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Can You Die From Diabetic Shock?

Symptoms Of Diabetic Shock

Symptoms Of Diabetic Shock

Diabetic shock is a medical emergency in patients suffering from diabetes mellitus. It occurs when body contains too much insulin decreasing the blood glucose levels (hypoglycemia). It is also called insulin shock, severe hypoglycemia or simply, low blood sugar. The insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas. The insulin decreases the blood glucose by moving the glucose into the cells. The endogenous insulin secretion is tightly regulated according to the blood glucose levels so that glucose levels neither increase nor decrease disproportionately. In diabetic individuals, this mechanism is disturbed and blood glucose levels rise. To normalize the increased blood glucose levels, insulin and other oral anti-diabetic medicines are given. In diabetic person, the blood glucose may decrease dramatically and diabetic shock may develop if the person: Takes too much insulin or other anti-diabetic medicines by mistake Misses the meal completely after taking insulin Exercises excessively Drinks too much alcohol without eating Symptoms of Diabetic Shock: The glucose is the necessary energy fuel for our brain and nervous system. When blood glucose levels decrease in diabetic shock, energy supply to the brain is decreased causing most of the symptoms that may be divided into mild, moderate or severe depending upon the glucose levels. The mild symptoms are as follows: Excessive sweating The patients with low blood sugar sweat profusely, even in cold temperatures. They may develop the tremors and shakiness within their whole body. Pallor These patients also become pale and cold. These are due to the effects of some blood hormones, catecholamine, that are released in response to low blood sugar. Hunger The low blood glucose levels naturally stimulate the hunger center in the brain ca Continue reading >>

How To Help Someone In A Coma

How To Help Someone In A Coma

Author's Sidebar: Every once in a while, I'll get a phone call or an email message from a person, who has a relative in the hospital in a diabetic coma. I can usually tell by the tone in their voice that they are desperate, afraid and uncertain what to do. These types of phone calls are difficult, because there's nothing that I can do to help them. Usually, I suggest that the person make sure that they share as much information that they can about the person's health with the doctors and nurses. The more that you know about the person's health, the better it can help the doctors understand what is happening. Another thing that I usually suggest is to keep a notebook or journal of what's going on and ask questions, but be respectful to the medical staff. Use the notebook for taking notes when the doctors tell you things about the patient's condition, etc. Otherwise, you will never remember what was said to relay to other family members. When a large family is involved it gets tiring to keep repeating the same information -- so they can read your notebook. Also, write down all the pertinent phone numbers and emails of people who would need to be contacted when changes in condition occur. There are usually a lot of people who want this information and having email addresses makes it easier than trying to call everyone. Keeping notes is also a good way to keep busy. A journal may not only serve as a method for coping with grief, it may also be helpful for the patient when they come out of the coma -- to realize what happened to them. If the person has a smartphone or similar device, usually I'll suggest that they google phrases like "diabetic coma" to better understand what is going on. If the hospital allows it, bring a small CD player or tape player and play some of the p Continue reading >>

Diabetic Coma: Causes, What Happens When You Go Into A Diabetic Coma?

Diabetic Coma: Causes, What Happens When You Go Into A Diabetic Coma?

What is Diabetic Coma and What Happens When You go Into a Diabetic Coma? Diabetic coma is a fatal complication that leads to unconsciousness. Any diabetic person with extremely high (hyperglycemia) or low (hypoglycemia) level of blood sugar can be affected by diabetic coma. A person who has slipped into diabetic coma will not be able to respond to any physical stimulation except for being alive. Diabetic coma can cause death when left untreated or not properly treated on time. There are very less chances of hopes in case of diabetic coma. However one can control his or her health conditions to avoid occurrence of diabetic coma. One should follow their diabetes management plan strictly to avoid a turn towards diabetic coma. Diabetic coma is of three types, ketoacidosis coma, hyperosmolar coma and hypoglycemic coma. Emergency medical facility is required in case of a diabetic coma Hyperglycaemia or hypoglycaemia is caused by huge rate of fluctuation in the blood sugar level leading to diabetic coma. Whenever there is any extreme fluctuation in the glucose level of the blood, the same has to be reported to the doctor immediately. Never forget that "prevention is better than cure". Make yourself more aware on diabetes and learn the likely consequences of the disease to keep yourself alert. Frequently Asked Questions (F.A.Q's) on Diabetic Coma A person can fall in to diabetic coma while suffering from Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). The person will not remain conscious in this sleep-like state. This state which can be caused by hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) or hypoglycemia (low blood glucose), can remain for long time or sometimes lead to death. "Ketones" are generated in the human body when it uses body fat for energy. Ketones are also generated when there is minimum insu Continue reading >>

