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Can You Give Blood If You Have Diabetes Uk?

Donating Blood With Type 1 Diabetes

Donating Blood With Type 1 Diabetes

According to the American Red Cross, every two seconds someone needs blood. We all know that donating blood is a worthy thing to do. But the donation of blood assumes a cooperative body and a donation system that will accept the blood running through your veins. So what does that mean for those with T1D? Many are under the assumption that a diagnosis means they can’t donate. Wrong. For the most part, giving blood is an option, but it does depend on the following: Where you live Your blood sugar levels What type of insulin you are taking Consider your own safety T1D should not put you at any greater risk of feeling feint or nauseous while donating. Some T1D patients report their BGLs run slightly higher for 3-5 days after donating. Your immediate levels shouldn’t be influenced either way — you won’t suddenly spike or bottom out. Doctors do say your A1c or HbA1c (glycated hemoglobin, which measures one’s 3-month blood sugar level) may be falsely lowered, a temporary effect thought to be caused by blood loss and accelerated red blood cell turnover. If you want to donate, but are concerned about the health consequences, talk to your doctor first. After donating it’s crucial to closely monitor your blood sugar levels and re-nourish your body. Increase your fluid intake and consider eating more iron-rich foods for a few days. Be smart. Use common sense. Take care of yourself the same way you always would. US donor requirements to be in good overall health (the day they plan to donate) have a weight of 110 pounds or more be at least 17 years old (in most states) When you arrive to donate, a donation professional will take you through a screening process requiring you to disclose any health conditions, including T1D. You should be ready to provide additional informa Continue reading >>

Can I Give Blood? | Blood Donation

Can I Give Blood? | Blood Donation

Sometimes it is not possible for you to give blood, or we may have to ask you to wait for a period of time before donating again. To save donors from wasted time and wasted journeys, this page addresses some of the most common questions about eligibility. If you have an existing medical condition, or have a question about your eligibility to give blood, you should check the health& eligibility and travel section before you book an appointment.Remember, if you ever need to cancel a donation appointment we ask that you give us 3 days' notice so that we can offer your appointment to another donor. You can easily cancel or reschedule your existing appointments by signing in to your online account or using the NHSGiveBlood app . Can I donate if I feel ill, have a chesty cough, a cold sore or am coming down with a cold? If you are feeling under the weather with any of these things its best that you wait until you feel better before you give blood. Use our health& eligibility section to find out more. Can I donate blood if I am taking antibiotics or have an infection? You must be completely healed or recovered from any infection for at least 14 days before you give blood. If you are taking antibiotics you may need to wait a period of time after your last tablet. Please follow our advice about donating after an infection . Please also see our advice about donating after antibiotics . Can I donate if I am pregnant, or have recently been pregnant? During your pregnancy, you are not able to give blood. If you had a blood transfusion during your pregnancy or at delivery then you will not be able to become a blood donor. Please follow our advice about giving blood during and after pregnancy . Can I give blood if I am receiving medical treatment or taking medication? Well need to ch Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes occurs mostly in people aged over 40 years. However, an increasing number of younger people, even children, are being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. The first-line treatment is diet, weight control and physical activity. If the blood sugar (glucose) level remains high despite these measures then tablets to reduce the blood glucose level are usually advised. Insulin injections are needed in some cases. Other treatments include reducing blood pressure if it is high, lowering high cholesterol levels and also using other measures to reduce the risk of complications. Although diabetes cannot be cured, it can be treated successfully. If a high blood sugar level is brought down to a normal level, your symptoms will ease. You still have some risk of complications in the long term if your blood glucose level remains even mildly high - even if you have no symptoms in the short term. However, studies have shown that people who have better glucose control have fewer complications (such as heart disease or eye problems) compared with those people who have poorer control of their glucose level. Therefore, the main aims of treatment are: To keep your blood glucose level as near normal as possible. To reduce any other risk factors that may increase your risk of developing complications. In particular, to lower your blood pressure if it is high and to keep your blood lipids (cholesterol) low. To detect any complications as early as possible. Treatment can prevent or delay some complications from becoming worse. Type 2 diabetes is usually initially treated by following a healthy diet, losing weight if you are overweight, and having regular physical activity. If lifestyle advice does not control your blood sugar (glucose) levels then medicines are used to help lower your Continue reading >>

