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Diabetes And Breastfeeding Low Milk Supply

A Case-control Study Of Diabetes During Pregnancy And Low Milk Supply

A Case-control Study Of Diabetes During Pregnancy And Low Milk Supply

Abstract Low milk supply is one of the most common reasons for stopping breastfeeding. Correlates of glucose intolerance are risk factors for delayed secretory activation, but it is not known if glucose intolerance is associated with persistent low milk supply. Our objective was to determine whether exposure to diabetes in pregnancy is greater among women with low milk supply as compared to women with latch problems in a Breastfeeding Medicine Clinic (BMC). We conducted a case-control analysis of electronic medical records. We defined cases as low milk supply, but without latch or nipple problem; and controls as latch or nipple problem without low milk supply. We calculated odds of exposure to diabetes in cases versus controls in an unadjusted model and after adjusting for covariates (maternal and infant age, Cesarean delivery, preterm birth) and comorbidities (PCOS, hypothyroid or infertility). After excluding 74 with dual diagnoses, 14.9% of cases (26/175) versus 6.2% of controls (14/226) were exposed to diabetes (OR [95%CI], 2.6[1.3-5.2]), a relation that remained robust after adjustment for covariates and comorbidities (AOR [95%CI], 2.4[1.2-4.9]). Thus, women with low milk supply were significantly more likely to have been exposed to diabetes than those with latch or nipple problems. Identification of physiologic parameters that underlie the association between glucose intolerance and low milk supply is needed to enable more effective therapy options. Continue reading >>

Increase Milk Supply For Diabetics And Pcos

Increase Milk Supply For Diabetics And Pcos

Are you one of the many moms struggling to make enough breast milk? Have you tried everything? Is it possible that there is something you and your doctor may not have considered? There are many individuals that are diabetic, not diagnosed diabetic, or have poly-cystic ovarian syndrome. All these conditions can affect your ability to make milk. If you have tried everything else to increase your milk supply and nothing is working, please consider trying these things. Here are 8 suggestions that can increase milk supply for diabetics and PCOS: 1. Keep your blood sugar levels more stable by eating high proteins and staying away from sugars and simple carbohydrates. When our blood sugar levels are all over the place it is a lot harder for our body to work correctly and it can affect your hormones. Our hormones are crucial in milk production. Eating more often the right foods can make a difference. This is especially the case in women with diabetes or poly-cystic ovarian syndrome. Some of my favorite easy and healthy foods to have on hand are: boiled eggs, nuts, jerky, greek yogurt (low sugar), protein drinks (Costco has one made by Premier Protein that has 30 grams of protein and 1 gram of sugar. It actually tastes really good too and I feel full when I drink it!) Other recommended foods for those with insulin resistance include: garbanzo and kidney beans, brown rice, carob, and cinnamon (Marasco 2015). 2. Consider talking to your doctor about Metformin which is a medication that helps to stabilize blood sugar levels and has been shown to help breastfeeding moms with insulin issues to increase their milk supply. Metformin improves the insulin receptor sensitivity thus helping with milk synthesis. (Bargiota 2012) It is also being used as a treatment during pregnancy and has b Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Breastfeeding

Diabetes And Breastfeeding

Breastfeeding is the normal and natural way to feed and nurture a baby. If you have diabetes you may be concerned about whether you can breastfeed. The answer is yes. All mothers experience metabolic and hormonal changes after giving birth. A mother with diabetes who breastfeeds has an advantage as breastfeeding reduces the impact of these changes. When you breastfeed, your body continues to support you and your baby, making your diabetes easier to manage in the days after birth. Later on, gradual weaning helps you to maintain control of your diabetes. Gestational diabetes Benefits of breastfeeding What about medications? Be prepared Blood glucose control Babies can have a hypo after birth Antenatal expression of colostrum Get breastfeeding off to a good start Looking after yourself Adjusting your diet Gestational diabetes It can be a shock if you are diagnosed with gestational diabetes during your pregnancy. This is usually a temporary condition in which your body fails to produce enough insulin to meet your extra needs while you are pregnant. It is usually diagnosed from the fourth month of pregnancy. Just like mothers who are on long-term treatment for diabetes, good control of blood glucose levels will minimise any problems for you and your baby. You may not need any extra medical care during labour and delivery. Diabetes treatment is usually unnecessary once you have given birth. Benefits of breastfeeding For you as a mum with diabetes • It is easier to control your blood glucose levels as your body adjusts after the birth of your baby. • Depending on the type of diabetes you have, you may need less insulin or other medications. • Breastfeeding suppresses your periods and monthly hormonal changes. • Oxytocin and prolactin hormones are calming and help to re Continue reading >>

