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Continuous Glucose Monitoring System Cost

Continuous Glucose Monitoring Systems - A Growing Market

Continuous Glucose Monitoring Systems - A Growing Market

Summary Continuous glucose monitoring systems offer many advantages for diabetics opposed to “traditional” ways of measuring. Potential users are mostly type 1 diabetics that regularly use insulin, but the broader market also consists of type 2 diabetics that need insulin regularly. If insurance companies would cover the costs, it could be a massive catalyst for continuous glucose monitoring systems. If we assume all type 1 diabetics that use an insulin pump will also use a continuous glucose monitoring system, the market could be about $4 billion a year. Diabetes can be called a global pandemic - there are 415 million people affected by it worldwide right now and the number is expected to grow to 642 million in 2040. In 2015 one out of 11 adults had diabetes, in 2040 the number will be one out of 10. High blood sugar is the third highest risk factor for premature mortality, after high blood pressure and tobacco use. In 2015 about 5 million people died from diabetes. As diabetics are producing too little insulin or none at all (depending on the type of diabetes), the most important aspect when talking about diabetes is the constant availability of high quality insulin. The big names in this market are Sanofi (NYSE: SNY), Eli Lilly and Company (NYSE: LLY), Merck & Co Inc. (NYSE: MRK) and of course the diabetes giant Novo Nordisk (NYSE: NVO). But aside from the ability to administer insulin the diabetic has to be able to measure his or her blood sugar and in the last decade there have been some very interesting developments in this field. In this article, we talk about the future of blood sugar measurement and take a closer look at that market as well as a possible catalyst for continuous glucose monitoring systems. Why glucose measurement? The bodies of healthy peopl Continue reading >>

The Cost-effectiveness Of Real-time Continuous Glucose Monitoring (rt-cgm) In Type 2 Diabetes

The Cost-effectiveness Of Real-time Continuous Glucose Monitoring (rt-cgm) In Type 2 Diabetes

We used the validated IMS CORE Diabetes Model (CDM), which has been broadly applied.15,16 The CDM is a non-product-specific computer simulation model. The simulations predict the long-term health outcomes and costs of particular interventions for type 1 and/or type 2 diabetes. In this case, the intervention is short-term, intermittent use of RT-CGM versus self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) by fingerstick among people with type 2 diabetes not taking prandial insulin. Data that inform the probabilities of events (such as hypoglycemia, amputation, a myocardial infarction, etc.), the progression of A1C, systolic blood pressure, lipids, and appropriate risk adjustments are derived from the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS), the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT), the Framingham Heart Study, and other sources. The CDM simulates disease progression in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and is widely used to estimate the impact of interventions on clinical and cost outcomes, as well as a range of economic analyses (cost-effectiveness, cost-utility, cost-benefit or cost of disease). It can also be used to identify potential high-risk patient profiles. The outputs of the model include life expectancy (LE), quality-adjusted life expectancy (QALE), direct and indirect costs, cumulative incidence and time to onset of complications, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios per additional life year (LY) or quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained. The characteristics of the cohort simulated by the CDM to predict the long-term health outcomes and costs of RT-CGM for people with type 2 diabetes not taking prandial insulin are based on the study by Vigersky and colleagues.9-11 Briefly, it was a 52-week, prospective, 2-arm RCT in 100 adult subjects compari Continue reading >>

Is Continuous Glucose Monitoring Worth It?

Is Continuous Glucose Monitoring Worth It?