Diabetes Uk - Local Groups - St Helens And District

Diabetes Uk - Local Groups - St Helens And District

Welcome to tonight`s meeting, we are delighted to welcome back one of our most popular speakers, Prof Kevin Hardy who is a Cons Physician & Endocrinologist from St Helens Hospital Diabetes Unit. Prof Hardy has been speaking at our meetings since November 1995, and according to our records he has not missed a single year! Tonight he will be answering your questions about diabetes. Please note, this will be our last meeting until September. New Prog Cards and yearly posters for 2016/17 are available tonight, please help yourself and take some spare ones to pass on to anyone else who may be interested. It would be very helpful in publicising our group, if you could take some to your local Pharmacy, Doctors, Opticians, libraries, Sports Centres etc, please take as many as you can use. Is there a link between statins, and aching muscles? Many of us take statin tablets to lower our cholesterol levels. Over the years some people have stopped taking them because of a possible link between statins and muscle inflammation leading to pain. At our last meeting Dr McNulty mentioned that there was a blood test which couldshow if statins were the cause of muscle inflammation, which can cause aching, or if it was simply caused by cramps. If you are concerned about this, then ask your Dr if you can have a Creatine Kinase, or CK blood test. DUK Big Collection at Tesco, many thanks to all the people who helped at the local Prescot collection last year. The total raised from all the collections in the 250 participating stores in the UK was over 175,000. These vital funds raised through the partnership with Tesco, the British Heart Foundation and DUK, will be used to improve the lives of people at risk of, and those living with diabetes. This year`s collection will be on Fri 16th & Sat 17t Continue reading >>

Treatment

Treatment

If you have gestational diabetes, the chances of having problems with the pregnancy can be reduced by controlling your blood sugar (glucose) levels. You'll also need to be more closely monitored during pregnancy and labour to check if treatment is working and to check for any problems. Checking your blood sugar level You'll be given a testing kit that you can use to check your blood sugar level. This involves using a finger-pricking device and putting a drop of blood on a testing strip. You'll be advised: how to test your blood sugar level correctly when and how often to test your blood sugar – most women with gestational diabetes are advised to test before breakfast and one hour after each meal what level you should be aiming for – this will be a measurement given in millimoles of glucose per litre of blood (mmol/l) Diabetes UK has more information about monitoring your glucose levels. Diet Making changes to your diet can help control your blood sugar level. You should be offered a referral to a dietitian, who can give you advice about your diet, and you may be given a leaflet to help you plan your meals. You may be advised to: eat regularly – usually three meals a day – and avoid skipping meals eat starchy and low glycaemic index (GI) foods that release sugar slowly – such as wholewheat pasta, brown rice, granary bread, all-bran cereals, pulses, beans, lentils, muesli and porridge eat plenty of fruit and vegetables – aim for at least five portions a day avoid sugary foods – you don't need a completely sugar-free diet, but try to swap snacks such as cakes and biscuits for healthier alternatives such as fruit, nuts and seeds avoid sugary drinks – sugar-free or diet drinks are better than sugary versions; be aware that fruit juices and smoothies contain s Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Checks Such As Blood Pressure Help You Live Longer | Health | Life & Style | Express.co.uk

Type 2 Diabetes Checks Such As Blood Pressure Help You Live Longer | Health | Life & Style | Express.co.uk

Type 2 diabetes: Blood pressure and cholesterol check could save lives People with diabetes should be having potentially life-saving annual health checks, according to a charity. The recommended annual health checks include measuring blood pressure, cholesterol and a kidney function test, and mean that problems can be identified and treated before they become too serious. A new report published today said missing out on regular recommended diabetes care processes doubles the risk of early death. The National Diabetes Audit 2015-16 Report 2: Complications and Mortality, looked at the link between three of the key annual diabetes health checks recommended by NICE and mortality rates. Type 2 diabetes: People with the condition should have access to health checks It found that the risk of premature death for people with diabetes was more than twice as high for those who had not consistently had their blood glucose, cholesterol and blood pressure checks in the preceding seven years. Annual health checks and effective support for self-management mean some of the serious complications of diabetes can be avoided or treated early, enabling people with diabetes to live long, healthy lives, said Robin Hewings, head of policy at Diabetes UK. It is unacceptable that the risk of early death continues to be so much higher for people with diabetes, a condition that is costing the NHS more than 10 billion every year, the majority of which is spent on managing the devastating complications experienced by people with diabetes and their families. Complications such as heart attacks, stroke and kidney failure devastate families, and cost billions yet still people are missing out. Can you live a normal life with diabetes? Type 2 diabetes: Blood pressure and cholesterol check could save live Continue reading >>