What To Do If Someone Goes Into Diabetic Shock

What To Do If Someone Goes Into Diabetic Shock

Although most people equate diabetes with high blood sugars, individuals using insulin or certain diabetes pills may experience low blood sugar levels, especially if they miss a meal or exercise more than usual. Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, may be mild and easily treated or can worsen to a medical emergency. When a person suffering from low blood sugar requires the help of others for treatment, this is considered severe hypoglycemia, according to the 2015 practice guidelines of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. Severe hypoglycemia is also referred to as diabetic shock or an insulin reaction. Most low blood sugar episodes are minor and easily recognized and treated. However, severe cases require emergency treatment at home or warrant a 911 call. Video of the Day Hypoglycemia is typically defined as a blood sugar level below 70 mg/dL. Common symptoms of mildly low blood sugar levels include shakiness, dizziness, sweating and a fast heartbeat. As blood sugar levels continue to drop, irritability and confusion are common, and severely low blood sugars can cause nightmares, combative behavior, seizures and unconsciousness. People with longstanding diabetes may have hypoglycemia unawareness, which means they have very subtle or no early warning signs of low blood sugar levels. Hypoglycemia unawareness may be related to diabetes nerve damage; however, people with frequent bouts of severe hypoglycemia are also at risk for this problem. The lack of early warning signs puts a person a greater risk for the serious consequences of low blood sugars. The 15-15 Rule If a person has symptoms of hypoglycemia, and a blood sugar testing kit is available, a test can be done to confirm the blood sugar level. Although levels below 70 mg/dL are considered low, severe Continue reading >>

Diabetic Coma Recovery: What You Need To Know

Diabetic Coma Recovery: What You Need To Know

In people with diabetes, a diabetic coma occurs when severe levels of either high or low uncontrolled blood sugar are not corrected. If treated quickly, a person will make a rapid recovery from a diabetic coma. However, diabetic coma can be fatal or result in brain damage. It is important for people with diabetes to control their blood sugars and know what to do when their blood sugar levels are not within their target range. The severe symptoms of uncontrolled blood sugar that can come before a diabetic coma include vomiting, difficulty breathing, confusion, weakness, and dizziness. Recovery from diabetic coma If a diabetic coma is not treated within a couple of hours of it developing, it can cause irreversible brain damage. If no treatment is received, a diabetic coma will be fatal. In addition, having blood sugar levels that continue to be too low or too high can be bad for long-term health. This remains true even if they do not develop into diabetic coma. Recognizing the early signs of low or high blood sugar levels and regular monitoring can help people with diabetes keep their blood sugar levels within the healthy range. Doing so will also reduce the risk of associated complications and diabetic coma. What is diabetes? Diabetes is a long-term condition in which the body is unable to control the level of a sugar called glucose in the blood. Diabetes is caused by either a lack of insulin, the body's inability to use insulin correctly, or both. In people who don't have diabetes, insulin usually ensures that excess glucose is removed from the bloodstream. It does this by stimulating cells to absorb the glucose they need for energy from the blood. Insulin also causes any remaining glucose to be stored in the liver as a substance called glycogen. The production of insul Continue reading >>

