diabetestalk.net

Continuous Glucose Monitoring Iphone

Apple Watch Vs Diabetes: The Glucose Monitoring Story So Far

Apple Watch Vs Diabetes: The Glucose Monitoring Story So Far

Apple Watch vs diabetes: The glucose monitoring story so far How Apple's smartwatch could evolve into a smarter health device For as long as the Apple Watch has been rumoured, there have been murmurs that the company will one day build a wearable that is capable of offering continuous glucose monitoring. Suffice it to say, that would be a big deal for a lot of people not just diabetics. The Apple Watch isn't quite there yet in terms of offering this serious health tracking feature, but it seems as if it's working to try and make it happen. Essential reading: Apple Watch Series 4 investigation As Apple continues to make a bigger push into health, we explore how the smartwatch is already working with glucose monitoring devices, the challenges Tim Cook and company face to offer the monitoring from its its own wearable and how it could actually take shape. If you're looking to check your glucose right now, there is a way to do this with the Apple Watch. All you need is a device from Dexcom, the biggest name in continuous glucose monitoring these days. Specifically, you'll need the Dexcom G5 CGM mobile system, which will pair with the Dexcom G5 Mobile app. You'll then be able to see your glucose levels right there on your Watch. Eventually, Dexcom plans to upgrade its app for watchOS 4 support, which will take advantage of core Bluetooth to pair your Dexcom device directly with your Apple Watch. That way you won't need your iPhone to act as an intermediary. Read this: How wearables are helping the lives of diabetics It's been a couple months since watchOS 4 dropped, so it's easy to wonder whether Fitbit's deal with Dexcom has killed the Apple Watch update, but it's likely the watchOS 4 support has been held up by the FDA (we'll get back around to this in a bit). There's als Continue reading >>

Dexcom G5 Cgm, Iphone, And Apple Watch: Your Questions Answered

Dexcom G5 Cgm, Iphone, And Apple Watch: Your Questions Answered

Dexcom G5 CGM, iPhone, and Apple Watch: Your Questions Answered Dexcom released their highly-anticipated G5 continuous glucose monitor (CGM) for diabetes in September 2015. As the firstCGM (ever!) that transmits glucose data directly to the iPhone, theres been a lot of excitement about the revolutionary new device. Theres also been a LOT of questions, and weve collected official (and unofficial) answers to all of them. [divider]The Basics of the Dexcom G5 Mobile CGM System[/divider] 1.Whats the main difference between the Dexcom G5 and the G4 with Share? The G4 with Share was the first system to allow sugars to be displayed on an iPhone or Apple Watch, but this required thereceiver to be nearby. (Here, the iPhone is acting like another display to the receiver). TheG5s key difference is that the user no longer has to carry around theirreceiver, because the iPhone canfunction alone as a receiver. Keep in mind that both the G5 and G4 uses the exact same G4 sensor, but they have a different transmitter. (Confused yet? Hope this picture helps) 2. What are the subtle, more technical differences between the Dexcom G5 and G4 with Share? As described above, the onlydifference is a new transmitter that comes with the G5. (Confusingly, the G5 System ships with G4 sensors anda G4 with Share receiver.) This new G5 transmitter is just a tad thicker and transmits sugar readings viabluetooth tomultiple devices (such as an iPhoneandG4 receiver with Share). It also has a shorter lifespan (estimated at 3 months). The older G4 transmitter transmits via radio frequency toone device (must be a G4 receiver or G4 receiver with Share). The G4 transmitter is estimated to last 6 months. 2. If the G5 CGM doesnt need the Receiver, thenwhy does itstill come with a G4 Receiver with Share? The FDA in Continue reading >>