Continuous glucose monitoring systems (CGMS) may not make life with diabetes any easier. But they can definitely improve health, if you can deal with the hassle and expense. So how do you know if such a system is right for you? As many readers already know, CGMS give a nearly continuous readout of glucose levels in tissue fluid, the wet stuff that oozes out when you have a scrape or a burn. To read these levels, you insert a long-lasting sensor under your skin, a process that feels similar to a needle stick. The sensor is made of material like the filters used in dialysis. It measures glucose levels and radios the results, via a connected transmitting device, to a small receiving device about the size of a pager. This sounds nice — much more information without all the needle sticks. Unfortunately, you still have to do fingertip blood checks 2–4 times a day to keep the monitor calibrated. And the information you get from the meter is only valuable if you know how to use it. Originally, CGMS was for your doctor. You got a continuous 72-hour readout of blood sugar levels, with a nice graph to go with it. If you conscientiously wrote down what you ate, your exercise, and medicines, your doctor would learn a lot about your body’s use of food and insulin. The doc could adjust insulin dosages and other aspects of your care. Then you gave the monitor back. Studies showed this treatment reduced A1C levels by 0.4% to 1.0% or so. Many people with diabetes wanted this capability for themselves, so they could regularly adjust their own treatment and self-management. Now thousands of people use CGMS continuously. But how well do they work? Advantages According to manufacturers’ data, “You can easily and discreetlyview your current glucose values continuously throughout the Continue reading >>

Continuous Glucose Monitoring: Everything You Need To Know

Continuous Glucose Monitoring: Everything You Need To Know

Continuous glucose monitors or CGMs can be a lifesaving device for people with any type of diabetes. They continually check your blood sugar 24 hours a day and alert you you before you begin experiencing low or high blood sugar levels. They can reduce the number of times you have to check your blood sugar each day which is welcome news for everyone with diabetes! Insurance coverage is changing this year with Medicare jumping on board also, so this is the time to learn about this awesome piece of technology available to you. I know there are a lot of questions surrounding the use of continuous glucose monitoring, so we will break it all down here for you! What is a CGM and how does it work? Is it right for me? Will I still have to check my blood sugar? What choices do I have currently on the market? Will my insurance cover a CMG? How much will it cost? Can I travel and play sports with a CGM? In this article I will answer all your questions. What Is Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM)? A continuous glucose monitoring system or CGM is a system that does just what it sounds like, it monitors you glucose (blood sugar) continuously…well, every 5 minutes, 24 hours a day! You are able to see what your blood sugars are with a receiver; the data is transmitted from a sensor which is inserted right beneath your skin which is attached to a transmitter which sends the data to the receiver. Now, the newest system are even integrated with a Smartphone; with this advancement you can check your data right from your cell phone. For parents with children, this technology is peace of mind, allowing them to check their child’s blood glucose level any time-day or night. There are two different types of systems: The first is a personal continuous glucose monitoring system that you wear a Continue reading >>

How Much Does Continuous Glucose Monitoring Cost?

How Much Does Continuous Glucose Monitoring Cost?

back to Overview Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) cost and insurance coverage. Does that phrase make your head spin? These were hot issues in response to our last article where I asked about your experience with CGMs. Like anything we’re considering, the financial impact is a big part of the decision-making process. But because the cost depends so much on your insurance coverage, it can be confusing to find out how much you’ll end up paying. And maybe it’s just me, but I don’t like talking to my health insurance company. It feels complicated and I’m rarely confident in the information I get. Additionally, the information changes depending on when during the benefit year I call. What’s the importance of a benefit year? Typically (in the U.S.), health insurance policies are done on an annual basis, and things like deductibles and out-of-pocket maximums, which act like thresholds, are reset. You’ll usually find your cost to be lower later in the benefit year after they’ve been met (even $0 in some cases). For many, the benefit year is the same as a calendar year, so the end of the year might be a smart time to ask about your coverage again. You might be in for a pleasant surprise for the holidays! More to consider? We also have to keep in mind that each employer’s policy can be different, even with the same insurance company. So even though you and your neighbor both have health insurance from the same company, your individual coverage may be different because you work for different employers. An opportunity? But rather than thinking of all this complexity as a barrier and feeling intimidated by it, I believe it creates an opportunity to leverage companies like Dexcom. They have people whose full-time jobs are to dive into our insurance plans and uncov Continue reading >>

