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Can You Check Your Blood Sugar In Your Arm?

How Is The Meter That You Can Test On Your Arm | Diabetic Connect

How Is The Meter That You Can Test On Your Arm | Diabetic Connect

How is the meter that you can test on your arm ?? By dyanne Latest Reply2009-12-06 12:26:17 -0600 I had a friend call me tonight whom just found out she is also diabetic and was asking me what type of meter she should get. She wanted to know about the one where you can test on your arm. Does any one have any experience with it? And if so do you like it better? Hi. I have tried both types of meter. Started out with a finger one from Ultra. I have been a typist most of my life. Never could write worth anything that someone could read so I learned to type in High School and have used that method ever since. My fingers are sensitive.I have switched to aFreestyle Freedom meter. I use it on my left arm mostly down around the wrist above where a watch goes. I figure it is about 80% accurate vs 95 on a finger. Since my readings are all over the spectrum anyway, I can afford a 20% difference. Try this. Take a reading at your wrist, then take a reading on your arm near the joint where the meat is. Do this a minute or so apart. There will be a difference in the readings depending on where you test. This is because you are out of the main stream of the blood. I find the one down by the wrist is more accurate. The other thing I love about this meter (which most meters probably have) is the average feature. It keeps a running score average of your readings for you. I am on medicare for the meter sticks. They require a document every six months or so with a month's worth of readings. It is right there in the meter. My only criticism of the meter is I use a linux operating system called Ubuntu 7.10 and I would like a download of the data from the meter from this machine to a USB2 port. They only do the old serial port for downloads and it is strictly windows oriented. I would also lik Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Testing, Pain, And Promise

Blood Sugar Testing, Pain, And Promise

All of us have had at least one fingerstick test at the doctor’s office. Children get them. Pregnant women, too. Blood sugar testing is done on everyone. But when you have diabetes, sticking your finger is a daily reality. For people with Type 1, the checks must sometimes be done hourly. When I developed Type 2, the doctors said to monitor once a day, and my journey with glucose monitoring began. The first blood glucose meter I received needed a large suspended drop of blood from my finger, so my fingertip stayed sore for days. It was not hard to tell which fingertip to avoid for the next blood check. After starting on insulin, I had to monitor several times a day, but by then the meters had improved. Only a tiny drop was enough for a blood check, and the lancets were needle thin. No mark was left afterward, so it was impossible to tell which finger I used last. However, every blood sugar check still meant getting a drop of blood and facing the possibility of pain. There was also the cost of a test strip and lancet, which needed to be disposed of in the proper way. That process has not changed over the last 15 years. Is pain from blood sugar testing avoidable or are traditional, invasive methods the only options available? Doing research on diabetes for my website, I found out that there are people with Type 2 who refuse to monitor. I read about a doctor who had worked in the field of diabetes research and blood sugar monitoring for years. Then he himself developed Type 2 diabetes. He followed his doctor’s advice faithfully about diet and exercise and took his medicine every day, too. But he absolutely would not check his own blood sugar at home. He is just one among many with diabetes who cannot face pricking a finger and using a glucose monitor. The blood, the pai Continue reading >>