Fitbit Announces Deal To Bring Glucose Monitoring Data To Its Ionic Smartwatch

Fitbit Announces Deal To Bring Glucose Monitoring Data To Its Ionic Smartwatch

Fitbit Announces Deal to Bring Glucose Monitoring Data to its Ionic Smartwatch Friday September 8, 2017 3:48 AM PDT by Tim Hardwick Fitbit has announced a new partnership with glucose monitoring device company Dexcom that is set to bring diabetes monitoring capabilities to the fitness tracker company's new Ionic smartwatch. The deal initially means Ionic users will be able to connect a Dexcom device to the Fitbit app and seamlessly transfer up-to-date glucose level data to the smartwatch, making the information more easily accessible on their wrist. "The collaboration between Dexcom and Fitbit is an important step in providing useful information to people with diabetes that is both convenient and discreet," said Kevin Sayer, President and CEO, Dexcom. "We believe that providing Dexcom CGM data on Fitbit Ionic, and making that experience available to users of both Android and iOS devices, will have a positive impact on the way people manage their diabetes." There's nothing in the partnership to suggest the Ionic smartwatch will be able to give continuous glucose monitoring readouts on its own when it's released next month current continuous glucose monitoring systems require a small sensor that's worn under the skin to monitor glucose levels but Fitbit shares jumped 13 percent on the news, a high for the company since January, when it laid off some of its employees and announced its smartwatch plans. Dexcom also has a deal with Apple to bring its features to the Apple Watch this year, while owners of Dexcom monitors can already view their glucose data on an Apple Watch advanced devices by Dexcom include a transmitter, which can display glucose information directly to an iPhone app. Apple is thought to be working on a non-invasive real-time glucose monitor for a future v Continue reading >>

Dexcom G5 Mobile Cgm System Components

Dexcom G5 Mobile Cgm System Components

The first FDA-approved CGM System that lets you make treatment decisions without pricking your finger.* The Dexcom G5® Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) System provides real-time glucose readings for patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes every five minutes. With Dexcom G5 Mobile, dynamic glucose data can be accessed and shared safely and conveniently anywhere, anytime to your smart device.† The Dexcom G5 Mobile - the first CGM system approved for adults and pediatric patients two years of age and older. *Dexcom CGM-based treatment requires fingersticks for calibration; may result in hypoglycemia if calibration not performed or symptoms/expectations do not match CGM readings. Continue reading >>

Dexcom G5 Mobile On The Appstore

Dexcom G5 Mobile On The Appstore

I want to love dexcom, but the phone app is disastrous, inadequate mess. 1) The button to update your blood sugar keeps disappearing, I have to wait until whenever the button returns and re-test, wasting strips. I have to walk around uncalibrated with inaccurate numbers at least four days a week due to this. 2) Almost all test machines give readings up to 500 or 600, dexcom only goes to 400. Sometimes I have no idea what my blood sugar is because dexcom just says "high." The scale MUST go to at least 500, it simply doesn't match to other products in the industry and people like me with recurrent hyperglycemia really need that information. 3) The fact that you can only set 100 as your urgent low is AWFUL. I drop super quickly, if I find out I'm low at 100, I have roughly five minutes to correct that before I become incapacitated. Dexcom needs to allow users to set their low alert wherever they need it. It's not inclusive to create software only for well controlled people. This has been the biggest disappointment of the dexcom and it almost defeats the purpose of having I. I only know what's happening once it's already dangerous. Why even have it? 4) Also, I know the paper in the sensor packages states the missing alarm for quick drops and urgent lows is fixed, but I still have this problem. Dexcom is SO PERSISTENT about highs and so touch and go about lows, which need more urgent addressing! Inexcusable. Thank you for taking the time to leave a review. We'd like to follow up with you. If you'd like a member of our Team to reach out, please send your contact information along with your app store username or review to [email protected], and we will be in touch directly. Thank you! Frustrating issues especially with Apple Watch I love my Dexcom but there are a number o Continue reading >>

Continuous Glucose Monitors (cgms)

Continuous Glucose Monitors (cgms)

