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Diabetes And Sudden Memory Loss

Diabetes And Seizures: What Are They? What Are The Symptoms?

Diabetes And Seizures: What Are They? What Are The Symptoms?

Having a seizure is a very serious thing. It is dangerous for the person experiencing it, and it is also scary for those nearby. Seizures can be caused for several reasons. Some people have epilepsy, which is a disorder where seizures happen often. For those without epilepsy, they are often called “provoked seizures” because they were provoked, or brought on, by something reversible. Individuals with diabetes can experience these “provoked seizures” when their blood sugar drops too low. The following article explains the difference in these, how to prevent them, and how to care for someone that is having a diabetic seizure. The difference between epilepsy and seizures Epilepsy is a seizure disorder that happens because there is an electrical storm in the brain. People have recurrent seizures that involve loss of consciousness, convulsions, abnormal behavior, disruption of senses, or all of the above. Some have an “aura” before having a seizure and know when it is going to happen. Most causes of epilepsy are unknown, however they can be triggered by flickering light, loud noises, or physical stimulation. Treatment for this condition includes medications and sometimes diet changes. A “provoked seizure” happens because something abnormal is happening in the body. This can include low sodium, fever, alcohol, drugs, trauma, or low blood sugar. The same thing happens as with epilepsy, and there is unusual activity in the brain causing abnormal movements and behaviors. Unlike epilepsy though, where a seizure can happen for no reason, there is an actual cause for each one that occurs for “provoked seizure”. It is important to understand the cause of these so that preventative measures can be taken. There is no relationship between epilepsy and diabetes. One Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar Levels Linked To Memory Loss

High Blood Sugar Levels Linked To Memory Loss

New research suggests that people with high blood sugar levels, even those who do not have diabetes, may have an increased risk for developing cognitive impairment. This is according to a study published in the journal Neurology. Previous research has shown that people with type 2 diabetes - a disorder that causes a person's blood sugar levels to become too high - may increase the risk of dementia. According to the Mayo Clinic, diabetes is considered a risk factor for vascular dementia as it can damage blood vessels in the brain. This form of dementia is often caused by reduced or blocked blood flow to the brain. But researchers from Germany now say that even those without diabetes who have high blood sugar levels may be at risk for impaired memory skills. Scanning the hippocampus To reach their findings, the researchers analyzed 143 people with an average age of 63, who were free of diabetes or pre-diabetes (impaired glucose intolerance). The researchers excluded those who were overweight, consumed more than 3.5 servings of alcohol per day, and those who already had memory and thinking impairments. The participants underwent blood glucose tests and were required to carry out memory tests. One of the tests required subjects to recall a list of 15 words 30 minutes after hearing them. The researchers also carried out scans of the participants' brains in order measure the size of the hippocampus - a region of the brain linked to memory. Results showed that participants who had lower blood sugar levels obtained higher scores on the memory tests, compared with those who had higher blood sugar levels. In the word recall test, the researchers found that remembering fewer words was linked to higher blood sugar levels. They break this down, stating that an increase of 7 mmol/mol Continue reading >>

Diabetes May Lead To Memory Loss, Dementia In Elderly

Diabetes May Lead To Memory Loss, Dementia In Elderly

Inflammation playing a role in type-2 diabetes is nothing new, but the reduced blood flow that results has also been linked to memory loss and dementia in the elderly. Over the last decade more research has looked at diabetes and the brain. Just this summer, a study published in the journal Neurology outlined that reduced blood flow and blood vessel capability speeds up cognitive impairment. In fact, the study showed that diabetes and memory loss are closely related. Researchers studied 65 people between the ages of 57 and 75. Thirty-five of them had been treated for type-2 diabetes. At the beginning of the study they were tested for memory and brain function. Blood tests, blood pressure, inflammation markers, as well as MRI scans were taken into consideration. None of the participants had memory loss or other cognitive impairment. Two years later, the people who had type-2 diabetes showed severe memory loss, while none of the non-diabetic participants showed any memory loss. People suffering from diabetes are encouraged to pay careful attention to their blood sugar levels so that they never get too high or too low. Monitoring how much physical exercise they get and what kind of foods they eat is key. Research shows that diabetes left uncontrolled can lead to cognitive impairment, particularly in the elderly. There is a limited space for storage of glucose in the brain. It has to pass through the blood-brain barrier where its intake is in fact regulated. Our brain requires a constant supply of glucose to keep functioning properly. Studies show that when a person has too much glucose or too little glucose the brain starts to suffer. Just the right amount of glucose feeds the neurotransmitters in our brain. When we are learning new information or trying to remember someth Continue reading >>

