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Continuous Glucose Monitoring System

The Pros And Cons Of Continuous Glucose Monitoring (cgm)

The Pros And Cons Of Continuous Glucose Monitoring (cgm)

You have probably seen me wearing a small device on my upper arm in a lot of the pictures on this website. That’s my CGM, an instrumental tool in my daily diabetes management. It’s a brilliant piece of equipment and I absolutely love it (most of the time). CGM stands for Continuous Glucose Monitoring. This device makes it possible for me to see my blood glucose readings in (almost) real-time and track historical data. The piece of equipment you see on my arm is a small sensor with an attached transmitter. The CGM then allows me to see my blood sugar levels and how I’m trending on my phone or on the receiver that comes with the CGM. There are currently two CGM systems available for personal use in the US. The Medtronic Enlite and the Dexcom. I got my first Medtronic CGM in December 2012 and wore it every day for 18 months before taking a break. I then ordered my first Dexcom system in August 2016, and that has been my go-to since. There are pros and cons to both CGM systems, and since I’ve worn both, I want to give you my opinion so you can decide if it’s something that would help you manage your diabetes better. Why using a CGM is great Information – You do your blood sugar measurements, you know your body, and you think you have a pretty good idea of what your sugars are up to between measurements. Well, you are most likely wrong. At least, I got a big surprise when I started seeing how my blood sugar actually varied throughout the day, not to mention during the night when I usually don’t test. And that’s why CGM is such an awesome tool, for that in between measurement information. All of a sudden, I could see how certain foods and activities affected my sugars over the next several hours. That information is golden! Also, being able to catch low sugars Continue reading >>

Medtronic Showcases Smartphone-enabled Continuous Glucose Monitoring

Medtronic Showcases Smartphone-enabled Continuous Glucose Monitoring

Medtronic showcases smartphone-enabled continuous glucose monitoring Medtronic has developed a Bluetooth-enabled continuous glucose monitoring system for patients with diabetes, that will connect to an iOS app, Medtronic Global Program Marketing Manager Samantha Katz announced from the stage at Health 2.0 in Santa Clara, California. MobiHealthNews has learned that though the new system is not yet FDA cleared, it will start a "pivotal clinical trial" later this fall. "Weve heard from our customers that they dont like having to carry a separate display device and they feel self-conscious when they use it in public, so we want to address that." Katz said, referencing Medtronic's current CGM offering, the Medtronic Guardian, which uses a custom display device. "Introducing Guardian mobile, Medtronics first CGM system enabled by Bluetooth LE that communicates directly with the users smartphone." Although a number of noncontinuous fingerstick glucometers are smartphone-connected, the race to an app-connected CGM is still in the early stages. Notably, Dexcom filed a patent in January for such a device and Maryland-based Senseonics raised $20 million this summer with an eye onsmartphone-connected CGM. And CGMs have connected to smartphones in research contexts , especially around efforts to develop an "artificial pancreas" by linking CGMs up to insulin pumps. Said Bolorforosh, vice president of global technology at Medtronic, told MobiHealthNews in an email that regulation is a hold up, as is the high standard of accuracy CGMs need to meet for their patients. "With a product like Guardian Mobile, the stakes are higher than your average mobile app because were talking about personal health," he wrote. "And were talking about information related to diabetes, which is a very chal Continue reading >>

Continuous Glucose Monitoring.

Continuous Glucose Monitoring.

Get glucose values continuously. The Animas® Vibe® Insulin Pump is CGM-enabled, which means you have the option to receive glucose readings every 5 minutes on your Animas® Vibe® Insulin Pump, where the data can be viewed and analysed on the pump’s colour display*. Giving you the full picture. The major benefit of having a CGM-enabled insulin pump is that this functionality reveals a complete view of the glucose highs, lows and rates of change over time. This information complements fingerstick testing results and can be used to help guide therapy adjustments.† How it works. CGM components include a Sensor and a Transmitter. The Sensor is a disposable unit that is placed under the skin (the subcutaneous space) of your abdomen or upper buttocks. The Dexcom G4® PLATINUM Sensor continuously measures the glucose levels in your tissues (the interstitial fluid), not in the blood. The Transmitter is a reusable device that snaps into the Sensor Pod. The Transmitter wirelessly sends the sensor-measured glucose readings every 5 minutes to your Animas® Vibe® Insulin Pump, where the data can be viewed and analysed on the pump’s colour display.* CGM doesn’t replace fingerstick testing; rather, it works with it.† With trending graphs and directional arrows, the idea is to use CGM to determine the direction your glucose is headed and how fast, and then use your fingerstick test to figure out your insulin dose. About the sensor. The Dexcom G4® PLATINUM Sensor is a thin wire inserted underneath your skin with the help of an introducer needle. The Sensor is held in place with adhesive, similar to the way your infusion set is attached. CGM readings, measured by the Sensor, are sent from the Transmitter to the Animas® Vibe® Insulin Pump every 5 minutes.* To track how you Continue reading >>