4 Signs Of An Impending Diabetic Pet Emergency

4 Signs Of An Impending Diabetic Pet Emergency

Caring for a diabetic pet can be challenging, but there are certain precautions pet owners can take to prevent a diabetic emergency like hypoglycemia. Preventing a health crisis in a dog or cat with diabetes involves employing a consistent daily routine involving diet, exercise, insulin therapy, and supplementation. It also involves avoiding any and all unnecessary vaccinations. Even the most diligent pet parent can find himself facing a diabetic emergency with a dog or cat. Hypoglycemia is the most common health crisis, and is usually the result of an inadvertent overdose of insulin. Symptoms of hypoglycemia can appear suddenly and include lethargy or restlessness, anxiety or other behavioral changes, muscle weakness or twitching, seizures, coma, and death. At-home treatment for a diabetic pet with hypoglycemia is determined by whether or not the animal is alert. Signs of other potential impending diabetic emergencies include ketones in the urine; straining to urinate or bloody urine; vomiting or diarrhea; or a complete loss of appetite or reduced appetite for several days. By Dr. Becker Caring for a diabetic pet can be quite complex and time consuming. It involves regular monitoring of blood glucose levels, making necessary dietary adjustments, giving insulin injections or oral medications, and keeping a careful eye on your pet at all times. Frequent veterinary visits are the norm for dogs and cats with diabetes, as are the costs associated with checkups, tests, medical procedures, and insulin therapy. And unlike humans with the disease, our pets can’t tell us how they’re feeling or help in their own treatment and recovery. Preventing Diabetic Emergencies The key to preventing diabetic emergencies with a pet involves implementing a consistent daily routine and sti Continue reading >>

Knowing The Signs Of Diabetic Shock Could Save A Life

Knowing The Signs Of Diabetic Shock Could Save A Life

Play Video Play Mute Current Time 0:00 / Duration Time 0:00 Loaded: 0% 0:00 Progress: 0% 0:00 Progress: 0% Stream TypeLIVE Remaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate 1 Chapters Chapters descriptions off, selected Descriptions subtitles off, selected Subtitles captions settings, opens captions settings dialog captions off, selected Captions Audio Track Fullscreen This is a modal window. Caption Settings Dialog Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaque Font Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400% Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadow Font FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall Caps DefaultsDone Diabetic shock, or severe hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), can strike at the most inopportune times, like while you’re driving. “I haven’t ever had an accident, but I’ve sometimes gone home and wondered, ‘I don’t remember driving home.’ I’ve had some close calls,” Laurie Hanauer tells Local 12’s Liz Bonis. It’s often Lori’s husband, Steve, however, who sees that she’s in trouble, as her blood sugar levels plummet. “I can usually tell, a lot of times, before she does, actually. She kind of gets a blank expression on her face, kind of almost moves in slow motion,” he explains. Related: Do I Need Diabetes Education? Diabetic Shock: The Warning Signs Laurie has Type I diabetes, a chronic disease in which there is a high level of sugar (glucose) in the blood and requires insulin to survive. Mich Continue reading >>

Diabetic Shock And Insulin Reactions

Diabetic Shock And Insulin Reactions

Severe hypoglycemia, or diabetic shock, is a serious health risk for anyone with diabetes. Also called insulin reaction, as a consequence of too much insulin, it can occur anytime there is an imbalance between the insulin in your system, the amount of food you eat, or your level of physical activity. It can even happen while you are doing all you think you can do to manage your diabetes. The symptoms of diabetic shock may seem mild at first. But they should not be ignored. If it isn't treated quickly, hypoglycemia can become a very serious condition that causes you to faint, requiring immediate medical attention. Diabetic shock can also lead to a coma and death. It's important that not only you, but your family and others around you, learn to recognize the signs of hypoglycemia and know what to do about them. It could save your life. Hypoglycemia is a low level of blood sugar. The cells in your body use sugar from carbohydrates for energy. Insulin, which normally is made in the pancreas, is necessary for sugar to enter the cells. It helps keep the levels of sugar in the blood from getting too high. It's important to maintain the proper level of sugar in your blood. Levels that are too high can cause severe dehydration, which can be life threatening. Over time, excess sugar in the body does serious damage to organs such as your heart, eyes, and nervous system. Ordinarily, the production of insulin is regulated inside your body so that you naturally have the amount of insulin you need to help control the level of sugar. But if your body doesn't make its own insulin or if it can't effectively use the insulin it does produce, you need to inject insulin as a medicine or take another medication that will increase the amount of insulin your body does make. So if you need to me Continue reading >>

How Do People Die From Diabetes?

