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Continuous Glucose Monitoring Dexcom

What Is (cgm) Continuous Glucose Monitoring?

What Is (cgm) Continuous Glucose Monitoring?

A CGM is an FDA-approved device that provides continuous insight into glucose levels throughout the day and night. The device displays information about glucose direction and speed providing users additional information to help with their diabetes management. Studies have shown that CGM systems may help reduce your A1C and reduce your risk for hypoglycemia, whether you are on insulin injections or pump therapy.2 The Dexcom G5 Mobile Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) System is FDA-approved to help minimize the guesswork that comes from making decisions based solely on a number from a blood glucose meter reading, for better diabetes management.* Continue reading >>

Dexcom G4 Platinum Cgm System With Share

Dexcom G4 Platinum Cgm System With Share

Still the same high-performing Continuous Glucose Monitoring system, now with ShareTM technology (Bluetooth) built into the Receiver! Stay One Step Ahead of Diabetes with Dexcom Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) Don’t just meter. Monitor. Only Dexcom CGM keeps you One Step Ahead of diabetes by unveiling dynamic glucose patterns that no meter can.* When it comes to glucose sensing, Dexcom sets the standard. Dexcom CGM The Dexcom G4 PLATINUM Receiver with Share has Bluetooth wireless communication built in! Through secure wireless connections, the Dexcom G4 PLATINUM Receiver with ShareTM allows remote viewing of glucose levels, trends and data between the person with diabetes and their spouse, grandparent or other loved ones from an Apple iPhone® or iPod touch®. Continue reading >>

Dexcom Sensors Will Be First To Offer Continuous Glucose Monitoring From Apple Watch

Dexcom Sensors Will Be First To Offer Continuous Glucose Monitoring From Apple Watch

Dexcom announced today that it’s preparing updates to its two mobile apps that will allow users of its Continuous Glucose Monitor System to track everything straight from Apple Watch. The apps will not only let users view their own glucose information, but also invite others– parents or caregivers for example– to monitor the data from their own Apple Watch. The Dexcom sensors that will work with Apple Watch, the G4 PLATINUM Glucose Monitor System, requires users to embed a sensor just underneath their skin and attach a small Bluetooth LTE receiver to transmit the data to iOS and the Apple Watch: Continuous glucose monitoring is considered the most significant breakthrough in diabetes management in the past 40 years1. The traditional standard-of-care for glucose (blood sugar) monitoring has been a finger stick meter. CGM augments the use of glucose meters for the management of diabetes. Meters are still required to calibrate CGMs and for guidance in making therapy and meal decisions. CGM is important because, in addition to providing the glucose level, it provides the direction and rate of glucose change with the push of a button and alerts users when glucose is too low or too high. The Dexcom apps— Dexcom Follow and Dexcom Share2— will be updated by April 24th with Watch support, just in time for the first shipments of preordered Apple Watches arriving to customers. You can get more info on purchasing the G4 PLATINUM Continuous Glucose Monitor System — the receiver kit costs around $1000— on Dexcom’s website. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Technology: Dexcom G5 Cgm Review - So Much Wasted Potential

Diabetes Technology: Dexcom G5 Cgm Review - So Much Wasted Potential

As you may know, I'm a Type 1 Diabetic and have been for well over 20 years. I wear a Medtronic Insulin Pump 24 hours a day and use a Dexcom CGM (Continuous Glucose Meter) to monitor my blood sugar, also 24 hours a day. This post won't explain how diabetes works to you, so check these posts out (or this video) first if you're not familiar. Moving from a Dexcom G4 to a Dexcom G5 A CGM (Continuous Glucose Meter) doesn't keep you from pricking your fingers. You'll still do finger sticks in order to calibrate a CGM, at least twice a day. The Dexcom G4 "with Share" worked like this. There was a small transmitter that is attached to me, and it talks a proprietary RF wireless format to a Receiver and then the Receiver talks Bluetooth LE to your iPhone, like this picture below. Once the sugar number got to my iPhone it's then optionally uploaded to the Dexcom Share Cloud. My wife can install the Dexcom Follow application on her iPhone and see my sugar on her phone. She also gets the same notifications and warnings I get. When you "upgrade" to the G5 from the G4, you'll likely do what I did. I called Dexcom support to see if I was eligible. They had a US$199 upgrade fee which I paid, and the G5 transmitter showed up a week later. I then called them back to get an "upgrade code" which was a 12 digit unique number (GUID) that I had to enter into their Dexcom Studio application on my Windows machine. I plugged in my Dexcom G4 with Share Receiver to my Windows machine using Microsoft USB and ran the upgrader. I needed that upgrade key. Then about 20 minutes later the G4 receiver (remember it talked RF to the G4 transmitter) is now a G5 and only speaks Bluetooth directly to the Bluetooth-enabled G5 transmitter. That means it works like this now: The G5 software that runs on the iPhon Continue reading >>

Comparison Of Two Continuous Glucose Monitoring Systems, Dexcom G4 Platinum And Medtronic Paradigm Veo Enlite System, At Rest And During Exercise.