Low Breast Milk Supply Following Pregnancy Linked To Diabetes

Low Breast Milk Supply Following Pregnancy Linked To Diabetes

Pregnant women who have diabetes are more likely to have a lower milk supply for breastfeeding, according to new research. The Centre for Breastfeeding Medicine at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Centre reports that maternal glucose intolerance could make breastfeeding harder for new mothers. A study team led by Dr. Sarah Riddle conducted an analysis of 641 electronic medical records of women between June 2011 and May 2013. All participants had given birth within the previous 90 days and planned to breastfeed. Mothers with diabetes were compared to two other groups: women with low milk supply and no other breastfeeding problems; and mothers experiencing breastfeeding problems, such as latching onto the breast, but had a normal milk supply. Because the researchers wanted to investigate abnormal glucose metabolism during pregnancy, and not differentiate between diabetes types, diabetes was defined as documentation of gestational diabetes, type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes. 14.9 per cent of the low milk supply group had diabetes, whereas 6.2 per cent of the normal milk supply group had diabetes. The results, after adjustment, showed that women with diabetes were around 2.4 times more likely to have milk supply problems compared to women with latch or nipple problems. The researchers wrote that "further research is needed to elucidate how maternal glucose intolerance may impede lactation," but hypothesise that abnormal insulin action or glucose metabolism can make it harder to sustain regular milk production. Riddle told Medical News Today: "We are hopeful that with a better understanding of the underlying physiology, targeted therapy may be designed to treat or perhaps prevent this problem. We are currently engaged in a small randomized controlled trial of metformi Continue reading >>

10 Reasons For Low Milk Supply When Breastfeeding

10 Reasons For Low Milk Supply When Breastfeeding

Lactation expert, Teresa Pitman, discusses the top 10 reasons for low milk production and offers tips to find a solution Photo: iStockphoto When baby’s fussy or wants to nurse just an hour after eating, it’s natural to worry that you’re not producing enough milk. However, these are normal behaviours and more often than not baby’s weight gain reassures everyone that things are going well. However, for some mothers the results of baby’s weight checks aren’t as encouraging and the amount of milk they are producing isn’t always enough to meet baby’s needs. Diana West, IBCLC (International Board-Certified Lactation Consultant) and co-author of Making More Milk says that changes in breastfeeding techniques or assistance from a breastfeeding expert can help boost milk production significantly. Here are some of the most common causes of low milk supply and some strategies that may help. 1. Insufficient glandular tissue Some women’s breasts don’t develop normally (for various reasons) and may not have enough “milk-making” ducts to meet their baby’s needs. Ducts do grow during each pregnancy and breastfeeding stimulates the growth of more ducts and tissue, so this may be less of a problem with a second or third baby. There are certainly steps you can take to maximize your milk production (these might include pumping and taking a prescription medication–talk to your doctor and a breastfeeding expert) but you may also need to supplement with formula. It’s worth the effort to continuing breastfeeding, though, as even a small amount of your milk will help support your baby’s immune system, brain development and nutritional needs. 2. Hormonal or endocrine problems Perhaps you have polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a low or high thyroid, diabetes, hypert Continue reading >>

