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Can You Be Misdiagnosed With Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes - Can You Be Misdiagnosed? : Babybumps

Gestational Diabetes - Can You Be Misdiagnosed? : Babybumps

Background: I failed the 1 hour by 1 point - My dr. uses a cut off of 135, I had 136. I failed the 3 hour - my fasting was 68, 1 hr 183, 2 hr 161, 3 hr passed (but don't remember my number). I don't have any risk factors for GD, I am a normal healthy weight, I eat a very healthy and balanced diet and get regular exercise...though I know that doesn't preclude me from getting it. So I have been testing my blood sugar for a few days. I got a monitor from a friend but don't technically have my monitor from the doctor yet (I get that Wednesday). I have been testing to see what might spike my blood sugar (for science, since I'm not actually tracking my numbers yet according to the dr.). Sunday my numbers were as follows (fasting, 2 hrs after breakfast, lunch, dinner): 65, 77, 87, 72. I ate WAY worse than I would normally eat - including a peanut butter sandwich, a whole chipotle burrito, pineapple and sugary yogurt, and fruit snacks! Saturday: 68, 79, 90, 86. Again, I ate terribly (for science and it was father's day)... PB&J, empandas, fried plantains, a burger, ice cream, fruit salad, chips, corn salsa, brownie, etc. Basically I've loaded up on carbs AND sugar and still my two hour numbers are... totally normal?! Now, I assure you I'm back to eating my normal diet today, so far my numbers are 69 and 70. I normally eat very healthy and balanced. I just wanted to see what would impact my numbers and to see if I've been "uncontrolled." But, it seems my blood sugar is perfectly controlled no matter what I eat. Is it possible I don't have gestational diabetes?! I am not seeking medical advice, I am going to follow all of the guidelines laid out by my OB... but I hate having this GD label when it seems like my body is handling ALL food, carbs and sugar included, just fine! Has a Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Malpractice During Pregnancy

Gestational Diabetes: Malpractice During Pregnancy

Gestational Diabetes: Malpractice During Pregnancy Gestational Diabetes: Malpractice During Pregnancy Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) is an intolerance of carbohydrates that appears during pregnancy. In simpler terms, it is diabetes while being pregnant which can complicate childbirth. The most common concern is the size of the child. Delivering large children can lead to a more difficult labor and delivery that may result in shoulder dystocia or a brachial plexus injury . A recent study using new diagnostic criteria found that 18% of pregnancies are affected by gestational diabetes, much higher than previous estimates of 1-14%. Think about that. Almost one in five pregnant women. Doctors should be on the lookout. Still, misdiagnosis of gestational diabetes is all too common , carrying risks to both mother and fetus. Children born to mothers with GDM may have excessive birth weights resulting in high rates of cesarean delivery which carries the risk of trauma to both mother and child. Babies also have a risk of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) and hyperinsulinemia (high blood insulin). They are also at risk for glucose intolerance and long-term obesity. Following pregnancy, women who have gestational diabetes have a 40 to 60% chance of developing diabetes in the next 10 to 20 years and an estimated 5 to 10% of women who have had GDM develop diabetes immediately following pregnancy. Current practice has been under recent review to correctly diagnose GDM, with a goal of increasing the proportion of women diagnosed. Canadian healthcare guidelines suggest that HbA1c levels be 6.0% (normal), fasting blood glucose 3.8 to 5.2mmol/L, one hour post-prandial (post meal/glucose challenge) glucose of 5.5 to 7.7mmol/L and two-hour postprandial glucose of 5.0 to 6.6mmol/L. Similar Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: 'i Was Misdiagnosed By My Doctor' - Kidspot

