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Diabetes And Hot Weather

How Hot Weather Can Affect Your Diabetes Management

How Hot Weather Can Affect Your Diabetes Management

Susan B. Sloane, BS, RPh, CDE, has been a registered pharmacist for more than 20 years and a Certified Diabetes Educator for more than 15 years. Her two sons were diagnosed with diabetes, and since then, she has been dedicated to promoting wellness and optimal outcomes as a patient advocate, information expert, educator, and corporate partner. As temperatures soar, so do blood sugar levels of many people with diabetes, while others saw their blood sugar levels drop. How is that possible, and what can we do to protect ourselves? First of all, we need to understand that excessive heat or cold puts a strain on the body. The body often goes into a flight-or-fight mode under stress, releasing hormones such as adrenalin and cortisol. These survival hormones cause the liver to release more glucose for energy, which can result in higher-than-normal blood sugars. To make it more confusing, low blood sugars can also occur during weather extremes as your body utilizes more energy to stay warm or tries to cool down. This can seem very complicated as we try to enjoy our vacations and maintain good blood sugar control. What you need to remember is that where your blood sugar takes you is dependent on other factors, such as hydration, exercise, and what you eat. Hydration is probably the single most important element to help us stay healthy outdoors. Clear fluids such as water are best, and have Gatorade or another electrolyte beverage handy if you are sweating excessively. Anyone with diabetes is especially prone to dehydration, which can become dangerous if left unchecked. Dehydration can also cause confusion, which may make a person unaware of a low blood sugar. The key piece of advice I can give you is to stay well hydrated and test blood sugars more frequently while outdoors. Als Continue reading >>

Diabetes-friendly Tips For Handling The Summer Heat

Diabetes-friendly Tips For Handling The Summer Heat

The heat being experienced in many parts of the nation these days is tough enough for the average person, but for the estimated 21 million Americans with diabetes, special precautions may be required. "People with chronic diseases like diabetes as well as people taking certain medications, including heart disease medications and diuretics, which are often used to treat complications of diabetes, are at increased risk of experiencing difficulties in the heat, even though they may not be aware of it," says Catherine Carver, M.S., A.N.P., C.D.E, Director of Educational Services at Joslin Clinic. Carver and her colleagues at Joslin Clinic offer the following tips for people with diabetes during these steamy summer days: Keep hydrated. Dehydration, or the loss of body fluids, can happen on these very hot summer days whether you have diabetes or not. If you have diabetes, dehydration also can occur when blood glucose is not under control. When blood glucose is elevated, this can lead to an increase in the body's excretion of urine. To prevent dehydration drink plenty of caffeine-free fluids such as water, seltzer or sugar-free iced tea and lemonade. Limit your intake of alcohol. Watch for signs of heat exhaustion, especially if you are working or exercising outdoors. People with diabetes and other chronic diseases like heart disease are more susceptible to overheating. Symptoms include: feeling dizzy or fainting; sweating excessively; muscle cramps; skin that is cold or clammy; headaches; rapid heartbeat and/or nausea. If you experience any of these symptoms, move to a cooler environment, drink fluids like water, juice or sports drinks (based on your healthcare provider's instructions) and seek medical attention. Exercise in a cool place such as an air-conditioned gym, or ear Continue reading >>