Comparison Of Two Continuous Glucose Monitoring Systems, Dexcom G4 Platinum And Medtronic Paradigm Veo Enlite System, At Rest And During Exercise.

Comparison of Two Continuous Glucose Monitoring Systems, Dexcom G4 Platinum and Medtronic Paradigm Veo Enlite System, at Rest and During Exercise. Taleb N, et al. Diabetes Technol Ther. 2016. 1 Institut de Recherches Cliniques de Montral , Montral, Canada . 2 Division of Sciences Biomdicales, Faculty of Medicine, Universit de Montral , Montral, Canada . 3 Division of Experimental Medicine, Department of Medicine, McGill University , Montral, Canada . 4 Montreal Children's Hospital, McGill University Health Centre , Montral, Canada . 5 Centre de Recherche du Centre Hospitalier de l'universit de Montral (CRCHUM) , Montral, Canada . 6 Montreal Diabetes Research Center , Montral, Canada . 7 Nutrition Department, Faculty of Medicine, Universit de Montral , Montral, Canada . 8 Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, Montral, Canada . 9 Division of Endocrinology, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, Montral, Canada . Diabetes Technol Ther. 2016 Sep;18(9):561-7. doi: 10.1089/dia.2015.0394. Epub 2016 Jun 29. BACKGROUND: Despite technological advances, the accuracy of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) systems may not always be satisfactory with rapidly changing glucose levels, as is notable during exercise. We compare the performance of two current and widely used CGM systems, Dexcom G4 Platinum (Dexcom) and Medtronic Paradigm Veo Enlite system (Enlite), during both rest and exercise in adults with type 1 diabetes (T1D). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Paired sensor and plasma glucose (PG) values (total of 431 data pairs for Dexcom and 425 for Enlite) were collected from 17 adults (37.3 13.6 years) with T1D. To evaluate and compare the accuracy of sensor readings, criteria involving sensor bias (sensor minus PG levels), absolute relative d Continue reading >>

Fda Approves Dexcom G5 Mobile Continuous Glucose Monitoring System

Fda Approves Dexcom G5 Mobile Continuous Glucose Monitoring System

FDA Approves Dexcom G5 Mobile Continuous Glucose Monitoring System First and Only Fully Mobile CGM System Allows Adults and Children as young as 2 years old to Conveniently and Discreetly Monitor and Share Glucose Levels Aug 25, 2015, 08:30 ET from Dexcom, Inc. SAN DIEGO, Aug.25, 2015 /PRNewswire/ --Dexcom, Inc., (NASDAQ: DXCM ), a leader in continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) for patients with diabetes, announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the Dexcom G5 Mobile Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) System. With wireless Bluetooth technology built into the device transmitter, the G5 Mobile CGM System is the first and only fully mobile CGM system approved by the FDA for both adults and children as young as 2 years of age that sends glucose data directly to a smartphone, freeing users from the need to carry a separate receiver. The new transmitter securely sends vital glucose information directly to an app on iOS-enabled devices for real-time diabetes management. Android applications will follow early next year. Like its predecessor, the G4 PLATINUM CGM with Share, users can also select up to five designated recipients, or "followers". These followers can remotely monitor a patient's glucose information and receive alert notifications from almost anywhere. "Dexcom is rapidly advancing technology for continuous glucose monitoring devices to improve diabetes management. Since January, the company has introduced the G4 PLATINUM CGM with Share, apps to enable the first CGM on the Apple Watch and now the Dexcom G5 Mobile CGM. These advances are making diabetes management more convenient and flexible than ever before," stated Kevin Sayer, President and Chief Executive Officer of Dexcom. "We are excited for the promise this new technology h Continue reading >>

