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Connection Between Diabetes And Mood Swings

Connection Between Pcos And Mood Swings? | Pcos.com

Connection Between Pcos And Mood Swings? | Pcos.com

We all have the tendency to downplay someones emotions or moods as being, on some level, whimsical; the way you feel about something or the kind of disposition you have is simply the result of the kind of day youve had, or on which side of the bed you got up. We tend to disregard the fact that moods and emotions are closely linked to our bodys overall wellbeing, and that, in many cases, mood abnormalities can have serious physical causes. Thats certainly the way it is with PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome) and mood swings. There is a clear and very real link between this physical condition and its emotional effects, and its good that we understand this so we know what exactly were up againstand what can be done about it. For starters, though, a few introductory words about Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) might be in order. This is not at all an uncommon diseasein fact, its the most common womens hormonal disorder there isbut it can manifest itself in so many different ways that physicians have a hard time pining down a diagnosis sometimes. It could be the cause of anything from infertility and miscarriage to an increased risk of heart and liver disease, and is characterized, most basically, by a string of cysts in the ovaries. Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) is rooted in Insulin Resistance and is fundamentally a hormonal issue, which goes a long way toward explaining how it can cause symptoms so variedincluding mood swings. After all, the body is a complex and interconnected thing, and the link between body and mind is self-evident. Its not at all surprising, then, that a physical affliction, such as a hormonal imbalance, might cause mood swings. Its important to remember that mood swings are, in this case, not something subjective, but rather can be serious sym Continue reading >>

Mood Swings In Men (irritable Male Syndrome): Causes, Symptoms, And Prevention

Mood Swings In Men (irritable Male Syndrome): Causes, Symptoms, And Prevention

Home » Men's Health » Mood swings in men (irritable male syndrome): Causes, symptoms, and prevention Irritability and mood swings in men are common symptoms of andropause and may be referred to as irritable male syndrome (IMS). IMS can be caused by high cortisol levels and may cause men to act out or become depressed. To learn more about this condition, including its connection to low testosterone, symptoms, causes, and treatment, continue reading below. Irritable male syndrome and low testosterone: What’s the connection? As men age, their bodies produce less testosterone. Approximately 40 percent of men over the age of 45 have below normal levels of testosterone, but can this effect their moods and result in irritable male syndrome? Dr. Abraham Morgentaler, founder and director of Men’s Health Boston medical clinic commented on the potential connection, stating, “Men with low testosterone find that their emotional reserves are lower. They have a shorter fuse. In popular culture, people link male anger with high testosterone, but as a rule we see it more in men with low testosterone – most commonly when levels are dropping. That’s when men get cranky.” Other experts disagree that low testosterone is the main cause of irritable male syndrome, and instead posit that low testosterone may be a symptom of another condition that could contribute to mood swings. Dr. Alvin Matsumoto explained this point of view, stating, “I think there are a lot of things going on when you get older. If you’re androgen deficient and you’re experiencing a low sex drive, will you be irritable? Yes!” Whether IMS is caused by low testosterone or they are just side effects that occur together, experts agree that the way to feel better is to maintain your overall health. Symptom Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes definition and facts Risk factors for gestational diabetes include a history of gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy, There are typically no noticeable signs or symptoms associated with gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes can cause the fetus to be larger than normal. Delivery of the baby may be more complicated as a result. The baby is also at risk for developing low blood glucose (hypoglycemia) immediately after birth. Following a nutrition plan is the typical treatment for gestational diabetes. Maintaining a healthy weight and following a healthy eating plan may be able to help prevent or minimize the risks of gestational diabetes. Women with gestational diabetes have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes after the pregnancy What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is diabetes, or high blood sugar levels, that develops during pregnancy. It occurs in about 4% of all pregnancies. It is usually diagnosed in the later stages of pregnancy and often occurs in women who have no prior history of diabetes. What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is thought to arise because the many changes, hormonal and otherwise, that occur in the body during pregnancy predispose some women to become resistant to insulin. Insulin is a hormone made by specialized cells in the pancreas that allows the body to effectively metabolize glucose for later usage as fuel (energy). When levels of insulin are low, or the body cannot effectively use insulin (i.e., insulin resistance), blood glucose levels rise. What are the screening guidelines for gestational diabetes? All pregnant women should be screened for gestational diabetes during their pregnancy. Most pregnant women are tested between the 24th and 28th weeks of pregnancy (see Continue reading >>