Heat And Type 1 Diabetes

Heat And Type 1 Diabetes

Note: This article is part of our Daily Life library of resources. To learn more about the many things that affect your health and daily management of Type 1, visit here. Whether experiencing hot summer temperatures or a tropical vacation, it is important for everyone to beware of the heat – and the various effects that it can have on our bodies. Have you ever noticed your blood sugar either spiking or dropping rapidly in severe temperatures? Many people with Type 1 diabetes run into this issue and have been baffled as to why. Heat may have much more of an impact on your blood glucose levels than you realized! Keeping a close eye on your BG becomes even more important when in areas with higher temperatures. Here are some possible explanations to the heat’s role in blood sugar fluctuations, and some factors to keep in mind while enjoying your summer fun in the sun with Type 1! High blood sugar Heat can spike blood sugar levels easily if we are not properly hydrated. When the body is dehydrated, blood glucose becomes more concentrated due to the decrease in blood flow through the kidneys. This makes it much more difficult for the kidneys to remove any excess glucose from urine. How to fix it? Adjust insulin dosages as instructed by a medical professional, and most importantly drink plenty of water! Low blood sugar Blood glucose levels have been known to plummet in the heat – especially when combined with exercise. Why is this? Heat can cause the body’s blood vessels to expand, which in turn can speed up insulin absorption and potentially lead to hypoglycemia. This can be made worse when exercising due to the increased blood flow to certain areas, especially if insulin is injected in the legs. Also consider that hot tubs/jacuzzis or hot showers/baths can have the s Continue reading >>

Summer Heat Is A Risk To Diabetes Patients

Summer Heat Is A Risk To Diabetes Patients

The results weren't all bad. "Most patients incorporated appropriate personal protective measures such as staying indoors, drinking additional fluids on schedule, applying sunscreen, and wearing protective clothing," says Adrienne A. Nassar, MD, a third year resident at Mayo Clinic Arizona, who presented the findings at ENDO 2010 in San Diego, the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society. But the respondents fell short in other ways. For instance, one in five waited until temperatures were over 100 degrees before taking precautions, Nassar said at a news conference And 23% began drinking fluids when they got thirsty -- typically too late to prevent dehydration effectively. Many left their medications and monitoring equipment at home during a heat wave. Nassar and her colleagues analyzed responses of 152 people with diabetes living in Phoenix, where the average July temperature is 107 F. On average, the patients were 64 years old, 85% had type 2 diabetes, and 77% were on insulin injections or pumps. Their blood glucose test results on the hemoglobin A1c tests were on average 7.9%, although the goal for those with diabetes is 7%. While many respondents protected their medication in the heat by carrying it in a cooler, 37% left medication or supplies at home. "This is quite concerning,'' Nassar says, "because they would not have the means to check their blood sugar" if they became faint, for instance. While most respondents, 72%, knew about the effect of heat on insulin, just 40% said they had gotten information from their health care providers about the ill effects of high temperature on oral medications, 41% on glucose monitors, and 38% on glucose monitoring strips. The point at which respondents said they would take protective measures varies. Nassar can't pinpoint an ex Continue reading >>

Tips For Managing Diabetes In The Summer Heat

Tips For Managing Diabetes In The Summer Heat

Tips For Managing Diabetes in the Summer Heat People with diabetes not only need to know about how to manage their blood sugar levels, how their medications work,and what their blood tests mean but also how to plan and prevent damage from warm temperaturesto diabetes supplies, equipment, and blood sugar levels themselves. Beyond Type 1 is a non-profit founded in 2015 byJuliet de Baubigny, Nick Jonas , Sarah Lucas and Sam Talbot. The group works to educate others on type 1 diabetes as well as share resources and support for people living with type 1 diabetes. All of their money raised goes to support efforts to educate, advocate, and cure type 1 diabetes. The CEO and co-founder of Beyond Type 1, Sarah Lucas, has generouslyprovided some informationon the subject of managing diabetes in the summer heat. DD: Managing type 1 diabetes becomes a bit more complicated in the summer when we have to take the heat into account. What worries do people with type 1 encounter due to the heat? Warmer weather introduces a range of concerns for those with diabetes. Warmer weather conditions may cause heat exhaustion, hypoglycemia and a change in blood glucose levels. People with diabetes are also concerned with the effectiveness of medical supplies like blood glucose meters, test strips, and insulin. What are some things people with type 1 diabetes can do to stay safe when temperatures are high? Staying hydrated and monitoring blood sugar levels in the heat is essential. Drinking plenty of fluids like water is best, but non-caffeinated herbal beverages are good options as well. Taking extra steps to prevent dehydration is crucial as it can cause blood glucose malfunction.It is also recommended to avoid highly caffeinated or sodium filled beverages as those beverages can result in dehydra Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Hot Weather