Gestational Diabetes: 'i Was Misdiagnosed By My Doctor' - Kidspot

On the day I was booked in for my three-hour glucose tolerance test I woke feeling like death. Already two and a half weeks into battling a severe flu you know the pee-yourself-coughing kind juggling a toddler and severe sleep deprivation due to the constant coughing and blocked sinuses, I knew I was about to endure the longest three hours of my life. With the drink down the hatch, and only the first of three blood samples taken, I already had the sense all was not right. I was far more affected physically than the last time and needed to lie down immediately to keep me from fainting. I managed to keep the drink down and had blood drawn two more times. I left relieved it was over, but instinctively knowing this was not the end of the saga. The following Monday, I receive a call from my obstetricians office. I am on the set of a photoshoot and busy instructing the photographer where to set up, briefing the hair and makeup artist and getting the looks I will style on the model ready. I answer my phone and its the obstetricians secretary. We exchange hellos and then she says, you have gestational diabetes. I am completely taken by surprise, and was left speechless as she tells me she is booking me in to see an endocrinologist ASAP and they will be in touch to let me know about the diet I need to start on straight away and the apparatus I will need to buy to test my blood daily at multiple times. We hang up and I stand shell-shocked, tears flow as I ring my husband and tell him the news. Then I think about it, I was so sick the day I had the test, could that have skewed the results? I ring my obstetrician back and pose my theory, and request a retest. He declines and insists that I continue with the next course of action. With an appointment to see the endocrinologist lock Continue reading >>

My Diabetes Was Misdiagnosed—and It's A Lot More Common Than You'd Think

My Diabetes Was Misdiagnosed—and It's A Lot More Common Than You'd Think

The diagnosis from my primary care doctor was type 2 diabetes, but the specialist sitting across from me could tell that was wrong just by looking at me. I was 33 years old and slim, a new mom who'd been diagnosed with gestational diabetes while pregnant. All the hard work I'd been doing for the last year to control my blood sugar levels—fitness boot camp, a diabetic diet with drastically reduced carb intake—wasn't working anymore, so I'd booked an appointment with Jessica Castle, MD, an endocrinologist at the Harold Schnitzer Diabetes Health Center of Oregon Health and Science University. Castle told me I didn't have type 2 diabetes, the kind characterized by insulin resistance, where the body's cells are unable to fully use the insulin the pancreas makes. I had type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune disease that destroys the beta cells of the pancreas that produce insulin. MORE: 9 Everyday Things Making Your Gut Really Unhappy "It's OK," said Castle, handing me a box of tissues. "You're not the first person to cry in this office. You're not even the first person to cry in this office today." Type 2 diabetes, tied to obesity and genetic predisposition, has become an epidemic in the United States. Ninety to 95% of all 30 million diabetes cases are type 2. Type 1 diabetes is less common, representing approximately 5% of cases, with most of those surfacing during childhood. gettyimages-200454896-001-sweets-jw-ltd.jpg But those numbers may not be entirely accurate: A 2005 study found that about 10% of those over age 40 diagnosed as type 2 actually tested positive for the antibody cells associated with type 1 diabetes. For those younger than 35, the rate was closer to 25%. Castle says her practice sees multiple cases every year of people misdiagnosed with type 2. Many primary c Continue reading >>

Misdiagnosis Of Gd? The Bump

Misdiagnosis Of Gd? The Bump

You are still early. What is it going to hurt to keep checking? If your doc was concerned enough to give you the diagnosis, go with it. You are lucky your numbers right now are ok with whatever you eat. I wish I could say the same. Unfortunately, at 23 weeks I COULD eat almost anything. NOW? I'm on 16 units of Lantus daily and can barely have 2 servings of carbs/meal without being in the 130s. The placenta and hormones surge around 28/32/36 weeks and things get worse. I'd hate for you to fight your diagnosis, not get retested, and end up with complications to you and baby. VBACS wi GD are NOT impossible. They can be done. Relax, and enjoy your food Birth: 10lbs 11oz, 21.5 inches <> 1 mo: 14lbs 7oz, 23.5 inches 2mo: 18lbs 15oz, 25.5 inches <> 4mo: 26lbs 8oz, 27.5 inches 6mo: 29lbs 8oz, 30 inches <> 9mo: 32lbs, 32 inches 12 mo: 37lbs, 34.5 inches <> 15 mo: 38lbs 6 oz, 36 inches. 20.5 inch noggin 2yr: 47 lbs, 42 inches. 21.5 inch head. Woah. With my previous pregnancy, as long as your GD is diet controlled, it should not affect your birthing options. Mine was. I didn't even get any extra ultrasounds like other GD moms get. It seems to me as PPers have said, that it won't hurt the baby to follow the GD plan. It also sounds like youll be able to tolerate more carbs than most GDers. ETA: My dr even cut my pricks down to once a day. I just had to alternate between the 4 times so that he would be able to see if there was a change to be concerned about. So it may not be the extreme life change you seem to fear it will be. With my previous pregnancy, as long as your GD is diet controlled, it should not affect your birthing options. Mine was. I didn't even get any extra ultrasounds like other GD moms get. It seems to me as PPers have said, that it won't hurt the baby to follow th Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Is It Overdiagnosed?