Ways To Test Your Blood Sugar

Ways To Test Your Blood Sugar

Everyone with diabetes should test their blood sugar (glucose) levels regularly. Knowing the results lets you tweak your strategy for keeping the disease in check, as needed. Regular testing can also help you avoid getting long-term health problems that can stem from the condition. Research shows that in people with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes, sticking to your target blood sugar and HbA1c levels makes complications less likely. 1. Traditional Home Glucose Monitoring You prick your finger with a lancet (a small, sharp needle), put a drop of blood on a test strip, and then place the strip into a meter that displays your blood sugar levels. Meters vary in features, portability, speed, size, cost, and readability (with larger displays or spoken instructions if you have vision problems). Devices deliver results in less than 15 seconds and store this information for future use. Some meters also calculate an average blood sugar level over a span of time. Some also feature software kits that take information from the meter and display graphs and charts of your past test results. Blood sugar meters and strips are available at your local pharmacy. 2. Meters That Test Other Parts of Your Body. Some devices let you test you upper arm, forearm, base of the thumb, and thigh. These results may differ from the blood sugar levels gotten from a fingertip stick. Levels in the fingertips show changes more quickly. This is especially true when your sugar is changing fast, like after a meal or after exercise. If you have symptoms of low blood sugar, don’t rely on test results from other parts of your body. 3. Continuous Glucose Monitoring System Some of these devices are combined with insulin pumps. They're not as accurate as finger-stick glucose results. But they can help you find p Continue reading >>

Fda Approves First Blood Sugar Monitor Without Finger Prick

Fda Approves First Blood Sugar Monitor Without Finger Prick

U.S. regulators have approved the first continuous blood sugar monitor for diabetics that doesn't need backup finger prick tests. Current models require users to test a drop of blood twice daily to calibrate, or adjust, the monitor. The pain of finger sticks and the cost of testing supplies discourage many people from keeping close tabs on their blood sugar, which is needed to manage insulin use and adjust what they eat. Abbott's new FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System, approved Wednesday by the Food and Drug Administration, uses a small sensor attached to the upper arm. Patients wave a reader device over it to see the current blood sugar level and changes over the past eight hours. Most of the 30 million Americans with diabetes use standard glucose meters, which require multiple finger pricks each day and only show current sugar level. More-accurate continuous glucose monitoring devices are used by about 345,000 Americans. But most don't do the finger pricks to calibrate them and may get inaccurate readings, said Dr. Timothy Bailey, who helped test FreeStyle Libre. "We're able to lower blood sugar safely" with this technology, said Bailey, director of the Advanced Metabolic Care and Research Institute in California. He receives consulting fees from various diabetes device makers. Too-high blood sugar levels can damage organs and lead to heart attacks, strokes, blindness and amputations. Very low blood sugar can cause seizures, confusion and loss of consciousness. Abbott's device was approved for adults with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes and should be available in pharmacies within months. The company, based near Chicago, did not disclose the price of the reader or the sensors. Abbott's system can't be used with an insulin pump, a device worn against the skin th Continue reading >>

Alternate Blood Sugar Testing Sites

Alternate Blood Sugar Testing Sites

An alternative blood testing site is a body location other than your fingertip where you can reliably test your blood glucose. Common alternative blood testing sites include the palm, forearm, upper arm, thigh and calf. Using alternative body sites for blood sugar testing has been a relief to many with type 1 diabetes who have suffered with chronically sore fingers from multiple tests each day. Of course, people with diabetes have been using alternative sites for years -- but only recently do we have research available to show this is OK (meaning, these sites give accurate results). Also, the majority of (but not all) glucose meters are designed to support alternative testing. Before you use an alternative site, discuss it with your doctor. Read the instructions for your blood glucose meter and only use sites that are identified in the instructions. Keep in Mind That Blood Glucose Results May Vary with Alternate Sites It is important to know that blood sugar results can vary depending on when and where you test your blood. For example, if you get a sample of blood from a testing site on your thigh and your blood sugar is going up significantly at the time, you may get a delayed result. In other words, the result you receive may be what your blood sugar was 20 to 30 minutes ago but it is not accurate for the present moment. You might be able to speed up the process slightly by rubbing the area until it is warm to increase blood flow to that site. This doesn’t mean you shouldn’t use alternative test sites but they may not give an accurate result when glucose levels are apt to change rapidly, such as after a meal, after taking insulin, during exercise or when you are sick or experiencing stress. When you need an immediate, present-moment result, such as when you suspec Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Testing Goes Wireless, Painless For Diabetes Patients