Freestyle Libre Now Available In Major Us Pharmacies

Freestyle Libre Now Available In Major Us Pharmacies

FreeStyle Libre Now Available in Major US Pharmacies Abbotts no-calibration CGM availableat pharmacies like CVS and Walgreens for a cash price ranging from about $36-$53/10-day sensor; get cost and prescription details here Two months after approval by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Abbotts FreeStyle Libre (real time) continuous glucose monitor (CGM) is now on the shelves of major pharmacies in the US, including CVS, Walgreens, Walmart, Rite Aid, and Krogers/Smiths. The long awaited sensor finally comes to the US more than three years after it launched in Europe. Here are all the details on how to get one and what it costs. A prescription is required to get FreeStyle Libre in the US, and Abbotts website has a helpful prescription request form after filling it out with your information, Abbott will actually request a prescription from your healthcare provider. To help start a conversation with your provider, Abbott also has a discussion guide . Healthcare professionals can also visit Provider.FreeStyleLibre.us . How much does FreeStyle Libre cost? Does it have insurance coverage? US insurance companies, Medicare, and Medicaid do not yet cover FreeStyle Libre in the US, meaning people with diabetes will need to pay cash for it in pharmacies. Abbott has made the cash price of FreeStyle Libre less than other systems both for individual sensors and for the reader devices. Below are the price ranges at major pharmacies we called. In our research, FreeStyle Libre is the least expensive at Walmart, where each 10-day sensor is $35.99, and each reader device (one time purchase) is $69.99. Please note that diaTribe contacted individual pharmacies to get this information; prices at your local pharmacy may differ. 10-day Libre Sensor - $52.99 each (about $159 per month) 10 Continue reading >>

The Cost-effectiveness Of Continuous Glucose Monitoring In Type 1 Diabetes

The Cost-effectiveness Of Continuous Glucose Monitoring In Type 1 Diabetes

OBJECTIVE Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) has been found to improve glucose control in type 1 diabetic patients. We estimated the cost-effectiveness of CGM versus standard glucose monitoring in type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This societal cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) was conducted in trial populations in which CGM has produced a significant glycemic benefit (A1C ≥7.0% in a cohort of adults aged ≥25 years and A1C <7.0% in a cohort of all ages). Trial data were integrated into a simulation model of type 1 diabetes complications. The main outcome was the cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained. RESULTS During the trials, CGM patients experienced an immediate quality-of-life benefit (A1C ≥7.0% cohort: 0.70 quality-adjusted life-weeks [QALWs], P = 0.49; A1C <7.0% cohort: 1.39 QALWs, P = 0.04) and improved glucose control. In the long-term, CEA for the A1C ≥7.0% cohort, CGM was projected to reduce the lifetime probability of microvascular complications; the average gain in QALYs was 0.60. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was $98,679/QALY (95% CI −60,000 [fourth quadrant] to −87,000 [second quadrant]). For the A1C <7.0% cohort, the average gain in QALYs was 1.11. The ICER was $78,943/QALY (15,000 [first quadrant] to −291,000 [second quadrant]). If the benefit of CGM had been limited to the long-term effects of improved glucose control, the ICER would exceed $700,000/QALY. If test strip use had been two per day with CGM long term the ICER for CGM would improve significantly. CONCLUSIONS Long-term projections indicate that CGM is cost-effective among type 1 diabetic patients at the $100,000/QALY threshold, although considerable uncertainty surrounds these estimates. The Diabetes Control and Complication Trial (DCCT) e Continue reading >>