Dexcom G5 Mobile Continuous Glucose Monitoring System Review

Dexcom G5 Mobile Continuous Glucose Monitoring System Review

Dexcom has been the leader in the continuous glucose monitoring market for many years. They always seem to be ahead of the game in terms of technology, and the newest addition to the Dexcom family is just that and more. Before we continue with this article, I wanted to let you know we have researched and compiled science-backed ways to stick to your diet and reverse your diabetes. Want to check out our insights? Download our free PDF Guide Power Foods to Eat here. Their recent release of their G5 system provides users with a variety of features to help make managing your diabetes care much more simple. G5 is the same system as their previous G4 GGM system but it no longer requires a receiver. The transmitter works over a Bluetooth signal which can be picked up by a smartphone with an installed Dexcom application. The phone now acts as the receiver to display all information and alarms. Controlling Type 2 Diabetes Through Diet Experts Panel Not a lot has changed in terms of the G4 and G5, the sensors are the same, calibrations are still required a minimum of two times a day. The accuracy is still the same as the G4, as well as the trend display settings. So what is the benefit of the G5 over the G4 system? Lets discuss: To understand what the G5 system really is you first need to understand that it features four different components to it. CGM Sensor: The CGM sensor for the G5 system is the same as the G4 Platinum sensor. It is inserted into the skin for up to 7 days. The sensor still requires that you check your blood sugar two times a day to calibrate the system. I can attest that weve checked a little more with my youngest who is currently wearing the G5 system. This has helped to improve the overall accuracy of the sensor even more. G5 Transmitter: The G5 transmitte Continue reading >>

If I Knew Then: Continuous Glucose Monitoring – Dexcom.

If I Knew Then: Continuous Glucose Monitoring – Dexcom.

I tried my first CGM system back in 2006 (this post outlines the very first awkward sensor application) and have spent the last seven years or so being thankful that this technology exists. If I knew then what I know now … actually, I started on a CGM as quickly as I could, and stayed on it. Why I wanted a CGM is an easy question to answer, but there are a few things I wish I had known before starting out: I wish I had known that some of the sensors would hurt. So many diabetes devices are branded with “pain-free!” and “barely feel it!” advertising taglines, which I think is crap. We’re talking about a needle that pierces your skin and leaves a wire behind, underneath your skin, for a week at a time. To think that every sensor will glide under your skin with barely a whisper is bullshit. Some of the sensors hurt like hell when they go through my skin, and sometimes it takes an hour, or a day, for the site to settle down and not feel so tender. But most often, it is a reasonably quick pinch and then reasonably painless for the duration of the wear. Your mileage may vary with each and every sensor. I wish I had known the data would be addictive at first. The first time I wore a Dexcom sensor, it was back in 2006 and was one of the first marketed versions of the system. But I was hooked on the data. I looked at the receiver every five minutes and went bonkers trying to make sense of the trends. The trouble was that the readings were far less accurate back on the Dexcom STS, but I took them as seriously as the numbers on my glucose meter. For the first few weeks of wearing the Dexcom, I drowned in data, obsessively checking it and chasing slight blood sugar climbs with aggressive correction boluses. I needed to learn to let the data flow into my management, not Continue reading >>

Dexcom Files For Patent For Smartphone-connected Continuous Glucose Monitoring

Dexcom Files For Patent For Smartphone-connected Continuous Glucose Monitoring

Dexcom files for patent for smartphone-connected continuous glucose monitoring San Diego-based Dexcom, a maker of continuous glucose monitors, has filed for a patent for a system that would integrate a smartphone with a Dexcom device, detailing some of the features such a device might have. "The present embodiments harness a wide variety of capabilities of modern smartphones, and combine these capabilities with information from a continuous glucose monitor to provide diabetics and related people with more information than the continuous glucose monitor can provide by itself," the patent application reads. "The increased information provides the diabetic with an increased likelihood of good diabetes management for better health." The patent is focused particularly on a "continuous analyte monitor", and describes how continuous monitoring could connect with a phone's built-in activity monitor, GPS, scheduling systems, contacts, camera, and voice activation. Much of the functionality described in the patent has to do with collecting continuous blood sugar data and other data -- like activity and location -- simultaneously, so the user can retrospectively see what sorts of life events tend to lead to hypo- and hyperglycemic events. But the patent also suggests that the device might be able to take action in cases of low blood sugar. The system could contact a doctor, caretaker, or parent by text or email in the event of a blood sugar drop. It could also trigger a push notification to the patient, either telling them to eat a meal, or just setting off a specialized alarm (an illustration in the patent shows a patient setting their low blood sugar alarm to "Low" by Flo Rida.) The system could also tie into the phone's GPS and respond to low blood sugar by recommending nearby Continue reading >>

Comparison Of Continuous Glucose Monitoring Between Dexcom G4 Platinum And Hd-xg Systems In Nonhuman Primates (macaca Fascicularis)

Comparison Of Continuous Glucose Monitoring Between Dexcom G4 Platinum And Hd-xg Systems In Nonhuman Primates (macaca Fascicularis)