How Do People Die From Diabetes?

Diabetes is amongst the foremost leading cause of deaths in most of the countries. Today, the disease is widespread like an epidemic and the several complications which diabetes leads to often make people wonder #Can you Die from Diabetes?”. Well, although the answer to the above question cannot be a straight “Yes”, there is no denying of the fact that diabetes can, in fact, turn out to be a deadly disease. As per a report circulated by Diabetes UK, the life expectancy of a type 1 diabetes patient can be reduced by 20 years, while the same can be reduced by 10 in the case of a type 1 diabetes patient. This, of course, can be controlled by adopting a healthy lifestyle and controlling your blood sugar levels. Some of the ways in which you can die from diabetes include the following: High Blood Glucose Levels: The leading cause of death in diabetic patients is the inability to keep the blood glucose levels under control. Lipid Disorders: With diabetes comes a host of various other complications such as heart diseases, kidney disorders, amongst others. The leading cause of these complications is the disorder of the lipids in a diabetic patient. Diabetes Ketoacidosis: The high sugar level in the blood which is a characteristic of diabetes often leads to the high amount of ketone cells in the body. These ketones could be extremely deadly, causing deaths in patients. Complications: Diabetes is known to cause several complications in patients which adversely affect the functioning of the heart, kidney, eyes, and even nerves of different body parts. Any of these complications can become serious and lead to the death of the patient. Hence, can you die from diabetes? Well, yes you can. However, with proper care, regular exercise, following a proper diet, and taking timely me Continue reading >>

A Silent Danger: When Blood Sugar Goes Down While You Were Sleeping

A Silent Danger: When Blood Sugar Goes Down While You Were Sleeping

You've heard it before—how taking a snack at nighttime after dinner may not be such a good idea, what with the weight gain that may come with it. But if you're a diabetic, that nighttime snack may spell the difference between life and death—literally. “The absence of a nighttime snack when one is usually taken is one cause of nocturnal hypoglycemia,” said Dr. Richard Elwyn Fernando, president of Diabetes Philippines and consultant at St. Luke's Medical Center and Capitol Medical Center. Nocturnal hypoglycemia, as the name implies, happens at night. “It occurs when blood glucose levels fall below 4 millimoles per liter (mmol/l) or 72 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dl). At 40 mg/dl or below, a person can be comatose... In rare cases, it may lead to death,” Fernando said during a media briefing organized by pharmaceutical company Novo Nordisk last May 27. What makes it dangerous is that the person, being asleep, is not aware of what is happening and is not able to seek help. This poses a real concern for diabetics and their families, said Fernando. In a previous interview, former Health Secretary Esperanza Cabral said the body needs glucose to function well. “Kailangan ng katawan ang sugar for energy, metabolism,” she told GMA News. When the blood sugar drops to low levels, a person may experience dizziness, weakness and even fainting, Cabral said. There may also be confusion and disorientation. Fernando said hypoglycemia may lead to complications affecting the heart (decreased heart rate, decreased cardiac output, myocardial contractility), blood vessels (stroke, myocardial infarction, acute cardiac failure, ventricular arrythmia), and brain (seizures, convulsions, coma). While hypoglycemia may occur in both diabetics and non-diabetics alike—“kapag gutom Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Diabetic Shock