Sleep And Mood | Need Sleep

Sleep And Mood | Need Sleep

People who have problems with sleep are at increased risk for developing emotional disorders, depression, and anxiety.Dr . Lawrence J. Epstein Sleep and mood are closely connected; poor or inadequate sleep can cause irritability and stress, while healthy sleep can enhance well-being. Chronic insomnia may increase the risk of developing a mood disorder, such as anxiety or depression. Poor sleep and feelings of depression or anxiety can be helped through a variety of treatments, starting with improved sleep habits, and, if needed, extending to behavioral interventions and an assessment for a sleep or mood disorder. Studies have shown a link between depression and abnormal sleep patterns. When Sheila, a busy assistant district attorney and mother of two began getting better sleep, her mood and quality of life improved. You probably know firsthand that sleep affects mood. After a sleepless night, you may be more irritable, short-tempered, and vulnerable to stress. Once you sleep well, your mood often returns to normal. Studies have shown that even partial sleep deprivation has a significant effect on mood. University of Pennsylvania researchers found that subjects who were limited to only 4.5 hours of sleep a night for one week reported feeling more stressed, angry, sad, and mentally exhausted. When the subjects resumed normal sleep, they reported a dramatic improvement in mood. 1 Not only does sleep affect mood, but mood and mental states can also affect sleep. Anxiety increases agitation and arousal, which make it hard to sleep. Stress also affects sleep by making the body aroused, awake, and alert. People who are under constant stress or who have abnormally exaggerated responses to stress tend to have sleep problems. "There's a big relationship between psychiatric and p Continue reading >>

High Or Low Blood Glucose Making You Cranky? Here’s Why

High Or Low Blood Glucose Making You Cranky? Here’s Why

Mood changes can be a common experience in people with diabetes, both type 1 and type 2. Medtronic Diabetes Clinical Manager Gina, who has lived with type 1 diabetes for more than 39 years, addresses the affect blood sugar levels can have on your everyday emotions. The other day, I was driving and was suddenly overcome by a feeling of intense sadness; I started to cry. At the time, I thought I was reacting emotionally to a stressful week; I had been looking for a home to purchase, and my offer on a townhome I really liked had been rejected. Then, my Low Predictive alert sounded on my pump, and I realized the reason for the sudden change in my emotions was because my blood glucose (BG) had been dropping and was approaching a low level. Once my BG stabilized, I was fine. The sadness went away as quickly as it had come. Has this ever happened to you? There is a Reason: Your Brain! Well, there is an explanation! Your brain, the center of your thoughts and emotions, needs glucose to do its job. If you don’t have enough glucose to “feed your brain,” your brain can go “haywire”. Even though it seems like you are overly emotional, this is really a physical response to low BG (hypoglycemia). You don’t have to be below a certain number, like 70 mg/dL, to experience this. Your BG may be in the 80-130 md/dL range, or possibly higher, when the reaction occurs. It can be due to a rapid drop in your BG level instead of the actual level (1). Can high BG’s (hyperglycemia) affect your immediate emotions? It probably will not surprise you the answer is “yes.” High BG’s can make it difficult to think and concentrate. I know some people with diabetes tend to get grouchy and irritable when our sugar is high because any blood sugar outside of our desired range can make us Continue reading >>

What Is The Connection Between Blood Sugar And Emotions?