Blood Sugar Testing Goes Wireless, Painless For Diabetes Patients

Open this photo in gallery: Now that is cool: Testing your sugar without needles and without blood droplets. In Europe, the medical company Abbott has just released its FreeStyle Libre system, which may usher in a revolution in diabetes care. And both doctors and patients can't wait. Prabahar Gopalakrishnan, 26, is a type 1 diabetic who has taken daily insulin injections since the age of seven. "I've probably pricked my fingers almost 15,000 times so far," he tells me. When I tell him about the new system, he finds it hard to believe. "You mean I might never have to poke myself again?" Chandroutie Permaul, a 65-year-old woman with type 2 diabetes, also finds routine self-testing problematic. "My flesh gets so tender," she complains. "And when I wash the dishes, it just burns and burns." These hassles may soon be a thing of the past. The Libre system uses an advanced, coin-size sensor that is worn on the arm for two weeks at a time. According to the instructions, a tiny "filament is inserted just under the skin and held in place with a small adhesive pad." It comes with a hand-held scanner which looks like a largish smartphone. Swiping the scanner over the sensor instantly measures your sugar, displaying the result in "less than one second." Speaking at the European launch in Vienna, Jared Watkin, a technology vice-president at Abbott, also demonstrated that you can even scan the sensor "through your clothes." You don't even need to calibrate the system with a test drop of blood. That's remarkable – and unheard of in the diabetes world. "Patients would fly with this," says Dr. Susan Burlacoff, a Toronto family physician. She believes there will be great utility of this bloodless system in her own practice. "It's painless, convenient, without needles and [patients] woul Continue reading >>

Painless Blood Sugar Testing

Painless Blood Sugar Testing

If you learned how to test your blood sugar in the hospital or from a nurse in your doctor's office who doesn't themselves have diabetes, you may have been taught the wrong technique for testing and may be causing yourself unnecessary pain. Here are some tips about how to test painlessly drawn from my own experience and that of people who have posted on this topic on the alt.support.diabetes newsgroup over the past decade. Where to Test The least painful spot to do a blood sugar test is on the side of your finger. Do not test on the pad of the finger. That hurts! Many of us find that our pinkies have the best blood flow. I only use my pinky and ring fingers on both hands for testing. Dr. Bernstein recommends using the top of the finger, underneath the nail. For me, that location hurts. Be sure to adjust the depth of your lancet to the shallowest depth before you test. That is usually 1 on most lancets. If that setting it is too shallow to draw blood, adjust it up one notch and try again. As you get callouses on your fingers from testing, you may need to adjust the depth again. What About Testing on Your Arm? When you test your arm rather than your finger tip, the reading you get will lag about 15 minutes behind the reading you would have gotten at your finger tip. This means arm testing is worthless for detecting hypos. I have found it hurts more to test on my arm than on the sides of my fingers. Alcohol Toughens Skin There is no need to dab your skin with alcohol before testing. Dr. Bernstein reports that neither he nor his patients have ever developed infections after testing without alcohol. I have not used alcohol for nine and a half years and have never developed an infection from a blood test either. The use of alcohol over time will dry out and toughen your skin, Continue reading >>