And Diabetes

And Diabetes

Diabetes is a common, life-long condition that occurs when the pancreas doesn’t produce enough insulin, or the insulin it does produce doesn’t work properly. Insulin is a hormone that transfers glucose from the bloodstream into the cells to be used for energy. If you have diabetes, your body cannot make proper use of this glucose so it builds up in the blood instead of moving into your cells. The chances of developing diabetes may depend on a mix of your genes and your lifestyle. Drinking to excess, for example, can contribute to individuals becoming diabetic. Diabetes is a manageable condition. But when it’s not well managed, it is associated with serious health complications including heart disease, stroke, blindness, kidney disease, nerve damage and amputations2. There are two main types of diabetes3 Type 1 diabetes develops if the body can’t produce enough insulin, because insulin-producing cells in the pancreas have been destroyed. It can happen: Because of genetic factors When a virus or infection triggers an autoimmune response (where the body starts attacking itself). People who have this type of diabetes are usually diagnosed before they’re 40 and there’s currently no way to prevent it. It’s the least common type of diabetes – only 10% of all cases are type 14. Type 2 diabetes. Develops when the body can still make some insulin, but not enough, or when the body becomes resistant to insulin. It can happen: When people are overweight and inactive. People who are an ‘apple-shape’ (with lots of fat around the abdomen) have a greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes Because of genetic factors. People who have this type of diabetes are usually diagnosed when they’re over 40, and it’s more common in men. However, more overweight children and Continue reading >>

A Diabetes Test You Can Do Yourself

A Diabetes Test You Can Do Yourself

Are you urinating more often, feeling very thirsty, hungry, or tired? Maybe you’re losing weight. You may have type 2 diabetes. To find out, you can make an appointment with your doctor and have your blood tested for the condition. Or you can go to the drug store, buy a blood glucose meter, and give yourself a diabetes test. An estimated 40 percent of adults with type 2 diabetes don’t know they have it, which means they aren’t getting treatment that could protect them from very serious health problems down the road, such as heart disease, stroke, blindness, and kidney failure. The best option is to go to a doctor if you’re having symptoms of diabetes. But if you’re reluctant to do that, for whatever reason, the next best thing is to buy an over-the-counter diabetes test kit. "If you have a family history of diabetes, are obese, or have high blood pressure, you should test yourself for diabetes, if your doctor hasn’t already done so," says Marvin M. Lipman, M.D., Consumer Reports' chief medical adviser. "By being a proactive person, you might save yourself a lot of grief in the future.” Blood glucose meters can be purchased without a prescription. Models in our Ratings of more than two dozen devices cost $10 to $75. They usually come with 10 lancets, but you might have to buy a pack of test strips separately, which can cost $18 and up; check the package to see what it includes. If the meter doesn’t come with strips, make sure you buy a pack made for that model or you’ll get inaccurate results. Most models come with batteries. Here’s what you need to do next: Fast overnight. Don’t have anything to eat or drink (except water) for at least 8 hours, then test yourself first thing in the morning, before breakfast. Follow directions. Read the manual to ma Continue reading >>

Can You Give Blood? 12 Reasons You Might Not Be Able To Be A Blood Donor

Can You Give Blood? 12 Reasons You Might Not Be Able To Be A Blood Donor

Can you give blood? 12 reasons you might not be able to be a blood donor Heres the lowdown on whos allowed to give blood and who isnt. Did you know that not everyone can give blood? Anyone who gives blood on a regular basis should be widely applauded as this selfless act (which only takes 20 minutes) can be used to enhance the lives of up to three recipients at a time, including life-saving immunisations for chicken pox, hepatitis B and tetanus. Red blood cells, plasma and platelets are a vital lifeline for so many medical treatments, yet only one in 30 of us regularly donates blood which means keeping supply levels topped up is a constant battle. But what about those that can't give blood? Whether youve just finished a course of antibiotics, had a tattoo, or started dating a new partner - there may be a question mark over your eligibility as a blood donor. If youve been feeling under the weather with a chesty cough, sore throat or an active cold sore you shouldnt consider giving blood until youre better. Unfortunately you wont be allowed to give blood if a member of your family has suffered with Creutzfeld-Jakob Disease, a rare and fatal brain disorder. Anyone who has just finished a course of antibiotics within the last seven days or has had any type of infection within the last two weeks will be excluded from donating blood. If youre gay and have recently had anal or oral sex with another man youll need to wait 12 months before giving blood. Any female who discovers her male partner has slept with another man wont be allowed to give blood for 12 months either. Anyone who has slept with a commercial sex worker will also have to wait 12 months before they can donate. Have you been ill with hepatitis or jaundice in the last 12 months? If so, you wont be allowed to give Continue reading >>

Can I Still Donate Blood If I Have Diabetes?

