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Diabetes And Azithromycin

Antibiotics And Diabetes: Do The Two Mix?

Antibiotics And Diabetes: Do The Two Mix?

Antibiotics and Diabetes: Do the Two Mix? Chances are, at some point in your life youve taken a course of antibiotics. Maybe you took penicillin as a child for strep throat. Or perhaps youve been given azithromycin (brand names Zithromax, Z-Pak, and others) for a sinus or upper respiratory infection. No doubt, antibiotics are lifesavers in most instances. You might have wondered how antibiotics affect your diabetes control, if at all. And even if youve never given it a thought, there are a few pointers to keep in mind when it comes to using antibiotics. Antibiotics are medicines that fight infections caused by bacteria. They kill bacteria or keep them from reproducing. Antibiotics are powerful drugs that, when used properly, can save lives. (Unfortunately, antibiotics are often used improperly, and thats creating a serious set of problems, which Ill get to in a moment.) Alexander Fleming discovered penicillin in 1928 (a good piece of trivia to remember), and now there are several antibiotics that are related to penicillin, including ampicillin, amoxicillin, and benzylpencillin. These drugs are used to treat a variety of infections, such as chest infections, urinary tract infections (UTIs) , and skin infections. There are also more modern antibiotics available, such as: Cephalosporins: used to treat UTIs, ear and skin infections, respiratory infections, bacterial meningitis, and sepsis. These include cephalexin (Keflex). Macrolides: used to treat lung and chest infections, and are also used in case of a penicillin allergy or penicillin resistance. These include erythromycin (E-Mycin), clarithromycin (Biaxin), and azithromycin (Zitromax, Z-pak, and others). Tetracyclines: often used to treat acne and rosacea. These include tetracycline (Sumycin, Panmycin) and doxycycline Continue reading >>

Azithromycin And Levofloxacin Use And Increased Risk Of Cardiac Arrhythmia And Death

Azithromycin And Levofloxacin Use And Increased Risk Of Cardiac Arrhythmia And Death

Azithromycin and Levofloxacin Use and Increased Risk of Cardiac Arrhythmia and Death 1Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina 2William J.B. Dorn Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Columbia, South Carolina 3School of Public Health, Columbia, University of South Carolina, South Carolina 4South Carolina College of Pharmacy, Columbia, South Carolina CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: Gowtham A. Rao, MD, PhD, MPH, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, University of South Carolina, 3209 Colonial Dr, Columbia, SC 29203, gowtham.rao{at}va.gov PURPOSE Azithromycin use has been associated with increased risk of death among patients at high baseline risk, but not for younger and middle-aged adults. The Food and Drug Administration issued a public warning on azithromycin, including a statement that the risks were similar for levofloxacin. We conducted a retrospective cohort study among US veterans to test the hypothesis that taking azithromycin or levofloxacin would increase the risk of cardiovascular death and cardiac arrhythmia compared with persons taking amoxicillin. METHODS We studied a cohort of US veterans (mean age, 56.8 years) who received an exclusive outpatient dispensation of either amoxicillin (n = 979,380), azithromycin (n = 594,792), or levofloxacin (n = 201,798) at the Department of Veterans Affairs between September 1999 and April 2012. Azithromycin was dispensed mostly for 5 days, whereas amoxicillin and levofloxacin were dispensed mostly for at least 10 days. RESULTS During treatment days 1 to 5, patients receiving azithromycin had significantly increased risk of death (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.48; 95% CI, 1.052.09) and serious arrhythmia (HR = 1.77; 95% CI, 1.202.62) comp Continue reading >>

Certain Antibiotics Tied To Blood Sugar Swings In Diabetics

Certain Antibiotics Tied To Blood Sugar Swings In Diabetics

Drugs such as Cipro, Avelox were most implicated, but experts say other factors may be at play Please note: This article was published more than one year ago. The facts and conclusions presented may have since changed and may no longer be accurate. And "More information" links may no longer work. Questions about personal health should always be referred to a physician or other health care professional. THURSDAY, Aug. 15, 2013 (HealthDay News) -- Diabetes patients who take a certain class of antibiotics are more likely to have severe blood sugar fluctuations than those who take other types of the drugs, a new study finds. The increased risk was low but doctors should consider it when prescribing the class of antibiotics, known as fluoroquinolones, to people with diabetes, the researchers said. This class of antibiotics, which includes drugs such as Cipro (ciprofloxacin), Levaquin (levofloxacin) and Avelox (moxifloxacin), is commonly used to treat conditions such as urinary tract infections and community-acquired pneumonia. One expert said the study should serve as a wake-up call for doctors. "Given a number of alternatives, physicians may consider prescribing alternate antibiotics ... in the place of fluoroquinolones (particularly moxifloxacin) to patients with diabetes," said Dr. Christopher Ochner, assistant professor of pediatrics and adolescent medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, in New York City. "In general, this study demonstrates that closer attention needs to be paid to particular drug-condition interactions." The study included about 78,000 people with diabetes in Taiwan. The researchers looked at the patients' use of three classes of antibiotics: fluoroquinolones; second-generation cephalosporins (cefuroxime, cefaclor, or cefprozil); or ma Continue reading >>