The Hidden Cost Of Diabetes Devices To Patients

The Hidden Cost Of Diabetes Devices To Patients

I want to thank those who create the amazing devices that make my diabetes easier to manage and help me stay healthier. That said, there’s a cost to new technology and devices we never talk about. It’s the one to patients. And I’m not talking financial. While devices lighten the burden of managing my disease, they also create new burdens. Patients who use devices must among other things: Invest time, effort and brainpower researching which device, among the many, are best for them Often spend time and aggravation dealing with their insurance company Spend time in training sessions learning how to use their device Know what to do when devices err Manage potential danger to one’s health when devices fail Be cool-headed and adaptable when the data makes no sense Upload data for their own and provider’s use Make space on their body and give up their vanity Find accessories for, and carry around, a ton of equipment and backup supplies Sit on the phone with customer service reps at all hours of the day and night As tiring as it is to manage a chronic illness like diabetes, managing devices adds another layer of complexity and fatigue. And, as invisible as my Type 1 diabetes is to everyone, the responsibility of managing devices is also invisible. I see a steady stream of this on my Facebook page — “Soooo, this happened again. Called Tandem... sending me out a new pump (again) since this is the second time it happened... I hope that by acknowledging the burden patients bear using devices, device developers, health care providers and insurance companies will do more to lighten it. Device engineers and designers need to spend more time understanding what a day of living with and managing diabetes is like. Many rarely even speak to patients. Digging deeper into the Continue reading >>

Say Goodbye To Finger Sticks: Fda Approves Abbott’s Freestyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System

Say Goodbye To Finger Sticks: Fda Approves Abbott’s Freestyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System

The U.S. FDA has approved Abbott’s FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System as a replacement for blood glucose monitoring (BGM) for adults with diabetes. This revolutionary new glucose sensing technology eliminates the need for routine finger sticks and is the only personal continuous glucose monitor (CGM) that does not require finger stick calibration. Designed to be approachable, accessible and affordable for the 30 million people with diabetes in America, the FreeStyle Libre system reads glucose levels through a sensor that is worn on the back of the upper arm for up to 10 days, making it the longest lasting personal glucose sensor available in the U.S. The BGM replacement indication means that people with diabetes and their physicians can now make treatment decisions based on information from the FreeStyle Libre system, without the need for finger sticks. The cost of the Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System is just a fraction of the cost of other CGM systems currently available. “Today, we are celebrating a breakthrough moment for people with diabetes in the U.S.–an end to the worry and hassles associated with routine finger sticks which have been the standard of glucose testing for more than 40 years,” said Jared Watkin, senior vice president, Diabetes Care, Abbott. “At Abbott, we believe that FreeStyle Libre will transform diabetes management and we’re proud to be at the forefront of innovation that empowers people to take control of their health to live their best lives.” How The Freestyle Libre System Works With the FreeStyle Libre system, people with diabetes can: Self-apply the sensor, which is approximately the size of two stacked quarters, to the back of the upper arm. Capture real-time glucose readings with one-second painless scans of Continue reading >>

Cost-effectiveness Of G5 Mobile Continuous Glucose Monitoring Device Compared To Self-monitoring Of Blood Glucose Alone For People With Type 1 Diabetes From The Canadian Societal Perspective

Cost-effectiveness Of G5 Mobile Continuous Glucose Monitoring Device Compared To Self-monitoring Of Blood Glucose Alone For People With Type 1 Diabetes From The Canadian Societal Perspective

Cost-effectiveness of G5 Mobile continuous glucose monitoring device compared to self-monitoring of blood glucose alone for people with type 1 diabetes from the Canadian societal perspective Accepted author version posted online: 26 Jul 2017 Get access/doi/full/10.1080/13696998.2017.1360312?needAccess=true Aims: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of real-time continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) compared to self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) alone in people with type 1 diabetes (T1DM) using multiple daily injections (MDI) from the Canadian societal perspective. Methods: The IMS CORE Diabetes Model (v.9.0) was used to assess the long-term (50 years) cost-effectiveness of real-time CGM (G5 Mobile CGM System; Dexcom, Inc., San Diego, CA) compared with SMBG alone for a cohort of adults with poorly-controlled T1DM. Treatment effects and baseline characteristics of patients were derived from the DIAMOND randomized controlled clinical trial; all other assumptions and costs were sourced from published research. The accuracy and clinical effectiveness of G5 Mobile CGM is the same as the G4 Platinum CGM used in the DIAMOND randomized clinical trial. Base case assumptions included (a) baseline HbA1c of 8.6%, (b) change in HbA1c of 1.0% for CGM users vs 0.4% for SMBG users, and (c) disutilities of 0.0142 for non-severe hypoglycemic events (NSHEs) and severe hypoglycemic events (SHEs) not requiring medical intervention, and 0.047 for SHEs requiring medical resources. Treatment costs and outcomes were discounted at 1.5% per year. Results: The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for the base case G5 Mobile CGM vs SMBG was $33,789 CAD/quality-adjusted life-year (QALY). Sensitivity analyses showed that base case results were most sensitive to changes in percentage reduction in hyp Continue reading >>