Diabetes In Hot Weather

Diabetes Ireland > Diabetes in Hot Weather In the current hot weather, it is possible to become dehydrated as we sweat more. Even a small fluid decrease of 2% can reduce the bodys ability to perform by affecting concentration and capacity to remember. Other affects of dehydration include fatigue, constipation and circulatory problems. The groups most affected by a fluid decrease are the very young and the elderly. Dehydration can be a problem in both of these groups because childrens feeling of thirst is not developed enough and with older people the thirst mechanism is declining. Water is an essential part of life. The amount we need depends on our age, weight, diet, activity levels and climate. It will vary from person to person but on average most adults need at least 1.5 to 2 litres of fluid daily (approx 3 pints) Water makes up a very large part of the body for men about 60-70% of their body weight and women about 55-65% of their body weight. Blood is 83% water, muscles are 75% water, the brain is 74% water and bone is 22% water. The types of fluids to be discussed in the article are Fruit juices, vegetable juices and smoothies Diabetes Ireland recommend water as the best source of hydration. A lot of the other fluids listed will contain carbohydrates.Carbohydrates (CHO) are made up of sugars and starches and when carbohydrates are digested they are all broken down to sugars (glucose) It is important to remember it is the total amount of CHO that the person with Diabetes eats or drinks at one time that will have the biggest affect on the glucose level in the blood as the more CHO eaten or drunk will require more insulin. Fluids containing carbohydrates will be absorbed a bit quicker into the blood stream and this is important to remember when choosing drinks betwe Continue reading >>

Hot Weather And How It Affects Diabetes

Hot Weather And How It Affects Diabetes

Diabetes Qld Pharmacist The hot summer ahead may have many impacts on diabetes management for your clients. Oral hypoglycaemic medications, insulin and blood glucose monitoring strips are affected by the heat so may impact people living with diabetes and their care. As the temperature rises, so may the levels of counter regulatory hormones in your clients living with diabetes. Counter regulatory hormones such as catecholamines, growth hormone, cortisol and glucagon may potentially elevate blood glucose levels, impacting glucose management. Higher temperatures may also increase the risk of hypoglycaemia, especially for people living with type 1 diabetes. This may be due to an increase in absorption rate of insulin from the subcutaneous layers. In a study, the absorption of rapid-acting insulin injected subcutaneously was compared at room temperatures of 20°C and 35°C. During a 4-hour period, the rate of insulin disappearance at 35°C was 50 per cent to 60 per cent greater than at 20°C ambient temperature. (1) Another factor to consider which increases risk in high temperatures among people with diabetes is possible abnormalities of the thermoregulatory capacity caused by autonomic neuropathy. Autonomic neuropathy affects several organ systems, with undesirable outcomes such as hypoglycaemia unawareness and cardiovascular dysfunction. Heat stress intensifies the issues resulting from autonomic neuropathy by affecting body homeostasis (balance within the body), especially for cardiovascular and glycaemia states. (2) Oral medications have a shelf life which represents the time that the active ingredient retains an acceptable potency. At the expiry date, the potency of the medication must be above 90 per cent of the original active ingredient content. Medications are all Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Hot Weather: Be Extra Careful