Gestational Diabetes Is It Overdiagnosed?

Gestational Diabetes Is It Overdiagnosed? by Nicola Filed Under: Fertility and Preconception Hello there! Its Fertile Friday again. This time last weekwe wereflying to Scottsdale for a lovely weekend of R&R (with maybe one conference lecture presentation thrown in!). This week its a quiet, normal weekend, and that actually feels really good! Today I want to ask the question Gestational Diabetes is it overdiagnosed? I know for myself, and for several other mamas in my circle, that the whole issue of gestational diabetes was a thorn in their side during pregnancy, perhaps unnecessarily. Before I go any further, let me be clear that Gestational diabetes (GD) is a very real issue, with very real and potentially very serious effects for both mother and baby. I am not making light of that, nor am I implying that all cases of GD are misdiagnosed. Ill just tell you about my situation, and say that I am not the only one who has had this experience. The more I talked to people, the more prevalent this type of situation seemed to be. I went into my pregnancy 510 and 140 lbs. I gained a healthy amount of weight during pregnancy (32 lbs all together). Because of my advanced maternal age, the only test I was offered was a 2-hour glucose tolerance test. Its the grossest thing where you have to guzzle this sugary, syrupy liquid, and they measure your blood sugar 1 hour later and 2 hours later. Lets just say that my body is not familiar with sugary, syrupy liquids. I dont eat any sugar, except for a piece of pie at Thanksgiving and another one at Christmas. I dont drink soda (ever), and I eat a low-carb diet (I did incorporate some brown rice and sweet potato during my pregnancy). Ive never had any history of blood sugar problems, nor is there any family history. Nevertheless, I failed Continue reading >>

How To Detect True Gestational Diabetes

How To Detect True Gestational Diabetes

The study showed that 7% of women diagnosed with gestational diabetes were already diabetic at the time of first visit and were misdiagnosed with gestational diabetes, when they had diabetes. They also found that, a HBA1C level at the first visit of less than 5.3 would not develop gestational diabetes during the entire course of pregnancy. HBA1C test can tell if a woman has been a diabetic even before conception. HBA1C test should be done at first visit especially when GTT tests abnormal Women who develop diabetes during pregnancy are said to have gestational diabetes (GDM). But, the way pregnant women are tested for GDM makes it difficult to say with surety that the disease has indeed been developed only during pregnancy. Women who are already diabetic but become aware of their disease at the time of pregnancy cannot be classified as having gestational diabetes. The conventional way to detect GDM is through oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT). But such testing has a limitation; it cannot tell if the woman is truly a GDM case or a diabetic even prior to conception. Unlike the OGTT, the HBA1C test is equipped to tell if a woman has been a diabetic even before conception. This is because HBA1C provides the average concentration of blood glucose during the weeks previous to testing. So the HBA1C test when done at the time of first visit, especially when the OGTT value is abnormal, can help in distinguishing the true GDM cases from the other. The paper published in the Diabetes Care journal last year by Dr. Balaji and others found that 33 of the 507 women tested had HBA1C above 6. This clearly showed that they (33 women) did not develop diabetes during pregnancy but were already diabetic (even before conception). Detecting women who are diabetic even before conception is ve Continue reading >>