Breastfeeding And Diabetes

Breastfeeding And Diabetes

The Advantages of Continued Nursing Should you be breastfeeding while diabetic? What about breastfeeding and type 2 diabetes? Yes, a diabetic mother can continue to breastfeed her baby. Whether you have type 1, 2 or gestational diabetes, you can and should continue to breastfeed. Diabetic mothers are advised to breastfeed their babies exclusively for 6 months or longer. ~ Breastfeeding and diabetes ~ Does insulin pass through my breast milk? No, the insulin molecule is too large to pass through into your breast milk. Why is it Important to Breastfeed if You have Diabetes? It lowers your baby’s risk of developing diabetes. It helps the mother lose weight. It helps the body utilize insulin more efficiently. It lowers the need for insulin. Oxytocin released whilst breastfeeding will help a mother feel better physically and emotionally. Stress can aggravate diabetes, so this is a big huge advantage. Other basic benefits of breastfeeding ~ Breastfeeding and diabetes ~ Solid foods should be introduced only after 6 months of life, especially if there is a risk for diabetes. Tips for Breastfeeding with Diabetes Diabetic mothers should always eat something that contains a combination of protein and carbs before a breastfeeding session. Mothers who breastfeed will need to increase their calories daily, diabetic mothers who breastfeed need to increase their calories by an extra 500 (spread out through the day). A diabetic mother's milk might take longer to "come in" after her baby's birth. If her baby needs to be supplemented within those first few days, while her milk is coming in, she should try to get donor breast milk if possible. A Hypoallergenic formula can be given, if no donor breast milk is available. During those first few days, while you are waiting for your milk to " Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance And Lactation Insufficiency: Faq

Insulin Resistance And Lactation Insufficiency: Faq

As emerging research sheds light on possible reasons for lactation trouble even when mothers receive competent support, insulin resistance, or IR, is rising to the forefront of the discussion of possible causes. The following is an adapted-for-the-blogosphere excerpt of my upcoming book, Finding Sufficiency: Breastfeeding with Insufficient Glandular Tissue, which will be available this summer from Praeclarus Press. Can maternal body mass index be a warning sign for lactation trouble? This question has been studied, and the answer is yes—maternal overweight has been identified as a potential risk factor for delayed onset of lactation (Chapman & Pérez-Escamilla, 1999), which can generate a snowball effect of early supplementation and poor breastfeeding management in those critical early hours and days. However, we are reminded that high BMI does not always predict lactation difficulty. Many women with a high body mass index go on to produce plenty of milk, even overproduce in some cases, and not all women with milk production issues have a BMI over 30, though it seems a growing percentage does. There is also scientific literature that suggests overweight or obesity during adolescence can affect pubertal development (Burt Solorzano & McCartney, 2010). More research is needed to explore the possible relationship between adolescent body mass index, or, perhaps, adolescent diet and mammary gland development. Today’s new mothers grew up during what some call “the Snackwell’s era,” referring to a popular brand of snacks that were, as dietary recommendations of that time encouraged, processed to be low in fat. In order to be appealing, however, these products had—and perhaps still have—there are many “low fat” products still marketed as “healthy” foods eve Continue reading >>

Breastfeeding Difficulties Linked To Gestational Diabetes: Moms With Low Milk 2.5 Times More Likely To Have Condition

Breastfeeding Difficulties Linked To Gestational Diabetes: Moms With Low Milk 2.5 Times More Likely To Have Condition