Diabetes And Hot Weather: Be Extra Careful

For people with diabetes, particularly those taking medications and/or insulin, the Center for Disease Control’s Division of Diabetes Translation has prepared a list of precautions during hot weather: Heat can affect your blood glucose (sugar) levels and also increase the absorption of some fast-acting insulin, meaning you will need to test your blood glucose more often and perhaps adjust your intake of insulin, food, and liquids. Drink plenty of fluids, especially water, to avoid dehydration. Avoid sugar-sweetened beverages such as sweet tea and sodas. If your doctor has limited how much liquid you can drink, ask what to do during times of high heat. Check package inserts with medications to learn when high temperatures can affect them. Take medications with you if you will need to take them while you’re away from home, and protect them from the heat. If you’re traveling with insulin, don’t store it in direct sunlight or in a hot car. Keep it in a cooler, but do not place it directly on ice or on a gel pack. Check glucose meter and test strip packages for information on use during times of high heat and humidity. Do not leave them in a hot car, by a pool, or on the beach. Heat can damage insulin pumps and other equipment. Do not leave the disconnected pump or supplies in the direct sun. Get physical activity in air-conditioned areas, or exercise outside early or late in the day, during cooler temperatures. Use your air conditioner or go to air-conditioned buildings in your community. A beautiful sunny day is the ultimate motivation to go outside and play, but the summer heat and exercise can be a risky combination. Get 12 Tips For Summer Exercise Take life to the next level, and be all that you can be. That's what a vacation at Pritikin is all about. Live bette Continue reading >>

Hot Summer Weather May Affect Individuals With Type 1 Diabetes Or Type 2 Diabetes

Hot Summer Weather May Affect Individuals With Type 1 Diabetes Or Type 2 Diabetes

Hot summer weather may affect individuals with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes Exercise is a key component in diabetes management plans, and individuals with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes may be more likely to meet their physical activity goals during the summer months when there is plenty of opportunity to spend time outdoors. However, the hot weather may pose certain risks to individuals with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes. A recent article published by Fox-31 News Online reported that people with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes may be more susceptible to dehydration than those who do not have the disease. The news provider explained that low blood sugar levels may accelerate the rate of dehydration, so it is important for diabetics to stay hydrated throughout the day. Checking your blood sugar is very important because with the extra energy that your body has to use to stay cool, your blood sugar may go down more than it normally would, said pediatrician Cathy Palmier, quoted by the news source. She noted that some individuals with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes have an impaired ability to sweat, which may make them more likely to be affected by even moderate heat. Warm weather may also affect diabetes medications, the news organization stated. Temperatures above 86 degrees may cause abnormal interactions between ingredients in diabetes treatments, which may alter their efficacy. The American Diabetes Association recommends that people with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes who require insulin should store their supplies at room temperature. Bottles of insulin that are not in use can be kept in the refrigerator, but they should be taken out long enough to warm up before they are put to use, the organization says. This is because chilled insulin m Continue reading >>

Diabetes In The Sun – Staying Safe In Hot Weather

Diabetes In The Sun – Staying Safe In Hot Weather

Dehydration is a major issue in hot weather, and higher blood glucose levels can further increase this risk. People with diabetes need to increase their intake of fluids in hot weather, drinking regularly during the day and focusing on drinking water. The body’s metabolism is higher in hot and humid weather, which can lead to an increased chance of LOW blood glucose levels, especially for those on blood glucose lowering medication. Insulin will also be absorbed more quickly, which can also increase the risk of hypoglycaemia. Long periods of inactivity in the sun can also affect diabetes control, and the risk of HIGH blood glucose levels, which could lead to hyperglycemia. Hypoglycaemia – Don’t disregard the symptoms Heat exhaustion can develop when the body finds it difficult to keep cool. Symptoms include headaches, dizziness, nausea and vomiting, tiredness, muscle cramps, stomach cramps and pale skin. As some of these could also be due to unstable blood glucose levels, it’s important to test regularly. Hypos may be slightly harder to spot in hot weather so take care not to disregard symptoms such as sweating and tiredness, as these can easily be overlooked as potential symptoms of hypoglycemia. To prevent hypos, be prepared to test your blood glucose more often, particularly if taking part in physical activity. Take extra care when driving and test your blood sugar before and after each journey. Try to stop regularly to check your blood sugar if taking longer journeys. Insulin You may need to adjust your insulin levels during changes in temperature. If you are experiencing higher or lower blood sugar levels and need advice about adjusting your insulin levels, speak with your healthcare team. If your levels are consistently higher than expected, it is worth con Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Hot Weather — 12 Things To Know