Symptoms Of Diabetic Shock

Diabetic shock occurs when blood sugar levels plummet, causing a disruption in the proper functioning of the body and brain. A significant drop in blood sugar due to excessive insulin is called hypoglycemia; diabetic shock is an extreme result of this condition. Diabetic shock, also called insulin shock, is a serious health risk for diabetics. It is important for people to recognize early symptoms so that the diabetic can receive the medical attention he or she needs. Symptoms Mental State The brain is one of the first parts of the body to be affected by this severe blood sugar drop. Some mental changes that could indicate diabetic shock are: Confusion Memory loss Irritability Aggressive behavior Difficulty engaging in conversation Physical Symptoms Physical symptoms to be on alert for are: Dizziness Weakness Lethargy Hunger Sweating Rapid heart rate Headaches Unconsciousness If the hypoglycemia goes untreated, the body will no longer be able to function and the diabetic will faint and become unconscious. This person will not be able to be roused from this state. His or her skin might feel cool and sweaty, and his or her pulse will be either extremely weak or rapid. If untreated, the diabetic may go into a coma. Seizure With the brain not functioning properly, a hypoglycemic person may start to have seizures. When in a seizure, the person will fall to the ground and thrash his or her arms or legs. Muscles may start to twitch erratically. Treatment If the diabetic has not become unconscious or had seizures, the best way to raise his or her blood sugar level is to eat or drink something with sugar in it. Glucose tablets are also a good remedy for hypoglycemia. After eating a snack, the diabetic should test his or her blood sugar every 15 minutes and eat more snacks if the Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Insulin Shock And Diabetic Coma

Diabetes, Insulin Shock And Diabetic Coma

"I'm not sure what's wrong with her. Suddenly she just sat down and seemed really confused. We went for a jog this morning but didn't have time to eat breakfast. We were on the way to get a late lunch when this happened." Diabetes is caused by the body's inability to process and use the type of sugar carried by the bloodstream to the body's cells. Sugar is an essential nutrient. The cells of the body need both oxygen and sugar to survive. The body produces a hormone called insulin, which enables sugar carried by the blood to move into individual cells, where it is used as fuel. If the body does not produce enough insulin, cells become "starved" for sugar. This condition is called diabetes. A person with diabetes must take supplemental insulin to bring insulin levels up to normal. Mild diabetes can sometimes be treated by oral medicine rather than insulin. Diabetes is a serious medical condition. Therefore, all diabetic patients who are sick must be evaluated and treated in an appropriate medical facility. Two specific things can go wrong in the management of diabetes: insulin shock and diabetic coma. Both are emergencies that you must deal with as a first responder. Insulin Shock Insulin shock occurs if the body has enough insulin but not enough blood sugar. A diabetic may take insulin in the morning and then alter the usual routine by not eating or by exercising vigorously. In either case, the level of blood sugar drops and the patient suffers insulin shock. The signs and symptoms of insulin shock are similar to those of other types of shock. Suspect insulin shock if a patient has a history of diabetes or is carrying medical emergency information. Symptoms of insulin shock include: Pale, moist, cool skin. Rapid pulse. Dizziness or headache. Confusion or unconsciousness Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Hypoglycemia Deaths Per Year

Type 1 Diabetes Hypoglycemia Deaths Per Year

Hi, thanks for the article. I am a Type 1 diabetic. I use the Mini Med Paradigm Revel pump also. I have been using an insulin pump for the past 26 years. I started out with MiniMed, and I’ve used their pumps ever since. My question for those that are reading this blog is: Has anybody experienced paralysis when their blood sugars are extremely low? Two years ago, I awoke and I was completely paralyzed on my right side. I could turn my head, and my speech was normal. I woke my husband up, and said “Somethings not right!” He then asked if my blood sugar was low, and at the time I had no symptoms of low blood sugar. He rushed and brought me orange juice anyway. I drank two 8 oz glasses of juice, and slowly my right side began functioning again. Why, it didn’t alarm me more as to being paralyzed with a possible stroke, I don’t know. I called my physician and he immediately wanted me to come in. He then hospitalized me, and they ran a lot of test. All test came back normal. Thankfully. The only conclusion was that my blood sugar had dropped dangerously low, which caused the hemi paralysis. Jump now to this week, and I have had two mornings of waking up with hallucinations. This morning was the worst. I was screaming and crying at the top of my lungs. My husband was holding me and saying “it’s ok, it’s ok” , I was convinced that there were small babies drowning right beside me and I couldn’t move to help them. My right side was slightly paralyzed this morning also. This really scares me. I have some CGM sensors, but don’t always wear one, mainly because they are so expensive, and they only last 4 – 5 days per sensor. I will put one one this afternoon however. Just curious as to has anybody else experienced paralysis with low blood sugars? Continue reading >>