The Cost-effectiveness Of Continuous Glucose Monitoring In Type 1 Diabetes

The Cost-effectiveness Of Continuous Glucose Monitoring In Type 1 Diabetes

Go to: Abstract Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) has been found to improve glucose control in type 1 diabetic patients. We estimated the cost-effectiveness of CGM versus standard glucose monitoring in type 1 diabetes. This societal cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) was conducted in trial populations in which CGM has produced a significant glycemic benefit (A1C ≥7.0% in a cohort of adults aged ≥25 years and A1C <7.0% in a cohort of all ages). Trial data were integrated into a simulation model of type 1 diabetes complications. The main outcome was the cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained. RESULTS During the trials, CGM patients experienced an immediate quality-of-life benefit (A1C ≥7.0% cohort: 0.70 quality-adjusted life-weeks [QALWs], P = 0.49; A1C <7.0% cohort: 1.39 QALWs, P = 0.04) and improved glucose control. In the long-term, CEA for the A1C ≥7.0% cohort, CGM was projected to reduce the lifetime probability of microvascular complications; the average gain in QALYs was 0.60. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was $98,679/QALY (95% CI −60,000 [fourth quadrant] to −87,000 [second quadrant]). For the A1C <7.0% cohort, the average gain in QALYs was 1.11. The ICER was $78,943/QALY (15,000 [first quadrant] to −291,000 [second quadrant]). If the benefit of CGM had been limited to the long-term effects of improved glucose control, the ICER would exceed $700,000/QALY. If test strip use had been two per day with CGM long term the ICER for CGM would improve significantly. Long-term projections indicate that CGM is cost-effective among type 1 diabetic patients at the $100,000/QALY threshold, although considerable uncertainty surrounds these estimates. Continue reading >>

Continuous Glucose Monitoring

Continuous Glucose Monitoring

With Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM), you get a more complete picture of your glucose levels, which can lead to better treatment decisions and better glucose control. Without diabetes, your body tracks glucose levels all day and night to ensure the right amount of insulin is released at the right time. To successfully manage diabetes, a monitoring system is needed to consistently check your glucose levels. The most common glucose monitoring solutions are blood glucose meters and continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) systems. Sensor overtape not shown in depiction How Does CGM Work? CGM is a way to measure glucose levels in real-time throughout the day and night. A tiny electrode called a glucose sensor is inserted under the skin to measure glucose levels in tissue fluid. It is connected to a transmitter that sends the information via wireless radio frequency to a monitoring and display device. The device can detect and notify you if your glucose is reaching a high or low limit. The latest Medtronic CGM systems can actually alert you before you reach your glucose limits. CGM systems usually consist of a glucose sensor, a transmitter, and a small external monitor to view your glucose levels. MiniMed insulin pumps have built-in CGM so the information can be conveniently seen on your pump screen. The CGM monitor or insulin pump is small, discreet, and easy-to-wear. It can be attached to your belt, hidden in your pocket, or placed under your clothing. This component will show your current glucose levels and your historical glucose trends. It also notifies you before you reach your low or high glucose limits and if your glucose level rises or falls too quickly. The CGM transmitter is a small, lightweight device that attaches to the glucose sensor, gathers your glucose data, Continue reading >>

What Is The Cost Of A Continuous Glucose Monitor For Diabetes?

What Is The Cost Of A Continuous Glucose Monitor For Diabetes?

