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Diabetes And Driving Laws

Driving With Diabetes

Driving With Diabetes

Tweet Having diabetes does not mean you cannot drive a car or a motorbike. Given that your diabetes is well controlled, and your doctor states that you are safe to drive, there is no reason why you cannot have a driving licence or hang on to your existing licence. Nonetheless, you may need to let your car insurance company and the Driving and Vehicle Licence Agency (DVLA) know that you have diabetes depending on your type of diabetes and how it is controlled. You should also keep up to date with the latest DVLA guideline changes to driving with diabetes. Who do I need to inform about my diabetes? No matter how your diabetes is treated, you must by law inform your insurance company that you have diabetes. If your diabetes is treated with insulin, you must inform the DVLA. If you are applying for a driving licence for the first time, and your diabetes is treated with tablets or insulin, you also must inform the DVLA. In addition: You must inform the DVLA if any diabetes complications develop that may affect your ability to drive safely. If you fail to inform the DVLA or your insurance company then your driving insurance will be invalid. You do not need to tell the DVLA if you are treated by diet alone or by tablets that do not bring on hypoglycemia. However, if you change from tablets to insulin treatment, then they must be informed. You do not need to tell the DVLA if you are treated by: Diet alone By tablets which carry no risk of hypoglycemia Non-insulin injectable medication such as Byetta or Victoza (unless you are also on tablets which do carry a risk of hypos) Tablets which are deemed to carry a risk of hypoglycemia are sulfonylureas and prandial glucose regulators. Unless you have other complications or reasons that may affect your ability to drive. For informatio Continue reading >>

Diabetesvoicejune 2010 €¢ Volume 55 €¢ Issue 1 43

Diabetesvoicejune 2010 €¢ Volume 55 €¢ Issue 1 43

Hypoglycaemia at the wheel is the most common acute risk for drivers with diabetes, and a concern for public road safety. Drivers with diabetes worldwide are subject to special legislation, although the restrictions and requirements vary considerably from one country to another. but are drivers with diabetes really a danger? Are they more likely to provoke an accident than people without the condition? João Manuel Valente Nabais steers us through the related research and reports from Europe on the Eu’s latest laws on driving with diabetes. Since the 1960s, a number of stud- ies have looked at the issues around driving and diabetes. In terms of the possible safety risks from driving with diabetes, the findings are far from con- sensual. Overall, however, there ap- pears to be no clear evidence that a driver with diabetes is more likely to be involved in an accident than a driver without diabetes. Any increased safety risk has been found to be modest, and not sufficient to warrant major legal restrictions on drivers with diabetes.1,2,3 The available scientific evidence does not support a blanket restriction on all drivers with insulin-treated diabe- tes. Another interesting finding is that there is no significant difference in the rate of citations and law violations (such as speeding, careless driving, alcohol and drug violation) for driv- Diabetes at the wheel – the need for safety and fairness under the law João Manuel Valente Nabais ers with diabetes when compared with drivers without a medical condition. Although the immediate effects of mild hypoglycaemia are unpleasant, it is un- likely to create a danger when driving a motor vehicle if treated quickly. This is because the signs of cognitive dys- function, and thus a negative impact on driving c Continue reading >>

Driver License & Car Insurance Information For Diabetes

Driver License & Car Insurance Information For Diabetes

Driving has become an essential part of life in the United States as it allows individuals to go to work or school, and run many daily necessary errands. However, almost all states legally require that drivers have car insurance. If you are wondering about how diabetes may affect your eligibility of obtaining a driving license and impact on your car insurance policy rates, this article will answer these questions: Driver License Eligibility for Individuals with Diabetes In the United States, each state has its own special licensing rules regarding medical conditions concerning diabetes. Some states implement these rules to all drivers with diabetes while others only apply them to diabetes individuals who take various medications such as insulin or exhibit symptoms such as: vision problems (such as retinopathy) loss of consciousness seizures low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) foot problems (such as neuropathy) As a quick reference, here is a compilation list of the application process for each state in alphabetical order. For further detailed information, it is highly recommended that you should contact your local Department of Motor Vehicle (DMV) for the most update application process for diabetes patients. Please use this map to skip directly to your state. Click on the state that you wish to learn more about. First-time applicants will be asked two medical condition related questions on their applications. The first question is whether the applicants have any medical condition that affects their ability to drive safely. Diabetes is included in a list of these conditions. The second question is whether the applicants are being treated for the listed conditions. As a diabetic individual, you will be required to have a medical examination to proof that you have to ability t Continue reading >>