Drug Interactions Of Medications Commonly Used In Diabetes

Drug Interactions Of Medications Commonly Used In Diabetes

When patients are diagnosed with diabetes, a large number of medications become appropriate therapy. These include medications for dyslipidemia, hypertension, antiplatelet therapy, and glycemic control. So many medications can be overwhelming, and it is imperative that patients are thoroughly educated about their drug regimen. Patients have many concerns when multiple medications are started, including prescribing errors, the cost of medications, and possible adverse effects. Significantly, 58% of patients worry that they will be given medications that have drug interactions that will adversely affect their health.1 These worries are not unfounded given that several highly publicized drugs have been withdrawn from the U.S. market in the past several years because of adverse effects from drug interactions. Terfenadine, mibefradil, and cisapride have all been withdrawn from the market specifically because of drug-drug interactions. When terfenadine or cisapride were given with a strong inhibitor of their metabolism, torsades de pointes, a life-threatening drug-induced ventricular arrhythmia associated with QT prolongation, could occur.2 Cisapride, for gastroparesis or gastrointestinal reflux disease, and mibefradil, for hypertension, were prescribed for many patients with diabetes. An adverse drug interaction is defined as an interaction between one or more coadministered medications that results in the alteration of the effectiveness or toxicity of any of the coadministered medications. Drug interactions can be caused by prescription and over-the-counter medications, herbal products or vitamins, foods, diseases, and genetics (family history). The true incidence of drug interactions is unknown because many are not reported, do not result in significant harm to patients, o Continue reading >>

Azithromycin And Levofloxacin Use And Increased Risk Of Cardiac Arrhythmia And Death

Azithromycin And Levofloxacin Use And Increased Risk Of Cardiac Arrhythmia And Death

Azithromycin and Levofloxacin Use and Increased Risk of Cardiac Arrhythmia and Death 1Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina 2William J.B. Dorn Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Columbia, South Carolina 3School of Public Health, Columbia, University of South Carolina, South Carolina 4South Carolina College of Pharmacy, Columbia, South Carolina CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: Gowtham A. Rao, MD, PhD, MPH, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, University of South Carolina, 3209 Colonial Dr, Columbia, SC 29203, gowtham.rao{at}va.gov PURPOSE Azithromycin use has been associated with increased risk of death among patients at high baseline risk, but not for younger and middle-aged adults. The Food and Drug Administration issued a public warning on azithromycin, including a statement that the risks were similar for levofloxacin. We conducted a retrospective cohort study among US veterans to test the hypothesis that taking azithromycin or levofloxacin would increase the risk of cardiovascular death and cardiac arrhythmia compared with persons taking amoxicillin. METHODS We studied a cohort of US veterans (mean age, 56.8 years) who received an exclusive outpatient dispensation of either amoxicillin (n = 979,380), azithromycin (n = 594,792), or levofloxacin (n = 201,798) at the Department of Veterans Affairs between September 1999 and April 2012. Azithromycin was dispensed mostly for 5 days, whereas amoxicillin and levofloxacin were dispensed mostly for at least 10 days. RESULTS During treatment days 1 to 5, patients receiving azithromycin had significantly increased risk of death (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.48; 95% CI, 1.052.09) and serious arrhythmia (HR = 1.77; 95% CI, 1.202.62) comp Continue reading >>