What Is The Connection Between Blood Sugar And Emotions?

Changes in blood sugar can have a significant impact on how a person feels, including emotionally, because of how sugar affects not just the brain but the entire body. In addition, emotions can also affect how the body regulates blood sugar. Anyone with persistently high or low blood sugar should talk to a doctor to determine if an underlying condition is to blame. Blood sugar is affected by a variety of factors, including food. Blood sugar rises in the hour or two after a meal and then gradually declines. Foods high in carbohydrates can lead to higher spikes in blood sugar, followed by a more rapid decline. Physical activity causes the muscles to burn glucose, leading to lower blood glucose levels. Some medications can affect blood glucose levels, and stress can also lead to an overall increase in blood sugar. Blood Sugar Effects on Emotions Abnormally high or low blood sugar can affect emotions. Unusually low blood sugar --- also known as hypoglycemia --- can cause feelings of anxiety and confusion. Hypoglycemia can also make it hard to complete routine tasks and can lead to abnormal behavior. High blood glucose, on the other hand, can cause fatigue. Persistently high blood glucose due to poorly treated diabetes may also worsen depression. Stress Effect on Blood Sugar The link between emotions and blood sugar goes beyond the symptoms of hypo- and hyperglycemia, as emotions can also affect blood sugar. Stress, whether emotional or physical, leads to the release of hormones such as cortisol and epinephrine. Both of these hormones can cause a rise in blood glucose levels. People with diabetes already have trouble regulating blood sugar, so emotional stress can lead to dangerously high blood sugar levels. Managing Blood Sugar and Emotions Persistently high or low blood su Continue reading >>

Mood Swings

Mood Swings

Women who experienced PMS or postpartum depression are more likely to experience mood swings during menopause. Not only can menopause prompt uncomfortable physical symptoms, but it can also turn a woman's emotions into a pendulum, prompting moderate to severe mood swings. Menopause is a time of significant hormonal changes, and these changes, typically occurring in women between the ages of 45 and 55, can affect emotional stability. More than 50% of women experience mood swings as they approach menopause. Fortunately, there are effective ways to manage menopausal mood swings. Continue reading to learn all about mood swings, their causes, risk factors, extreme cases, and treatment options. About Mood Swings Mood swings are defined as extreme or abrupt fluctuations in mood. During mood swing episodes, people often experience drastic shifts in their emotional state. The term "mood swing" is often used to describe an emotional reaction that is inappropriate or disproportionate in relation to its cause or trigger. During menopause, women commonly experience mood swings because their hormones, which regulate mood and emotions, are thrown off balance. While this is a common and normal symptom of menopause, it can negatively impact your personal and professional relationships. It is often helpful for women going through mood swings to understand the symptoms of this condition. Keep reading to learn more about how mood swings can manifest during menopause. Symptoms of mood swings Because each woman has her own unique way of managing her emotions, stress, and her environment, all women experience the symptoms of mood swings differently. However, many symptoms of mood swings are common among women going through menopause. Frequent mood changes Inexplicable emotions Depression Sadn Continue reading >>

Is Anger At A Spouse Normal With Diabetes?

Is Anger At A Spouse Normal With Diabetes?