Driving & Diabetes

Driving & Diabetes

Recently a driver needed to be subdued with a taser after hitting several cars in a parking lot and refusing a policeman’s instructions to stop. The driver, who had diabetes, appeared to have been suffering a hypoglycemic episode. Fortunately, the officer recognised this. The man was given emergency treatment, stabilised, and taken to the hospital. He was not charged with breaking the law. If you develop diabetes you must inform the Driver Licensing Authorities in your state or territory. In most cases if you manage your diabetes by insulin you will require a medical certificate every two years and if you manage it by tablet every five years. If you control your diabetes by diet and exercise alone you are still required to inform them. If you are required to notify the authorities but don’t, you could be charged with driving offences if you have a driving accident. If you develop diabetes it is also advisable to inform your motor vehicle insurer. If you don’t report your diabetes to your motor vehicle insurance company you may have problems with insurance claims. Do you know the law in your state? Have you advised your road traffic authority about your diabetes? Hypoglycaemic impairment is not the only hazard that can complicate driving. Other potential complications of Type 1 diabetes and Type 2 diabetes include vision impairment and neuropathy leading to loss of feeling in the feet and hands, for example. Why such a state by state variance? In Australia the issuance of driver licenses, rules of the road, and regulation of conduct by drivers is reserved to the states. Contrary to common perception, there is no such thing as a federal driver’s license. Under the act, there is a requirement for commercial drivers to pass a physical exam, and regulations to govern Continue reading >>

Getting Your Driver’s License

Getting Your Driver’s License

Note: This article is part of our Daily Life library of resources. To learn more about the many things that affect your health and daily management of Type 1, visit here. Getting your driver’s license in the US is an exciting milestone unlike any — it gives you the freedom and independence to go wherever you want, whenever you want. No more waiting for the bus! No more having to call a cab! But learning how to drive or parallel park is one thing, and fully realizing that the lives of your passengers rest in your hands is another. You know you’re ready for this responsibility if you’ve already cultivated a good diabetes management habit — responsibility to others starts with being responsible for yourself. Many people with Type 1 have been able to successfully obtain their licenses and maintain them. Here’s a quick guide to what you may expect at the US Department of Motor Vehicles. For specific state-by-state guidelines, consult your DMV for the latest and most accurate information or enter your state in the ADA’s database for driver’s license laws affecting those with diabetes. Application Depending on your state, your application form is probably going to ask if you have any medical condition that might affect your driving behavior. You might be asked specifically if you have diabetes. While this can sound like an unfair question, you will be given a chance to prove that you can be a good driver. Paying attention to the wording of the question will help you — if it asks if you’ve ever lost consciousness, but you’ve never had a hypoglycemic episode, then you can safely answer, “No.” Otherwise, if they want you to specify your type of diabetes, you’ll have to answer accordingly. Medical Evaluation The next step in most states’ applications Continue reading >>

Driving & Your Rights

Driving & Your Rights

What is Diabetes Canada’s position on driving? People with diabetes have the right to be assessed for a license to drive a motor vehicle on an individual basis in accordance with Diabetes Canada guidelines for private and commercial driving. Read the Diabetes Canada's full position statement on driving and licensing, including background and rationale. What are Diabetes Canada's recommendations for private or commercial drivers? In October 2015, the Clinical and Scientific Section of the Diabetes Canada published Diabetes and Driving: 2015 Canadian Diabetes Association Updated Recommendations for Private and Commercial Drivers. I have been diagnosed with diabetes. Can I keep driving? Most likely. In consultation with your doctor, a decision will be made as to whether you are medically fit to drive. In assessing the suitability of people with diabetes to drive, medical evaluations document any complications and assess blood glucose (BG) control, including the frequency and severity of any hypoglycemic incidents. Diabetes and its complications can affect driving performance due to: Impaired sensory or motor function Diabetic eye disease (retinopathy) Nerve damage (neuropathy) Kidney disease (nephropathy) Cardiovascular disease (CVD) Peripheral vascular disease and stroke Incidents of hypoglycemia Motor vehicle licensing authorities can require licensed drivers to be examined for their medical fitness to drive. You should not have difficulty obtaining and maintaining an operator’s license if you: Properly manage your diabetes; Are able to recognize and treat the early symptoms of hypoglycemia; and Do not have complications that may interfere with your ability to drive. Do I have to report diabetes to the motor vehicle licensing authority? Yes. As a rule, anyone applyin Continue reading >>