Alzheimer's Treatment: Diabetes Drug Holds Promise For Fighting Disease After 'significantly Reversing' Memory Loss

Alzheimer's Treatment: Diabetes Drug Holds Promise For Fighting Disease After 'significantly Reversing' Memory Loss

A drug developed for type 2 diabetes significantly reverses memory loss and could have potential as a new treatment for Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative diseases, scientists say. The study, by UK and Chinese universities, is the first to look at a new combined diabetes drug and found improvements in several characteristic symptoms of Alzheimer’s. Lead researcher Professor Christian Holscher, from Lancaster University, said these “very promising outcomes” show multi-action drugs developed for type 2 diabetes “consistently show neurological protective effects”. Independent academics said a reduction in nerve-cell-killing protein molecules was particularly interesting and this was likely to be another avenue in the search for an elusive drug to combat dementia. He has previously reported optimistic findings from an older diabetes drug, liraglutide, and clinical trials in humans are currently under way. This latest study, published in the journal Brain Research, looked at a “triple action” treatment that combine three different drugs for type 2 diabetes, acting on biological pathways that could also have an impact on dementia. Type 2 diabetes is a known risk factor for Alzhemier’s disease and impaired production of insulin – the hormone that people with diabetes don’t produce sufficiently to control their blood sugar – is linked to brain degeneration. The identification of this link had a twofold benefit, according to charities. It opened up new research and drug development opportunities, such as this study. But it also means that by making lifestyle changes, like eating healthily and exercising, patients can avoid developing type-2 diabetes and lower their risk of Alzheimer’s disease as well. There are currently half a million peop Continue reading >>

Confusion, Memory Loss, And Altered Alertness

Confusion, Memory Loss, And Altered Alertness

Topic Overview It is not unusual to occasionally forget where you put your keys or glasses, where you parked your car, or the name of an acquaintance. As you age, it may take you longer to remember things. Not all older adults have memory changes, but they can be a normal part of aging. This type of memory problem is more often annoying than serious. Memory loss that begins suddenly or that significantly interferes with your ability to function in daily life may mean a more serious problem is present. Dementia is a slow decline in memory, problem-solving ability, learning ability, and judgment that may occur over several weeks to several months. Many health conditions can cause dementia or symptoms similar to dementia. In some cases dementia may be reversible. Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia in people older than age 65. Delirium is a sudden change in how well a person's brain is working (mental status). Delirium can cause confusion, change the sleep-wake cycles, and cause unusual behavior. Delirium can have many causes, such as withdrawal from alcohol or drugs or medicines, or the development or worsening of an infection or other health problem. Amnesia is memory loss that may be caused by a head injury, a stroke, substance abuse, or a severe emotional event, such as from combat or a motor vehicle accident. Depending upon the cause, amnesia may be either temporary or permanent. Confusion or decreased alertness may be the first symptom of a serious illness, particularly in older adults. Health problems that can cause confusion or decreased alertness include: Alzheimer's disease. Asthma or COPD, which cause a decrease in the amount of oxygen or an increase in the amount of carbon dioxide in the blood. Alcohol and many prescription and nonprescript Continue reading >>

Breaking: Diabetes Drugs Linked To Alzheimers And Dementia

Breaking: Diabetes Drugs Linked To Alzheimers And Dementia

If you’re diabetic and you’re taking medication, you’re probably putting your brain at great risk. Their calling the new study from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine a “Diabetes Game-Changer." It proves that prolonged use of diabetes drugs puts you at risk for a deficiency which can cause neurological problems, including dementia, and even brain shrinkage. This study used data that was funded by the National Institute of Diabetes. This was a 5-year study that ran from 1996 until 2001. It followed more than 3,000 people who were “at risk” for diabetes. Participants were divided into three groups. Group #1 was assigned a special lifestyle change method. They were put on a very specific diet and performed light exercises. Group #2 was given the diabetes drug metformin. Group #3 was given a placebo. The purpose of this study was to see which group had the lowest rates of diabetes and took the longest to develop it. Group #1 beat the others by a landslide. The study authors were so astounded by their findings that the program morphed into a follow-up study, in which the original participants were followed for several more years. The researchers found that Group #2 (those taking metformin) were twice as likely as to have a B12 deficiency, and more likely to become anemic. More shocking yet, it was discovered that they were also more likely to develop neurological problems like Alzheimer’s and Dementia. Yet, for unknown reasons, the Diabetes-Institute-funded research didn’t follow up on the special diet procedure completed by Group #1. It’s everywhere, dangerous, and under-diagnosed While we don’t hear much about it, it’s common knowledge that B12 deficiency causes dementia. And data from a large study by Tufts University* suggests that low B12 leve Continue reading >>