Diabetes In Hot Weather — 12 Things To Know

To date, 2016 has been the hottest year ever, and it’s getting hotter. From now on, coping with heat will be an important part of managing diabetes. Some knowledge that might help you: 1. High body temperatures can lower blood sugar. Mayo Clinic writers Nancy Klobassa Davidson, RN, and Peggy Moreland, RN, CDE, say you should check your sugars more often in the hot weather. 2. Sunburn can raise blood sugar. The Mayo Clinic advises wearing a good sunscreen, sunglasses, and a hat while out in the sun. 3. Warm skin absorbs insulin faster, while dehydrated skin absorbs insulin more slowly. The closer you can keep your injection site to normal temperature and hydration, the better. 4. Dehydration from sweating can raise blood sugar and can lead to heat exhaustion. According to the Cleveland Clinic, people with diabetes are more likely than others to be admitted to hospitals for dehydration and heat exhaustion, and to die from it. High glucose levels lead to urinating more, which increases risk for dehydration. This may be especially true if you’re on an SGLT-2 inhibitor drug. Keep drinking water with a bit of salt if you are blessed to live in an area where water is available. Have a bottle with you and don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink. Learn to check yourself for dehydration by pinching up some skin on your arm and letting it go. It should snap right back into place. If it goes more slowly, you are getting dehydrated. Don’t drink alcohol or caffeine in super-hot weather, as they are dehydrating. 5. Heat can damage insulin, other medications, and test strips. The Joslin Clinic advises people to keep their insulin cool, but not on ice. If you take medicines with you while you’re away from home, get a cooler bag to keep your medicines and test strips in. Ext Continue reading >>

How Hot And Cold Weather Affects Your Blood Sugar

How Hot And Cold Weather Affects Your Blood Sugar

Find a weather-proof location to exercise all year round. Working out in your living room or local gym, or even just walking your local mall are all good options. When temperatures start to get out of control, so can your blood sugar. Both hot and cold weather extremes can affect your testing equipment and your medications, and have a negative impact on your body’s ability to produce and use insulin. Research shows that when it’s hot out, more people with diabetes end up in the ER and are hospitalized because of heat illness. The number of deaths in diabetes patients due to heat illness also increases in summer. Low temperatures can be an issue for people with diabetes as well. But you don’t have to let the environment have the upper hand. Taking a few smart precautions can help you outsmart Mother Nature. Here are the adjustments to make depending on where you live and the weather forecast. 6 Tips to Survive the Summer Heat Take these steps to keep your diabetes under control when the temperature soars: Stay hydrated. Lori Roust, MD, an endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic in Arizona, explains, “The problem is that in the heat, people tend to get dehydrated easily. When you’re dehydrated, you have higher concentrations of blood sugar because less blood flows through your kidneys. With less blood, your kidneys don’t work as efficiently to clear out any excess glucose (blood sugar) from your urine.” When it’s hot, be sure to drink plenty of water or sugar-free drinks. Don’t wait until you are thirsty to replenish fluids. Store your medications properly. High summer temps can affect your diabetes medications, glucose meter, and diabetes test strips. “When it’s hot out, it’s easy for insulin and other drugs to become degraded,” Dr. Roust says. Be su Continue reading >>