You may be wondering if anger is a normal part of dealing with diabetes. Is it normal for someone with type 1 diabetes to erupt into violent anger and take it out on his or her partner? Frustration and anger are often experienced by people who deal with chronic illnesses like diabetes. Fluctuating blood glucose levels can also contribute to mood swings and cause people to exhibit angry behavior. But when does that kind of anger cross the line into domestic abuse? Anger Can Be a Part of Chronic Illness Anger and frustration can be common reactions when someone has a chronic disease like diabetes. It's a lot to cope with, and at times it may really be upsetting to have to deal with diabetes day after day for a lifetime. Plus, physiologically, when someone's blood sugar fluctuates, spikes, or drops, it can produce feelings of anger, anxiety, or depression that are really out of the control of the person experiencing them. Your partner's diabetes may make it easier for you to overlook or make excuses for angry reactions, which is okay to an extent. However, anger that escalates into physical, verbal, or emotional abuse is not a normal reaction. When Anger Becomes Abuse Every person has a right to get angry sometimes, but if that anger is expressed violently to hurt or scare you, then it becomes domestic abuse. Abuse can be actual physical contact, like hitting, slapping, pushing, or otherwise inflicting bodily harm, but it can also be threatening, belittling, or making you feel intimidated or scared. What to Do If You're Struggling With Diabetes and Anger If you have diabetes and anger is a problem for you, whether it's because you're angry that you have the condition or because you have frequent blood sugar fluctuations, try these methods to cope: Take good care of yoursel Continue reading >>

Do People With Diabetes Have Mood Swings And More Negative Thoughts Than Non-diabetic People?

Do People With Diabetes Have Mood Swings And More Negative Thoughts Than Non-diabetic People?

My fiance has been a diabetic for about 15 years. In the past year he has become irritable and angry for little things that I feel shouldn't make anyone angry. For example, we were going to a nice restaurant and I said, honey, I believe this people need to be more dressed up than casual. He went off the deep end, said I was trying to tell him how to dress and he started cussing. I was dumbfounded and we didn't go to the restaurant. This is just one incident. He then pouts and doesn't speak to me. He is a wonderful person but I never know what is going to trigger the angry mood swing. He can be happy one minute and angry the next. Any suggestions? Oops, meant, "I believe this restaurant requires more than casual attire." ( He was in jeans and a baseball cap.) Tempers and other bizarre behaviors can happen when there are swings in blood pressure. A friend of mine with a diabetic husband said she can always tell when his sugar goes low because he starts getting crazy. She asks him if he's checked his sugar. How old is your husband? He is 72. When he gets angry he brings up the hurtful things from the past. Can't seem to let go. My mom was like that, she was in beginning stages of dementia. Not saying your husband is but it would not hurt to talk to his doctor. There is a connection between diabetes and vascular dementia. Here is the best way I can think to explain it. Sugar is a crystal (think of how it looks close up, angular, with sharp edges, squareish). When in your blood, especially when the sugar level is too high, that sugar is like having tiny razor blades flowing throughout your body. The sugar cuts into the arteries and veins it flows through, slashes the tissues in organs (particularly the kidneys) causing scarring and hardening of the arteries (Atherosclerosis) Continue reading >>

Mood Changes Associated With Blood Glucose Fluctuations In Insulin-dependent Diabetes Mellitus.

Mood Changes Associated With Blood Glucose Fluctuations In Insulin-dependent Diabetes Mellitus.

Abstract Individuals with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and their healthcare practitioners believe that extreme blood glucose (BG) fluctuations are characterized by changes in subjective mood states and emotional behavior, as well as physical symptoms. This study examined relationships between BG levels and self-reported mood in a group of 34 IDDM adults. The method followed a within-subject, repeated-measures design employed in previous studies of physical symptoms associated with diabetic glucose. Four times each day, participants completed a mood/symptom checklist just prior to a self-measurement of BG until 40 checklists had been completed. Half the items on the checklist described physical symptoms and half described mood states. In addition, half the mood items described negative states and half described positive states. Within-subject correlations and regressions showed that moods were related to BG for the majority of participants and that, like physical symptoms, mood-BG relationships were highly idiosyncratic. Low BG levels tended to be associated with negative mood states, primarily self-reported "nervousness." Positive mood items were almost always associated with high BG. High BG levels also frequently correlated with negative mood states, although the negative mood items that tended to relate to high glucose (anger, sadness) differed from those that tended to relate to low BG. The implications of these findings for self-treatment and glucose perception in the IDDM individual are discussed. Continue reading >>

