diabetestalk.net

Diabetes And Dialysis Diet

Following A Diet For Diabetes And Kidney Disease

Following A Diet For Diabetes And Kidney Disease

Both of these illnesses can be difficult to manage alone, but can create even more stress when you have to manage both. Many Americans suffer from both conditions though and according to the End-Stage Renal Disease Incident and Prevalent Quarterly Update, approximately 37% of patients with ESRD have diabetes. (1) Diet becomes even more important for patients with both conditions. You will need to pay more attention to the amount of carbohydrates (sugars) that you eat. Carbohydrates can be found in many foods such as fruits, milk, breads, deserts and many drinks. Sodium remains important for both CKD and diabetic patients. Keeping your diet lower in sodium helps to lower blood pressure and reduce fluid retention. Protein is another nutrient that has enhanced importance and too much protein can be harmful for diabetic patients. It is important to talk to your dietician and nephrologist to determine the levels appropriate for your care. Another major change from only a kidney friendly diet is emphasis on eating on a routine and balancing out your meals and snacks. Peritoneal dialysis patients that also are diabetic need to be extra careful with their sugar levels, because dialysate solutions used to clean the body are normally sugar based solutions. Your care team will help determine what solution is best for you and help you adjust your diet to account for the extra sugar in the dialysate. Your care team should be aware of your status as a diabetes patient, however be proactive and make sure your dialysis care team is aware of your condition. The Following are examples of foods and drinks that are can be exchanged and are good for both diets: Fruits Good alternatives: Berries, grapes, cherries, apples, plums Avoid: Cantaloupe, mangos, kiwi, oranges, pomegranate Vegetables Continue reading >>

Type 1 - Diabetic On Dialysis | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Type 1 - Diabetic On Dialysis | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Hi all. Please assist my brother in law who is on dialysis. He has been advised by his dietitian to eat white bread, white rice, and it is ok for him to have diet soda!! I am concerned that this advice is incorrect. Help!! Hi all. Please assist my brother in law who is on dialysis. He has been advised by his dietitian to eat white bread, white rice, and it is ok for him to have diet soda!! I am concerned that this advice is incorrect. Help!! Is your brother in law type 1? Does he carb count? A type 1 diabetic who carb counts and appropriately boluses can eat white bread and white rice. I think the advice from the dietician was probably more aimed at avoiding whole grain bread and brown rice because patients on dialysis aren't supposed to have these because they are too high in phosphorus. Diet soda is, obviously, sugar free soda. Which is fine for diabetics. Hi all. Please assist my brother in law who is on dialysis. He has been advised by his dietitian to eat white bread, white rice, and it is ok for him to have diet soda!! I am concerned that this advice is incorrect. Help!! It is so wrong for anyone. There are people out there that assume, incorrectly, that people on dialysis will want to eat what they would rather eat, also erroneous. Now, a bland diet low phosphorus I can understand but it can be low carb Hi all. Please assist my brother in law who is on dialysis. He has been advised by his dietitian to eat white bread, white rice, and it is ok for him to have diet soda!! I am concerned that this advice is incorrect. Help!! Redrav -I'm sorry your brother in law is having dialysis. I would just like to add that the members of this forum are unlike Continue reading >>