Although the first few days of breastfeeding may be difficult, many women overcome the complications and eventually find their nursing experience to be among the most loving and satisfying in their lives. Women who experience a low milk supply often worry they are somehow inadequate, while also feeling heartbroken over their loss. Now, two new studies conducted by Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center researchers have gotten to the roots of low milk supply — the same factors contributing to diabetes may cause a insufficient milk in new mothers. In fact, new mothers diagnosed with lower-than-average milk were found to be 2.5 times more likely to have problems with insulin metabolism (gestational diabetes) compared to other new mothers. “One consequence of the obesity epidemic is that nearly one out of every four reproductive-aged women is pre-diabetic,” said Dr. Laurie Nommsen-Rivers, a researcher at the Cincinnati Children's Perinatal Institute. “Research to inform how to support lactation success in this vulnerable group of women is urgently needed." Nommsen-Rivers presented her work at the annual meeting of the Pediatric Academic Societies. The Best Food Scientists have described breast milk as the perfect meal. Not only does it provide a baby with all that is needed immunologically, but it is also tuned to the sensory needs of a baby. The first milk, for instance, is more watery and so addresses a baby's thirst. Yet as the nursing continues, the milk becomes higher in fat and ends at its creamiest texture. Even more wondrous is the fact that breast milk changes throughout the day and also over time. In the evening, for instance, breast milk has more sedating properties when compared to the morning, and as a baby grows, mother’s milk takes on nutriti Continue reading >>

Breastfeeding With Type 1 Diabetes

Breastfeeding With Type 1 Diabetes

Note: This article is part of our library of resources for Type 1 mothers. Check out more of our articles and personal stories for Type 1 Pregnancy. For many moms with Type 1 diabetes, giving birth is only a small part of their story of living beyond. Breastfeeding presents its own set of challenges and rewards for new mothers and as well as those who have done it before. Here is some information on how the basics of breastfeeding and how it may impact your Type 1 diabetes management. Breastfeeding 101 Recommendations about breastfeeding for all mothers, not just those with Type 1: Breastfeeding has been shown to have short-term and long-term benefits for both mother and baby According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), “All women, including those with diabetes, should be supported in attempts to breastfeed.” Research breastfeeding, the act of “expressing” and caregiving prior to delivery and know where you can go for support (your partner, your physician, etc.) Exclusive breastfeeding is recommended for at least the first six months following delivery Clear and consistent communication with your diabetes team is crucial for a successfully planned conception, pregnancy and delivery Moms with Type 1 It may come as no surprise that the medical community strongly advises closely monitoring blood glucose levels before, during and after pregnancy for mothers with all types of diabetes. Women with Type 1 have an increased risk for hypoglycemia during pregnancy and may experience less severe symptoms of hypoglycemia (also known as hypoglycemia unawareness). This is important because insulin sensitivity rises after giving birth and delivering the placenta. Immediately After Birth In the first minutes following delivery, babies born to mothers with diabetes can Continue reading >>

Breastfeeding And Low Supply: Common And Surprising Causes And Solutions

Breastfeeding And Low Supply: Common And Surprising Causes And Solutions

Low milk supply is always listed as a top reason why mothers quit breastfeeding and switch to formula. Experts often claim that the percentage of women who can't produce enough milk is extremely small (usually numbers under 5% are quoted, without any specific source being given). However, the number of women who say they tried everything and still couldn't make enough milk seems to be on the rise. This article explores some of the possible reasons for that, including polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), diabetes and pre-diabetes, and mammary hypoplasia (insufficient glandular tissue). Image credit: Daquella manera on flickr Why do so many mothers struggle to make enough milk? In Bangladesh, where infant formula isn't readily accessible, affordable or safe for most families, 98 percent of babies are breastfed and the average age of weaning is 33 months (source: WHO Global Data Bank on Infant and Young Child Feeding). In Norway, a country well known for having created perfect conditions for breastfeeding, around 80 percent of babies are still being breastfed at six months of age (source: Suzanne Barston, Bottled Up). Norway's 80 percent is significantly higher than in countries like Canada, the United States, and the United Kingdom, but it is also a far way off from the 98 percent in Bangladesh. So what is the difference? I think part of it is certainly choice. Although formula feeding may be frowned upon in Norway, ultimately, women still have the option not to breastfeed. Infant formula is accessible and Norwegians generally have the financial means to be able to afford it. Some women may simply not want to breastfeed or may find it too difficult and they have the freedom to make that choice. A mother in Bangladesh, however, would have to grit her teeth and push through. B Continue reading >>