Timely knowing glucose level helps diabetic patients to manage the disease, including decisions about food, physical activity and medication. This study compared two continuous glucose monitoring systems in conscious and moving-free nonhuman primates (NHPs, Macaca fascicularis). Each normoglycemic or diabetic monkey was implanted with one Dexcom G4 Platinum subcutaneously or one HD-XG glucose sensor arterially for glucose monitoring. The glucose levels measured by both telemetry devices significantly correlated with the glucometer readings. The data of oral glucose tolerance test (oGTT) showed that the glucose levels measured by either Dexcom G4 Platinum or HD-XG transmitter were very similar to glucometer readings. However, compared to HD-XG transmitter or glucometer, Dexcom G4 Platinum detected a decreased glucose peak of ivGTT with approximately 10 min delay due to interstitial glucose far behind blood glucose change. Our data showed the advantages of the telemetry systems are: (1) consecutive data collection (day and night); (2) no bleeding; (3) no anesthesia (moving freely); (4) recording natural response without physical restriction and stress; (5) less labor intensity during ivGTT and other tests; (6) quick outcomes without lab tests. This article summarized and compared the differences of the general characteristics of two continuous glucose monitoring systems in diabetic research. Dysfunctional carbohydrate metabolism without treatment eventually leads to diabetes which significantly impacts on the quality of patient life. Potential new therapies and technologies may help to improve the quality of life beyond current standard of care and perhaps even to cure the disease in future1, 2. Various animal models have been used in research for understanding the diseas Continue reading >>

U.s. Fda Approves The Dexcom G4 Platinum Continuous Glucose Monitor (cgm)

U.s. Fda Approves The Dexcom G4 Platinum Continuous Glucose Monitor (cgm)

(NASDAQ: DXCM), a leader in continuous glucose monitoring , announced today that the has approved its eagerly anticipated new continuous glucose monitoring system, the Dexcom G4 PLATINUM. Clinical trials report up to approximately 19 percent improvement in overall accuracy for the Dexcom G4 PLATINUM compared to the Seven Plus, and approximately a 30 percent improvement in accuracy in the hypoglycemia range (i.e., when blood glucose is less than 70mg/dl). The overall accuracy and ease of use for the Dexcom G4 PLATINUM sets a new standard for commercially available CGMs, making the Dexcom G4 PLATINUM the most-advanced CGM system available. "Improved accuracy in the critical hypoglycemic range is most important from a life-saving point of view," said CEO. "The Dexcom G4 PLATINUM fulfills the promise of CGM for people with diabetes by providing accurate and reliable real-time performance." Continuous glucose monitoring is considered the most significant breakthrough in diabetes management in the past 40 years. The traditional standard-of-care for glucose (blood sugar) measurement has been a finger stick meter. Although they remain an essential part of a comprehensive diabetes management program, finger stick meters are inherently limited by the fact that, like a photograph, it only provides data for the specific moment in which the measurement is completed; it doesn't show whether glucose is going up or down or how fast. By contrast, CGM provides an in-motion picture that shows not only glucose levels, but also the speed and direction in which it is moving, and alerts the user to sudden changes so they can take action. The Dexcom G4 PLATINUM offers not only outstanding accuracy and performance, but many new capabilities, including: Longest transmission range, enabling impr Continue reading >>

Dexcom Recall Of Continuous Glucose Monitor Receivers

Dexcom Recall Of Continuous Glucose Monitor Receivers

Dexcom Recall of Continuous Glucose Monitor Receivers Reviewed by Grazia Aleppo MD, FACE, FACP Company urges consumers to test alarms and alerts, which may not sound when a users blood sugar is dropping or rising beyond a healthy range. Dexcom, Inc., one of the largest makers of continuous glucose monitoring systems (CGMs) in the U.S.1 is recalling receivers for its G4 Platinum and G5 Mobile CGM systems because of consumer complaints that alarms for low and high blood sugar levels may not sound. The alarms are intended to notify users with type 1 and type 2 diabetes before they experience dangerous episodes of hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia.2,3 The voluntary recall applies only to receivers that are not working properly, according to Dexcom. The company first alerted users to the potential alarm failures via certified letters in February and recommended that all users test their units. (For testing directions, see below.) If you rely on hearing the alarm or alert, you may not detect a severe hypoglycemic (low glucose) or hyperglycemic (high glucose) event, the letter stated. 4 In an April 11, 2016 press release , the U.S. Food and Drug Administration called the recall a Class I recall, the most serious type of recall. Relying on this device may cause serious injuries or death. 5 The recall affects 263,520 Dexcom CGM units sold in the U.S. since October of 2012.6 It applies to the Dexcom G4 PLATINUM Receiver, Dexcom G4 PLATINUM (Pediatric) Receiver, Dexcom G4 PLATINUM (Professional) Receiver, Dexcom G4 PLATINUM Receiver with Share, Dexcom G4 PLATINUM (Pediatric) Receiver with Share and the Dexcom G5 Mobile Receiver, according to the company.7 Dexcom has been very proactive in addressing the problem and immediate in its response to patients who reported malfunctioning uni Continue reading >>