Certain Antibiotics Tied To Blood Sugar Swings In Diabetics

Certain Antibiotics Tied To Blood Sugar Swings In Diabetics

THURSDAY, Aug. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Diabetes patients who take a certain class of antibiotics are more likely to have severe blood sugar fluctuations than those who take other types of the drugs, a new study finds. The increased risk was low but doctors should consider it when prescribing the class of antibiotics, known as fluoroquinolones, to people with diabetes, the researchers said. This class of antibiotics, which includes drugs such as Cipro (ciprofloxacin), Levaquin (levofloxacin) and Avelox (moxifloxacin), is commonly used to treat conditions such as urinary tract infections and community-acquired pneumonia. One expert said the study should serve as a wake-up call for doctors. "Given a number of alternatives, physicians may consider prescribing alternate antibiotics ... in the place of fluoroquinolones (particularly moxifloxacin) to patients with diabetes," said Dr. Christopher Ochner, assistant professor of pediatrics and adolescent medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, in New York City. "In general, this study demonstrates that closer attention needs to be paid to particular drug-condition interactions." The study included about 78,000 people with diabetes in Taiwan. The researchers looked at the patients' use of three classes of antibiotics: fluoroquinolones; second-generation cephalosporins (cefuroxime, cefaclor, or cefprozil); or macrolides (clarithromycin or azithromycin). The investigators also looked for any emergency-room visits or hospitalizations for severe blood sugar swings among the patients in the 30 days after they started taking the antibiotics. The results showed that patients who took fluoroquinolones were more likely to have severe blood sugar swings than those who took antibiotics in the other classes. The level of risk Continue reading >>

Controversies In Using Iv Azithromycin To Treat Gastroparesis

Controversies In Using Iv Azithromycin To Treat Gastroparesis

Controversies in Using IV Azithromycin to Treat Gastroparesis GR Health, Georgia Regents Medical Center University of Georgia, College of Pharmacy ABSTRACT: Gastroparesis, a chronic condition marked by delayed gastric emptying in the absence of mechanical obstructions, occurs in nearly 2% of the population. Since gastroparesis is incurable, treatment has focused only on treating symptoms to improve quality of life. However, many patients continue to experience symptoms during therapy with currently approved medications. Azithromycin, which has been studied as an alternative to erythromycin, increases the risk of cardiovascular death from QT prolongation after only a 5-day treatment course. Azithromycin is not currently approved to treat gastroparesis, and its use for this purpose seems to have more risks than benefits. Pharmacists should intervene to prevent IV azithromycin from being ordered for gastroparesis treatment, especially when prescribed at an inappropriate dosing frequency. Gastroparesis is a syndrome of delayed gastric emptying caused by factors other than mechanical obstructions in the stomach.1-11 The condition is estimated to affect 1.8% of the population; it is more prevalent in women (37.8 women vs. 9.6 men per 100,000 people) and is more common (88%) in younger women (mean age 41 years).1,6 Gastroparesis is incurable, and when its symptoms worsen, patients are typically admitted to the hospital for treatment. From 1995 to 2004, the number of hospital admissions for gastroparesis increased significantly, from 3,977 to 10,252 (158% increase) for primary gastroparesis and from 56,726 to 134,146 (136% increase) for secondary gastroparesis.3,6 Accordingly, healthcare costs for gastroparesis treatment have increased significantly since 2000.1 The most commo Continue reading >>

Azithromycin For The Secondary Prevention Of Coronary Heart Disease Events: The Wizard Study: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Azithromycin For The Secondary Prevention Of Coronary Heart Disease Events: The Wizard Study: A Randomized Controlled Trial

BarronHV, CannonCP, MurphySA, BraunwaldE, GibsonCM.Association between white blood cell count, epicardial blood flow,myocardial perfusion, and clinical outcomes in the setting of acute myocardialinfarction: a thrombolysis in myocardial infarction 10 substudy.Circulation.2000;102:2329-2334.Google Scholar JudeB, AgraouB, McFaddenEP. et al.Evidence for time-dependent activation of monocytes in the systemiccirculation in unstable angina but not in acute myocardial infarction or instable angina.Circulation.1994;90:1662-1668.Google Scholar SaikkuP, LeinonenM, MattilaK. et al.Serological evidence of an association of a novel Chlamydia, TWAR,with chronic coronary heart disease and acute myocardial infarction.Lancet.1988;2:983-986.Google Scholar KuoCC, GraystonJT, CampbellLA, GooYA, WisslerRW, BendittEP.Chlamydia pneumoniae (TWAR) in coronary arteriesof young adults (15-34 years old).Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A.1995;92:6911-6914.Google Scholar SiscovickDS, SchwartzSM, CoreyL. et al.Chlamydia pneumoniae, herpes simplex virustype 1, and cytomegalovirus and incident myocardial infarction and coronaryheart disease death in older adults: the Cardiovascular Health Study.Circulation.2000;102:2335-2340.Google Scholar DahlenGH, BomanJ, BirganderLS, LindblomB.Lp(a) lipoprotein, IgG, IgA and IgM antibodies to Chlamydia pneumoniae and HLA class II genotype in early coronary arterydisease.Atherosclerosis.1995;114:165-174.Google Scholar LiuL, HuH, JiH, MurdinAD, PierceGN, ZhongG.Chlamydia pneumoniae infection significantlyexacerbates aortic atherosclerosis in an LDLR-mouse model within six months.Mol Cell Biochem.2000;215:123-128.Google Scholar MuhlesteinJB, AndersonJL, HammondEH. et al.Infection with Chlamydia pneumoniae acceleratesthe development of atherosclerosis and treatment with azithrom Continue reading >>