Continuous Glucose Monitoring System For Rodents

Continuous Glucose Monitoring System For Rodents

CONTINUOUS GLUCOSE MONITORING SYSTEMS FOR RATS, PINNACLE TECHNOLOGY CGMS CONTINUOUS GLUCOSE MONITORING SYSTEM FOR RODENTS Pinnacles CONTINUOUS GLUCOSE MONITORING SYSTEM (CGMS) is designed to obtain real-time interstitial glucose measurements in freely moving rodents with one-second temporal resolution. Our turn-key system capitalizes on over 15 years of experience as innovators in preclinical biosensor technology to deliver a simple 17 day+ subcutaneous sensor for use in diabetes and metabolic studies. The sensor is connected to a backpack wireless Bluetooth Transmitter. Combine this with our user-configurable CGMS software for remote monitoring and easy analysis. The glucose sensor penetrates the animals subcutaneous space on the dorsal surface and is held in place with four surgical sutures A low-powered, wireless potentiostat applies a bias and transmits up to two digitized signals to a Bluetooth USB dongle and Pinnacles Sirenia Acquisition software. .A durable, tear-resistant, water-resistant pouch houses the electronics and battery. The system uses a jacket to secure the pouch and stabilize the sensor. Continue reading >>

How Much Does Continuous Glucose Monitoring Cost?

How Much Does Continuous Glucose Monitoring Cost?

How much does continuous glucose monitoring cost? / How much does continuous glucose monitoring cost? Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) cost and insurance coverage. Does that phrase make your head spin? These were hot issues in response to our last articlewhere I asked about your experience with CGMs . Like anything were considering, the financial impact is a big part of the decision-making process. But because the cost depends so much on your insurance coverage, it can be confusing to find out how much youll end up paying. And maybe its just me, but I dont like talking to my health insurance company. It feels complicated and Im rarely confident in the information I get. Additionally, the information changes depending on when during the benefit year I call. Typically (in the U.S.), health insurance policies are done on an annual basis, and things like deductibles and out-of-pocket maximums, which act like thresholds, are reset. Youll usually find your cost to be lower later in the benefit year after theyve been met (even $0 in some cases). For many, the benefit year is the same as a calendar year, so the end of the year might be a smart time to ask about your coverage again. You might be in for a pleasant surprise for the holidays! We also have to keep in mind that each employers policy can be different, even with the same insurance company. So even though you and your neighbor both have health insurance from the same company, your individual coverage may be different because you work for different employers. But rather than thinking of all this complexity as a barrier and feeling intimidated by it, I believe it creates an opportunity to leverage companies like Dexcom . They have people whose full-time jobs are to dive into our insurance plans and uncover the details Continue reading >>

Continuous Glucose Monitoring System In Children With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis

Continuous Glucose Monitoring System In Children With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis

, Volume 51, Issue2 , pp 233240 | Cite as Continuous Glucose Monitoring System in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus: a systematic review and meta-analysis We investigated the potential effects of the Continuous Glucose Monitoring System (CGMS), as compared with self-monitoring of blood glucose, on glycaemic control in children with type 1 diabetes. The following electronic databases were searched throughout June 2007: MEDLINE, EMBASE and The Cochrane Library. Additional references were obtained from reviewed articles. Only randomised controlled trials were included. We included five trials involving 131 type 1 diabetic patients in the study. Combined data from all trials showed that the CGMS did not significantly reduce HbA1c levels compared with control groups. The pooled weighted mean difference was 0.02% (95% CI 0.29 to 0.25) with a fixed model and remained insignificant in the random effect model. Sensitivity analysis determined that the findings were stable. There was a trend towards a longer time under the CGMS curve for glucose <3.89mmol/l in the CGMS group compared with the control group (mean difference 49.00min, 95% CI 18.00 to 116.00). The CGMS significantly increased the number of insulin dose changes per patient per month for those managed with CGMS compared with the control groups (mean difference 6.3 changes, 95% CI 2.889.72). The Continuous Glucose Monitoring System is not better than self-monitoring of blood glucose with regard to improvement of metabolic control among type 1 diabetic children. However, due to the small number of participants and methodological limitations of the studies included, findings of this meta-analysis should be interpreted with caution. AdolescentCGMSChildContinuous glucose monitoringHaemoglobin A1cHbA1cMeta-analysisRand Continue reading >>