Story #2

Story #2

Received by NAG [Nutrition Action Group] May 18, 1989 I'm writing to you because I spoke to you by phone in January regarding gestational diabetes. You asked me to let you know how things turned out. In my 32nd week of pregnancy, I was diagnosed as a gestational diabetic, and put on a 1900 calorie ADA diet. I was instructed to go weekly for tests to determine if there was a need for insulin. I was told my baby could die, particularly in the 37th week, or have brain damage, if I did not follow these instructions. I was assured these tests were absolutely reliable, and my baby could be helped. Also around this time, my sister in Arizona read the article on gestational diabetes in "Mothering" magazine. She knew the tests described were the ones I had been given, and she sent me a copy. After reading it, I was sure I was misdiagnosed, and was extremely angry I had been told these tests were reliable. (I was tested "routinely" without having any symptoms, no sugar in the urine, no diabetic history.) I tried to get a second opinion, but could not even get past the receptionist because I was near the end of my pregnancy. Each one told me that they also routinely test for gestational diabetes, and I should accept my doctor's advice. It was then I decided to call you. I read you my test results and briefly described my situation. You said my test results did not indicate diabetes, and the diet I was on was dangerous. You felt, too, that I was misinformed by my doctor. At this point I had been on this diet for 2 weeks. You were so right! In this 2 weeks I lost 5 1/2 pounds. The last day I became weak, chilled, but sweaty, and fell asleep for nearly 14 hours. When the doctor saw I lost weight, he wanted to schedule an ultrasound in the hospital. He was taken aback when he realize Continue reading >>

Hello =) Not Happy About Gestational Diabetes Diagnosis

Hello =) Not Happy About Gestational Diabetes Diagnosis

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community hello =) Not Happy About Gestational Diabetes Diagnosis i'm glad i found this forum. i am a uk resident but based in australia at the moment. was diagnosed by australian hospital 2wks ago to have gestational diabetes. not happy about it. will post more about it in a little bit. It is hard when you are first diagnosed, but you'll find this forum really helpful. I've been diabetic for ten years and there are things I've learnt through this forum that I've found so useful. Hi, you can manage this and have a healthy pregnancy. Lots of gd/diabetic mums here to help. i am a uk resident but based in australia at the moment. i'm 20wks pregnant and was diagnosed (by a sydney hospital) with gestational diabetes 2 weeks ago. my problem is - i never had gestational diabetes. both my 5yo and 3yo were born in the uk - never had problems. now, australian hospital is telling me that i do have it. when i double-checked their proc, they're testing is different. they test 3x during the GTT (start, 1st hour and 2nd hour). with the nhs, they only test twice (start and on the 2nd hour). they caught my peak at the 1st hour (they said it should be 10, but was at 10.2). after that, they got me the accu metre and now have to test 4x a day. i saw the dietitian today and she asked me if i ever had gestational diabetes. i said never. and told her that if i were in the uk, i would have passed the GTT. then she said that the uk is still resistant to international changes (do you know what she's talking about?). after a few hours, nurse called me and told me that the doctor wants to put me on medication: tablets and insulin. i am not really happy about this =( Hi @sczaja Firstly, co Continue reading >>

Can Gestational Diabetes Be Misdiagnosed?

Can Gestational Diabetes Be Misdiagnosed?

Can gestational diabetes be misdiagnosed? I was told last week that I have gestational diabetes. I'm meeting with a nutritionist tomorrow, but she let me start testing right away because I was curious to check my glucose levels on my regular diet. After 3 days of testing, the very highest reading I got was 99. I had a baby shower yesterday and had 3 pieces of pizza and a cupcake, and that's when I got the 99. How can I have GD with regular numbers so low? How soon after you eat are you testing? You should wait 2 hrs after eating to test, and your number should be below 120. But regardless of what your numbers are saying now, if you didn't pass the 3 hr glucose test, then you've got it. The good news is that it sounds like yours might be fairly easy to control through diet alone. Mine is too (thank God), but I have to really watch my carbs. I was told by my doctor to test 1 hour after eating. I can't imagine how low the levels would be if I waited two hours. Yes, it absolutely can. The false positives are very high with the 1 hour test, and even though there are less false positives with the 3 hour test, there still are enough. Also keep in mind that this test is a one time measure and therefore no indication of how your body controls BG any other time. It is merely an indicator that your body might have problems controlling BG, and regular BG pre and post meal can either verify the GD or not, so continue to test regularly. I am not surprised to see so many women failing the 3 hour test but then having normal numbers when testing regularly. Think about, you are forced to drink 100 g of pure sugar all at once, an amount most of us would never get in one meal, so no wonder your body cannot handle it. This test is quite questionable, and there are a lot of discussions abou Continue reading >>