What They Do: Continuous glucose monitors (CGMs) monitor the body’s glucose levels in real-time by sensing the glucose present in tissue fluid (also called interstitial fluid). Glucose is another word for sugar. Whereas a meter provides a measurement of the blood glucose at a specific moment in time, a CGM provides an overview of the blood glucose levels over a period of time. An apt analogy is that a meter is similar to a photo – providing a single blood sugar “snap shot.” A CGM, however, is like a video, providing a constant stream of information on your glucose levels throughout the day. CGMs provide a good way to monitor time spent “in range” (time spent within a normal, pre-specified blood sugar range), and can warn users if they are trending towards hypo or hyperglycemia. They are particularly useful at night, as they can sound an alert if glucose levels drop. CGMs typically need to be calibrated with a fingerstick blood sugar reading for optimal sensor accuracy. What Supplies Do I Need? CGMs require three basic parts: Sensor – monitors glucose levels, inserted under the skin Transmitter – sends glucose information to the receiver, attached to body Receiver – displays glucose level trends. For some products (e.g. Dexcom CGM), the patient carries the receiver (which is not attached to the body). For others (e.g. Medtronic Paradigm/MiniMed CGMs), the CGM is combined with an insulin pump Useful Links: What’s Coming in CGM Technology in 2016 and Beyond? – Dexcom’s new insertion, Android G5, touchscreen receiver; Medtronic’s Android MiniMed Connect, Hypo Prediction App, 670G, and Guardian Connect. TEST DRIVE: Dexcom G5 Mobile - CGM on Your Phone, Receiver Optional – More flexible data viewing, customizable alarms, excellent Clarity analysis Continue reading >>

Smartphone App Hits Europe For Abbotts Continuous Glucose Monitor

Smartphone App Hits Europe For Abbotts Continuous Glucose Monitor

Smartphone app hits Europe for Abbotts continuous glucose monitor Abbott announced Feb. 7 the FreeStyle LibreLink smartphone applicationto be used alongside the companys continuous glucose monitoris now available to iPhone and Android users in 12 European countries. The app allows diabetic patients to access their glucose data directly on their smartphones. Previously, they would need to carry a separate, handheld device to scan the FreeStyle Libre sensor and get a glucose reading. By holding their smartphone near the sensor, users can view real-time glucose levels, eight-hour glucose history and how their glucose is changing. They can also add notes to track food, insulin use, medication and exercise, and share information with healthcare professionals and caregivers through related applications, according to a press release . "We're committed to bringing life-changing technology and tools to liberate people from the many hassles of diabetes management," said Jared Watkin, Abbotts senior vice president of diabetes care. "The FreeStyle LibreLink app is a digital health tool that integrates glucose data directly on a smartphone so everything is all in one place. This is another step forward in making glucose monitoring seamlessly fit into a patient's daily lifestylehelping them live a fuller, healthier life." The app is freely available to people in Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Spain, Sweden, Netherlands, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. Abbott said it is working to provide mobile apps to other countries based on their specific regulatory approval processes. The FreeStyle Libre system was approved by the FDA in September. At the time, Watkin said the approval represented an end to the worry and hassles associated with routine finger sti Continue reading >>

Medicares Smartphone Restriction Of Dexcom G5 Hurts Patients

Medicares Smartphone Restriction Of Dexcom G5 Hurts Patients

Medicares Smartphone Restriction of Dexcom G5 Hurts Patients When I first wrote about Medicares guidance in covering the Dexcom G5 Continuous Glucose Monitor (CGM), I worried that their wording suggested that using a smartphone as a secondary display would disallow Medicare coverage. But even then, I thought there was no way this limitation would actually be enforced Until a Dexcom rep came into my office and told me that Medicare transmitters would start shipping soon. These transmitters would be hard-coded to prevent pairing with the Dexcom G5 smartphone app. I was flooredand incensed at the same time: Medicare required Dexcom to build custom transmitters that forbid users from using their smartphones! While CGM approval by Dexcom is a huge win overall (it really is), restricting smartphone integration isabsolutely ridiculous. Heres why: Smartphones Make the Dexcom G5 Better, and No Worse The Dexcom G5 Mobile system always ships with a receiver, even before Medicare got involved. The system is a fully functional medical device without a smartphone. Using an iPhone (or any supported smartphone) as a receiver improves the experience greatly and simplifies the cloud sharing process, but its completely optional. Not only is the iPhone optional, it actually duplicates the functionality of the receiver, meaning that you can still use both a standard receiver and a smartphone at the same time. Adding a smartphone to the G5 equationonly offers benefit. It does not change the functionality of the standard G5 components in any way. To help convey howridiculous it is to restrict smartphone use, consider a backup camera for your car. If youve ever used one, you know how amazing they are. For many tasks, the backup camera offers a better user experience than just using your rear Continue reading >>

Will Apple’s New Iphone Monitor Blood Sugar Levels—without Pricking Your Skin?