Iot-based Continuous Glucose Monitoring System: A Feasibility Study

Iot-based Continuous Glucose Monitoring System: A Feasibility Study

IoT-based continuous glucose monitoring system: A feasibility study Author links open overlay panel Tuan NguyenGia1 Health monitoring systems based on Internet-of-things (IoT) have been recently introduced to improve the quality of health care services. However, the number of advanced IoT-based continuous glucose monitoring systems is small and the existing systems have several limitations. In this paper we study feasibility of invasive and continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) system utilizing IoT based approach. We designed an IoT-based system architecture from a sensor device to a back-end system for presenting real-time glucose, body temperature and contextual data (i.e. environmental temperature) in graphical and human-readable forms to end-users such as patients and doctors. In addition, nRF communication protocol is customized for suiting to the glucose monitoring system and achieving a high level of energy efficiency. Furthermore, we investigate energy consumption of the sensor device and design energy harvesting units for the device. Finally, the work provides many advanced services at a gateway level such as a push notification service for notifying patient and doctors in case of abnormal situations (i.e. too low or too high glucose level). The results show that our system is able to achieve continuous glucose monitoring remotely in real-time. In addition, the results reveal that a high level of energy efficiency can be achieved by applying the customized nRF component, the power management unit and the energy harvesting unit altogether in the sensor device. Continue reading >>

Fda Approves Dexcom G5 Mobile Continuous Glucose Monitoring System

Fda Approves Dexcom G5 Mobile Continuous Glucose Monitoring System

FDA Approves Dexcom G5 Mobile Continuous Glucose Monitoring System Dexcom, Inc. a leader in continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) for patients with diabetes, announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the Dexcom G5 Mobile Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) System. With wireless Bluetooth technology built into the device transmitter, the G5 Mobile CGM System is the first and only fully mobile CGM system approved by the FDA for both adults and children as young as 2 years of age that sends glucose data directly to a smartphone, freeing users from the need to carry a separate receiver. The new transmitter securely sends vital glucose information directly to an app on iOS-enabled devices for real-time diabetes management. Android applications will follow early next year. Like its predecessor, the G4 PLATINUM CGM with Share, users can also select up to five designated recipients, or followers. These followers can remotely monitor a patients glucose information and receive alert notifications from almost anywhere. The G5 Mobile system is anticipated to begin shipping in late September 2015. All purchasers of a G4 Platinum with Share system from August 1, 2015, until the G5 Mobile system is shipped, will be eligible to receive a no-cost upgrade to the G5 Mobile system. There will be a low cost cash upgrade to the G5 Mobile system for those patients who are still under warranty with their existing system. This iframe contains the logic required to handle Ajax powered Gravity Forms. Disclaimer: By signing up for Diabetes Education and Supply Center of the Midlands materials, you consent to receiving our regular education and communication information, which may include paid advertising. We do not pass on or share your data with any external com Continue reading >>

Continuous Glucose Monitoring

Continuous Glucose Monitoring

Lee Herold,DVM, DACVECC,discusses the advantages of using a continuous glucose monitor in the ICU setting and dispels some myths about this technology. Home All Article Continuous Glucose Monitoring Here in the ICU at DoveLewis, we have the opportunity to treat many patients with diabetic ketoacidosis either due to newly diagnosed diabetes or disregulation of a previously diagnosed diabetic patient. Previously diagnosed diabetics can become ketotic because of changing insulin needs or the development of insulin antagonistic conditions. Patients with ketoacidosis who are sick require hospitalization, Regular insulin therapy, nutritional support, acid base and electrolyte monitoring and intensive glucose monitoring to reverse their ketoacidotic state. This often means spending 3-5 days in the ICU. During that time, glucose monitoring every 1-2 hours is required in the initial 1-3 days to guide Regular insulin therapy. This frequent glucose monitoring can be achieved by several methods - each with their advantages and disadvantages. The first method of serial glucose monitoring is to perform serial peripheral venous blood sampling (saphenous, cephalic, or auricular vein sampling). This method requires no specialized equipment and is easy to perform, but a significant disadvantage of this method is caused by the discomfort of serial and frequent blood sampling for the patient. After 1-2 days of hourly to every other hour sampling, these small veins can become bruised or thrombosed limiting their usefulness for vascular access or further blood sampling. The second method to achieve frequent serial glucose monitoring that eliminates some disadvantages posed by peripheral collections is the placement of a central or peripheral blood sampling catheter. The placement of a sampl Continue reading >>