A Case Control Study Of Diabetes During Pregnancy And Low Milk Supply

A Case Control Study Of Diabetes During Pregnancy And Low Milk Supply

Go to: Abstract Objective: The objective of this study was to determine whether a history of diabetes during pregnancy, as a marker of perinatal glucose intolerance, increases the odds of a diagnosis of low milk supply at a Breastfeeding Medicine Clinic (BMC). Materials and Methods: A case-control analysis was conducted of electronic medical records for BMC visits <90 days postpartum. Diabetes was defined as documentation of gestational, type 1, or type 2 diabetes. Cases were defined as those with a low milk supply diagnosis but without latch or nipple problems, and controls as those with latch or nipple problems but without low milk supply. A sensitivity analysis was then conducted by expanding cases to include all low milk supply diagnoses, and controls to include any diagnoses except low milk supply. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for diabetes were calculated in cases versus controls, including adjustment for cesarean delivery, preterm birth, polycystic ovary syndrome, hypothyroidism, and infertility. Results: In the primary analysis, 14.9% of 175 cases versus 6.2% of 226 controls had a history of diabetes during pregnancy (OR 2.6 [95% CI 1.3–5.2]; adjusted OR 2.4 [95% CI 1.2–4.9]). In the sensitivity analysis, 14.9% of 249 cases versus 6.1% of 312 controls had diabetes in pregnancy (adjusted OR 2.4 [95% CI 1.4–4.3]). Conclusions: Women diagnosed with low milk supply were significantly more likely to have had diabetes in pregnancy compared with women with latch or nipple problems and, more generally, compared with women with any other lactation difficulty. Further research is needed to elucidate how maternal glucose intolerance may impede lactation. Continue reading >>

One Possible Reason For Low Milk-supply

One Possible Reason For Low Milk-supply

“Why Some Women Don’t Have Enough Breastmilk for Baby: Important Role of Insulin in Making Breast Milk Identified” This is very exciting news and may be one of the reasons why some moms have milk-supply difficulties. Moms with gestational diabetes and diabetic moms tend to have a slower increase of full milk-supply and now there is evidence that shows why this may be true. For those who are interested in reading the original research: These are early findings but if you have low milk-supply and insulin resistance, you might consider using dietary modifications to lower your blood sugar in order to increase your milk-supply. One dietary modification that may be helpful in lowering blood sugar is magnesium supplementation. Low magnesium is associated with insulin resistance and sugar cravings. Many breastfeeding moms notice a milk-supply drop coinciding with sugar cravings during certain times of their menstrual cycles and have found that magnesium (and calcium) supplementation can help them to avoid this supply drop. Since many of us are low in magnesium, supplementation of this mineral may be one dietary intervention that could positively affect blood sugar and milk-supply. Laura Spitzfaden, LLLL, IBCLC Continue reading >>

Low Milk Supply Linked To Maternal Diabetes

Low Milk Supply Linked To Maternal Diabetes

Women who have any form of diabetes during pregnancy may face a low milk supply that cuts short their breastfeeding plans, according to a recently published study from the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. The study did not differentiate between type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes but compared new mothers who had diabetes during pregnancy with new mothers not diabetic during pregnancy. Dr. Sarah Riddle, a pediatrician at the medical center’s Center for Breastfeeding Medicine who led the study, said, "There are limited evidence-based strategies for helping mothers to increase milk supply, and low milk supply is often cited as the reason for new mothers to stop breastfeeding earlier than planned." Riddle and her colleagues analyzed data in electronic medical records of 641 women who first visited the breastfeeding center between June 2011 and June 2013. All women had had a baby in the previous 90 days and all were documented as highly motivated to nurse their babies. The study evaluated breastfeeding concerns in two ways: Low Milk Supply (Primary) – Compared women with low milk supply but no nipple or latch problems against women with ample milk supply but who were struggling due to nipple or latch problems. Sensitivity – Compared women who had low milk supply for any reason with women who had all other difficulties with breastfeeding successfully. In the primary analysis: 14.9% of 175 women producing low milk supplies but no latch or nipple problems had diabetes during pregnancy. 6.2% of the 226 in the comparison group were not diabetic during pregnancy. In the larger sensitivity analysis: 14.9% of the 249 with low milk supplies were diabetic during pregnancy. 6.1% of the 312 with other breastfeeding problems were diabetic during pregnancy. Wome Continue reading >>