Can I Still Donate Blood If I Have Diabetes?

20 Books People with Diabetes Should Read Your diabetes should be under controlled before you donate blood To donate blood with diabetes, your blood sugar needs to be in your target range . Your A1C should be less than 7%, as recommended by the American Diabetes Association. If your blood sugars and diabetes are not well controlled, you shouldnt donate blood. Its up to you to let the Red Cross know. If you are unsure about the condition of your diabetes, discuss your concerns with your healthcare provider. They will be able to help you decide if giving blood is a good idea, or if you should wait until your diabetes is better managed. You should be in good overall health before you donate blood with diabetes Besides having your blood sugars in control, you should also have other conditions under control. For example, your blood pressure should be less than 180/100 mmHg to give blood, which is higher than 140/90 mmHg that is the recommended blood pressure for people with diabetes. Conversely, if your blood pressure is less than 90/50 mmHg, you wont be able to donate blood. Besides diabetes, they will also ask you about other conditions, and medications which you may be taking. Diabetes medications generally wont keep you from giving blood in the US, but there is a Red Cross list of other medications that shouldnt be taken if you are donating blood, including blood thinners. The Red Cross representative will screen you for conditions and medications which may affect your ability to donate blood with diabetes and related health conditions. Another thing to know is that if you plan to donate platelets, you should not take aspirin or blood thinners for several days prior to your donation. 1 If you have heart complications from your diabetes, there are some things that you ne Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar (hypoglycaemia)

Low Blood Sugar (hypoglycaemia)

A low blood sugar, also called hypoglycaemia or a "hypo", is where the level of sugar (glucose) in your blood drops too low. It mainly affects people with diabetes, especially if you take insulin. A low blood sugar can be dangerous if it's not treated promptly, but you can usually treat it easily yourself. Symptoms of low blood sugar A low blood sugar causes different symptoms for everybody. You'll learn how it makes you feel if you keep getting it, although your symptoms may change over time. Early signs of a low blood sugar include: feeling hungry sweating tingling lips feeling shaky or trembling feeling tired becoming easily irritated, tearful, stroppy or moody turning pale If not treated, you may then get other symptoms, such as: weakness blurred vision difficulty concentrating unusual behaviour, slurred speech or clumsiness (like being drunk) feeling sleepy seizures (fits) collapsing or passing out Hypos can also occur while sleeping, which may wake you up during the night or cause headaches, tiredness or damp sheets (from sweat) in the morning. If you have a device to check your blood sugar level, a reading of less than 4mmol/L is too low and should be treated. Treatment for low blood sugar Treating a low blood sugar yourself Follow these steps if your blood sugar is less than 4mmol/L or you have hypo symptoms: Have a sugary drink or snack – try something like a small glass of non-diet fizzy drink or fruit juice, a small handful of sweets, or four or five dextrose tablets. Test your blood sugar after 10-15 minutes – if it's 4mmol or above and you feel better, move on to step 3. If it's still below 4mmol, treat again with a sugary drink or snack and take another reading in 10-15 minutes. Eat your main meal (containing carbohydrate) if you're about to have it or Continue reading >>

Can I Give Blood, Even Though I Have Diabetes?

Can I Give Blood, Even Though I Have Diabetes?

I am 42 years old, and I have diabetes. Can I donate blood or become an organ donor? — Annette, New Jersey How wonderful it is that you are thinking about donating blood or an organ. It is a constant struggle for the blood banks and transplant centers to maintain an adequate supply. The answer to your question is not the same for both organ and blood donation, so I will first address blood donation. Yes, you can donate blood, if you meet the following criteria: Your sugar level is controlled. You are in good health. Your blood pressure is below 180/100. You are not anemic (low red blood cells). The blood banks usually check for donor eligibility through a series of other questions and tests, so keep in mind that you might still be disqualified. For example, if you have received bovine (beef) insulin since 1980, you may not be eligible to donate. That's because some bovine insulin was made from cattle in the United Kingdom and might carry Creutzfeldt-Jakob (or "mad cow") disease. If you are eligible to donate, make sure you have an adequate meal, drink extra fluids to replace the volume being removed, and stay away from caffeinated beverages on the day of your donation. Around that date, it's important to eat iron-rich foods (such as spinach, kale, and lean red meat). And as always, stay away from fatty foods, which might affect some of the tests done to determine eligibility. Regarding organ donation, let me give you some general information. There are various organs and tissues in the human body that can be transplanted to save lives or cure illnesses. The heart, lungs, kidneys, pancreas, liver, and intestines can be donated. Besides organs, we can donate tissues such as skin, cartilage, tendons, corneas, veins, and heart valves. The donation of an organ can be life Continue reading >>

Can Diabetic People Donate Blood?