Continuous Glucose Monitoring: A Movie Is Worth A Thousand Pictures A Review Of The Medtronic Guardian Real-time System

Continuous Glucose Monitoring: A Movie Is Worth A Thousand Pictures A Review Of The Medtronic Guardian Real-time System

A Review of the Medtronic Guardian REAL-time system The expression information is power is especially true for diabetics seeking tight blood glucose control using either multiple daily injections of insulin (MDI) or insulin pumps. Using these therapies, you can decide how much short-acting insulin to take four, six, eight, or even more times per day, based upon the corresponding four or six or eight blood glucose readings you take using finger sticks. Imagine how much blood glucose readings might improve if your blood glucose was automatically measured and displayed every five minutes, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Well, you dont need to imagine it, it is here, and is known as a continuous glucose monitoring system, or CGMS. Medtronic is one of a small handful of companies offering a continuous glucose monitoring system, and they recently released their latest product, the Medtronic Guardian REAL-Time CGMS. With the Guardian REAL-Time, you can follow the trend of your blood glucose up and down throughout the day and night in response to different foods, exercise, and insulin doses. Knowing what direction blood glucose is trending can be at least as important, if not more important, than knowing your current blood glucose reading. As Gary Fox of Med-tronic says the biggest advantage is the education you get from the Guardian REAL-Time regarding how different foods, stress and other activities impact your blood sugar. The data obtained from CGMS can be compared to watching a movie of blood glucose readings throughout the day, whereas the data from finger sticks taken four or six times a day is like viewing individual snapshots. A single snapshot may be misleading if what occurred prior to the picture is not known. For instance, if you are getting ready for bed and d Continue reading >>

How Does A Continuous Glucose Monitor Work?

How Does A Continuous Glucose Monitor Work?

Glucose meters are a great tool, but sometimes you need to keep a closer eye on your blood sugar levels. That's where a device called a continuous glucose monitor (CGM) can help. This FDA-approved system tracks your blood sugar levels day and night. It collects readings automatically every 5 to 15 minutes. It can help detect trends and patterns that give you and your doctor a more complete picture of your diabetes. The data can help you find ways to better manage your condition. Several devices are available for adults and children. You need a prescription from your doctor to get one. CGM measures the amount of glucose in the fluid inside your body. Different devices collect the information in different manners using tiny sensors. In some cases, the sensor is placed under the skin of your belly in a quickly and painless fashion or, it can be adhered to the back of your arm. A transmitter on the sensor then sends the information to a wireless-pager-like monitor that you can clip on your belt. The monitor displays your sugar levels at 1-, 5-, 10-, or 15-minute intervals. If your sugar drops to a dangerously low level or a high preset level, the monitor will sound an alarm. In the past, only doctors could see the readings CGM systems collected. Now anyone can use the devices as part of at-home diabetes care. You can download data on your computer, tablet, or smartphone to see patterns and trends in your sugar levels. The information can help you and your doctor make the best plan for managing your diabetes, including: The number of meals and snacks you need each day CGM doesn’t replace traditional home monitors. You’ll still need to measure your blood sugar with a regular glucose meter a few times a day to help the monitor stay accurate. Most monitors still require a f Continue reading >>

What Is A Continuous Glucose Monitor (cgm)?

What Is A Continuous Glucose Monitor (cgm)?

A certified diabetes educator and member of the OTD advisory board tells you what you need to know about using a continuous glucose monitor, also called a CGM. What is a CGM? A continuous glucose monitor (also called CGM or sensor) is a diabetes device that is inserted and worn under the skin for a specified number of days that can read and record glucose readings every few minutes. A CGM can be worn by people with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Due to the constant, real-time blood glucose monitoring enabled by a CGM, many people with diabetes report better glucose control which often goes hand-in-hand with an improved quality of life. Components of the CGM There are 3 basic parts of a continuous glucose monitor: The sensor. This is a disposable piece—usually a very small wire that is inserted under the skin. The sensor reads the glucose in the fluid under the skin and gives a reading. Wear times vary depending on the manufacturing company. Typically, 7-14 day wear. The transmitter. This reusable piece captures the sensor readings and sends them to another device for the wearer to see it. It works via radio frequency or is Bluetooth enabled. The receiver. This is the device that communicates with the transmitter to display the glucose readings from the sensor. Today's CGMs: Many Variations There are 5 different type of CGMs on the market today—not every version is designed to be integrated with an insulin pump. Some people with diabetes monitor their blood sugars using a CGM, finger pricks and insulin shots. Medtronic, Tandem, Animas, Dexcom and Abbott all make personal CGMs for home use. Learn more by visiting their websites, listed below. The t:slim X2 insulin pump by Tandem Diabetes (now compatible with the Dexcom G5 CGM) Animas Vibe insulin pump (Note: As of D Continue reading >>