Diet Tips For People With Diabetes And Kidney Disease

Diet Tips For People With Diabetes And Kidney Disease

Diet is one of the most important treatments in managing diabetes and kidney disease. If you’ve been diagnosed with kidney disease as a result of diabetes, you’ll need to work with a dietitian to create an eating plan that’s right for you. This plan will help manage your blood glucose levels and reduce the amount of waste and fluid your kidneys process. Which nutrients do I need to regulate? Your dietitian will give you nutritional guidelines that tell you how much protein, fat and carbohydrate you can eat, as well as how much potassium, phosphorus and sodium you can have each day. Because your diet needs to be lower in these minerals, you’ll limit or avoid certain foods, while planning your meals. Portion control is also important. Talk to your dietitian regarding tips for accurately measuring a serving size. What may be measured as one serving on a regular diet may count as three servings on the kidney diet. Your doctor and dietitian will also recommend you eat meals and snacks of the same size and calorie/carbohydrate content at certain times of the day to keep your blood glucose at an even level. .It’s important to check blood glucose levels often and share the results with your doctor. What can I eat? Below is an example of food choices that are usually recommended on a typical renal diabetic diet. This list is based on sodium, potassium, phosphorus and high sugar content of foods included. Ask your dietitian if you can have any of these listed foods and make sure you know what the recommended serving size should be. Carbohydrate Foods Milk and nondairy Recommended Avoid Skim or fat-free milk, non-dairy creamer, plain yogurt, sugar-free yogurt, sugar-free pudding, sugar-free ice cream, sugar-free nondairy frozen desserts* *Portions of dairy products are o Continue reading >>

Sample Renal Meal Plan

Sample Renal Meal Plan

For people with diabetes who have kidney disease, it is essential to follow a diet that takes your individual health needs into account. Depending on those needs, a meal plan for one day may resemble the following one. Estimated totals: 1600 calories, 60 grams protein, 1500 mg sodium, 2300 mg potassium, 800 mg phosphorus. BREAKFAST 4 ounces unsweetened grape juice 1 cup Rice Krispies cereal 4 ounces liquid nondairy creamer 1/2 English muffin 1 teaspoon low-sodium margarine 1 tablespoon fruit jam LUNCH 2 slices low-calorie white bread 2 ounces sliced fresh roasted turkey Lettuce and onion for sandwich (one slice each) 1 teaspoon light mayonnaise 1 medium apple (three-inch diameter) 1 cup raw baby carrots 4 vanilla wafers 12 ounces Diet Sprite DINNER 3 ounces baked pork tenderloin (seasoned with rosemary, garlic powder, and black pepper) 1/3 cup white rice topped with one sliced scallion 1 cup steamed fresh green beans 12 seedless grapes 1 small white roll 2 teaspoons low-sodium margarine Water BEDTIME SNACK 1 small slice plain sponge cake 1/2 cup unsweetened canned peaches 2 tablespoons light nondairy whipped topping Water Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Renal Failure: Everything You Need To Know

Diabetes And Renal Failure: Everything You Need To Know

Unfortunately, renal failure or nephropathy (commonly referred to as kidney failure) and unmanaged diabetes go hand in hand. In addition, 50 percent of people with diabetes will experience some form of kidney damage in their lifetime, even if they never experience kidney failure or end up on dialysis. In this article, we will look at how renal failure and insufficiency can have an impact on people with diabetes, and how people with diabetes can avoid renal failure and dialysis. We will look at risk factors, causes, and symptoms, as we explore the relationship between renal failure, diabetes, and high blood glucose. We will also look at what happens to a person with diabetes when their kidneys fail. We will discuss dialysis and kidney transplantation. First, let’s see what Lydia had to say when she contacted TheDiabetesCouncil. Lydia’s story Lydia had received a laboratory result from her doctor that was very alarming to her. She had an excess amount of protein in her urine, usually an early sign of kidney damage. He informed Lydia that her kidneys were being affected by her diabetes, and she needed to work on self-managing her diabetes. He ordered some more tests to further look at her kidneys. Was Lydia headed to the kidney dialysis center? Her friend Tracey, whom she’d met in a diabetes support group had been the first person she knew who was on dialysis. Tracey seemed to have a very difficult life in and out of the dialysis center. Lydia was afraid to end up like Tracey. Lydia knew that she hadn’t been efficiently self-managing her diabetes. Her A1C had been greater than 8 percent a few times over the last few years. While most of the time she kept it around 7.5 percent, she was aware that her doctor wanted her to get it below 7 percent, and keep it there in Continue reading >>