Thyroid And Blood Sugar Relationship

Thyroid And Blood Sugar Relationship

Both controlled by the endocrine system, the thyroid gland and your blood sugar levels (controlled by the pancreas) go hand in hand. As such, a problem with one can lead to a problem with the other. If you are suffering from a thyroid problem – or diabetes – then read on to learn more about the relationship between your thyroid and your blood sugar – and how it can affect your health in the long run. The Endocrine System The endocrine system is a group of cells and glands that produce hormones, molecules that regulate the activities of various organs and tissues in the body. Included in this system is the thyroid gland, pituitary gland, adrenal gland, pancreas, testicles, and ovaries. However, only those that will be discussed in detail are the glands relevant to this topic. The Thyroid Gland Located at the front of your neck, the thyroid gland is proof that great things come in small packages. Shaped like a butterfly, this gland controls many vital functions in the body, such as your respiration, heart rate, body temperature, and digestion. If your thyroid is inactive, it is not able to make the hormones that the body needs. This condition is called hypothyroidism. Symptoms include weight gain, cold intolerance, lower heart rate, fatigue, and muscle pain, to name a few. On the other hand, if your thyroid is too active, it will produce more hormones than the body requires. This condition, called hyperthyroidism, is characterized by heat intolerance, sleeping problems, mood swings, weight loss, and faster heart rate, among many others. Pancreas Located behind the stomach’s lower part is the pancreas, a gland responsible for making digestive enzymes as well as insulin, a hormone which regulates the body’s blood sugar levels. Insulin is produced in the islets of Continue reading >>

Links Between Hypertension, Bipolar Disorders Identified

Links Between Hypertension, Bipolar Disorders Identified

Follow all of ScienceDaily's latest research news and top science headlines ! Links between hypertension, bipolar disorders identified Nearly half of patients hospitalized with bipolar disorder may suffer from hypertension, and the younger a person is diagnosed with the psychiatric condition the more likely they are to develop high blood pressure, according to a recent study. The research analyzed 99 patients hospitalized for bipolar disorder, a condition sometimes called manic-depressive disorder. Nearly half of patients hospitalized with bipolar disorder may suffer from hypertension, and the younger a person is diagnosed with the psychiatric condition the more likely they are to develop high blood pressure, according to a recent Michigan State University study. The study, led by MSU psychiatrist Dale D'Mello, analyzed 99 patients hospitalized for bipolar disorder, a condition sometimes called manic-depressive disorder and characterized by mood swings ranging from depression to mental hyperactivity known as mania. D'Mello presented his findings -- which could lead to improved treatments -- recently at the American Psychiatric Association's 2010 annual meeting in New Orleans. While the connection between such disorders and cardio-metabolic conditions such as heart disease and diabetes has been established, D'Mello also discovered bipolar patients with high blood pressure suffered higher levels of mania. "There is a large clinical relevance to the finding hypertension could be linked to the severity of bipolar disorders," he said. "There is some similarity to the pathology of the two conditions; they both can be triggered by stress and are tied to the excretion of norepinephrine, a hormone affecting how the brain reacts to stress." Understanding how bipolar disorder and Continue reading >>