Can Diabetic People Donate Blood?

In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration does not have any regulatory restrictions against diabetics donating blood other than if the individual has received bovine source insulin since 1980. The concern here is not the diabetes but rather the bovine spongiform encephalopathy. As bovine source insulins were not widely available in the US, the diabetic would have had to specifically import it from Europe. (Of note, the FDA regulations require that is the donor answers that they are not certain whether they received bovine source insulin, they are deferred. Many donors answer "I do not know" and are therefore deferred when in reality they have not been exposed as it was not available in the US.) Donors may mistake this deferral as being due to their having diabetes. Here is the FDA guidance (Each blood collection center in the US can have criteria more stringent that either the FDA and AABB so there is some variability among blood centers. At the collection center where I work, we allow donors with diabetes, whether controlled with diet, oral hypoglycemics, or insulin, to donate. The only instance where I can think where diabetes would have a negative affect on blood product and therefore an adverse effect on the patient would be in the rare instances where we collect granulocytes. If the donor had poor glucose control, this could impair neutrophil function. Since granulocyte donors are usually stimulated with corticosteroids, which would worsen glucose control, diabetics are deferred from granulocyte donation at my institution so this is not an issue. Continue reading >>

Diabetics Put At Risk As Nhs Rations Blood Test Strips That Monitor Blood Sugar Levels

Diabetics Put At Risk As Nhs Rations Blood Test Strips That Monitor Blood Sugar Levels

Diabetics are being put at risk by vital blood test strips being rationed by the NHS, a report claims. If patients are unable to monitor their blood sugar levels, it could lead to serious complications, such as blindness - and even death. But diabetics are being refused blood glucose testing strips due to NHS rationing, according to a new report. The Diabetes UK study found that people with the condition - who need to test their blood glucose levels several times a day - are having restrictions placed on how many strips they can have, sometimes by GP receptionists. Many Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs), which have come under fire for rationing other NHS services, have guidance on how often people should test their blood glucose and how many boxes of strips should be issued per month. They have also urged GPs to switch patients to cheaper blood glucose meters and cheaper strips (less than £10 for 50) - sometimes against the patient’s will. Diabetes UK said the rationing was a “false economy” because the cost of dealing with complications caused by poorly-managed diabetes, including stroke, heart disease, amputations and blindness, is far higher. A Diabetes UK survey of more than 6,000 people found 25% had not been prescribed enough test strips for their needs. A separate poll of over 1,000 people found 27% of patients had either experienced restrictions or been refused test strips, compared to one in five four years ago. More than half (52%) of these had Type 1 diabetes, which is controlled by insulin. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (Nice) recommends that all Type 1 patients self-monitor blood glucose levels, testing at least four times a day. People who are frequent drivers, take regular exercise or who are at high risk of suffering low Continue reading >>

Can People With Diabetes Give Blood?

Can People With Diabetes Give Blood?

Tweet When it comes to giving blood, there are a number of conditions that can make you ineligible. Unfortunately, people with diabetes won't, in most cases, be eligible to give blood. At least, not in the UK. This is because NHS Blood and Transplant (NHSBT) maintain a policy of refusing blood donations from anybody who may be placed at risk by giving blood. In many cases, this includes people with diabetes. Prediabetes and giving blood People who have been diagnosed with prediabetes are eligible to give blood, as long as they haven't had any heart problems. Insulin and blood donation People who take insulin are not allowed to give blood, which excludes both people with type 1 diabetes and people with type 2 diabetes who are insulin-dependent. The affect of blood donations on insulin levels is considered a risk to the donor's health. Because of this, people who are dependent on insulin are not permitted to give blood. This applies to both regular insulin injections and insulin pump therapy. Diabetes medication and giving blood People who take diabetes medication can give blood, as long as their medication hasn't changed in the last four weeks. Medication changes include changes in dosage, as well as the type of medication taken. If your medication has changed recently, the effect on your blood glucose means that your health would be at risk should you give blood. Diabetes, the heart, and giving blood People with diabetes who have experienced heart problems are, in most cases, ineligible to give blood. This includes people who have: Experienced faintness or giddiness as a result of heart problems Experienced heart failure Had surgery for blocked or narrowed arteries (including amputation) Conditions for giving blood There are a number of conditions that may prevent you f Continue reading >>

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