5 Surprising Causes Of Memory Loss

5 Surprising Causes Of Memory Loss

You can't find your keys or you forget an appointment. For many people in middle age or older, simple acts of forgetfulness like these are scary because they raise the specter of Alzheimer's disease. But Alzheimer’s is not the only health issue that can lead to forgetfulness, which is often treatable if you know the cause, according to the National Institute on Aging. Memory loss can happen at any age and for a number of reasons. “Patients might experience memory loss and describe their symptoms similarly, but a doctor can tease apart what parts of the brain are affected,” says Seth Gale, MD, a neurologist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. He points out things like polypharmacy (taking several medications), significant depression, and poor sleep that can lead to memory complaints. “When you drill down and find out what is actually happening with brain function, you can reassure someone. They have the capacity to learn and store information but because of their overloaded mental resources, they are having trouble,” says Dr. Gale. Talk with your doctor about concerns you may have about your memory, so the condition responsible for your symptoms can be addressed. Discussing your symptoms and taking various tests, possibly including an MRI, may help your doctor determine what is affecting your memory, Gale says. In some cases, one or more of the following issues could play a role. 1. Sleep Apnea This common but treatable sleep disorder causes breathing to stop briefly and frequently throughout the night. It is linked to memory loss and dementia, according to Constantine Lyketsos, MD, director of the Memory and Alzheimer's Treatment Center at Johns Hopkins Medicine and professor and chair of psychiatry at Johns Hopkins Bayview. You might have sleep apnea Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes May Lead To Short-term Memory Loss

Type 2 Diabetes May Lead To Short-term Memory Loss

Type 2 diabetes, which has been found to impact dexterity and sensory function in the hands, may also impact the short-term memory of those living with the disease. Stacey Gorniak is an assistant professor in the University of Houston Department of Health and Human Performance. She studies the impact of changes in the brain due to chronic health conditions, movement disorders and aging. Currently, she is studying cognitive, sensory and motor changes of middle aged and older adults who control their type 2 diabetes with medication. “We’re seeing mild cognitive impairment, particularly in working memory, or short-term memory,” she said. “The tests we administered included visual spacial examinations, time orientation and delayed recall, which involved asking them to remember a list of words, immediately and then a few minutes after they heard the words.” Additionally, when patients were asked to perform a simple activity with their hands—for example holding an object like a smartphone—and were asked to repeat a set of words while interacting with the object, patients with type 2 diabetes exhibited difficulty in recalling words and performing the activity. Gorniak’s next step is to identify changes to brain structures that are involved in cognitive, sensory and motor functions. “By better understanding both structural and functional brain changes with type 2 diabetes, clinicians will have a better idea of how to modify treatment plans to better accommodate the challenges faced by diabetic patients,” she said. Another ongoing study she is pursuing is an examination of how the disease may affect the sense of touch. It builds on her previous work that found type 2 diabetes affected dexterity and sensory function in the hands. As part of a new study, partic Continue reading >>

'clear Promise': Diabetes Drug Reversed Memory Loss In Mice With Alzheimer's, Researchers Find

'clear Promise': Diabetes Drug Reversed Memory Loss In Mice With Alzheimer's, Researchers Find

A team of Chinese and British researchers has discovered that a drug originally created to treat diabetes shows “clear promise” as a treatment for Alzheimer’s disease, since it significantly reversed memory loss in mice. News of the potential breakthrough was published this week in Brain Research. “[The drug shows a] clear promise of being developed into a new treatment for chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease," the scientists’ report reads. “The drug improved memory formation in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease,” they said, adding that amyloid plaque load, inflammation and oxidative stress were all visibly reduced. The new diabetes drug is a triple receptor that combines GLP-1, GIP and Glucagon, three biological molecules known as “growth factors.” According to Newsweek, researchers tested the receptor in mice specifically created to express certain genes associated with Alzheimer's disease in humans and waited for them to age for a couple of months and sustain some brain damage. Once given the drug, the mice were put through a maze test and results showed a clear improvement in their learning and memory formation. "These very promising outcomes demonstrate the efficacy of these novel multiple receptor drugs that originally were developed to treat type 2 diabetes but have shown consistent neuro-protective effects in several studies," said lead researcher Christian Holscher said, in a press release from Lancaster University. The drug improved memory formation in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease - Chinese and British research team "Clinical studies with an older version of this drug type already showed very promising results in people with Alzheimer's disease or with mood disorders," Holscher added. "Further dose-r Continue reading >>