Eating & Nutrition For Hemodialysis

Eating & Nutrition For Hemodialysis

How does what I eat and drink affect my hemodialysis? Your choices about what to eat and drink while on hemodialysis can make a difference in how you feel and can make your treatments work better. Between dialysis treatment sessions, wastes can build up in your blood and make you sick. You can reduce waste buildup by controlling what you eat and drink. You can match what you eat and drink with what your kidney treatments remove. Some foods cause wastes to build up quickly between your dialysis sessions. If your blood contains too much waste, your kidney treatment session may not remove them all. Your dialysis center has a renal dietitian to help you plan your meals. A renal dietitian has special training in caring for the food and nutrition needs of people with kidney disease. Use this information to help you learn how to eat right to feel right on hemodialysis. Read one section at a time. Then, review with your renal dietitian the sections marked Talk with Your Renal Dietitian. Keep a copy of this information handy to remind yourself of foods you can eat and foods to avoid. Meet with a renal dietitian to create an eating plan that will work well for you. Yes. You will need to carefully plan your meals and keep track of the amount of liquids you eat and drink. It helps to limit or avoid foods and beverages that have lots of sodium for example, vegetable juice and sports drinks Why is it important to keep track of how much liquid I eat or drink? You may feel better if you keep track of and limit how much liquid you eat and drink. Excess fluid can build up in your body and may cause swelling and weight gain between dialysis sessions your heart to work harder, which can lead to serious heart trouble a buildup of fluid in your lungs, making it hard for you to breathe Hemod Continue reading >>

The Diabetic Dialysis Diet

The Diabetic Dialysis Diet

What is a diabetic dialysis diet? The diabetic dialysis diet is specifically for patients who have stage 5 chronic kidney disease (CKD), also called end stage renal disease (ESRD), in addition to diabetes. The diet’s goal is to manage blood glucose levels and help you feel your best. What can I eat? Like the other dialysis diets, the diabetic dialysis diet is filled with nutritious foods. You will work closely with your dietitian to create a balanced eating plan that will feature high-quality proteins and the proper balance of carbohydrates and fats to meet your individual needs. What can’t I eat? Your diet will have restrictions regarding foods that contain high amounts of phosphorus, sodium and potassium. But because of your diabetes, your carbohydrate intake will be tightly controlled in order to manage your blood glucose levels. High-sugar foods increase blood glucose. All carbohydrate-containing foods ( e.g., bread, cereal, pasta, rice, starchy vegetables, fruits, juices, many sugar-free desserts) increase blood glucose levels. Therefore, the total amount of carbohydrates you eat will be balanced with your medicines and activity level. Your dietitian may teach you a system called carbohydrate counting to keep your carbohydrate intake balanced. Why do I have to eat this way? Your dietitian and doctor will advise you to eat this way to reduce the risk of other health problems associated with diabetes and kidney disease. How does it help? Diabetes affects your entire body. It can cause nerve damage, problems in blood circulation and blindness as well as kidney disease. By following this eating plan, you can control your blood glucose levels and lessen the likelihood of developing other diabetes-related problems. Phosphorus isn’t cleared well through dialysis. It Continue reading >>

Snacks For Diabetics & Renal Failure Patients

Snacks For Diabetics & Renal Failure Patients

People with either renal failure or diabetes already have strict nutritional guidelines necessary for optimal health. If you have both diseases, choosing which foods to eat or avoid can be confusing. Not only must you restrict certain nutrients for kidney health, such as sodium, potassium and phosphorus, but you must also consider carbohydrate consistency for blood glucose control. A registered dietitian can help guide you toward developing a diet plan customized to meet your individualized needs. Video of the Day Several foods can be included in a renal, diabetic diet that may satisfy your sweet tooth. Fresh fruit that is low in potassium can make for a healthful option. These fruits include apples, strawberries, pineapple, grapes and plums. Top with a dollop of sugar-free whipped topping to make a dessert out of them. Sugar-free gelatin and ice pops are other sweet snack ideas, although be sure to count them toward your daily fluid intake if that is something you need to monitor. Animal crackers, vanilla wafers and graham crackers are kidney-friendly snacks that you can include in moderation but may contribute high amounts of carbohydrates if you do not control portions. Renal patients must pay particular attention to the sodium content of their foods. Savory snacks lower in sodium include unsalted breadsticks or pretzels, air-popped popcorn seasoned with a sodium-free herb blend and Melba toast with light cream cheese. Other healthy options include cut-up fresh vegetables, such as celery sticks, cucumbers, carrots and cauliflower with a low-fat salad dressing for dipping. If you are on hemodialysis, you may need a portable snack during the time-consuming process. Snacks that transport well and are appropriate on a renal, diabetic diet include a tortilla wrap with tun Continue reading >>