Medicines That Raise Blood Sugar (bg) Levels - Dlife

Medicines That Raise Blood Sugar (bg) Levels - Dlife

Some medicines that are used for treating other medical conditions can cause elevated blood sugar in people with diabetes. You may need to monitor your blood glucose more closely if you take one of the medicines listed below. Its important to note that just because a medicine has the possibility of raising blood sugar, it does not mean the medicine is unsafe for a person with diabetes. For instance, many people with type 2 diabetes need to take a diuretic and a statin to lower blood pressure and cholesterol. In these and many other cases, the pros will almost always outweigh the cons. Dont ever take matters of medication into your own hands. Discuss any concerns you have with your healthcare provider. Of all the different antibiotics, the ones known as quinolones are the only ones that may affect blood glucose. They are prescribed for certain types of infection. Niacin is used to lower triglycerides and cholesterol. In higher doses, it can raise blood sugar. Niacin (Niaspan, Niacor, Slo-Niacin and various non-prescription products) Over-the-Counter(Non-Prescription) Medicines That May Affect Blood Sugar The most common offenders are in the class of medicines known as decongestants. Decongestants dont contain sugar, but cause the release of stored sugar into the bloodstream. They are used to reduce nasal congestion, often during cold season and allergy season. There are two decongestants available in the U.S. and one, pseudoephedrine, is usually kept behind the counter, to be sold only by a pharmacist. These decongestants are included in many multi-symptom products. Advil Cold and Sinus tablets (pseudoephedrine) The second category is products that actually contain sugar: most often cough syrups, cough drops, and lozenges. The extent of the effect on blood sugar relates Continue reading >>

Zithromax (azithromycin): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses

Zithromax (azithromycin): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses

(azithromycin) Tablets and Oral Suspension ZITHROMAX (azithromycin tablets and oral suspension)contains the active ingredient azithromycin, a macrolide antibacterial drug , fororal administration. Azithromycin has the chemical name (2R,3S,4R,5R,8R,10R,11R,12S,13S,14R)-13-[(2,6-dideoxy-3-C-methyl-3-O-methyl--L-ribo-hexopyranosyl)oxy]-2-ethyl-3,4,10-trihydroxy-3,5,6,8,10,12,14-heptamethyl-11-[[3,4,6- trideoxy-3-(dimethylamino)--D-xylo-hexopyranosyl]oxy]-1-oxa-6-azacyclopentadecan-15-one.Azithromycin is derived from erythromycin ; however, it differs chemically fromerythromycin in that a methyl-substituted nitrogen atom is incorporated intothe lactone ring. Its molecular formula is C38H72N2O12,and its molecular weight is 749.0. Azithromycin has the following structural formula: Azithromycin, as the dihydrate, is a white crystallinepowder with a molecular formula of C38H72N2O122H2O and a molecularweight of 785.0. ZITHROMAX tablets contain azithromycin dihydrateequivalent to 600 mg azithromycin. They also contain the following inactive ingredients:dibasic calcium phosphate anhydrous, pregelatinized starch, sodiumcroscarmellose, magnesium stearate, sodium lauryl sulfate, and an aqueous filmcoat consisting of hypromellose, titanium dioxide, lactose, and triacetin. ZITHROMAX for oral suspension is supplied in a single-dosepacket containing azithromycin dihydrate equivalent to 1 g azithromycin. Italso contains the following inactive ingredients: colloidal silicon dioxide,sodium phosphate tribasic, anhydrous; spray dried artificial banana flavor,spray dried artificial cherry flavor, and sucrose. To reduce the development of drug-resistant bacteria andmaintain the effectiveness of ZITHROMAX and other antibacterial drugs, ZITHROMAXshould be used only to treat infections that are p Continue reading >>