Will Apple’s New Iphone Monitor Blood Sugar Levels—without Pricking Your Skin?

Not all Apple product rumors are equal. Speculation that the headphone jack will reappear with the iPhone 8 has been rightly ridiculed. But the evidence Apple will introduce a glucose monitoring device is worthy of our interest. “Glucose monitoring” is a code word for fighting the growing scourge of type 2 diabetes. Unlike type 1 diabetes, which is unpreventable, the type 2 variety is, to be polite, a “lifestyle” disease, meaning we eat too much and don’t exercise enough. (As usual, the French are more brutal: for them, Type 2 is diabète gras, “fat diabetes.”) A 2016 Harvard School of Public Health study places the global cost of type 2 diabetes at $825 billion per year and growing [as always, edits and emphasis mine]: … in the last 35 years, global diabetes among men has more than doubled—from 4.3% in 1980 to 9% in 2014—after adjusting for the effect of aging. Meanwhile diabetes among women has risen from 5% in 1980 to 7.9% in 2014. This rise translates as 422 million adults in the world with diabetes in 2014—which has nearly quadrupled since 1980 (108 million). In theory, there is, of course, an “easy” remedy: Eat less and exercise more…for the rest of your life. A healthy lifestyle adds days to one’s life, and life to one’s days. Easier nagged than done. In reality, a growing percentage of the human population keeps growing. Enter blood glucose monitoring. Devices that tell you your blood sugar concentration, once the province of the lab, have moved into the home. With just a minuscule drop of blood—as little as 0.3 microliters—you can get an answer in seconds. The subject is immediately alerted to an anomalous rise in blood sugar, a circumstance that could result in limb amputation, blindness, and kidney failure if left untreated Continue reading >>

Dexcom Ceo Talks ‘game Changer’ Diabetes Management Coming To Apple Watch

Dexcom Ceo Talks ‘game Changer’ Diabetes Management Coming To Apple Watch

With the upcoming watchOS 4 update for Apple Watch slated to bring new features for diabetes management devices, we took some time to speak with Dexcom’s CEO Kevin Sayer this week about what it means for users. When Apple revealed watchOS 4 at its Worldwide Developers Conference this month, it featured Dexcom, makers of the G5 Continuous Glucose Monitor (CGM) popular among iPhone users, on stage as an example of an Apple Watch app that will benefit from new features in the release. Sayer shared details on how exactly Dexcom devices will improve from these new features in watchOS 4, and more specifically why CoreBluetooth support will be a “game changer” for Apple Watch users with diabetes. We also learned from Sayer about the next-generation of the company’s popular G5 CGM coming soon. And we had to ask about the chatter prior to WWDC that Apple is reportedly developing its own glucose monitoring technology, to find out his thoughts on the possibility of such features being built directly into future Apple Watch models. Dexcom’s G5 CGM already works with both the iPhone and Apple Watch, but currently the G5’s signal has to go to the iPhone first before syncing data to Apple Watch. That means the data on Apple Watch is a bit delayed, and it also means you must have your iPhone around if you’re on the go and want to continue syncing data. With new support for CoreBluetooth in watchOS 4, the G5 CGM will make a direct connection: The way we architected our transmitter to transmit this glucose data many years ago is there is two Bluetooth channels…so it could communicate with two devices at the same time… because our sensor talks to Android phones as well, it also speaks with certain models of insulin pumps … an Apple patient now with this Watch direct co Continue reading >>