Thresholds For Diagnosing Gestational Diabetes

Thresholds For Diagnosing Gestational Diabetes

Hospitals do not have to use the recommendations listed below and so different targets for diagnosis are used all over the UK & Ireland. As a result, all this can cause a lot of confusion! Diagnosis test target levels England & Wales: Diagnose gestational diabetes if the woman has either: a fasting plasma glucose level of 5.6 mmol/litre or above or a 2‑hour plasma glucose level of 7.8 mmol/litre or above. [new 2015] Diagnosis test target levels Scotland: The adoption of internationally agreed criteria for gestational diabetes using 75 g OGTT is recommended: fasting venous plasma glucose ≥5.1 mmol/l, or one hour value ≥10 mmol/l, or two hours after OGTT ≥8.5 mmol/l. Women with frank diabetes by non-pregnant criteria (fasting venous glucose ≥7 mmol/l, two hour ≥11.1 mmol/l) should be managed within a multidisciplinary clinic as they may have type 1 or type 2 diabetes and be at risk of pregnancy outcomes similar to those of women with pre-gestational diabetes. Diagnosis test target levels Ireland: HSE guidelines: A diagnosis of gestational diabetes is made when one or more values are met or exceeded Fasting 5.1mmol/L 1 hour 10.0mmol/L 2 hour 8.5mmol/L Borderline diagnosis can have very different meanings when it comes to gestational diabetes. It could mean that following your GTT your fasting or post glucose levels were: Just below the threshold targets Bang on the threshold targets Just over the threshold targets Bearing in mind that test threshold levels differ from one hospital to another, this could be a huge difference in actual blood glucose levels and therefore what is classed as a borderline diagnosis in one hospital may be a clear positive diagnosis result in another. Our point of view is that if you have been told to monitor your blood glucose levels, Continue reading >>

Questions About Gestational Diabetes. Low Levels?

Questions About Gestational Diabetes. Low Levels?

Questions About Gestational Diabetes. Low levels? Some days ago I was diagnosed with gestational diabetes after failing both the 1-hour and 3-hour glucose tests. I had a meeting the other day with a nurse to teach me about using the glucose monitor. I'll also be meeting with a dietitian, but that will be in a few weeks. On the same day, I'll be doing a standard follow up with my OB about this. Anyway, I've been kind of doubtful that I would have/had GD even before I was diagnosed. And I've only been monitoring my glucose for 3 days now. But I am still doubting that I have it. For example, when I went in for my appointment with the nurse, we tested my blood (to prove I knew how to use the machine) an hour an a half after I had eaten breakfast. My level was 117. My doctor wants my level to be 120 or below two hours after eating. So obviously this is an acceptable result. What's funny is that I definitely had quite a bit of carbs at breakfast that morning. I had a pint glass full of orange juice, a banana and a protein bar. Normally I wouldn't eat/drink so much fruit at breakfast. But I had been told that my potassium levels were a bit low and I've been trying to stave off leg cramps by eating bananas more. Anyway, even with the extra fruit, my level was more than fine. The only time so far when I have gone over 120 was after a carb-filled Indian dinner. Seriously, it was a LOT of carbs. And even then, it was only 125. I didn't want to change my eating habits right away, so I haven't. I basically figured I'd eat like I usually do, test my blood, and then I'd be able to more easily establish where the issues are so I could figure out how to fix them. Has anyone here been diagnosed with GD, not changed their eating habits and had normal glucose levels? Are false positives c Continue reading >>

Why Is Type 1 Diabetes Misdiagnosed?

Why Is Type 1 Diabetes Misdiagnosed?