Diagnostics | Free Full-text | Continuous Glucose Monitoring Systems: A Review

Diagnostics | Free Full-text | Continuous Glucose Monitoring Systems: A Review

Diagnostics 2013, 3(4), 385-412; Continuous Glucose Monitoring Systems: A Review HSG-IMITInstitut fr Mikro-und Informationstechnik, Georges-Koehler-Allee 103, 79100, Freiburg, Germany Received: 5 July 2013 / Revised: 10 October 2013 / Accepted: 17 October 2013 / Published: 29 October 2013 There have been continuous advances in the field of glucose monitoring during the last four decades, which have led to the development of highly evolved blood glucose meters, non-invasive glucose monitoring (NGM) devices and continuous glucose monitoring systems (CGMS). Glucose monitoring is an integral part of diabetes management, and the maintenance of physiological blood glucose concentration is the only way for a diabetic to avoid life-threatening diabetic complications. CGMS have led to tremendous improvements in diabetic management, as shown by the significant lowering of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in adults with type I diabetes. Most of the CGMS have been minimally-invasive, although the more recent ones are based on NGM techniques. This manuscript reviews the advances in CGMS for diabetes management along with the future prospects and the challenges involved. View Full-Text Continue reading >>

Continuous Glucose Monitoring System

Continuous Glucose Monitoring System

To view the current medical policy, please click the link below: To view previous versions of this policy that are now expired, please click on the links below: The following procedure/CPT/HCPCS codes are included in this policy: 95250, 95251, A9277, A9278, 250.01, 250.02, 250.03, 648.00, 648.03, E10.9, E11.65, E10.65, 024.319, 024.911, 024.912, 024.913 Moved the previously existing version of this policy in the "previous" section and added a link to the current policy version. Moved the previously existing version of this policy in the "previous" section and added a link to the current policy version. Added a link to the 90-day notice version of this policy. Replaced the link to the 90-day policy with a link to the clean, current policy version and moved the previous version into the "previous" section. Added a link to the clean, current policy version and moved the previous version into the "previous" section. Added a link to the new 90-day notice version of this policy, effective 04/01/2016. Added a link to the new, current policy (which replaced the 90-day notice) and moved the expired policy into the previous section. The 90-day notice policy was removed. Added a link to the new 90-day notice version of this policy, effective 04/01/2017. Added a link to the clean, current policy effective 4/1/17 (which replaced the 90-day notice) and moved the expired policy into the previous section. The 90-day notice policy was removed. Added a link to the new 90-day notice version of this policy, effective 04/01/2018. Added a link to the clean, current policy effective 4/1/17 (which replaced the 90-day notice) and moved the expired policy into the previous section. The 90-day notice policy was removed. Added a new link to the clean, current policy (effective 08/29/2018) and mov Continue reading >>

Continuous Glucose Monitoring

Continuous Glucose Monitoring

Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) is a means of measuring glucose levels continuously in order to gain insight into patterns and trends in glucose levels throughout the day and night. A Continuous Glucose Monitoring System sensor is worn separately to the pump, inserted under the skin, and measures the level of glucose in the interstitial fluid (fluid in the tissue). The sensor is disposable and changed according to manufacturer recommendations. The cost of CGM including consumables (sensors) is around $5,000 per year. CGM can sound an alarm if the glucose level is changing rapidly. A “hypo” or the trend towards a “hypo” can trigger an alarm alerting the user or family/carer to treat immediately. "Hypo" refers to hypoglycaemia, when the blood glucose level has dropped too low. Alerts can prevent a hypo before it happens and is particularly useful overnight when parents and children are in separate rooms. During the 2016 Federal Election, the Government committed to subsidise continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) technology to assist children and young adults under 21 years of age who face extra challenges managing their type 1 diabetes. Diabetes Australia strongly advocated for CGM funding and has been working constructively with the Federal Government and the Department of Health to ensure the initiative is implemented successfully. The Diabetes Australia funding submission can be read here. The Australian Government is now providing access to subsidised continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) products through the National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS). Visit the NDSS website to find out more. There are several continuous glucose monitoring systems available in Australia for people living who require insulin to manage their diabetes. These include: Continue reading >>

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