How Long Does Diabetic Coma Last And How Is It Treated?

How Long Does Diabetic Coma Last And How Is It Treated?

When immediately attended and given the right treatment, the diabetic patient can be quickly wakened up from the diabetic coma. Late attention to diabetic coma might take more glucose to be given to the person for better healing. The diabetic coma is connected to the metabolic abnormalities which forces the diabetic patient to the coma. If the diabetic patient stays in the coma for longer periods of time or if the patient is unattended for long time, permanant brain damage may take place or in rare instances it may lead to death of the patient. What is the Prognosis or Outlook for Diabetic Coma? Diabetic coma can be fatal. Late attention may prolong the period of treatment. A person who has been treated for long for diabetic coma is recorded to experience a brain damage. This is a dire situation but can be avoided by taking precautionary measures. Remain alert and aware to save yourself from diabetic coma. Manage your diabetic syndromes effectively to save your life. Even after the sugar level is normalized in a person, he or she will still experience nervous disorders like seizures or talking problems. Problems still persists even after recovering from diabetic coma. The recovery time cannot be predicted and depends on individual case. When immediately attended and given glucose biscuits, a person can be quickly wakened up. Late attention might take more glucose to be given to the person for better healing. Consult your doctor and take necessary guidelines on how to prevent any incident of diabetic coma or any other complexities if you are diabetic. Your doctor may prescribe you tests to determine the exact "dos and don'ts" to you on how to manage diabetes. Diabetic coma is caused by three major reasons: Severe hypolgycemia i.e., low blood sugar level Diabetic ketoacid Continue reading >>

Diabetic Coma Symptoms, What You Need To Know

Diabetic Coma Symptoms, What You Need To Know

Diabetic coma symptoms are something we should all be aware of. It is true that type 1 diabetics are more likely to experience them than type 2, but as diabetics are living longer, the chance of experiencing symptoms is greater. One statistic is that up to 15% of diabetics will go into diabetic coma because of severe hypoglycemia. Coma is another word for unconscious. A diabetic is in a coma if he cannot be wakened and can't respond to sounds and sights. It does not mean the person in a coma will die. These days, with swift blood test results and treatment, a diabetic will come out of a coma very fast. Diabetic medical alert bracelets and necklaces keep us from being misdiagnosed as drunk or epileptic when we cannot speak. But just knowing you are a diabetic is not enough. If you are taken to an emergency room, the doctors look for diabetic alert charms. But diabetic coma symptoms still need to be diagnosed correctly so the proper treatment is started, because there are three different types of coma, and the complications of all three are brain damage and death. Oddly, either chronic high blood sugar or sudden low blood sugar can trigger diabetic coma symptoms. That's why it's good to know how we react to both of them. With high blood sugar, or hyperglycemia, you feel thirsty and have to urinate more often. You feel fatigue, and there is always nausea and vomiting, often for days. You can feel short of breath and have stomach pain. There is a fruity or acetone smell to your breath and a fast heartbeat. The symptoms are not sudden. But low blood sugar comes on very swiftly and can wake you out of a sound sleep. You feel shaky, nervous, tired and either hungry or nauseated. You sweat a lot and your heart races. You can get irritated and even aggressive for no reason, and Continue reading >>

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