Memory Loss: Can It Be Cured? -- Majid Fotuhi, Md -- 6/26/03

Memory Loss: Can It Be Cured? -- Majid Fotuhi, Md -- 6/26/03

WebMD Live Events Transcript Memory loss is a frightening occurrence for anyone who finds the records of their lives fading away, whether it's minor forgetfulness or the devastating effects of Alzheimer's disease. We had a memorable discussion about preventing and treating memory loss with Majid Fotuhi, MD. The opinions expressed herein are the guest's alone and have not been reviewed by a WebMD physician. If you have questions about your health, you should consult your personal physician. This event is meant for informational purposes only. Moderator: Welcome to WebMD Live, Dr. Fotuhi. Is memory loss an inevitable part of aging? Fotuhi: No. People may have slower rate of learning and memorizing things, but they should not lose their memory. Some degree of forgetfulness is normal with aging, but people should maintain the ability to function in their jobs and remember names of their spouses, children, friends, and so on. The only thing they should not forget is the names of their close relatives and their friends. That would be abnormal. Moderator: How can one determine what is causing short-term memory loss? Fotuhi: The most common cause of memory loss is stress and anxiety. The second most common cause is depression. The third most common cause is medical issues. Only the 10th or 11th on the list would be Alzheimer's disease. Ninety percent of older adults who complain about memory loss do not have Alzheimer's disease. Most of them have depression, stress, anxiety, fatigue, and lack of sufficient amount of sleep or medical issues. Member question: What, if any, is the difference between dementia and Alzheimer's disease? Fotuhi: That is a very good question. Dementia means memory loss plus deficit in one or more area of cognition, such as getting lost, confusion of tim Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Cause Memory Loss?

Can Diabetes Cause Memory Loss?

Memory loss is the main symptom of Alzheimer’s disease. But does your body’s inability to process insulin cause memory loss? Diabetes is a condition which can lead to various complications in the body. There speculations pointing to it being one of the main causes behind memory loss. The Link Between Diabetes and Memory Loss Diabetes happens because of the body’s inability to produce insulin, a hormone that converts the sugar into energy. According to medical experts, the metabolic disease can lead to memory loss because of its ability to affect the brain’s blood vessels. The various side effects can also affect one’s reasoning and learning abilities, if it’s not controlled in time. According to studies, people who are in the pre-diabetic stage or cannot process blood sugar in the normal way are at high risk of suffering from poor memory or memory loss. Research has further shown that people suffering from diabetes could be at high risk to developing Alzheimer’s disease, as compared to those who are not suffering from the chronic metabolic disease. New research has shown however that people who are suffering from both diabetes and Alzheimer’s will have memory loss at a much slower rate than those people who are only suffering from Alzheimer’s alone. Another study showed similar findings. In another study, experts observed almost 608 people who suffered from mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease for more than four years. These people’s thinking and reasoning abilities have also been tested and 63 of them have been diagnosed with diabetes. Before the study was conducted, those with and without diabetes have secured the same scores in several cognition tests. In more than a period of six months, researchers observed that the rate of the cell damage in Continue reading >>

Could A Three-part Diabetes Drug Ease Memory Loss In Alzheimer’s?

Could A Three-part Diabetes Drug Ease Memory Loss In Alzheimer’s?

The Alzheimer’s field is littered with drug-development failures, but that isn’t deterring a group of British scientists from looking for hope in an unlikely source: diabetes treatments. The team, from Lancaster University, is reporting that an experimental three-part drug originally developed for use in Type 2 diabetes seems to reverse memory loss in mice. The treatment combines the growth factors GLP-1, GIP and glucagon. The reasoning behind the approach is that growth factor signaling is impaired in the brains of people who suffer from Alzheimer’s, according to a statement from the university. When administered in mouse models of Alzheimer’s, the treatment reversed memory loss, which was measured via a maze test, the scientists reported in the journal Brain Research. The drug improved learning and memory formation, slowed down the rate at which nerve cells were lost in the brain, and enhanced levels of a growth factor that preserves the functioning of nerve cells, they said. It also reduced the amount of amyloid plaque—the abnormal brain growths that have been implicated in the disease. This is not the first time diabetes treatments have been tried in Alzheimer’s disease. Novo Nordisk’s Victoza (liraglutide), a GLP-1 agonist, has undergone small clinical trials in people with Alzheimer’s. The results “have shown real promise,” said Doug Brown, Ph.D., director of research and development at the London-based Alzheimer's Society, in the statement. That said, the most heavily cited clinical trial of Victoza in Alzheimer’s only showed a reduction in the buildup of amyloid plaque. But there was no difference in cognitive ability between trial participants who received the drug and those who took a placebo. That likely explains why further investigatio Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar Levels Linked To Memory Loss