Azithromycin (zithromax): Antibiotic Side Effects & Dosage

Azithromycin (zithromax): Antibiotic Side Effects & Dosage

Bacterial Infections 101: Types, Symptoms, and Treatments See Slideshow Is azithromycin (Zithromax, Zithromax Tri-Pak, Zithromax Z-Pak, Zmax) safe to use during pregnancy or while breastfeeding? There are no adequate studies of azithromycin in pregnant women . Azithromycin should only be used during pregnancy if it is clearly necessary. It is not known if azithromycin is secreted in breast milk . What else should I know about azithromycin (Zithromax, Zithromax Tri-Pak, Zithromax Z-Pak, Zmax)? What preparations of azithromycin (Zithromax, Zithromax Tri-Pak, Zithromax Z-Pak, Zmax) are available? Suspension: 100 mg/5 ml (teaspoon), 200 mg/5 ml (teaspoon). Powder for suspension (extended release): 2 g. Powder for Injection: 500 mg. Z-PAK (Blister pack containing six 250 mg tablets); TRI-PAK (Blister pack containing three 500 mg tablets). How should I keep azithromycin (Zithromax, Zithromax Tri-Pak, Zithromax Z-Pak, Zmax) stored? Tablets should be stored at room temperature between 15 C to 30 C (59 F to 86 F). Suspension and solution for injection should be kept between 5 C to 30C (41 F to 86 F). How does azithromycin (Zithromax, Zithromax Tri-Pak, Zithromax Z-Pak, Zmax) work? Azithromycin, like all macrolide antibiotics, prevents bacteria from growing by interfering with their ability to make proteins. Because of the differences in the way proteins are made in bacteria and humans, the macrolide antibiotics do not interfere with production of proteins in humans. It is an unusual antibiotic in that it stays in the body for quite a while (has a long half-life), allowing for once-a-day dosing and for shorter treatment courses for most infections. When was azithromycin (Zithromax, Zithromax Tri-Pak, Zithromax Z-Pak, Zmax) approved by the FDA? The FDA approved azithromycin in No Continue reading >>

Azithromycin Insulin Diet Intervention Trial In Type 1 Diabetes (aidit)

Azithromycin Insulin Diet Intervention Trial In Type 1 Diabetes (aidit)

Azithromycin Insulin Diet Intervention Trial in Type 1 Diabetes i) Azithromycin Monohydrate, three times a week ( 48 h between doses) during 52 weeks. 500 mg if body weight 30 kg, 250 mg if body weight < 30 kg. ii) Extra intensive insulin treatment periods for maximum beta-cell rest with Insulin lispro (Sanofi). This treatment will be given i.v. for one episode of 72 hours in the first week after inclusion and s.c. on seven 6-8 h occasions during the study year. The dose will be individually titrated to reach target blood glucose 4.00.5 mmol/L. ii) Dietician support; Extra advice and support from the study dietician within the first week after randomization and after 1.5 and 4 months. Azithromycin Monohydrate tablet (Azithromycin Sandoz) or oral suspension (Azithromax). Solution for intravenous or subcutaneous use Patients will receive treatment as usual (TAU). All patients will receive standard therapeutic treatment consisting of insulin replacement with insulin analogues aiming for normoglycemia from diagnosis. Rapid acting insulin analogue will be administered via insulin pump (continuous subcutaneous infusion) with access to insulin injections in case of malfunction in the pump system. Stimulated C-peptide during an MMTT [TimeFrame:12 months after inclusion] Residual insulin secretion measured by mixed meal tolerance test (MMTT) stimulated C-peptide two-hour under the curve profile measured one year after study inclusion. >60% of time in target blood glucose levels [TimeFrame:two weeks in the 12th month after initiation of the study treatment] Proportion of subjects with time in target 3.9-7.8 mmol/L 60% and with a glycaemic variability expressed as standard deviation < 2 mmol/L according to continuous glucose monitoring during two weeks in the 12th month after ini Continue reading >>