Driving And Type 2 Diabetes

Driving And Type 2 Diabetes

Having diabetes is not an issue for driving but if you are taking medications that leave you at risk of hypoglycaemia you must take extra precautions and you must inform the National Driver Licence Service. CHECK WITH YOUR PHARMACIST IF YOUR MEDICATIONS LEAVE YOU AT RISK OF HYPOGLYCEAMIA e.g. Insulin or Sulphonylureas such as Gliclazide (Diamicron®) or generic versions such as Diabrezide, Diaglyc, Diacronal MR, Diaclide MR, Gliclazide, Zycron MR.or the post prandial regular Nateglinide (Starlix®). If you are not at risk of hypoglycaemia you do not need to inform the National Driver Licence Service (NDLS). Medicine regimes change therefore remember to tell the NDLS if you start any of the medications that increase the risk of hypoglyceamia. Drivers at risk of hypoglycaemia are advised to take the following precautions: • You must always carry your glucose meter and blood glucose strips with you. You must check your blood glucose before the first journey and every two hours whilst you are driving. • In each case if your blood glucose is 5.0mmol/l or less, take a snack. If it is less than 4.0mmol/l or you feel hypoglycaemic, do not drive and take appropriate action to correct glucose level. • If hypoglycaemia develops while driving, stop the vehicle as soon as possible. • You must switch off the engine, remove the keys from the ignition and move from the driver’s seat. • You must not start driving until 45 minutes after blood glucose has returned to normal. It takes up to 45 minutes for the brain to recover fully. • Always keep an emergency supply of fast-acting carbohydrate such as glucose tablets, lucozade or sweets within easy reach in the vehicle. • You should carry personal identification to show that you have diabetes in case of injury in a road tra Continue reading >>

Driving With Diabetes

Driving With Diabetes

Has diabetes affected your experience of driving? It can. How about getting licensed to drive? In some states, diabetes can make obtaining a driver license much harder. The biggest risk in driving with diabetes is low blood glucose. Our brains run on glucose, and when glucose gets low, it’s very hard to think or react. This is why authorities can be suspicious of people’s ability to drive with diabetes. One of the largest studies on safe driving with diabetes was published by University of Virginia researchers in 2003. At diabetes specialty clinics in seven US and four European cities, about 1,000 adults with Type 1 diabetes, Type 2 diabetes, and without diabetes completed an anonymous questionnaire concerning diabetes and driving. The results showed that drivers with Type 1 reported significantly more crashes and moving violations. Drivers with Type 2 did not, even when they were on insulin. Nearly all the accidents were related to hypoglycemic (low blood glucose) episodes. People who injected insulin were more likely to crash than those who used an insulin pump. Fewer than half of people with either type had discussed driving with their doctor. The researchers found that not checking glucose before driving was a big risk factor for accidents, and “encouraged [all physicians] to talk to their type 1 diabetic patients about hypoglycemia and driving.” There may not be studies, but on many Internet bulletin boards, people with Type 2 have reported difficulty driving from either high or low blood glucose. People talk about “brain fog” as a symptom that can come from lows or highs. Some commented that for people who typically run high, getting down to “normal” can feel like having a low and fog your thinking. If you ever feel fuzzy while driving, the America Continue reading >>