Dexcom G5 Mobile Continuous Glucose Monitoring System Review

Dexcom G5 Mobile Continuous Glucose Monitoring System Review

Dexcom has been the leader in the continuous glucose monitoring market for many years. They always seem to be ahead of the game in terms of technology, and the newest addition to the Dexcom family is just that and more. Before we continue with this article, I wanted to let you know we have researched and compiled science-backed ways to stick to your diet and reverse your diabetes. Want to check out our insights? Download our free PDF Guide Power Foods to Eat here. Their recent release of their G5 system provides users with a variety of features to help make managing your diabetes care much more simple. G5 is the same system as their previous G4 GGM system but it no longer requires a receiver. The transmitter works over a Bluetooth signal which can be picked up by a smartphone with an installed Dexcom application. The phone now acts as the receiver to display all information and alarms. Controlling Type 2 Diabetes Through Diet Experts Panel Not a lot has changed in terms of the G4 and G5, the sensors are the same, calibrations are still required a minimum of two times a day. The accuracy is still the same as the G4, as well as the trend display settings. So what is the benefit of the G5 over the G4 system? Lets discuss: To understand what the G5 system really is you first need to understand that it features four different components to it. CGM Sensor: The CGM sensor for the G5 system is the same as the G4 Platinum sensor. It is inserted into the skin for up to 7 days. The sensor still requires that you check your blood sugar two times a day to calibrate the system. I can attest that weve checked a little more with my youngest who is currently wearing the G5 system. This has helped to improve the overall accuracy of the sensor even more. G5 Transmitter: The G5 transmitte Continue reading >>

New Glucose Monitor Will Talk To Your Smartphone

New Glucose Monitor Will Talk To Your Smartphone

We're sorry, an error occurred. We are unable to collect your feedback at this time. However, your feedback is important to us. Please try again later. Here's a product description for you: an accurate, non-invasive continuous glucose monitor that talks to your iPhone, and will call someone if the CGM alarms and you don't respond. Sounds like something you might have heard about in our annual DiabetesMine Design Contest , isn't it? Well, guess again! It's a product actually under production by the folks at C8 MediSensors , a San Jose-based company. If you're wondering why you've never heard of them, C8 MediSensors has been in "stealth mode" since 2003, working on a device that monitors blood sugar using a sensor that never punctures the skin. Sounds too good to be true, we know. But after a conversation with Doug Raymond, Vice President of Marketing and Sales, we're truly optimistic. The device, called the HG1-c (which we admit is NOT a very catchy name), is a small unit weighing 5 ounces that fits in the palm of your hand. It's worn on a belt around the waist. Rather than puncturing the skin, the sensor sits close against the skin, and small drop of gel helps to seal any air gaps. The technology behind the HG1-c is complicated, but in a nutshell: a special camera, called a raman spectrometer , inside the sensor uses light to identify and analyze glucose molecules under the skin, via interstitial fluid. Each glucose molecule has a special "signature" the sensor identifies, and from there, analyzes and extrapolates a glucose value, which is transmitted via Bluetooth to a handheld device, like an iPhone or Android, or to a computer. Here's an overview video that C8 MediSensors shared at the recent EASD conference in Portugal: Before we get into the nitty-gritty details o Continue reading >>

Apple Reportedly Has A “super Secret” Project To Change The Way We Treat Diabetes

Apple Reportedly Has A “super Secret” Project To Change The Way We Treat Diabetes