Factors Leading To Diabetes May Contribute To Milk Supply Problems For New Mothers

Factors Leading To Diabetes May Contribute To Milk Supply Problems For New Mothers

New studies provide fresh evidence that the same factors that lead to diabetes contribute to low milk supply in some new mothers. In a study to be presented May 5, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center researchers discovered that problems with mothers’ insulin metabolism may affect their milk production. The study found that women diagnosed with low milk supply were 2.5 times more likely to have experienced gestational diabetes compared to women seen at the clinic solely because their infants were having problems latching onto the breast. “We need to better understand how we can identify mothers at risk for low milk supply and how best to support them in meeting their breastfeeding goals,” says Sarah Riddle, MD, a pediatrician at the Center for Breastfeeding Medicine and lead author of the study. “We also need to develop targeted therapies to support lactation success in women with a history of glucose intolerance.” The study, conducted among 561 women seeking help for a breastfeeding problem at Cincinnati Children’s Breastfeeding Medicine Clinic, will be presented at 4:15 p.m. Pacific time Monday, May 5, at the annual meeting of the Pediatric Academic Societies in Vancouver, Canada. In a separate study presented on April 27 at the Experimental Biology annual meeting in San Diego, Laurie Nommsen-Rivers, PhD, a researcher at the Cincinnati Children’s Perinatal Institute, showed that postpartum metabolic health also affects lactation sufficiency – even among women who did not experience diabetes in pregnancy. She found that elevated body mass index, elevated fasting insulin, insulin resistance and, especially, elevated fasting plasma glucose in the pre-diabetic range, were all predictors of insufficient milk supply in women attempting to exclusiv Continue reading >>

Breastfeeding After Gestational Diabetes Reduces The Risk Of Diabetes In Both The Mother And Baby

Breastfeeding After Gestational Diabetes Reduces The Risk Of Diabetes In Both The Mother And Baby

In this post we share the evidence that shows breastfeeding after gestational diabetes pregnancy can help reduce the risk of diabetes in both the mother AND baby. There is plenty of well established evidence showing the benefits to both the mother and baby of breastfeeding. This post is not designed to explain all the reasons why breastfeeding is beneficial, but will concentrate on the benefits specifically with regards to breastfeeding after gestational diabetes and how it can help prevent the development of Type 2 diabetes. Health benefits of breastfeeding According to UNICEF The Baby Friendly Initiative: Breastfed babies have a lower risk of: Type 1 diabetes Type 2 diabetes Obesity SIDS (sudden infant death syndrome) Respiratory infections Gastroenteritis Allergies Benefits to mothers who breastfeed: Lowers the risk of developing type 2 diabetes The longer mothers breastfeed, the greater their protection against breast and ovarian cancer, and hip fractures in later life. Recent evidence has demonstrated an association between prolonged breastfeeding and postmenopausal risk factors for cardiovascular (CV) disease. The World Cancer Research Fund includes breastfeeding as one of 10 recommendations to reduce the risk. Prevelance of type 2 diabetes in the mother following gestational diabetes pregnancy Gestational diabetes increases your risk of developing type 2 diabetes after the pregnancy. Statistics from Diabetes UK state that there is a seven-fold increased risk in women with gestational diabetes developing type 2 diabetes in later life. This risk increases if you gain weight too, for every 1kg gain over the pre-pregnancy weight there is a 40% increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. NICE state that up to 50% of women diagnosed with gestational diabetes develop Continue reading >>

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