Driving & Diabetes

Driving & Diabetes

Save for later Having diabetes does not mean that you need to give up driving, but it does mean that you need to plan in advance before you get behind the wheel. We have been campaigning for many years to ensure that you will be able to continue driving safely and without any unnecessary restrictions. This information can help you ensure that your driving is hazard-free. If you require further information, please see theDriver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA)website (or theDVAin Northern Ireland), or call ourHelpline. Group 1 driver (cars and motorbikes) If you are on insulin, you must tell the DVLA (in the UK) or DVA (Northern Ireland). Your licence will then be renewed every one, two, or three years. Any changes to your condition or treatment which occur between renewals (e.g complications which might affect your ability to drive safely) should be reported when they happen. Drivers who are under medical supervision by a doctor do not need to notify if insulin is used for a temporary period only (less than three months, or for gestational diabetes less than three months after delivery) unless they have problems with hypos/severe hypos/hypo unawareness. If you are a Group 1 driver on non-insulin medication for diabetes you do not need to notify unless: You have had two episodes of severe hypoglycaemia within the last 12 months (where you were completely dependent on another person to treat your hypo). You develop impaired awareness of hypoglycaemia (where you are unable to recognise the hypo when it starts). You experience a disabling hypo whilst driving. You have other medical conditions or changes to existing medical conditions which could affect your ability to drive safely. Examples are: problems with vision (e.g. laser treatment/injections), circulation, or sens Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes mellitus is a chronic life-long metabolic disorder affecting approximately five to ten percent of the population. Diabetes can develop at any age. Insulin, a pancreatic hormone which maintains normal metabolism of carbohydrates, fats, and protein, regulates how the body uses and stores food for energy. Insulin is the key to diabetes. Lack of insulin affects the body's ability to properly use glucose. In diabetes, the body either stops producing insulin or cannot properly use the insulin it makes. The three types of diabetes mellitus are: Type I diabetes: Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (IDDM) Type I diabetes is diagnosed in ten percent of the people with diabetes mellitus. In Type I diabetes, there is a defect in the person's immune system that triggers the body to destroy its own insulin-producing cells. The onset of Type I diabetes usually occurs before age 40. People with Type I diabetes always require insulin injections to regulate their blood glucose in order to survive. Type II diabetes: Non-Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (NIDDM) Type II diabetes affects approximately sixty percent of people diagnosed with diabetes mellitus. Most people who acquire Type II diabetes are overweight and are over age 40. In Type II diabetes, the pancreas may produce an insufficient amount of insulin or the body may become resistant to insulin, causing it to be less effective or not to be used properly in maintaining metabolic control. Most people with Type II diabetes manage their blood glucose by diet and/or oral diabetes medicine. In some cases, insulin injections are also prescribed for Type II diabetes. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) which develops during some pregnancies. Gestational Diabetes develops in approximately five percent of pregnant women during t Continue reading >>

Driving And Diabetes

Driving And Diabetes

Individuals with diabetes who have a driver’s license must: Have regular checkups by a physician (to assess potential diabetes complications and blood glucose (sugar) control); Have a good understanding of their disease and follow the recommendations of health care professionals; Take certain precautions when driving (primarily people at risk of hypoglycemia). Precautions for individuals being treated with insulin or an insulin secretagogue* You must measure your blood glucose (sugar) levels before taking the wheel, then every 4 hours thereafter on long trips. Your blood glucose (sugar) levels should be: Above 4 mmol/L if you are driving a car or motorcycle Above 6 mmol/L if you are driving a vehicle other than a car or motorcycle (classes 1, 2, 3, 4) If you have ever had severe hypoglycemia or hypoglycemic episodes with no warning signs, caution is advised. You should measure your blood glucose (sugar) levels before you depart and every hour thereafter. In this case, your blood glucose (sugar) level should be above 6 mmol/L before taking the wheel of a car or motorcycle. *Gliclazide (Diamicron® and Diamicron MR®), Glimepiride (Amaryl®), Glyburide (Diabeta®, Euglucon®), Nateglinide (Starlix®), Repaglinide (GlucoNorm®). Research and text: Cynthia Chaput, Dt.P., Dietitian June 2014 Reference: Association des Specialistes en Medecine Interne du Quebec. (2012). Document produit à l’intention des patients. (Downloadable PDF; French only.) (Consulted May 15, 2014). Continue reading >>

Driving

Driving

The guidelines for diabetes and driving have recently been updated. This page and resources are currently under review. Please visit the Austroads website for more information. In March 2012, new medical standards came into effect for drivers of both private and commercial vehicles. The new standards are contained in the Austroads document Assessing Fitness to Drive 2012, which replaces the previous standards (Assessing Fitness to Drive 2003). The new standards include the following: Private vehicle drivers treated by glucose-lowering agents other than insulin may generally drive without licence restriction but should be required to have five-yearly reviews. In addition to the sections on hypoglycaemia, there is now a new section on hyperglycaemia for commercial drivers whose diabetes is treated by either insulin or other glucose lowering agents and for private drivers whose diabetes is treated with insulin. The new medical standards address ‘satisfactory control’ of diabetes and state that satisfactory control “will generally be defined as a glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) level of less than 9.0% measured within the preceding three months”. The use of the term ‘generally’ is intended to allow medical practitioners to make their own clinical judgements on the ‘satisfactory control’ of diabetes on a case-by-case basis. ‘Satisfactory control’ of diabetes is required for a conditional licence to be considered by the driver licence authority. If you take medication for diabetes and you are a commercial driver, you must have an annual review by a specialist in endocrinology or diabetes to ensure you meet the specific criteria to hold a conditional licence. If you are a private driver and your diabetes is treated with insulin you must have a review at least e Continue reading >>