American Association Of Kidney Patients

American Association Of Kidney Patients

The Independent Voice of Kidney Patients Since 1969 Your healthcare team may recommend that you follow a meal plan to help you manage your dietary needs. When youre on dialysis, you may occasionally need to eat more or less of certain nutrients. When you have diabetes, you must balance food choices to keep blood sugar under control. There are two methods designed to help you manage your diet: The exchange system for meal planning uses a personal meal plan developed with the help of your renal dietitian. An exchange is a serving choice from a list of foods in measured amounts that have about the same nutritional value. Your renal dietitian or a certified diabetes educator can give you a copy of this plan that is tailored to meet your needs. Carbohydrate counting involves planning meals based on the total number of grams of carbohydrates that you will eat for that meal. To follow this plan, you must be willing to keep track of the foods you eat and the carbohydrates allowed for each meal. Reading and understanding food labels are very important. No matter which plan you choose, youll need to monitor your blood sugar levels to ensure your diabetes is well-controlled. Putting together a meal plan that meets the needs of both dialysis and diabetes may seem difficult. Your renal dietitian and healthcare team are available to make this easier for you. Your renal dietitian will review your special diet prescription with you when you begin dialysis and regularly thereafter. Work together with your team to develop the best overall plan to manage your meals, medications, exercise and blood sugar monitoring for your lifestyle and medical needs. Remember to be flexible; your plan may need to change over time! Always remember that if you are on dialysis and have diabetes, you can be Continue reading >>

What Food Should Diabetic On Dialysis Take

What Food Should Diabetic On Dialysis Take

What Food Should Diabetic on Dialysis Take Maintaining a healthy diabetic dialysis diet is specially important for patients who have End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD), also called Kidney Failure . The diets goal is to manage blood glucose levels, reduce burden on kidneys and ensure nutritions. What food are good for diabetic on dialysis? They have to closely limit sodium and fluid intake. In addition, taking enough high-quality proteins and balance carbohydrates and fats should also be included in your diet plan. Egg white, lean meat, fish, milk, bitter gourd, cabbage, lettuce, red bell peppers, apple, red grapes are good choices. They should restrict foods containing high amounts of phosphorous, sodium and potassium. High-sugar foods increase blood glucose. All carbohydrate-containing foods ( e.g., bread, cereal, pasta, rice, starchy vegetables, fruits, juices, many sugar-free desserts) increase blood glucose levels. Therefore, the total amount of carbohydrates you eat will be balanced with your medicines and activity level. How can a healthy diet help diabetic on dialysis? Diabetes affects your entire body, including nervous system, blood circulation and blindness as well as kidney disease. This diet plan is helpful for control blood glucose levels and protect kidneys. However, it cannot be taken as medication because no food can treat kidney disease from the root. Traditional Chinese Medicines (TCMs) are very natural for patients and can help patients reduce dialysis. What TCMs are good for diabetic on dialysis? I do not refer to several single Chinese herbs, but herbal remedies based on hundreds of Chinese medicines. Maikang composition, Micro-Chinese Medicine Osmotherapy , Medicated Bath , Foot Bath and Blood Pollution Therapy are all commonly used methods for Kidney Continue reading >>