New Device For Diabetes Eliminates The Need For Painful Finger Pricking

New Device For Diabetes Eliminates The Need For Painful Finger Pricking

Source:Supplied AUSTRALIAN adults with diabetes now have the option of using a new glucose monitoring device, which eliminates the need for regular finger pricking. The system, which has been available in Europe for several years, involves a small sensor the size of a 20 cent coin worn on the upper arm for 14 days. Many diabetics have to draw blood and test their blood glucose levels up to 12 times a day. Instead of doing that, they can now scan the sensor and get a reading in less than a second. The Abbotts FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System also displays an eight-hour history and a trend arrow showing the direction the glucose is heading. The device will make life easier for people living with diabetes who use insulin, whether type 1 or type 2, said Diabetes Australia spokeswoman Renza Scibilia. Source:Supplied “Finger pricking is painful, inconvenient and intrusive, which is often why people don’t check their levels as often as they ideally should,” she told news.com.au. “It’s very different from just wearing a device on your arm and scanning it.” The disposable, water-resistant sensor needs to be replaced every 14 days and costs $95, while the reader is the same price. The Freestyle Libre can be purchased online via the official website. Ashley Ng, 26, from Melbourne, has been testing the device for two weeks and is a big fan. “I didn’t realise how much a burden finger-pricking was until I stopped,” Ms Ng told news.com.au. “Normally I’d prick myself 6-10 times a day. It’s something that I’ve always lived with and gotten used to, and now I don’t have to do it. She said she felt no pain when inserting the sensor into her arm. “The first couple of days I was like ‘Is this for real?’ I was feeling really great. My fingers f Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Monitoring: Tips To Monitor Your Blood Sugar Successfully

Blood Glucose Monitoring: Tips To Monitor Your Blood Sugar Successfully

Blood sugar testing is an essential part of managing and controlling diabetes. Knowing your blood sugar level quickly can help alert you to when your level has fallen or risen outside the target range. In some cases, this will help prevent an emergency situation. You’ll also be able to record and track your blood glucose readings over time. This will show you how exercise, food, and medicine affect your levels. Conveniently enough, testing your blood glucose level can be done just about anywhere and at any time. In as little as a minute or two, you can test your blood and have a reading using an at-home blood sugar meter or blood glucose monitor. Learn more: Choosing a glucose meter » Whether you test several times a day or only once, following a testing routine will help you prevent infection, return true results, and better monitor your blood sugar. Here’s a step-by-step routine you can follow: Wash your hands with warm, soapy water. Then dry them well with a clean towel. If you use an alcohol swab, be sure to let the area dry completely before testing. Prepare a clean lancet device by inserting a clean needle. This spring-loaded device that holds the needle is what you will use to prick the end of your finger. Remove one test strip from your bottle or box of strips. Be sure to close the bottle or box completely to avoid contaminating the other strips with dirt or moisture. All modern meters now have you insert the strip into the meter before you collect blood, so you can add the blood sample to the strip when it is in the meter. With some older meters, you put the blood on the strip first, and then put the strip in the meter. Stick the side of your fingertip with the lancet. Some blood sugar machines allow for testing from different sites on your body, such as t Continue reading >>

A Study Of Forearm Versus Finger Stick Glucose Monitoring.

A Study Of Forearm Versus Finger Stick Glucose Monitoring.

Diabetes Technol Ther. 2002;4(1):13-23; discussion 45-7. A study of forearm versus finger stick glucose monitoring. Research and Development, Roche Diagnostics Corporation, Indianapolis, Indiana 46256, USA. [email protected] New glucose monitoring systems are now being launched into the market that offer the patient the option to test from an alternate site (forearm) with less pain. What is not clearly understood by patients and Health Care Providers is whether glucose measurements taken from the forearm are the same as the measurements taken from the finger. The objective of this study was to determine if results from the forearm are the same as results from the finger in normal use by the diabetic patient over a day. In clinical studies conducted in four physician's offices, patients were asked to measure their glucose from their forearm and finger ten times a day for ten days. The patients for this evaluation used the TheraSense FreeStyle glucose monitoring system. A total of 190 patients (of which 30% were type 1 and 70% type 2 diabetics) participated in this study. Patients also concluded their participation in this study with a post study questionnaire. A total of 18,036 data points were collected and used for analysis. Data was separated into four groups: preprandial, 1-h postprandial, 2-h postprandial, and bedtime. In three of the four groups, the mean bias was less than 1 mg/dL or %, whereas the 1-h postprandial group showed a mean bias of -6.02 mg/dL or %. The differences in bias between the 1-h postprandial to the preprandial and the 1-h postprandial to the 2-h postprandial, were statistically significant with a p value of <0.0001. Comparison of bias at 2-h postprandial to the preprandial bias was not statistically significant with a p value of 0.8073, ind Continue reading >>

