the exception of children and teens — is associated with health risks. (To see the sleep recommendations for all age categories, please see my previous article, How Much Sleep Is "Enough"?) Sleeping More T Continue reading >>

7 Health Risks Of Sleeping Too Much

7 Health Risks Of Sleeping Too Much

Simon Winnall via Getty Images It’s a little hard to believe there’s such a thing as sleeping too much, since so many of us feel like it’s a struggle even to get barely enough. But it’s true: You can overdo it on sleep. While it’s tough to pinpoint the “just right” amount, most adults need between seven and nine hours a night to feel and function their best. Regularly logging more than nine hours of sleep a night may be a sign of an underlying medical condition, but it also puts you at risk for a whole host of health concerns. Here are some of the biggest risks of catching too many Zzs. Sleeping too much can raise depression risk. In a 2014 study of adult twins, researchers found that long sleep duration increased a person’s risk of depression symptoms. The study participants who slept between seven and nine hours a night had a 27 percent heritability of depressive symptoms, while those who slept nine hours or more had a 49 percent heritability. It could impair the brain. A 2012 study found that among elderly women, sleeping too much (or too little) worsened brain function over a six-year period. Women who slept more than nine hours each night (or fewer than five) displayed changes in their brains on par with aging two years, HuffPost reported at the time. It might make it harder to get pregnant. In 2013, a Korea research team analyzed the sleep habits of more than 650 women undergoing in vitro fertilization. They found that pregnancy rates were highest among the women who got seven to eight hours of sleep a night and lowest in women who got nine to 11 hours. The findings, however, did not establish a clear causal relationship. “We know that sleep habits can certainly alter circadian rhythms, hormone secretions and menstrual cycles,” Dr. Evan Rosenbl Continue reading >>

Can Sleeping Too Much Cause Chronic Diseases?

Can Sleeping Too Much Cause Chronic Diseases?

“People who get more than 10 hours a night have an increased risk of heart disease, diabetes and obesity,” the Mail Online warns. The study this news is based on also found that those who don’t get enough sleep have an increased risk of disease. The study in question used survey data, collected via telephone, from more than 50,000 middle aged and older adults from 14 US states. The survey included questions on whether the person had ever been told they had heart disease, stroke or diabetes and how many hours sleep they normally got. The researchers found either sleeping more or less than the recommended amount (seven to nine hours) was associated with increased likelihood of having these three chronic diseases. A limitation of this study is its design; it was a cross sectional study where data is gathered at a single point in time. This means it cannot show a direct cause and effect relationship between sleep and disease risk. For example, it could be the case that the symptoms of heart disease were causing some people to sleep more, rather than sleeping more leading to heart disease. The study also failed to assess the various other factors that could influence both chronic disease risk and sleep history, such as lifestyle (for example, smoking, alcohol, physical activity and diet), family history, and other diagnosed physical and mental health illness. Overall, the study supports current recommendations on optimal sleep duration, but does not prove that less than or more than this directly causes chronic disease. So, occasionally having a long snooze is probably not something you should lose any sleep over. Where did the story come from? The study was carried out by researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, US, and received no ext Continue reading >>

Diabetes And The Importance Of Sleep

Diabetes And The Importance Of Sleep

To paraphrase the old Cole Porter love song: Birds do it, bees do it, even educated fleas do it. Let's do it, let's . . . sleep? "Sleep is a biological imperative," says Stuart Quan, M.D., a Harvard Medical School professor of sleep medicine and editor of the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine. "You can't not sleep," he says. Virtually all animals sleep. Fruit flies have been shown to have sleep cycles, and even sea sponges have sleeplike periods, Quan says. While experts have different theories on why we sleep, it's well proven that getting too little has serious consequences for your health and diabetes. Shorting yourself on shut-eye can worsen diabetes and, for some people, even serve as the trigger that causes it. People who don't sleep enough may: -- impair the body's use of insulin. -- have higher levels of hormones that cause hunger. -- crave junk food. No snooze, you lose People who don't get enough sleep often have higher levels of chronic inflammation and insulin resistance. Lack of sleep also can increase production of cortisol (the body's primary stress hormone), impair memory and reflex time, elevate blood sugar, and increase appetite -- ultimately promoting weight gain, says Carol Touma, M.D., an endocrinologist at the University of Chicago who focuses on sleep research and metabolism. And the more you weigh, the worse you sleep. Research by Madhu H. Rao, M.D., an endocrinologist at the University of California, San Francisco, found that a person's body mass index (BMI) affects slow-wave sleep, the deep sleep cycles needed for maximum rest. Very preliminary results of Rao's current research on the effects of sleep restriction in healthy volunteers show an increase in insulin resistance in the range of 10 to 15 percent. But mysteries remain. Will sleeping m Continue reading >>

Diabetes Risk In Men May Increase With Limited Or Excess Sleep

Diabetes Risk In Men May Increase With Limited Or Excess Sleep

(RxWiki News) For men, sleeping too much or too little could raise diabetes risk, a new study found. This study looked at sleep duration and diabetes in 788 adults. Diabetes is a disease marked by poor blood sugar control and insulin response. Untreated, diabetes can lead to heart and kidney complications, among other health problems. Over the last half century, average sleep time has decreased and diabetes has increased, the VU Medical Centre, Amsterdam, researchers behind this study noted. These researchers found that men who got more or less sleep than average were the most likely to demonstrate reduced ability of their bodies to control their blood sugar. "Even when you are healthy, sleeping too much or too little can have detrimental effects on your health," said senior study author Femke Rutters, PhD, in a press release. "This research shows how important sleep is to a key aspect of health — glucose (sugar) metabolism." These findings did not ring true for the women in this study, however. Talk to your doctor about how to improve your sleep and lower your diabetes risk. This study was published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. Information on funding sources and conflicts of interest was not available at the time of publication. Continue reading >>

Too Much Sleep Can Be Bad For Your Health

Too Much Sleep Can Be Bad For Your Health

You’ve probably heard that getting too little sleep — six hours or less — is bad for your health. But what about getting too much sleep? Is that even possible? Yes, it is. And sleeping too much — 10 hours or more — can harm your health. Further, it may be a sign of underlying health problems, according to a study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. Findings include: Too much sleep — as well as not enough sleep — raises the risk of chronic diseases, such as coronary heart disease, diabetes, anxiety and obesity in adults age 45 and older. Sleeping too much puts you at greater risk of coronary heart disease, stroke and diabetes than sleeping too little. Sleeping more than seven or eight hours a night, and feeling tired the next day, could indicate you have a health problem. When to See Your Doctor About Too Much Sleep If you find yourself feeling worn out on days after long nights of sleep, that could be a sign that you need to make an appointment with your doctor. Don’t ignore sleep problems. Feeling drained of energy after having more than adequate sleep could be a sign of conditions such as: Anemia: a deficit of red blood cells A thyroid problem Insomnia Sleep apnea and insomnia, common among people with chronic diseases, interfere with sound sleep and can worsen chronic health conditions, such as heart disease. If you wake up feeling exhausted, see your doctor. He or she may refer you to a sleep specialist to diagnose your specific problem and begin a course of treatment. Treating sleep-related conditions can significantly improve your chronic disease symptoms and quality of life. A Sleep Journal Can Help Keeping a sleep journal and sharing it with your doctor can be a big help in Continue reading >>

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