Many people with Type 1 share a similar diagnosis story. They display all the classic symptoms (extreme thirst, weight loss, frequent urination, nausea) and were fortunate enough to be accurately diagnosed by their primary care doctor. However, some people with Type 1 are not as fortunate to quickly receive a correct diagnosis. It is important to remember that the only way to have an accurate diagnosis of Type 1 diabetes is to test for the diabetes-related (islet) autoantibodies. If ICA, GADA, and/or IA-2A are present in a person with diabetes symptoms, then you have confirmation that the diagnosis is Type 1 diabetes. If IAA is present in a child with diabetes who is not using insulin, then the diagnosis is Type 1 instead of Type 2. If no diabetes-related autoantibodies are present, then it is unlikely that the diagnosis is Type 1 diabetes. Only in extremely rare incidents does someone have Type 1 and does not develop detectable amounts of islet autoantibodies. Some people who have Type 1 diabetes will never develop detectable amounts of islet autoantibodies, but this is rare. Approximately, 95% or more of people with new-onset Type 1 diabetes will have at least one islet autoantibody (labtestsonline.org). The following are some conditions and ailments that people are often misdiagnosed with after first experiencing symptoms of Type 1 diabetes. A misdiagnosis can be extremely dangerous and in some cases, fatal. Type 2 diabetes A common misdiagnosis is the other “type”: Type 2 diabetes, as most of the early symptoms are the same or very similar to that of a Type 1 diagnosis. Depending on your current state of health, weight fluctuations, eating habits, and other factors – a medical professional may wrongly assume that you are suffering from Type 2. Read Grace Bonne Continue reading >>

Bellies And Babies: Gestational Diabetes - Revisited

Bellies And Babies: Gestational Diabetes - Revisited

A short while ago I was asked my opinion on the GD testing.. I am finally back to blog it out... OK - the wonderful 'drink this concentrated sugar solution and come to have your finger pricked to see if you have high blood sugars' test. Well, can you tell my bias simply from that statement. How the test is done- This test can be done fasting or non-fasting, with blood drawn from finger sticks or from your veins. You are made to either drink a special sugar enhanced drink called Glucola (the sugar concentrate) or eat jelly beans. Then, a short time later, your blood will be tested for the level of glucose. They usually ask you to not eat for 12 hours before, but not always. And they ALWAYS tell you not to workout much after the Glucola consumption. When the test is done - It is done to most women around 28 weeks gestation. However, if you have a family history of diabetes or had gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy they may test you earlier. There are also guidelines that say not everyone needs to be tested for gestational diabetes, though it is routine in many places. How the results are given- 140 and below are considered not gestational diabetics, anything above this reading will usually be sent for further testing. Problems with this test... MY GOODNESS, don't get me started. Most women are told to lay off the physical activity and often are told to take the drink first thing in the morning after a 12 hour fast through the night... OK... (duh) - First off, who actually takes in that amount of sugar after a 12 hour fast? Many MANY women have SOME variation of blood sugar anomalies even when not pregnant - this type of body abuse will most assuredly be skewed in such circumstances. I tell you, as a borderline hypoglycemic, I SURE would be bouncing sugar out of Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Failure to Diagnose Gestational Diabetes Lawyer Wilmington Delaware During pregnancy its very important to test for gestational diabetes. Its common around the 26th week of your pregnancy to develop gestational diabetes and this does not mean that you had diabetes prior to pregnancy or that youll continue to have diabetes after pregnancy. Its estimated that 18% of pregnancies will result in gestational diabetes. This is why its very important to make sure that your physician is testing your blood sugar levels to ensure that its noticed and diagnosed properly. When it is not diagnosed its very important to hold the physician liable. At that time its crucial to have an experienced Gestational Diabetes Misdiagnosis Attorney . Misdiagnose of Gestational Diabetes Attorneys in Delaware The Wilmington, Delaware Medical Malpractice Attorneys at Shelsby & Leoni, P.A. has extensive experience handling medical malpractice from a misdiagnosis . Their Wilmington, Delaware office can be reached at 302-995-6210 and their Baltimore, Maryland office can be reached at 410-385-5612. It is very important that physicians are taking the steps necessary for a proper diagnosis of gestational diabetes. When this diagnosis is missed, other complications can occur. Complications could be: Macrosomia (excessive birth weight in a baby, which can result in shoulder dystocia injuries) Continue reading >>

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