Five Things To Know About Diabetes And Pcos

Five Things To Know About Diabetes And Pcos

September is Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) Awareness Month, an opportunity to raise awareness of a health problem that you may not be familiar with. For example: Did you know that PCOS is the most common cause of female infertility? Or that about 5 million women in the United States are affected by it? Wait, what!? Let’s start from the beginning… A woman’s ovaries have follicles (tiny, fluid-filled sacs that hold the eggs). When an egg is mature, the follicle releases the egg so it can travel to the uterus for fertilization. In women with PCOS, immature follicles group together to form large cysts or lumps. The eggs mature within the bunched follicles, but the follicles don’t break open to release them. Because of this, women with PCOS often don’t have menstrual periods or only have them on occasion. And because the eggs are not released, most women with PCOS have trouble getting pregnant. We’re sure you still have plenty of questions about PCOS—and what it means for women with diabetes. Keep reading! ____________________________ 1) What are the causes and symptoms of PCOS? Unfortunately, we don’t yet know the cause of PCOS, but based on studies of twins, scientists believe there’s a good chance genetics could play a role. But not everyone with PCOS genes develops the condition, so researchers are looking for lifestyle factors that affect a woman’s risk for PCOS. Though the cause is fuzzy, researchers know one thing for sure: There’s a link between PCOS and diabetes. How so? Women with type 1 diabetes are at increased risk for PCOS, which suggests that insulin may play a part. Ovaries see more insulin from people with type 1 diabetes than they would from those without diabetes. This extra insulin has a direct effect on ovaries by enhancing the p Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

People with diabetes have high blood glucose levels caused by a problem with the hormone insulin. The two main types of diabetes are type 1 (insulin dependent) and type 2 (non-insulin dependent). There is no cure, but symptoms can be controlled with diet, exercise and medication. If untreated, high blood glucose levels can result in serious complications. On this page: Diabetes is a chronic condition in which the levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood are too high. Blood glucose levels are normally regulated by the hormone insulin, which is made by the pancreas. Diabetes occurs when there is a problem with this hormone and how it works in the body. Around 5.1 per cent of Australians aged 18 years or older have diabetes. The risk of diabetes increases with age, from 2.8 per cent in people aged 35 to 44, to 15.0 per cent in those aged 65 to 74. Aboriginal people have one of the highest rates of type 2 diabetes in the world. Glucose in the body The body uses glucose as its main source of energy. Glucose comes from foods that contain carbohydrates, such as potatoes, bread, pasta, rice, fruit and milk. After food is digested, the glucose is released and absorbed into the bloodstream. The glucose in the bloodstream needs to move into body tissues so that cells can use it for energy. Excess glucose is also stored in the liver, or converted to fat and stored in other body tissues. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas, which is a gland located just below the stomach. Insulin opens the doors (the glucose channels) that let glucose move from the blood into the body cells. It also allows glucose to be stored in muscle, the liver and other tissues. This is part of a process known as glucose metabolism. In diabetes, either the pancreas can’t make insulin (type 1 diabetes), or Continue reading >>

Psychological Symptoms And Thyroid Disorders

Psychological Symptoms And Thyroid Disorders

Psychological Symptoms and Thyroid Disorders Also available in Arabic , Polish and Urdu People with thyroid disorders often have emotional or mental health symptoms as well as physical symptoms. This is especially the case for people with hyperthyroidism (an over-active thyroid), hypothyroidism (an under-active thyroid), thyroid related eye disease, or thyroid cancer. What kind of emotional problems might I experience? Whatever your type of thyroid disorder, it can make you feel more emotional than you felt before and you may find that your mood changes, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably. Common emotional problems are: Anxiety - a feeling of nervousness, with butterflies, heart racing, trembling, irritability, sleep difficulties Depression - low mood and difficulty enjoying things, tearfulness, loss of appetite and disturbed sleep Mood swings - snappiness or short-temper which people often call 'moodiness' Mental health, or cognitive, problems that can occur, most often with thyroid under-activity, include: These symptoms can cause older people to worry about permanent memory failure (dementia) but in fact they are rarely as severe as seen in dementia. The cause is sometimes abnormal thyroid hormone levels. Hyperthyroidism can cause anxiety, irritability and mood swings, while hypothyroidism can cause mental slowing and memory problems as well as depression. Patients sometimes report they have gained weight or that they find it difficult to lose weight during treatment which may contribute to feelings of low self-esteem and mood. Rapid changes in thyroid hormone levels, in particular, can unsettle your emotions. Rapid and effective control of the hyperthyroidism is essential to stabilise the mood, and it is important to make sure that the thyroid remains stable. Some Continue reading >>

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