Apple is reportedly working on a “super secret” medical project: building sensors to monitor blood sugar levels without piercing the skin. According to CNBC, the iPhone maker has been working on this for at least five years, quietly hiring dozens of biomedical engineers and sequestering them in a nondescript Palo Alto office. It may be intended to connect to the Apple Watch, which Apple CEO Tim Cook has previously hinted at trying to make more medically useful, even suggesting that an app developed “adjacent to it” might have to get approval from the US Food and Drug Administration. And Reuters reported in 2014 that Apple, Samsung, and Google were all interested in merging their respective mobile devices with glucose monitoring devices. What Apple’s reportedly trying to do here hasn’t worked out so well for Google, whose life-sciences arm, Verily, is also located away from company headquarters in its own unassuming office building and has long been working (publicly) on a smart contact lens for blood sugar monitoring. That project hasn’t been fruitful yet. Keeping track of how blood sugar levels rise and fall throughout the day is a big job for people with type 1 diabetes, whose bodies don’t produce insulin—a crucial hormone in blood sugar regulation. Diabetics typically test blood samples from their fingertips several times a day to measure these levels, but since the numbers can fluctuate so much in response to food, exercise, stress, and other factors, a few data points per day isn’t always enough information. That’s why enthusiasm has been building for continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) sensors. These sensors rely on a small needle that stays under the skin for days at a time to analyze interstitial fluid—the stuff that surrounds tissue cell Continue reading >>

Guardian Connect | Medtronic Hcp

Guardian Connect | Medtronic Hcp

If your patients use Multiple Daily Injections (MDI) to manage their diabetes, Medtronic's new Guardian Connect can help make their life a little bit easier. With Guardian Connect, your patients will be able to check their glucose levels, anytime on their mobile device. Guardian connect empowers patients to take control of their diabetes. Guardian Connect is Medtronics latest innovation for Continuous Glucose Monitoring. It works with 3 elements: a thin sensor, a small plastic transmitter attached to the sensor and the Guardian Connect app on a compatible iOS device*. A quick glimpse at the mobile screen will let them know their current sensor glucose level and where its heading. But theres more. Setting-up low and high alerts is easy so that patient can be alerted if they are heading towards a hypo or hyper. It is also easy to share patient glucose reading with their family or friends. Care partners can even receive a text message when the patient drops below their target range. Guardian Connect does not work with Insulin Pumps. This is connected to your transmitter making it one small seamless unit. The sensor continuously measures glucose levels. The Gardian Connect App lets you check your glucose levels at a glance, displays glucose trends and sends alerts on your iPhone or ipod Touch. Connected to the glucose sensor, This lightweight, low profile transmitter sends glucose readings to your phone app every 5 minutes via bluetooth. This insightful software manages your data. Automatic syncing shares your data with your chosen healthcare professional with easy-to-interpret trends and reports. from 10 minutes to up to 1 hour ahead gives you time to respond. to up to 5 care partners on any mobile device - no need to download app. reduced chance of hypos and improved tim Continue reading >>

Continuous Glucose Monitoring For The Iphone Generation?

Continuous Glucose Monitoring For The Iphone Generation?

Continuous Glucose Monitoring for the iPhone Generation? Early CGM devices were expensive and had problems with accuracy and reliability , and patients often needed to provide finger-prick data to keep them. Modern CGMs are smaller and cheaper, but are they reliable? Diabetes is a major contributor to the burden of global chronic disease. In the UK, over 3 million people have type 2 diabetes, and the prevalence is predicted to rise . Some patients can be treated with a combination of diet and exercise, others with oral medications, such as metformin. However, some patients suffer from type 1 or more severe forms of type 2 diabetes and have to inject insulin to maintain good glycaemic control. This can have mixed effects on patients quality of life. In one recent survey , 68% of patients reported that insulin treatment had a positive or neutral effect on their quality of life, although 60% of patients agreed that insulin treatment was restrictive. Not only do patients have to inject insulin, they should also perform regular finger pricks to check their blood glucose. NICE recommends that all patients with type 1 diabetes should test 4 times per day and in some cases up to 10 times per day. Blood glucose testing is unpopular, and some patients report frustration and anxiety when trying to meet the requirements. Furthermore, the results are not always as helpful as they might be. A single test cannot distinguish between hypoglycaemia that is resolving and hypoglycaemia that is getting worse and requires treatment. Self-monitoring also fails to detect night-time hypoglycaemia, which is the cause of 6% of all deaths in young people (under 40) with type 1 diabetes. One potential solution is continuous glucose monitoring. First marketed in the early 2000s, continuous glucose Continue reading >>

More in blood sugar