Glucose Monitoring At The Arm

Glucose Monitoring At The Arm

Risky delays of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia detection Abstract OBJECTIVE—We have examined whether rapid changes in blood glucose (BG) result in clinically relevant differences between capillary BG values measured at the forearm and the fingertip and whether local rubbing of the skin before blood sampling can diminish such differences. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—Capillary BG samples were collected every 15 min for 3–5 h from the fingertip and the forearm of 17 insulin-treated diabetic patients and analyzed with different glucose monitors (FreeStyle, One Touch Ultra, and Soft-Sense). In a subgroup of patients (n = 8), local rubbing of the forearm skin was performed before blood sampling. A rapid increase in BG was induced by oral administration of glucose, and subsequently, a rapid decrease in glucose was induced by intravenous administration of insulin. RESULTS—In the fasting state, the BG values at the fingertip and at the forearm were similar (7.8 ± 2.4 vs. 7.2 ± 2.3 mmol/l, P = 0.06). However, during rapid increase in glucose, BG values at the fingertip were consistently higher than at the forearm (maximal difference 4.6 ± 1.2 mmol/l, P < 0.001). During rapid decrease in glucose, lower BG values were recorded at the fingertip (maximal difference to forearm 5.0 ± 1.0 mmol/l, P < 0.001). At the forearm, BG was delayed by a median of 35 min (P < 0.01) in relation to the fingertip. Rubbing of forearm skin decreased the observed differences but with a large intraindividual and interindividual variability. There were no obvious device-specific differences. CONCLUSIONS—To avoid risky delays of hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia detection, BG monitoring at the arm should be limited to situations in which ongoing rapid changes in BG can be excluded. Alternate sit Continue reading >>

7 Ways To Make Blood-sugar Testing Less Painful

7 Ways To Make Blood-sugar Testing Less Painful

No more sore fingers You need to prick your finger to obtain a drop of blood for home blood-glucose monitoring. Does it hurt? Some people say yes, but they've gotten used to it. Others say they find it virtually painless. Only you can decide. But here are 7 tried-and-true methods for making it less painful. Find out what works for you When Nancy Chiller Janow, age 54, was first diagnosed with type 2, her endocrinologist "punctured me so hard in the middle of the finger pad, that I never wanted to test again," she says. "It really hurt." Janow's internist recommended she experiment to find a more comfortable spot. "I did and finally found that testing on the side of the pad, close to the nail, is the most comfortable," she says. "I often use my thumb. Maybe because that's more callused, it's more comfortable and doesn't hurt when I stick it." Avoid pricking the finger’s tip This part of the finger is especially sensitive and can be more painful than other parts of your finger. Aim for the side of your finger. Fingertips are a poor choice because they tend to have more nerve endings, says Nadine Uplinger, director of the Gutman Diabetes Institute at Albert Einstein Healthcare Network in Philadelphia. "We teach people to monitor on the sides of their fingers, not down by the knuckle but up by the nail bed on the fleshy part and not on the tips," she says. "Another thing to do is pinch or put pressure on where you're going to test to seal it and that seems to minimize pain." Continue reading >>