High Blood Sugar Levels Linked To Memory Loss

People with higher blood sugar levels scored lower on memory tests, even though their levels were technically still considered ‘normal’ Even if you haven’t been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes or pre-diabetes, higher blood sugar levels appear to have a negative influence on cognition As you over-indulge on sugar and grains, your brain may become overwhelmed by the consistently high levels of blood sugar and insulin and leptin. Eventually insulin and leptin signaling becomes compromised, leading to impairments in your thinking and memory, and eventually even causing permanent brain damage By Dr. Mercola Many people now associate elevated blood sugar levels with diabetes or even pre-diabetes, but new research has highlighted a little-known adverse effect of higher blood sugar levels that can impair your brain – even if your levels are technically still within a ‘normal’ range. The study – an extremely important one considering the epidemic of people with out-of-control blood sugar metabolism – showed that lower blood sugar levels are associated with better brain function and may even help you avoid age-related declines in memory. Higher ‘Normal’ Blood Sugar Levels Linked to Memory Loss It’s already known that people with type 2 diabetes have an increased risk of developing cognitive impairment, including dementia. However, the new study involved people (with an average age of 63) who were free from diabetes and pre-diabetes (or impaired glucose intolerance). Still, even among this group, those with higher blood sugar levels scored lower on memory tests. For each 7-mmol/mol increase in HbA1c (a measure of damage caused by elevated blood glucose), participants recalled two fewer words on memory tests.1 Those with higher blood sugar levels also had lower Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Memory Loss

Type 2 Diabetes And Memory Loss

Researchers have long known that inflammation plays a role in the development of type 2 diabetes. This inflammation comes from substances that are produced by the body’s immune and fat cells. The result: impaired blood flow and blood vessel function— which impacts the health of the heart, kidneys and other organs and body systems. A study published in a July 2015 journal Neurology found that this reduced blood flow and blood vessel capability also affects the brain by speeding up cognitive decline and memory loss in older adults with type 2 diabetes. Measuring the Impact The researchers studied 65 men and women between the ages of 57 and 75. Thirty-five of the study participants had been treated for type 2 diabetes for more than five years at the beginning of the study. The initial assessment of all participants included testing of memory and cognitive function skills, as well as MRI scans and blood tests to determine baseline blood flow, blood pressure, markers of inflammation, and brain volume. None of the participants had any type of cognitive impairment at the time of the initial assessment. At a two-year follow-up, those with type 2 diabetes showed a significant decline in thinking and memory scores. None of the non-diabetic participants showed any decline. Blood vessel health and blood flow regulation were also seriously impaired in those with diabetes. “We ultimately concluded that diabetes-related inflammation of the small blood vessels in the brain may accelerate decline in those with type 2 diabetes,” says study author Vera Novak, MD, PhD, associate professor of neurology and director of Syncope and Falls in the Elderly (SAFE) laboratory at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. “This, in turn, affects not only their overall health but also their day- Continue reading >>

Nine Tips To Keep Your Memory With Diabetes

Nine Tips To Keep Your Memory With Diabetes

First, the good news. People, in general, are living longer. And people who have diabetes can and do live long, healthy lives. Now, the not-so-good news: People who have diabetes are more likely to experience memory problems than people without the condition. According to a study out of the University of South Florida in Tampa, older adults who had diabetes and high blood sugars performed worse on memory tests at the start of the study and showed a greater decline in memory by the end of the study compared to older adult without diabetes. What’s behind the memory decline in diabetes? Previous studies have shown that people with Type 2 diabetes have an increased risk for Alzheimer’s disease. Alzheimer’s is a kind of dementia that causes issues with memory, thinking, and behavior. It’s progressive and irreversible, and it eventually destroys a person’s ability to carry out even the simplest of tasks. While memory loss is a key feature of Alzheimer’s, there are differences between the memory loss that occurs with aging and memory loss due to Alzheimer’s. However, both are more likely to occur in people with Type 2 diabetes. Researchers think that damage to blood vessels, which can occur in diabetes, is what can lead to cognitive problems and vascular dementia. It’s also possible that high blood sugar levels cause damage in the hippocampus, a part of the brain that’s involved in memory. Actually, high blood sugars appear to be detrimental to brain health, in general. But even people whose diabetes is in good control are more likely to experience memory problems and impairments in cognitive function. It’s also worth noting that having too many very low blood sugars (if you’re at risk for lows) may potentially also affect your memory and cognition. The g Continue reading >>

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