Diabetes mellitus (MEL-ih-tus), often referred to as diabetes, is characterized by high blood glucose (sugar) levels that result from the body’s inability to produce enough insulin and/or effectively utilize the insulin. Diabetes is a serious, life-long condition and the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism (the body's way of digesting food and converting it into energy). There are three forms of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that accounts for five- to 10-percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes. Type 2 diabetes may account for 90- to 95-percent of all diagnosed cases. The third type of diabetes occurs in pregnancy and is referred to as gestational diabetes. Left untreated, gestational diabetes can cause health issues for pregnant women and their babies. People with diabetes can take preventive steps to control this disease and decrease the risk of further complications. Continue reading >>

Abbotts Freestyle Libre Approved In Us To Replace Routine Fingersticks

Abbotts Freestyle Libre Approved In Us To Replace Routine Fingersticks

Abbotts FreeStyle Libre Approved in US to Replace Routine Fingersticks Launch by end of 2017 in major pharmacies at lower price than other CGMs; No fingerstick calibration needed, 10-day wear, 12-hour warmup The FDA and Abbott finally announced long-awaited US approval of the FreeStyle Libre real-time flash glucose monitoring system. In the US, it is approved for adults with diabetes only. Like the international version, the FreeStyle Libre sensor is considered a replacement for fingersticks it does not require any daily fingerstick calibrations and real-time readings and trends can be used for insulin dosing. FreeStyle Libre will be available in major retail pharmacies across the US by the end of the year ( sign up for updates here ). The cash price without insurance will be far less expensive than other sensors we expect it will be sold for around $120 per month for three sensors, and each reader will be around $60 (one-time purchase). Were not sure how FreeStyle Libre will be reimbursed by insurance, and if it is, what the out-of-pocket spending will be. In the US, FreeStyle Libre has three notable changes: A much longer 12-hour warmup after insertion. Outside the US, FreeStyle Libre is 14-day wear, 1-hour warmup, and does not need a prescription see our 2015 test drive here . The longer warm-up period is definitely the biggest change it means when a new sensor is inserted, FreeStyle Libre will not show any real-time glucose data for the first 12 hours. During this time, users will go back to fingersticks. One option is to put a sensor on just before bed, which will get through much of the 12-hour warm-up for those who sleep close to eight hours or more per night. Another workaround is for users to buy two reader devices, alternate using them, and overlap sensor wea Continue reading >>

Newsflash: Dexcom's Next-gen

Newsflash: Dexcom's Next-gen "platinum" Cgm Approved By Fda!

Bye bye, oval-shaped Dexcom Seven Plus continuous glucose monitor! Hello, next generation Dexcom G4 Platinum CGM that's sleeker, more accurate and for sure looks more like an iPhone than a medical device (!) Today, San Diego, CA-based Dexcom issued a news release announcing that its much-anticipated Dexcom G4 (generation 4) Platinum device has received FDA approval. Here is the FDA approval letter, and a regulatory agency overview of the approval. Along with the rest of the D-community, we've been watching anxiously for this for some time, especially after Dexcom filed with FDA in late March 2012 and the device launched in Europe over the summer. Now, the U.S. approval comes in less than 180 days — way to go on a speedy review process, FDA! Dexcom CEO Terry Gregg says this record-time approval from the FDA on Friday caught the company by surprise, especially since many employees were overseas attending the EASD conference in Berlin. Gregg says that U.S. customers can start placing orders immediately and the new CGM will start shipping to new customers in just 10 days. So what's different from the Dexcom Seven Plus? With the diameter of a human hair, the sensor is 60% smaller but, as before, provides updates every five minutes for up to 7 days. Clinical trial data shows that it's roughly 19% more accurate overall, and as much as 30% more accurate when blood sugars are in the "hypo-range" less than 70 mg/dL. That is HUGE, IMHO. Now, the egg-shaped receiver is replaced with a rectangle-shaped device reminiscent of an iPad Nano. The controls are laid out in an Apple-esque circle with the main button in the middle. A longer CGM sensor transmission range from the previous five feet to as much as 20 feet! (Hallelujah for people like me, who kept walking out of range all the Continue reading >>

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