Alternate Site Blood Glucose Monitoring — The Facts

Alternate Site Blood Glucose Monitoring — The Facts

Over the past few years, a debate has been taking place about the use of sites other than the fingers for monitoring blood glucose levels. Before filling you in on the debate, let’s make sure you have the background, know what the alternate sites are and are versed in the pros and cons of using them.facts THE BACKGROUND Since the early 1980s, when people with diabetes were introduced to blood glucose monitoring, they have been using their fingers to obtain blood samples. The fingers became the accepted source for blood for nearly two decades. As increasing numbers of people with diabetes started to manage their diabetes intensively, doing upwards of four to six blood checks per day, a need arose to be able to use alternate sites for blood samples. This need gave rise to manufacturers developing monitors that were accurate and approved for alternate sites. Alternate sites Forearm Upper arm Fleshy side of the palm by the pinky Fleshy area between the thumb and index finger Thigh Calf THE ADVANTAGES The biggest advantage of alternate site testing is less pain. That’s because alternate sites have fewer nerve endings than fingertips. The second advantage is that you can give your well-worn, and possibly sore, fingers a rest. Third, you might be willing to check your blood glucose more often if there is less pain involved. Finally, alternate sites are less likely to have food, dirt, grease or other contaminants that can ruin the blood sample. THE DEBATE Several years ago, a couple of meters were approved by the Food and Drug Administration for alternate site testing. (The FDA is the government agency that approves medical devices, including blood glucose meters.) Following the approval, some research was published about the lack of accuracy of alternate site testing. The Continue reading >>

Beyond The Finger: Alternate Blood Sugar Testing Sites

Beyond The Finger: Alternate Blood Sugar Testing Sites

If you’re tired of the pain of finger sticking and the calluses that can develop over time, alternate site testing could be an option for blood sugar testing, especially for those who want to do frequent checks. In a study published in the Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, researchers compared patients’ satisfaction with fingertip blood sugar testing and testing using an alternate site, in this case the palm of the hand. They found that people who test their blood sugar levels four times a day like the idea of using alternative site testing approaches. However, they also found that testing on their palm with regular lancing supplies didn’t always provide easy access to get enough blood for a test strip. Managing Diabetes With Alternate Site Testing: The Choices “The palm of the hand is good because it’s capillary blood and it’s going to be current blood sugar,” said certified diabetes educator Sacha Uelmen, RD, program director of the outpatient diabetes education program at the University of Michigan Health System in Ann Arbor. Your thumb is another option if you’re tired of using fingers. Other possible locations include the thigh, calf, upper arm, and forearm. However, sites other than your palm are recommended only if your blood sugar is stable at the time of testing. Certified diabetes educator Hector Verastigui, RN, clinical research coordinator at the Texas Diabetes Institute in San Antonio, said he teaches patients to test using their arms as an option if they are interested in alternate site testing. However, there are disadvantages to this method as well. “Most patients that I teach alternative site testing will say that forearm testing is less painful but difficult to obtain a blood sample, and most patients will return to fingerti Continue reading >>

How And When To Test Your Blood Sugar With Diabetes

How And When To Test Your Blood Sugar With Diabetes

Most people with diabetes need to check their blood sugar (glucose) levels regularly. The results help you and your doctor manage those levels, which helps you avoid diabetes complications. There are several ways to test your blood sugar: From Your Fingertip: You prick your finger with a small, sharp needle (called a lancet) and put a drop of blood on a test strip. Then you put the test strip into a meter that shows your blood sugar level. You get results in less than 15 seconds and can store this information for future use. Some meters can tell you your average blood sugar level over a period of time and show you charts and graphs of your past test results. You can get blood sugar meters and strips at your local pharmacy. Meters That Test Other Sites: Newer meters let you test sites other than your fingertip, such as your upper arm, forearm, base of the thumb, and thigh. You may get different results than from your fingertip. Blood sugar levels in the fingertips show changes more quickly than those in other testing sites. This is especially true when your blood sugar is rapidly changing, like after a meal or after exercise. If you are checking your sugar when you have symptoms of hypoglycemia, you should use your fingertip if possible, because these readings will be more accurate. Continuous Glucose Monitoring System: These devices, also called interstitial glucose measuring devices, are combined with insulin pumps. They are similar to finger-stick glucose results and can show patterns and trends in your results over time. You may need to check your blood sugar several times a day, such as before meals or exercise, at bedtime, before driving, and when you think your blood sugar levels are low. Everyone is different, so ask your doctor when and how often you should chec Continue reading >>

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