Dexcom G5 Mobile Cgm System Components

Dexcom G5 Mobile Cgm System Components

The first FDA-approved CGM System that lets you make treatment decisions without pricking your finger.* The Dexcom G5® Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) System provides real-time glucose readings for patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes every five minutes. With Dexcom G5 Mobile, dynamic glucose data can be accessed and shared safely and conveniently anywhere, anytime to your smart device.† The Dexcom G5 Mobile - the first CGM system approved for adults and pediatric patients two years of age and older. *Dexcom CGM-based treatment requires fingersticks for calibration; may result in hypoglycemia if calibration not performed or symptoms/expectations do not match CGM readings. Continue reading >>

Fitbit And Dexcom To Develop Continuous Glucose Monitoring (cgm) Experience For People Living With Diabetes

Fitbit And Dexcom To Develop Continuous Glucose Monitoring (cgm) Experience For People Living With Diabetes

September 07, 2017 09:00 AM Eastern Daylight Time SAN FRANCISCO & SAN DIEGO--( BUSINESS WIRE )--Fitbit (NYSE:FIT), the leading global wearables brand, andDexCom, Inc.(NASDAQ:DXCM), the leader in continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) for people with diabetes, today announced a collaboration to develop and marketproducts to help people better manage their diabetes and get a more complete picture of their overall health with easy-to-use mobile tools. The first planned initiative is to bring Dexcom CGM data to Fitbits new smartwatch, Fitbit Ionic. Through this experience, Dexcom CGM users on either Android or iOS devices would be able to see both activity and glucose levels, right on their wrist. The strength of our brand and our ability to track critical health metrics continuously for up to 4+ days1, coupled with Dexcoms market leadership in CGM, present a powerful combination that we hope will help millions of people better manage their diabetes, said James Park, CEO of Fitbit. With Ionic, we are focused on driving positive health outcomes and more health focused tools, and this collaboration is a wonderful example of how we plan to bring that vision to our users. Dexcom CGM Display on Fitbit Ionic will provide data for those living with diabetes The World Health Organization estimates2 that more than 400 million people around the world are living with diabetes. For those individuals being able to see both physical activity and glucose can be a vital tool for effectively managing their diabetes. The collaboration between Dexcom and Fitbit is an important step in providing useful information to people with diabetes that is both convenient and discreet, said Kevin Sayer, President and CEO, Dexcom. We believe that providing Dexcom CGM data on Fitbit Ionic, and making that ex Continue reading >>

Dexcom

Dexcom

Dexcom, Inc. is a company that develops, manufactures and distributes continuous glucose monitoring systems for diabetes management. It operates internationally with headquarters in San Diego, California, United States. History[edit] DexCom's roots stem from 1967 research on implanted glucose sensors at the University of Wisconsin, and started with a focus on creating an implantable sensor that the body would not reject and that would perform for a long period of time.[1] With over 40 patents,[2] Dexcom’s Sensor technology is based on this research. Dexcom's history includes multiple generations of sensor technology coupled with partner development agreements. In 2006, Dexcom received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval and launched the Dexcom STS Continuous Glucose Monitoring System. This was a three-day sensor that provided up to 288 glucose measurements every 24 hours. Dexcom received approval of the second generation product, the Seven Continuous Glucose Monitoring System in May 2007. This device improved on accuracy as well as extending usage from three to seven days of continuous wear. In 2008, Dexcom announced two consumer development agreements with Insulet Corporation[3] and Animas Corporation[4] as well as a development agreement with Edwards Lifesciences for a continuous glucose monitor in the intensive care unit hospital environment.[5] During February 2009, Dexcom received approval for the SEVEN PLUS Continuous Glucose Monitor, the third generation Dexcom continuous glucose monitoring system from the FDA. This product received a CE mark in November 2009. In 2013, development to integrate with Insulet broke up. Dexcom entered a non-exclusive agreement with Tandem Diabetes Care, Inc. in 2015 to allow the integration of next generation G5 and G6 Continue reading >>

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