Renal Diabetic Diet Grocery List

Renal Diabetic Diet Grocery List

When you're dealing with diabetes and kidney disease, what you eat matters. The foods you include in your diet not only affect your blood sugar but also the amount of waste products and fluid your kidneys need to process and eliminate. If you're armed when you go to the grocery store with a ready list of foods you can eat, you're already well on your way to better managing your renal diabetic diet. Consult your doctor or dietitian to help you determine your individual nutritional needs and diet plan. Video of the Day Fruits and veggies are a source of potassium. When you have kidney disease, your body has a tough time getting rid of potassium, which can cause levels to build up in your blood, leading to an abnormal heart rate or even death. Loading your cart with mostly low-potassium fruits and veggies is a good start, but you also need to limit the amount you eat each day to keep potassium levels under control. Low-potassium fruits and veggies to add to your grocery list include apples, blueberries, peaches, pears, green beans, carrots, cabbage, eggplant, peppers and zucchini. When buying canned or frozen fruits and veggies, look for varieties without added salt or sugar. Better Off With Refined Grains and Starches While whole grains are most often recommended to people with diabetes to help with blood sugar control, whole grains are a source of potassium and phosphorus and may not be a healthy choice when you have kidney disease too. You need to be careful about getting too much phosphorus in your diet. High levels of phosphorus in your blood can lead to weak bones. To keep a lid on potassium and phosphorus intake, add foods such as white bread products, unsweetened refined cereals, flour tortillas, unsalted crackers, pasta or white rice to your grocery list. Meat, po Continue reading >>

The Best Fruits That Chronic Kidney Disease And Diabetic Patients Should Incorporate Into Their Diet

The Best Fruits That Chronic Kidney Disease And Diabetic Patients Should Incorporate Into Their Diet

While fruits are loaded with important vitamins, minerals and fiber, choosing the wrong types of fruit can be less helpful to the health of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) and Diabetic patients because some fruits contain high levels of carbohydrate, potassium and sugar. Hence, to maintain good health you need to count the RIGHT fruits as part of your meal plan, rather than grabbing any piece from time-to-time or avoiding it entirely. A diet high in appropriate fruits could improve the health of CKD and Diabetic patients, according to a study published by American Society of Nephrology. Recommended Reading: Surprising New Meal Recommendations That Greatly Affect The Diets Of Those With CKD And Diabetes Having a piece of fresh fruit or fruit salad for dessert is a great way to satisfy your sweet tooth and get the extra nutrition you need. The best choices of fruit are any that are fresh, frozen or canned without added sugars, you should choose canned fruits that are in juice or light syrup to limit sugar and potassium. Be aware that dried fruit is rather high in potassium and often has small serving sizes that can cause you to over eat which will disrupt your recommended diet. If you get your fruit intake via juice make sure that it is 100% fruit juice and that you remain within your fluid restrictions. Recommended Reading: Typically Whole Foods are More Expensive, but are they better for CKD Patients? Whether you love blueberries, strawberries, or any other type of berries, all are good for people with both CKD and Diabetes. Berries are packed with antioxidants, vitamins, fiber, low in potassium and carbohydrates. Three quarters of a cup of fresh blueberries have 62 calories and 16 grams of carbohydrates. If you cannot resist the urge to just pop a lot of them in your mout Continue reading >>

Emergency Meal Planning For Diabetics

Emergency Meal Planning For Diabetics

Why do I need an emergency meal plan? This meal plan is for you to use in case of an emergency or a natural disaster when you may not be able to attend dialysis. It is important to follow a limited diet if dialysis has to be missed. A grocery list and a three-day meal plan for an emergency are included in this fact sheet. This diet is much more strict than your usual diet. This very strict plan is needed to control the buildup of toxins such as potassium, phosphorus, urea and fluids that can be life threatening to you if several dialysis treatments are missed due to the emergency . Many things we depend on daily may not be working during an emergency. You may be without a telephone. Water and electricity may be cut off, keeping you from cooking your meals in the usual way. You may need to use cold or shelf-stable foods until the crisis is over. Food in your refrigerator will keep safely for up to 12 hours and in the freezer for one to two days, if these appliances are opened only when meals are prepared. It is best to eat the foods from your refrigerator and freezer first before using your shelf-stable foods. Distilled water, disposable plates and utensils also should be kept on hand. How do I prepare myself for an emergency? As natural disasters may happen without warning, it is good to keep foods with a long shelf-life on hand at all times. If you do stock foods, remember to check dates for freshness and replace regularly. The following items are important and useful to have on hand in case of an emergency: this diet sheet always have a two-week supply of all medicines and vitamins all of the groceries listed in this guide diabetics need to have enough insulin and supplies on hand, including extra batteries for the glucometer emergency phone list with names and phone Continue reading >>