Insulin-dependent Diabetic Requirements

Insulin-dependent Diabetic Requirements

Before an applicant for waiver for diabetes will be approved, the applicant must attend a meeting of the Motor Carrier Safety Appeal Board. An applicant will be scheduled to attend the next available board meeting after a completed packet is received. Packets are due no later than two weeks before the meeting date and must include: MC-027 - Application for Intrastate Medical Waiver. MC-028 - Physician's Statement of Examination. (Make sure box B, E and F is checked before printing.) A Medical Examination Report for Commercial Driver Fitness Determination (Form MCSA-5875) completed by a medical examiner familiar with the requirements of 49 CFR 391.41. (DOT Physical) Sixty days of blood sugar readings taken twice a day, including physician's recommended range. Application for employment for company applicant intends to drive for. A copy of the driver's official driving record. A copy of crash reports for any accidents applicant was involved in during the previous five years. Continue reading >>

Truck Drivers With Diabetes Dot Regulations

Truck Drivers With Diabetes Dot Regulations

The Department of Transportation (DOT) and the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) adapted medical guidelines that diabetic truck drivers must meet. They are part of the requirements for obtaining an interstate Commercial Driver’s License (CDL). At one point in time, a truck driver with diabetes had to prove they have had diabetic episodes for three years to qualify for the diabetic exemption program. Since the diabetic exemption program was revised, this qualification no longer applies. Read below to find out what the new DOT regulations mean for prospective truck drivers with diabetes. Changing DOT regulations for diabetic truck drivers The first diabetic exemption program was established in 2003. It contained a long list of stipulations that made it hard for diabetic truck drivers to qualify for their CDL. This kept many capable truck drivers from employment with interstate trucking companies. One of the main DOT regulations hindering diabetic drivers from qualifying for the exemption program was the three-year rule. The three-year rule stated truck drivers with diabetes must have a record of driving for three years without a diabetic episode, and must have been on insulin for that time. It prevented nearly all potential drivers with diabetes from meeting the old DOT regulations. Between 2003 and 2005, only four exemptions were granted to diabetic truck drivers. On November 8, 2005, the FMCSA overturned some of the rules stated in the 2003 diabetic exemption program. The agency made vital changes, opening the road to more diabetic truck drivers. The FMCSA started accepting applications for the revised diabetic exemption program on September 22, 2005. Implementing changes in the DOT program for diabetic truck drivers The 2005 DOT regulations for the Continue reading >>

Driver's License Requirements For People With Diabetes

Driver's License Requirements For People With Diabetes

It is a fact of life for people with diabetes that they have a medical condition that can potentially cause them to be a danger to themselves and others while driving a car. If a person becomes hypoglycemic, the person can become confused and disoriented and sometimes can lose consciousness. This can cause accidents. This does not mean that a person with diabetes cannot obtain a drivers license. The U.S. Supreme Court held in Bell v. Burson that driving is an "important interest" that may not be taken away from a licensed driver without a government agency providing procedural due process. Several lower courts have held that even person with insulin-dependent diabetes is not automatically subject to license forfeiture or nonrenewal, and an agency may do so only if the diabetes affects the driver's safe operation of a motor vehicle. These decisions mean that a person with diabetes cannot be denied a driver’s license solely because they have diabetes. Some states however do require a person to affirmatively state that they have diabetes. A person with diabetes must also do what they can to minimize the chance of their diabetes causing an accident. If a person has an accident or violates traffic laws because of uncontrolled blood sugar, they may need to get a note from their doctor verifying that they are safe to drive or they can have their license suspended. For specialized licenses this right has been hard won and comes with some additional requirements. For commercial truck licenses, for years there was a federal law banning people with insulin dependent diabetes from operating a commercial motor vehicle in “interstate commerce.” Intestate commerce is broader than driving between states. The term interstate commerce also includes driving that involves freight or Continue reading >>

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