Azithromycin Side Effect: Z-pak Heart Attack Death

Azithromycin Side Effect: Z-pak Heart Attack Death

May 16, 2012 -- Sudden heart death may be a new risk from the commonly prescribed antibiotic azithromycin -- better known as Zithromax or the Z-Pak. The finding comes from a study of Medicaid patients who received some 348,000 Z-Pak prescriptions from 1992 to 2006. Compared to patients who took no antibiotics , those taking the five-day course of azithromycin treatment had about a threefold higher risk of heart death. Compared to patients with infections treated with amoxicillin , another antibiotic, those taking azithromycin had twice the risk of heart death. Even so, it's a small risk. For every million courses of azithromycin treatment there were an estimated 47 extra heart deaths. Among people at highest risk of heart disease , there were 245 extra heart deaths per million courses of azithromycin. "It's a small risk. And if you look carefully, you'll see that all antibiotics have serious risks," study leader Wayne A. Ray, PhD, professor of preventive medicine at Vanderbilt University, tells WebMD. "For most patients, this is a relatively small risk." Ray says the study probably will make doctors think hard about prescribing azithromycin for patients at high risk of heart death. "When an equally effective alternative is available, it should be used for patients at high cardiac risk," Ray says. Infectious disease specialist Jay Varkey, MD, director of the antibiotic management program at Emory University, says the study is well done but far from conclusive. "In and of itself, this study does not warrant a dramatic amount of alarm," Varkey tells WebMD. "It calls for more studies to see whether the increased death rate was truly due to azithromycin or to the underlying disease being treated." Ray and colleagues tried to do this by comparing patients on azithromycin to Continue reading >>

What Medicines Can Make Your Blood Sugar Spike?

What Medicines Can Make Your Blood Sugar Spike?

If you have diabetes or high blood sugar, you probably know some of the things that cause your glucose (another name for blood sugar) to go up. Like a meal with too many carbohydrates, or not enough exercise. But other medicines you might take to keep yourself healthy can cause a spike, too. Know Your Meds Medicines you get with a prescription and some that you buy over the counter (OTC) can be a problem for people who need to control their blood sugar. Prescription medicines that can raise your glucose include: Steroids (also called corticosteroids). They treat diseases caused by inflammation, like rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and allergies. Common steroids include hydrocortisone and prednisone. But steroid creams (for a rash) or inhalers (for asthma) aren’t a problem. Drugs that treat high blood pressure, such as beta-blockers and thiazide diuretics High doses of asthma medicines, or drugs that you inject for asthma treatment OTC medicines that can raise your blood sugar include: Cough syrup. Ask your doctor if you should take regular or sugar-free. How Do You Decide What to Take? Even though these medicines can raise your blood sugar, it doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t take them if you need them. The most important thing is to work with your doctor on the right way to use them. If you have diabetes or you’re watching your blood sugar, ask your doctor before you take new medicines or change any medicines, even if it’s just something for a cough or cold. (Remember, just being sick can raise your blood sugar.) Make sure your doctor knows all the medicines you take -- for diabetes or any other reason. If one of them may affect your blood sugar, she may prescribe a lower dose or tell you to take the medicine for a shorter time. You may need to check your blood s Continue reading >>

Antimicrobials With Special Precautions In Diabetes

Antimicrobials With Special Precautions In Diabetes

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter Antimicrobials with Special Precautions in Diabetes To view the entire topic, please sign in or purchase a subscription . Official website of the Johns Hopkins Antibiotic (ABX), HIV, Diabetes, and Psychiatry Guides, powered by Unbound Medicine. Johns Hopkins Guide App for iOS, iPhone, iPad, and Android included. Explore these free sample topics: -- The first section of this topic is shown below -- Certain antibiotics may produce undesired changes in glycemic control when used in persons with diabetes. No apparent interactions are described between antibiotics and insulins. Serum concentrations of hypoglycemic agents may change due to inhibition or induction of oxidative metabolism (i.e. cytochrome P450 system) including: meglitinides (repaglinide, nateglinide), sulfonylureas (glyburide, glimepiride, glipizide), and glitizones (pioglitazone, rosiglitazone). Specific cytochrome P450 substrates: repaglinide (2C8, 3A4); nateglinide (2C9>3A4); glyburide and glipizide (2C9); pioglitazone (3A4>2C8); rosiglitazone (2C8> 2C9). Limited number of potential drug-drug interactions observed with metformin . -- To view the remaining sections of this topic, please sign in or purchase a subscription -- Auwaerter, Paul. "Antimicrobials With Special Precautions in Diabetes." Johns Hopkins Diabetes Guide, 2017. Johns Hopkins Guide, www.hopkinsguides.com/hopkins/view/Johns_Hopkins_Diabetes_Guide/547010/all/Antimicrobials_with_Special_Precautions_in_Diabetes. Auwaerter P. Antimicrobials with Special Precautions in Diabetes. Johns Hopkins Diabetes Guide. 2017. Accessed June 6, 2019. Auwaerter, P. (2017). Antimicrobials with Special Precautions in Diabetes. In Johns Hopkins Diabetes Guide. Available from Auwaerter P. Antimicrobials With S Continue reading >>

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