Which Diet For Diabetic Patients With Chronic Renal Failure?

Which Diet For Diabetic Patients With Chronic Renal Failure?

Which diet for diabetic patients with chronic renal failure? Henri Gin, Service Nutrition et Diabtologie, Hpital du Haut-Lvque, F-33064 Pessac, France. Search for other works by this author on: Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation, Volume 14, Issue 11, 1 November 1999, Pages 25772579, Henri Gin, Vincent Rigalleau, Michel Aparicio; Which diet for diabetic patients with chronic renal failure?, Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation, Volume 14, Issue 11, 1 November 1999, Pages 25772579, Moderate or severe protein restriction may be proposed in chronic renal failure both to fight its symptoms and to slow its progression [ 1 , 2 ]. Diabetic patients, whether insulin-dependent or non-insulin-dependent, have a chronic disease that has generally existed for a number of years before the occurrence of renal failure. Dietary protein restriction is effective in the progression of diabetic nephropathy [ 3 5 ] but several such patients have already been observing dietary recommendations, usually involving carbohydrates and fats for some time and are sometimes unwilling to give up eating habits acquired over a long period. Furthermore, when renal failure develops, the patient may get the impression that the different specialists managing his health have contradictory objectives and give opposing nutritional advice. It is important for the patient not to imagine that the diabetologist and the nephrologist are giving conflicting dietary directives when, in fact, most of the time their objectives converge. Nutritional rules for patients with uncomplicated insulin-dependent diabetes Insulin-dependent diabetes is characterized by a loss of endocrine pancreas function; there is no interference with the peripheral action of insulin. In other words, there is no more, or practically no more produ Continue reading >>

Diet Tips For People With Diabetes And Kidney Disease

Diet Tips For People With Diabetes And Kidney Disease

Diet is one of the most important ways to manage diabetes and kidney disease. If you’ve been diagnosed with kidney disease as a result of diabetes, you’ll need to work with a dietitian to create an eating plan that’s right for you. This plan will help manage your blood glucose levels and reduce the amount of waste and fluid your kidneys have to process. Which nutrients do I need to regulate? Your dietitian will give you nutritional guidelines that tell you how much protein, fat and carbohydrate you can eat, as well as how much potassium, phosphorus and sodium you can have each day. Because your diet needs to be lower in these minerals, you’ll limit or avoid certain foods, while planning your meals. Portion control is also important. Talk to your dietitian regarding tips for accurately measuring a serving size. What may be measured as one serving on a regular diet may count as three servings on the kidney diet. Your doctor and dietitian will also recommend you eat meals and snacks of the same size and calorie/carbohydrate content at certain times of the day to keep your blood glucose at an even level. It’s important to check blood glucose levels often and share the results with your doctor. What can I eat? Below is an example of food choices that are usually recommended on a typical renal diabetic diet. This list is based on sodium, potassium, phosphorus and high sugar content of foods included. Ask your dietitian if you can have any of these listed foods and make sure you know what the recommended serving size should be. Carbohydrate Foods Milk and Nondairy Recommended: Skim or fat-free milk, plain yogurt, sugar-free ice cream, sugar-free nondairy frozen desserts* *Portions of dairy products are often limited to 115 grams or 120 mL due to high protein, potassi Continue reading >>

More in blood sugar