How To Manage Your Diabetes In Extreme Summer Heat

How To Manage Your Diabetes In Extreme Summer Heat

We often look forward to changes of season, but if you have diabetes , you need to be extra careful when temperatures climb dramatically. Extreme heat can affect your blood sugar control. Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy If you use insulin or if your treatment of blood sugars is inadequate, this can put you at higher risk. Often, worsening blood sugar control is the main concern. Depending on the situation and your level of physical activity, low blood sugars are also possible. Extreme temperatures can also damage your medications and testing equipment. I always remind my patients to take precautions to protect themselves and their supplies during both winter and summer. If a patient’s blood sugars are mostly higher than 250 mg/dl, I recommend improving blood sugar control before engaging in heavy physical activity — regardless of the climate and the temperature, as recommended by the American Diabetes Association. The extreme heat of summer affects blood sugar levels. How the heat affects your levels depends on what you’ve eaten, whether you’re well-hydrated and your activity level. If the heat and your activity make you sweat profusely, you may become dehydrated, leading to a rise in glucose levels. If you become dehydrated, your blood glucose levels will rise. This can lead to frequent urination, which then leads to further dehydration and even higher blood sugar levels — a kind of vicious cycle. Further, if the treatment includes insulin, dehydration reduces blood supply to the skin and, therefore, less absorption of injected insulin dosage. Most types of insulin can tolerate temperatures from 93 degrees F to 95 d Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes In The Heat

Managing Diabetes In The Heat

How to keep your cool during the hottest time of year. Did you know that people who have diabetes—both type 1 and type 2—feel the heat more than people who don’t have diabetes? Some reasons why: Certain diabetes complications, such as damage to blood vessels and nerves, can affect your sweat glands so your body can’t cool as effectively. That can lead to heat exhaustion and heat stroke, which is a medical emergency. People with diabetes get dehydrated (lose too much water from their bodies) more quickly. Not drinking enough liquids can raise blood sugar, and high blood sugar can make you urinate more, causing dehydration. Some commonly used medicines like diuretics (“water pills” to treat high blood pressure) can dehydrate you, too. High temperatures can change how your body uses insulin. You may need to test your blood sugar more often and adjust your insulin dose and what you eat and drink. Drink plenty of water. Test your blood sugar often. Keep medicines, supplies, and equipment out of the heat. Stay inside in air-conditioning when it’s hottest. Wear loose, light clothing. Make a plan in case you lose power. Have a go-bag ready for emergencies. It’s the Heat and the Humidity Even when it doesn’t seem very hot outside, the combination of heat and humidity (moisture in the air) can be dangerous. When sweat evaporates (dries) on your skin, it removes heat and cools you. It’s harder to stay cool in high humidity because sweat can’t evaporate as well. Whether you’re working out or just hanging out, it’s a good idea to check the heat index—a measurement that combines temperature and humidity. Take steps to stay cool (see sidebar) when it reaches 80°F in the shade with 40% humidity or above. Important to know: The heat index can be up to 15°F Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Hot Weather - Staying Safe In The Heat

Diabetes And Hot Weather - Staying Safe In The Heat

Diabetes and Hot Weather - Staying Safe in the Heat There are hypo and hyper risks in hot weather Whether you are going on holiday or simply spending some time outdoors in the heat, high temperatures and the close humidity currently sweeping the UK do have an influence for people with long term conditions such as diabetes. This may partly be explained by increased activity in hot weather, but there is no doubt that the heat does affect some people with diabetes in other ways. What problems can hot weather cause for people with diabetes? Dehydration can be an issue in hot weather, and higher blood glucose levels can further increase this risk. People with diabetes may need to increase their intake of fluids in hot weather, drinking water regularly through the day. One of the major concerns regarding diabetes and hot weather is the risk of blood sugar levels rising or falling and causing hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia . What are the hypo risks from hot weather? Hot weather can increase the risk of hypoglycemia for those on blood glucose lowering medication. The Joslin Diabetes Centre notes that the bodys metabolism is higher in hot and humid weather which can lead to an increased chance of hypoglycemia. Hypos may be slightly harder to spot in hot weather. Dont be tempted to disregard hypo symptoms , such as sweating and tiredness, as a result of hot weather as it could be a sign of hypoglycemia. Take extra care when driving and test your blood sugar before and after each journey and stop regularly to check your blood sugar if taking longer journeys. To prevent hypos, be prepared to test your blood glucose more often, particularly if taking part in physical activity in hot weather. Keep a source of fasting carbohydrate, such as glucose tablets, to hand. To help treat hypos Continue reading >>

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